John Howe, III (1620 - 1678) MP

‹ Back to Howe surname

Is your surname Howe?

Research the Howe family

John Howe, III's Geni Profile

Records for John Howe

4,711,610 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Hadnall, Shropshire, England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in Marlborough, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
Occupation: Admitted Freeman Of Mass Bay Colony 5-13-1640, Glover, Taven owner, land owner, Innkeeper
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About John Howe, III

JOHN3 HOWE (JAMES2, ROBERT1)1 was born 1620 in Hadnall, Suffolk, England1, and died May 28, 1680 in Marlboro, Middlesex, MA1. He married MARY MARTHA JONES 1640 in Marlboro, Middlesex, MA1, daughter of ELIJAH JONES. She was born 1618 in England, and died September 09, 1672 in Marlborough, Middlsex, MA.

Notes for JOHN HOWE: Last name also spelled "Howe"

An "original grantor" of Sudbury, MA By Appointment of the Massachusetts Governor, John and Edmund Rice, he laid out the grounds at Framingham in 1662. John HOWE was born about 1602 in England. Based on age of death, stated as 78.His son, John was killed by the Indians in 1676, the first Mary died young, First Daniel died young, Alexander died soon, Daniel died perhaps at birth and may have been twin to Alexander. He was in Sudbury by 1639--and one of the original grantors-- when he received grant of a house lot, then shared in the three divisions of Sudbury Meadows, 1639-40. Was a petitioner for a grant of Marlboro, 1656, where he removed 1657. His house was about 1/3 mile NE of Spring-hill Meeting House. Opened a tavern in 1661. By appoint- ment of the Mass gov/t, he and Edmund Rice laid out the Framingham lands in 1662. Marlboro suffered greatly through all the years of Indian warfare. John How's eldest son was killed by them in 1671. His grand-daughter, Elizabeth was at her sister's home assisting her in caring for her infant neice when they were suprised by the indians in the home. The Indians seized them both, and later killed the baby. Elizabeth was held captive for many years in Canada, being ultimately redeemed. She was 17 when taken captive. She returned home to marry her long awaiting lover, Thomas Keyes. Her sister, Mrs. Joslyn, and a child two years old were murdered a few miles from her home. Elizabeth never recovered from the horror and brutality of her sister's death which she was obliged to witness. Her own life was spared because of the superstitious regard the Indians had for her beautiful voice, and during her captivity, she was frequently compelled to 'make sweet sound.' She retained for some time the customs of the Indians--their posture in sitting and their love for the out of doors." He was married to Mary UNKNOWN before 1640 in Sudbury, Middlesex, MA. Children were: John HOWE, Lt. Samuel HOWE, Sarah HOWE, Mary HOWE, Isaac HOWE, Josiah HOWE, Mary HOWE, Thomas HOWE, Daniel HOWE, Alexander HOWE, Eleazer HOWE.

An article in the "Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine" (V-11, pg. 181) states that "the HOWE people were all very large and of heavy frame and body". Also, the HOWE's can trace their ancestry back to the reign of Henry VII (1456-1509) and held estates in Somerset, Gloucester, Wiltshire, Nottingham, in England and in Fermanaugh in Ireland.

More About John Howe, Esq.: Burial: First white settler of Marlboro, MA Occupation: 1661, Tavern Keeper (Opened Sudbury tavern)

More About JOHN HOWE: Burial: Marlboro, Middlesex, MA Christening: Of, Framingham, Middlesex, England

More About MARY MARTHA JONES: Christening: Of, Framingham, Middlesex, England

    

Children of JOHN HOWE and MARY JONES are:

  1. JAMES4 HOWE, b. August 24, 1640, Sudbury, MA; d. April 20, 1676, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.
  2. SAMUEL HOWE, b. October 20, 1642, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. April 13, 1713, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA.
  3. SARAH HOWE, b. September 25, 1644, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. March 17, 1646/47, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA.
  4. MARY HOWE, b. January 18, 1645/46, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. March 17, 1646/47, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA.
  5. ISAAC HOWE, b. August 08, 1648, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. December 09, 1724, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.
  6. JOSIAH HOWE, b. 1650, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. June 20, 1710, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.
  7. MARY HOWE, b. January 01, 1650/51, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. June 05, 1684, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA.
  8. THOMAS HOWE, b. June 12, 1656, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. February 16, 1732/33, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.
  9. DANIEL HOWE, b. January 03, 1657/58, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA; d. January 28, 1660/61, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA.
  10. ALEXANDER HOWE, b. December 29, 1661, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA; d. January 04, 1661/62, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.
  11. ELEAZER HOWE, b. January 18, 1661/62, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA; d. March 17, 1735/36, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.

This last child makes no sense given the birth date of father and birth dates / location of other children

  1. ABRAHAM HOWE, b. Abt. 1635, Hatfield, Broadoak, Essex Co., England; d. January 30, 1694/95, Marlboro, Middlesex, MA.

--------------------

http://www.walthowe.com/howegenealogy/gp456.html CHILDREN

1. Thomas Howe

  Born:    22 JUL 1656  - Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
  Marr:              - Sarah Hosmer   (other spouses)
  Died:    16 FEB 1733  - 		 

2. John Howe

  Born:    24 AUG 1640  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 	

3. Samuel Howe

  Born:    20 OCT 1642  - 
  Marr:    1685  - Sarah Leavitt   (other spouses)
  Died:    13 APR 1713  - Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA		 

4. Sarah Howe

  Born:    25 SEP 1644  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 	

5. Mary Howe

  Born:    18 FEB 1646  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 		 

6. Isaac Howe

  Born:    08 AUG 1648  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 	

7. Josiah Howe

  Born:     ABT 1650  - 
  Marr:              - Mary Haynes  
  Died:    BEF 30 JUN 1710  - 		 

8. Mary Howe

  Born:    18 JUN 1654  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 	

9. Daniel Howe

  Born:    03 JUN 1658  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 		 

10. Alexander Howe

  Born:    29 DEC 1660  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 	

11. Eleazer Howe

  Born:    18 JAN 1662  - 
  Marr:     - 
  Died:      - 

-------------------- He was a freeman and became a proprietor of Sudbury 17 May 1640 and a town officer in 1657. He petitioned 30 July 1662 to be excused from training because he was aged, thick of hearing, and maintained 3 soldiers in his family. He was an innkeeper of the Black Horse Inn. His will was proved 15 June 1680 Sudbury, Worcester Co., MA.

WILL: 24 MAY 1680 Sudbury, Worcester Co., MA

_____

John Howe was in Sudbury as early as 1639 and was admitted freeman 1640. He was selectman 1642, and is mentioned in the records of that town as late as 1655. Soon after he moved to Marlboro, Mass. where he died in 1687. He and Mary, had the following children; James (1640-1701), Samuel (1642-1713), Sarah (1644-1707), Issac (1648-1724), Josiah (abt 1650-1710), Mary (1654-1684), Thomas (1656-1733), and Daniel (1658-1661).

Part of the land assigned to John Howe in Sudbury was used as the site of a tavern. "At least four generations of Howes kept the place as a tavern. In 1746 Ezekiel Howe called it "The Red Horse". As Sudbury was just about halfway between Boston and Worcester, this inn became a regular and popular stopping place for travelers between these two towns. it was owned and operated by Howes until the death of Lyman Howe in 1866. It was in the early sixties that Longfellow and his companions visited this "Wayside Inn'."

In 1656, John Howe and other Sudbury inhabitants petitioned the General Court for a grant of land. They received the grant for land about 8 miles west of Sudbury. The new settlement was called Marlborough.

On November 26, John Howe , Abraham Howe and Samuel Howe had lots assigned to them. From the begining there was friction with an adjoining Christian Indian tribe, the Wamesit. John Howe's grant was just east of the Indian lands. They had been granted 6,000 acres of the best land in the Marlborough area as early as 1643. Much to their dismay, the English settlers found that they couldn't have the Indians moved as the Masschusetts Council refused to go back on their word. The Indian village, Whipsuppenick, was there to stay. The Indians were self-supporting, peaceable and adapting to the English way of life.

The following relates an incident that occurred there;

"Mr. How went to Marlborough, built a cabin a little to the east of the Indian planting field, where his descendants lived for many generations. By his prudence and kindness, he gained the good will and confidence of his savage neighbors, who accordingly made him their umpire in all their differences. The following incident is related as one of the verdicts of this second Solomon. Two Indians, whose cornfields were contiguous, disputed about the possession of a pumpkin, which grew on a vine that had transgressed the limits of the field in which it was planted. the vine was planted in one field, the pumpkin grew in the other. the dispute grew warm.- Mr. How, after a patient hearing of both parties, divided the pumpkin into two equal parts, giving half to each. Both parties extolled the equity of the judge and acquiesced in the decision."

On September 30, 1662, John Howe wrote the following letter to the General Court of Mass. In it he attempts to be releived of the obligation to train with the militia.

Honrd Sr-

My humble suit unto this Honrd Court is that they would be pleased to grant me a freedom from Training, and that my liciense for Ordinary keeping may be renewed unto me. My grounds wch I request the said freedom are 1. The consideration of a bodily infirmity I have had many yeers upon me whch, as I grow in age, encreaseth its tediousness, in so much that it is frequently interuptive to me in my calling. 2. I am also thick of hearing. 3. I do and am like to maintain three train-souldiers in my family. Sr, I trust ye will endeavor that I may obtain my desire in ye respects mentioned, though I give you but a hint of things which, if you do, you will hereby more abundantly oblige me to subscribe myself, as already I do.

Yor humble servant, John How

Unfortunately, either hatred or greed for the land, kept relations between Marlborough and Whipsuppenick poor. Relations reached a head during the King Philip's War. English (militia) soldiers arrested 15 of the Indians and had then chained and sent to Boston. They also seized the Indians supply of weapons and plundered the town. This persecution led to the breakup of the village and the Indians fleeing.

During the King Philips War, the Indians attacked Marlborough on several occasions. The first attack occurred on March 26,1676. While they were repulsed and no damage done to the Garrison Houses, the meeting house, 13 homes, and 11 barns were destroyed. The town militia rallied the next night and attacked a nearby Indian camp. The Indians returned in April and left little standing except for the four garrison houses. Homes, crops, and livestock were gone. One of the dead was John Howe, the brother of Mary. He was killed in the fighting at nearby Sudbury.

During the battle, John Howe Sr., Thomas Howe, and John Wetherbee <wetherbe.htm> helped defend the Kerly Garrison House.

In 1692 an Indian raid took place in which the Howe family prominently figured.

On July 17, 1692 Indians attacked and killed the Joslin home. Elizabeth Howe, the daughter of John Howe, was staying there with her sister, Sara Joslin. The widow of Jonathan Whitcomb <whitcomb.htm> was living with the Joslin family at the time. It is unknown as to what the relation was between Peter Joslin and Hannah, but 6 years later Hannah's niece, Johanna, became Peter's second wife. "On the 18th July, 1692, the Indians assaulted the house of Peter Joslin, who was at his labor in the field, and knew nothing thereof until entering the house. He found his wife with three children, with a widow Whitcomb, who lived in his family, barbarously murdered with their hatchets, and weltering in their blood." Sarah had tried to fight them off with a hatchet but she was tomahawked by another Indian. Elizabeth Howe <howe.htm> was carried off along with one of the Joslin children. Elizabeth was ransomed by the colony after three years of captivity, but the child had died or was murdered in the meantime.

Upon returning to Boston, Governor Philips sent for her. He asked her why she had not been redeemed earlier stating that he had sent a number of missions to buy back captives. She replied "that if she had been a Beaver skin she would have been redeemed much earlier" implying that the govenor was more interested in his business ventures then in redeeming captives.

Mary Howe married John Wetherbee <wetherbe.htm> on September 18, 1672, in Marlborough, Mass.

Sources; "The How Family" pg. 63 NEHG Register, Vol.4, January 1850, "History of the Town of Rindge,New Hampshire", 1875, Press of George Ellis,Boston. Soldiers in King Philip's War, pg. 313, NEHG Register, Vol.40, July, 1886. -------------------- John Howe was in Sudbury as early as 1639 and was admitted freeman 1640. He was selectman 1642, and is mentioned in the records of that town as late as 1655; soon after he moved to Marlborough, Mass. where he died in 1687, leaving a widow Mary, five sons and three daughters. It was his daughter Mary Howe who married John Wetherbee, the ancestor of the many families in Rindge bearing his name.

Part of the land assigned to John Howe in Sudbury was used as the site of a tavern. "At least four generations of Howes kept the place as a tavern. In 1746 Ezekiel Howe called it "The Red Horse". As Sudbury was just about halfway between Boston and Worcester, this inn became a regular and popular stopping place for travellers between these two towns. it was owned and operated by Howes until the death of Lyman Howe in 1866. It was in the early sixties that Longfellow and his companions visited this "Wayside Inn'."

In 1656, John Howe and other Sudbury inhabitants petitioned the General Court for a grant of land. They received the grant for land about 8 miles west of Sudbury. The new settlement was called Marlborough. On November 26, John Howe , Abraham Howe and Samuel Howe had lots assigned to them. From the begining there was friction with an adjoining Christian Indian tribe, the Wamesit. They had been granted 6,000 acres of the best land in the Marlborough area as early as 1643. Much to their dismay, the English settlers found that they couldn't have the Indians moved as the Masschusetts Council refused to go back on their word. The Indian village, Whipsuppenick, was there to stay. The Indians were self-supporting, peaceable and adapting to the English way of life. Unfortunitly, either hatred or greed for the land, kept relations between Marlborough and Whipsuppenick poor. Relations reached a head during the King Philip's War. English (militia) soldiers arrested 15 of the Indians and had then chained and sent to Boston. They also seized the Indians supply of weapons and plundered the town. This persecution led to the breakup of the village and the Indians fleeing.

The following relates an incident that occurred there; "Mr. How went to Marlborough, built a cabin a little to the east of the Indian planting field, where his descendants lived for many generations. By his prudence and kindness, he gained the good will and confidence of his savage neighbors, who accordingly made him their umpire in all their differences. The following incident is related as one of the verdicts of this second Solomon. Two Indians, whose cornfields were contiguous, disputed about the possession of a pumpkin, which grew on a vine that had transgressed the limits of the field in which it was planted. the vine was planted in one field, the pumpkin grew in the other. the dispute grew warm.- Mr. How, after a patient hearing of both parties, divided the pumpkin into two equal parts, giving half to each. Both parties extolled the equity of the judge and acquiesced in the decision."

In 1692 an Indian raid took place in which the Howe family prominently figured. "On the 18th July, 1692, the Indians assaulted the house of Peter Joslin, who was at his labor in the field, and knew nothing there of until entering the house. He found his wife with three children, with a widow WHITCOMB, who lived in his family, barbarously murdered with their hatchets, and weltering in their blood. His wife's sister, ELIZABETH HOW (see Howe family), daughter of John How of Marlborough, with another of his children, were carried into captivity. She returned, but the child was murdered in the wilderness."

_____

John HOWE, of Sud., was one of the petitioners in 1657, for the grant which constituted Marl. He was the son of John Howe, supposed to be the John Howe, Esq., who came from Warwickshire in Eng., and who was a descendant of John Howe, himself the son of John of Hodinhull, and connected with the family of Sir Charles Howe of Lancaster, in the reign of Charles I.

John Howe resided first perhaps at Watertown, and afterwards at Sudury, where he was in 1639. He was admitted freeman in 1640. He died at Marlborough 1687, and his wife Mary died about the same time. In 1642 he was selectman in Sudbury, and in 1655 was appointed by the pastor and selectmen "to see to the restraining of youth on the Lord's day." According to tradition, he was the first white inhabitant who settled on the new grant. He came to Marl. about 1657, and built himself a cabin a little to the east of the Indian Planting Field, where his descendants lived for many generations. His place was situated some 100 rods from Spring Hill Meeting House, a little to the east of the present road from Spring Hill to Feltonville recently occupied by the late Edward Rice. His proximity to the Indian Plantation brought him in direct contact with the natives; but by his kindness, he gained the confidence and good will of his savage neighbors, who accordingly, not only respected his rights, but in many cases made him the umpire in cases of difficulties among themselves. In a case where a pumpkin vine sprang up within the premises of one Indian, and the fruit ripened upon the premises of another, the dispute which arose between them as to the ownership of the pumpkin, was referred to him ; and inspired with the wisdom of a second Solomon, he called for a knife, and severed the fruit, giving a moiety to each. This struck the parties as the perfection of justice, and fixed the impartiality of the judge on an immutable basis.

Nor was a sense of his justice and impartiality confided in by the Indians alone. When in 1662, Thomas Danforth, Esq., made a demand upon the Colony for a further compensation for his services, the Court ordered that he "shall have granted him so much land as old Goodman Rice and Goodman Howe, of Marlborough, shall judge to be worth ten pounds; and they are impowered to bound the same to him."

John Howe opened the first public house in the place. About 1670, we find his petition for a renewal of his license, and he speaks as though he had been some time engaged in the business.

The descendants of John Howe were very numerous ; though a portion of the Howes of Marlborough were of another family. John Howe's will, proved 1689, mentions wife Mary, sons Samuel, Isaac, Josiah, Thomas, and Eleazer, and dau. Sarah Ward, Mary Wetherby, and John IIowe, Jr., a son of son John, deceased. His property was inventoried at. £511. He gave Thomas "the horse he troops on."

1 - 2 John (How), b. 1640; m. Jan. 22, 1662, Elizabeth Ward. He was killed by the Indians.

1 - 3 Samuel, b. Oct. 20, 1642 ; m. June 5, 1693, Martha Bent, in Sud., where he resided and had a numerous family, some of whom were afterwards in Marlborough.

1 - 4 Sarah, b. Sept. 25, 1644 ; m. June, 1667, Samuel Ward.

1 - 5 Almy, b. June 18, 16,46; d. young.

1 - 6 Isaac, b. Aug. 8, 1648 ; m. June 17, 1671, Frances Woods.

1 - 7 Josiah., b._____; m. March 18, 1671, Mary Haynes, of Sud.

1 - 8 Mary, b. June 18, 1654; m. Sept. 18, 1672, John Wetherby.

1 - 9 Thomas, b. .tune 12, 1656: in. 1st, Sarah Hosmer, and 2d, Mrs. Mary Baron.

1 - 10 Daniel, b. June 3, 1658 ; d. 1661.

1 - 11 Alexander, b. Dec. 29, 1661; d. the January following.

1 - 12 Eleazer, b. Jan. 18, 1662; m. 1683, Hannah Howe, dau. of Abraham. -------------------- Came to America, lived in Watertown, then Sudbury; died in Marlborough (UK) -------------------- John was in Sudbury, MA in 1639 and took the freeman's oath in 1640. He was selectman and marshall in 1642 and was a longtime resident of Watertown, MA. -------------------- http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=grumpyhugs&id=P2332000554 -------------------- John was christened 20 November 1620 in Hadnall, Shropshire, England and married by 1637 in Hadnall Ease Shropshirel England Mary _______. She was born about 1618 in , , , England and died 9 September 1672 in Marlboro, Middlesex, Massachusetts. John died 28 May 1680 in Marlboro, Middlesex, Massachusetts.

John HOWE was born in England 20 Novimber 1620. He immigrated to America, on the ship Confidence, settling in Sudbury, Massachusett by 1639. He married Mary whose surname is not known. John was one of the original grantors of Sudbury. They moved to Marlborough by 1659. He opened a tavern in 1661. By appointment of the Massachusetts government, he and Edmund Rice laid out the Framingham lands to Governor Danforth in 1662.

view all 34

John Howe, III's Timeline

1606
March 12, 1606
Compton, Gloucestershire, England
1620
November 20, 1620
Hadnall, Shropshire, England, (Present UK)
1635
April 5, 1635
Age 14
Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
1639
1639
Age 18
Marlborough, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1640
August 24, 1640
Age 19
Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1640
Age 19
Marlborough, MA, USA
1642
October 20, 1642
Age 21
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
1644
September 25, 1644
Age 23
Sudbury,Middlesex,Massachusetts
1646
February 18, 1646
Age 25
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
1648
August 8, 1648
Age 27
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massacusetts, USA