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John M Meador (Meadows), Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Essex, Virginia, United States
Death: Died in Essex, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Meador and Sarah Yates Meador
Husband of Frances Meador; Elizabeth Meador and Mary Ann Awbrey
Father of Dinah Meador Tribble; Richard Meador, Sr.; Rachel Jordan; John Meador, Jr.; Elizabeth Armstrong and 7 others

Occupation: Tobacco planter
Managed by: Alan Robert Rosenfield TREE ANCE...
Last Updated:

About John Meador Sr

John married Elizabeth White in July 1677 John married Mary Awbrey on 16 Dec 1694

reference in 'The Macy Family'

Via

http://www.angelfire.com/wv2/AlfordGenealogy/ME.pdf

Notes for John Meadows (Meador): From the book "Our Colonial Meador Ancestors" by Victor Paul Meadors "As indicated in the preceding chapter on (2) Thomas Meador, no documentation has been found to show explicitly that Thomas Meador, orphan, and Thomas Meador the Younger are one and the same. This includes the lack of evidence to define that John Meador, the son of Thomas Meador, orphan, and John Meador, the only son of Thomas Meador the Younger and Sarah Meador, were the same. Nonetheless, as pointe out in that chapter, it appears that those facts which are known fit better with the conclusion that Thomas Meador, orphan, was also known as Thomas Meador the Younger. In the same sense, the known facts point quite conclusively that the John Meador who was the son of Thomas and Sarah Meador was the same John Meador, son of Thomas, orphan, who inherited the grants on Hoskins Creek. "On that basis, it would appear that this John Meador probably was born about 1658, because he apparently was of legal age August, 1679 . Thus he probably was about 4 or 5 years of age at the death of his father. Barring evidence to the contrary. it must be presumed that John spent his childhood with his mother Sarah and his step-father, Henry Awbrey, on Awbrey's plantation on the upper reaches of Hoskins Creek. AS noted in the preceding chapter his mother gave him a yoke of oxen and a gun. Marks for these oxen were registered , and marks for a black heifer were registered later for "John Meadors, son of Thomas Meadors of Hoskins Creek . The two registrations are essentially the same, except that the left and right sides of the cattle are interchanged. The st rong similarity between the marks also would support the view that John Meador, son of Thomas, orphan, and John Meador, son of Thomas and Sarah, were the same. "For clarity it would be noted here that the records indicate that only two John Meadors were living in the area of the Northern Neck at this time. The one named above unmistakably was the son of Thomas Meador, orphan, who held the two grants on Hoskins Creek. The other, a much older

Records of this latter John are found on Peumansend Creek in St. Mary's Parish, an area now part of Caroline County and quite distinct from the area on Hoskins Creek in South Farnham Parish where John, the son of Thomas, orphan, lived. "Of course, John could not occupy the grant lands of his father while a child, but apparently he did so upon

attaining adult status. This seemingly coincided with his marriage to Elizabeth White, the daughter of Richard and Addra White. Record of the date of this marriage has not been found, but it must have been between July, 1677 and February, 1678. On the first date, Elizabeth was still

single when she signed as witness to a deed , while on the latter date she and John Meador were deeded the plantation of her father, Richard White, "out of kindness and affection" for the care and maintenance of himself and his wife for the remainder of their lives . "Richard White had come from England before December 12,1654, as on that date he was granted 500 acres in Lancaster County "opposite Nanzemond Towne", an Indian village . Certainly of some means, he had paid for his own passage and that of six others; the headright grants made to him in 1658 were for Richard and Adria White, their son Thomas, and four others . His status is also indicated by the sale of 1500 acres on the south side of the Rappahannock River to Robert Taliaferro in 1666 which had been granted by Governor Berkeley the year before. In 1658 he shared with Evan Davis and Samuel Mann a grant for 1000 acres , and in 1664 he received the grant for 300 acres on the north side of Hoskins Creek which became his home plantation. This ground was opposite the grant lands of John Meador on the south side of the creek. In 1670, White sold 130 acres to John Waggoner . His last record was March 3,1690 , when he signed as witness to a deed. "The relationship between Richard White and the numerous other White families in the area has not been established, nor has his connection, if any, to the Whites prominent in the early history of the Puritan Church. Richard and Addra (Adria, Audry) White had at least two children, Thomas and Elizabeth. Thomas was evidently born before the voyage from England, as his father claimed headright for him. He was slain by Indians in a raid on the plantation in 1661 (see the chapter on Indian raids). Elizabeth seems to have been born after the passage to the colony, perhaps in about the

as a cooper (maker of tobacco casks). "Soon after his marriage, John Meador sold the 320 acre grant of his father to Ebenezer Stanfield , which was inherited by Rebekah Stanfield, and when she married John Williams, Jr. they sold it to James Fullerton . It never again was in the possession of the Meador family. John Meador made the 450 acre grant lands his home plantation, and this was the land later inherited by his children and grandchildren. "In 1689, John purchase from Edwin Thacker of Middlesex County and additional 105 acres which adjoined the 450 acre plantation on the south. He also received and additional 190 acres adjoining this 450 acre tract for the transportation of four persons to the colony . And for the transportation of one more, and additional headright grant of 50 acres on April 21,1690 which adjoined his own land and that of Henry Awbrey on the main "swamp" of Hoskins Creek. "Thus we see that by the early 1690's John Meador held at least 1095 acres of land centered on the grant of 450 acres and straddling Hoskins Creek just upstream from the location now called Cheatwood Millpond (see map). "Apparently Elizabeth White Meador, John's wife, died before the close of 1694. Anticipating a second marriage and wanting to ensure their rights of inheritance, John made a deed of gift on December 10,1695 , dividing the bulk of his holdings among his children. Through this deed, we learn that he had by this time sons Richard, Thomas. John Jr., and Hope; and daughters Rachel, Elizabeth and Esther. These lands were "never to be sold or disposed of, but to remaine from heir to heir as long as there can be one of ye Meadors found alive". However, we will see that within a few years the major portion of these lands passed into other hands. "The firstborn son of John and Elizabeth was Richard, named for his grandfather White. He is first named in a deed of gift by Abraham Coombe on October 16,1683 (previously reviewed in the chapter on Ambrose Meador). In adult life, Richard followed the "cooper" profession of his grandfather as well. The order of birth of the other children cannot be determined. "All left heirs to receive their share of these undivided lands except Hope, who died before 1721 without issue. The 150 acres given to him would appear to have been the easternmost portion of the 450 acre grant, and reverted to his father upon his death. It is not clear whether (3( John

was all deeded to those children he had by Elizabeth. "Widower John Meador then married a second time, but the name of this second wife cannot be determined. To this second marriage were born two more daughters and four more sons (making thirteen children in all). They were Dinah, Mary, Jonas, Job, Jason and Joshua. It has been suggested that the latter two were twins, because of the statement in John's will that "they are to be of age at 17", seemingly implying that they were of the same age. "Nearing 63 years of age, John Meador became aware of his approaching death, and made his will October 17,1721 . It was presented in court for probate November 21,1721. The will recognized the surviving children of his first marriage with token bequest s of a shilling apiece to Thomas, Rachel and Elizabeth. The other children by Elizabeth White, namely Richard, John Jr. and Esther, as well as Hope, had preceded him in death. Of the children of his second marriage, Dinah received a shilling and Mary a gold ring. Jonas was to receive a small piece of land, with the remaining lands to be equally divided among the four surviving sons. The disposition of these lands will be covered more thoroughly in the discussion of each of these children which follows. "The last resting place of John Meador and his family is at the present writing unknown. A visit to the old plantation now reveals no trace of the houses of cemeteries that once may have been there. The lands are now occupied by a large wheat field and by thick woods. A thorough exploration of the area may reveal the remnants of these early ancestors which is not apparent to the casual visitor. But certainly this wheat field of today must be the very ground once cleared by our ancestor, John Meador, planter, and the lands upon which he grew tobacco and Indian corn three hundred years ago.

"JOHN MEADOR'S DEED OF GIFT "Know all men by these presents that I, John Meador Senior, widower, in ye county of Essex in ye Parish of South Phernam, for ye love I bear to my children that I had by my wife Elizabeth Meador deceased, I doe hereby give them such persell of land that I shall set downe severall by themselves. All ye land that I have on y West side of a branch that goeth by ye name of a great branch I do give to

divided as I shall see fit between them as near as I can divide it to they and their heirs lawfully begotten of their owne bodies for ever. A parcell of land beginning at a Cole Spring by my orchard fence and runnung West and by north till it meets with ye great branch, so along ye great branch till it comes to ye maine swamp of ye creeke, them downe ye swamp till it comes to ye Cole Spring branch, then up ye branch where it begun, being a long neck of land, I do give to my son Thomas Meador and his heirs lawfully begotten of his owne body for ever. A parcell of land beginning at mu uppermost line by John Evans land by ye head of a branch at a marked whit e oake and running downe ye branch till it meets with ye maine swamp ye branch beeing crooked all ye lands that I have within my bounds of ye east side of that branch being a great deal of old fields belonging to it I

doe give to my son Hope Meador and his heirs lawfully begotten of his body for ever. I doe give to my daughter Rachell Meador one hundred and five acres of land that I bought of Mr. Edwin Thacker to she and her heirs for ever. A parcell of land lyeing into the neck the north side of the Creek which my father in law Richard White gave to me by deed of Gift I doe by the virtue of that Deed of Gift I doe give to my daughter Elizabeth Meader ye second neck & my daughter Esther Meader the neck that has ye housing and orchards to them and their heirs lawfully begotten of their owne bodies for ever. The land given unto my sons and daughters never to be sold nor disposed of but to remaine from heir to heir as there can be one of ye Meaders found alive, if it ye Lords will to call any of my Sons or

Daughters before me and any of them shall dye before me, ye land of ye deed to returne to me again to my disposing. I doe reserve & except myself Timber upon any parts of ye land for my own use as long as I live as Witness my hand and

seale this tenth day of December, 1694. John Meader (Seale)

ealed and dtd. in the presents of us Mary (x) Gorbell Joseph (F) Calloway

t a court held for Essex County Febry. ye 11th anno Dom. 1694 the within named John Meader appeared and acknowledged

ye same was ordered to be recorded.

WILL OF JOHN MEADOR (SENIOR) "In the Name of God, Amen. I, John Meador of Essex County, being sick and weak in body, but sound mind and perfect memory, blessed be God, therefore do make and ordain this to be my Last Will and Testament in the manner and form following: "First and principally, I commend my soul into the hands that giveth, hoping by the meritorious death and passion of my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, to receive full pardon and forgiveness of all my sins and offences, and a joyful resurrection in the last day; and my body to be decently buried at the direction of my executors hereafter named. And as for my worldly goods: "Item. I give to my son Thomas Meador, one shilling. "Item. I give to my daughter Rachell Jordan, one shilling. "Item. I give to my daughter Elizabeth Armstrong, one shilling. "Item. I give to my daughter Dinah Tribille, one shilling. "Item. My desire is that my five sons shall keep their own guns without appraising. "Item. I give to my daughter Mary Meador, one gold ring. "Item. I give to my son Jonas Meador a small piece of land joining upon Thomas Evinses land and running up to the church road that goes from my house, then up a (long?) road a small course until it comes to a vale that goes to ye branch, so down the branch till it comes to the forks of the branch where it begins, and from the forks to ye first beginning. And the rest of my land I give to my other four sons, to be Equally Divided, with all my houses and orchards theron belonging, and I do appoint my two sons Job Meador and Jason Meador my lawful Executors. "Item. I give to my son Joshua Meador one Chest not to be appraised, and the rest of my estate to be equally divided amongst my children and leave to my youngest Sons to be of age at seventeen and I do leave my son Jonas Meador to look after them three years. And that my will not to be in force till my decease.

Witness my hand and seal this 17th, day of October, yr 1721. Teste: John Meador Senior (Seal)

amuel Waggoner Francis F Poarris (Pierce?) Ann A Bradbury

resented for probate Nov, 21,1721 by Jonas Meador during the minority of the executor in the said will mentioned, with oaths by Samuel Waggoner, Francis Pierce and Ann Bradbury.

"INVENTORY OF (3) JOHN MEADOR, SR. "Essex Co. Will Book 3, p. 287

cows & yearling 2 barren cows 1 young stear & hefer 6 head of sheep 1 horse & mare 1 dozen new spoons ? doz. old ditto 3 pas. forks & 6 of spire 2 towells 2 pare of sheares 25 new pewter parcell of old iron 42 old pewter 1 chest & lumber parcell shoemakers tools chest & caine parcell of books chest & box parcell of candle stubbs 2 mills baggs parcell of tinn 1 feather bed & furn. ditto ditto parcel of earthenware parcell of glass bottles parcell of old lumber 2 lanterns parcell of old spools Lord 2 bolts 2 spinning wheels

collar & hames parcell of small sillards parcell of olifford drinking glass 2 parcell of lasts looking glass parcell of coopers & carpenters tools curing panse & steall 1 warming pan & sinior 2 old pads 3 pare of old wool cards 16 lb. wool parcell of baskoft 1 linen wheel 4 new hames pare of porbett comperios 1 old chest & lumber 1 gunn & 1rowring rod parcell of nails 2 old mills baggs 2 bushells of soft joynte parcell of bowels & trays 4 old barrells parcell of old chairs & table & furniture 1 skillett 2 pare of fire tongs & fire shovells 1 spitt 2 sadles & bridles 2 potts parcell of planks 1 cutting knife parcell of banded leather pare old baltol eddy hook 1 brass cord 2 raw hides parcell of old umblott old table 2 shott baggs & powder horns 1 cart & wheales parcell of earthen ware 1 hive of beases

old grinder 2 frine pans parcell of old carque & 1 spiro mortar basrolls 106 pott iron parcell of cotton parcell of old pott iron 1 lines & harness his own waring cloaths 5 bushels of wheat parcell of money scales & rule parcell of canhooks 2/6 cash 1 small auger parcell of mall lumber 6 years of caterloons pare of large scales stuff parcell of lumber

"THE INDIANS and BACON'S REBELLION "From the founding of the Jamestown Colony in 1607, relations with the local Indian tribes had been a continuing problem. Resentment of the encroachment upon their traditional tribal lands had led to much unrest among the Indians. The massacres of 1622 and 1644 took a great toll of the colonists. As the migration to the New World increased, the pressure for additional land caused the settlers to force the Indians from more and more areas. Despit e many treaties with the natives and restrictive laws by the Jamestown authorities, the occupation of outlying areas continued. "For a time, white settlement was forbidden above the Pamunkey River; later this prohibition was only for the land above the Piscattaway and Totuskey Creeks. But many settlers filed claims upon the choice river front lands, and by 1646-1650 (as detailed in the first chapter) grants were being given along the Rappahannock River on these areas. The river valley was occupied principally by the Rappahannock Indians, with a few villages of Mattaponi, Moratticoes, Totuskeys, Portobagoes, and others. These tribes were forced into the forested lands behind the mile- deep grants. Behind the grants to James Williamson, William Underwood, and the land of Thomas Meads and others on the

villages at Totuskey Creek, Cat Point Creek, and the present site of Warsaw. "Tension between the settlers and the Indians remained high, and there were recurring raids, for which the nearby Rappahannocks received most of the blame. In February, 1654 , a small army was raised, with 100 men from Lancaster County, 40 from Northumberland, and 30 from Westmoreland to meet the threat. They met at the plantation of Thomas

Meades on the eastern shore, and were to march from thence to the village of the Rappahannocks (probably near Warsaw) to ensure peace, without provoking hostilities. The outcome is not recorded, but the Rappahannocks seemingly caused no trouble.

"Not so with the Doegs, the Susquahannocks, and the Senecas (from Maryland), whose numerous raids into the northern colonies caused great hardships during the 1660's and 1670's. One such raid took place in 1661 at the plantation

of Richard White (who later became the father-in-law of (3) John Meador). White's plantation lay on the north side of Hoskin's Creek, opposite that of John Meador. Though Richard White and his wife Addra escaped, their son Thomas White and two men were brutally murdered. An account of the results of this raid, as viewed by a committee of twelve

men, forms a gruesome record . "The ninth day of September, Anno Domini 1661. We, the undersigned, being impaneled and sworn to Enquire into the deaths of the Englishmen lately murthered at the house of Richard White in the freshes of Rappahannock County, we went up to the said plantation and viewed the bodies and found the body of (....) ..amelly massacred in the house of the aforesaid White ( ....) his skull splitt on the forehead down to the (....) his skull beaten in the side of the head over the eyes. Moreover near the door of the said house we found the body of Thomas White, Sonn of the aforesaid Richard (....) striped naked with his skull beaten in over the eye, also we found the skull of Daniel Pignell Servant to the lord Richard White beaten in the side of the head with and ax as we conceive by the bigness of the hole in the skull, also we found that part of the body of the said Pignell was carried away with Varment but the hind quarters from the loins we found dragged in a swamp by which said consequences of the said action, and by the examination of an English Servant of the said Whites named John Evans that escaped out

do all agree in our verdict that it was the Indians, also by the report of an Indian of Nanzemum named George, a great man of the said towne, that went with us to the plantation the same time when we viewed the dead bodyes -- he told us that the same day that the murther was committed he found the footing of divers Indians going from the said plantation". "Perhaps 300 settlers were killed in these raids. Demanding protection, the settlers petitioned the Jamestown Government for arms, forts, and soldiers. From Rappahannock County was sent a "Petition of 15 Grievances" signed by, among others, Henry Awbrey and Col. Thomas Gouldman. They begged that "the war was the heathen...may be prosecuted effectually and managed in such sort that some Counties may not be totally ruined whilst others live in...peace and quietness, whilst poore Rappahannock lies ableeding whose number of people murthered and estates destroyed can find no parallel in Virginia...for wile we are tending corn to feed our wives and children, the Indians...would butcher us in our fields, they being so frequent about us that we dare not stir from our plantation" . "Governor Berkeley ordered the colonists to band together, ten men to a house, and ordered a 500-man army raised to defend the frontiers. To support this army, a tax of 500 pounds of tobacco per poll was levied. This was a very dear tax, as in that year (1676) there had been a severe drouth and crop failure. An army of 250 men was raised under the command of Major Thomas Truman of Maryland and Col. John Washington of Virginia, but proved ineffective against the hit -and-run tactics of the Indians. "Dissatisfaction with these measures led the colonists to raise a volunteer army of their own, and a wealthy, cocky newcomer from England, Nathaniel Bacon, was chosen as their leader. Bacon's request to the Governor for a commission to lead this army was refused, so he determined to set out on his own. With his little army he raided some "tame" Pamunkeys, then assaulted some friendly Occaneeches, killing 30 of them. Governor Berkeley declared him a rebel, whereupon Bacon seized Jamestown and forced Berkeley to grant him a commission. Bacon then issued a "Declaration of the People", which has since been hailed as democracy" proclaimed a hundred years before the American Revolution. Protesting the colonial government even more than the Indian

shown by the authorities, the monopoly of trade, and the poor defense of the colonies. "Governor Berkeley fled to lands east of the Potomac River, but his fortunes soon changed and returned to Jamestown. Bacon then laid siege to the town, recapturing it, and burned it. Thus matters stood when Bacon died in October, 1676, and support for his "rebellion" faded away . The colonists had been severely divided over support for Bacon or for the royal governor, and this division was pronounced in the outlying colony of Rappahannock County. In reprisal, Governor Berkeley seized much of the property of the rebels, and awarded the loyalists with huge grants of land. Some of the seized property was later returned by the courts, but 23 rebels were hung.

"At this time our ancestor, (3) John Meador, was less than ten years old, and records do not reveal the details of how his step-father, Henry Awbrey, fared during these times. But it is a matter of record that Col. Thomas Goodrich and his son Benjamin were supporters of Bacon, for which they were fined 50,000 pounds of tobacco each and ordered to recant before the court with a rope about their necks. This Col. Goodrich did, but with a token cord instead of a rope, to demonstrate his contempt for the Governor's orders. Since the county court (of which Henry Awbrey was a member) permitted this display, it probably concurred.

"Some support for Goodrich came from Col. Thomas Gouldman (father of Francis Gouldman, who married (3) Mary Meador). Gouldman proposed that half the debt be paid by selling to the government 50 acres of land near Hobb's Hole for the establishment of a warehouse center and shipping port. As Burgess for Rappahannock County, Gouldman used his influence in the Jamestown Assembly and the port was established. Joining in the venture also were Henry Awbrey, Col. William

Loyd, and Col. William Stone. The port was called "New Plymouth", after the Puritan colony in New England, a testimony to continuing Puritan influence in the area, and was so known until 1705, when it was renamed Tappahannock in honor of the Indian villages that had once stood there. It

is still the county seat of Essex County. Thus, some of the families allied to the Meadors were influential in founding this city . "Meanwhile, the Rappahannock Indians had fled from their villages behind the settlers on the east bank of the river

lands were taken up by white settlers, and the Indians could not return. Decimated and broken, though having remained peaceful during the whole affair, their cause was championed by Henry Awbrey, the senior member of the county court. Enlisting the help of about a dozen settlers, they were relocated, probably on Henry Awbrey's large grant lands, where there is a place which is till called Indian Neck.

There is also a Rappahannock Indian church at Beasley; and there are reports that traces of an Indian settlement have been found on the Meador plantation , but no records have been found to this effect.

"Participating in the resettlement in January, 1684 were Henry Awbrey, who served as overseer and go-between as well as furnishing his boat; Robert Tomlin, Jr., who supplied a sloop and a smaller boat; and several men including (3) John Meador. John was reimbursed by the court for 9 days service and the use of his horse . "THE OTHER CHILDREN OF (3) JOHN MEADOR "The greatest disappointment of the present research in the Eastern Virginia counties has been the lack of additional information developed about the remaining children of John Meador. It had been hoped that connections would be found to the many Meadors of the late 1700's and 1800's whose parentage is as yet unknown. But beyond those lineages already established, of Dinah, Jonas, and Jason Meador, no additional lineages have been documented. Perhaps the loss of records in Caroline and King and Queen Counties has contributed in part to this lack of data. The later moves to Cumberland |County have been well documented, but research in surrounding counties of Amelia and Prince Edward perhaps will reveal the links now missing; but that is another project and not within the province of the present work." [alford1.FTW]

From the book "Our Colonial Meador Ancestors" by Victor Paul Meadors "As indicated in the preceding chapter on (2) Thomas Meador, no documentation has been found to show explicitly that Thomas Meador, orphan, and Thomas Meador the Younger are one and the same. This includes the lack of evidence to define

that John Meador, the son of Thomas Meador, orphan, and John Meador, the only son of Thomas Meador the Younger and Sarah Meador, were the same. Nonetheless, as pointe out in that chapter, it appears that those facts which are known fit

also known as Thomas Meador the Younger. In the same sense, the known facts point quite conclusively that the John Meador who was the son of Thomas and Sarah Meador was the same John Meador, son of Thomas, orphan, who inherited the grants on Hoskins Creek.

"On that basis, it would appear that this John Meador probably was born about 1658, because he apparently was of legal age August, 1679 . Thus he probably was about 4 or 5 years of age at the death of his father. Barring evidence to the contrary. it must be presumed that John spent his childhood with his mother Sarah and his step-father, Henry Awbrey, on Awbrey's plantation on the upper reaches of Hoskins Creek. AS noted in the preceding chapter his mother gave him a yoke of oxen and a gun. Marks for these oxen were registered , and marks for a black heifer were registered later for "John Meadors, son of Thomas Meadors of Hoskins Creek . The two registrations are essentially the same, except that the left and right sides of the cattle are interchanged. The strong similarity between the marks also would support the view that John Meador, son of Thomas, orphan, and John Meador, son of Thomas and Sarah, were the same. "For clarity it would be noted here that the records indicate that only two John Meadors were living in the area of the Northern Neck at this time. The one named above unmistakably was the son of Thomas Meador, orphan, who held the two grants on Hoskins Creek. The other, a much older man, was the son of Ambrose Meador and was born about 1633. Records of this latter John are found on Peumansend Creek in St. Mary's Parish, an area now part of Caroline County and quite distinct from the area on Hoskins Creek in South Farnham Parish where John, the son of Thomas, orphan, lived. "Of course, John could not occupy the grant lands of his father while a child, but apparently he did so upon attaining adult status. This seemingly coincided with his marriage to Elizabeth White, the daughter of Richard and Addra White. Recor

More About John (Meador) and Elizabeth White: Marriage: Abt. 1667

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John Meador Sr's Timeline

1658
August 3, 1658
Essex, Virginia, United States
1677
July 16, 1677
Age 18
Old Rappahannock, Essex, Virginia
1679
1679
Age 20
Rappahannock, Virginia Colony
1680
1680
Age 21
Rappahannock, Essex, VA
1683
1683
Age 24
Rappahannock, Essex, VA
1684
1684
Age 25
Rappahannock, Essex, VA
1685
1685
Age 26
Virginia
1686
1686
Age 27
Rappahannock, Essex, Virginia, USA
1696
1696
Age 37
Lancaster, Essex Cty., VA
1698
1698
Age 39
Rappahannock, Essex, VA