John Moulton, of Hampton

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John Moulton, of Hampton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ormsby, Norfolk, England
Death: Died in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire, United States
Place of Burial: Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Moulton and Mary Eastow
Husband of Anne Moulton
Father of Henry Moulton; Anne Moulton; Mercy Moulton; Mary Sanborn; Miriam Moulton and 6 others
Brother of Robert Moulton; Samuel Moulton, Sr.,; Bridget Moulton, Twin; James Moulton, of Wenham; Henry Moulton and 6 others
Half brother of Sarah Hobbs and Mary Marston

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Moulton, of Hampton

http://www.themorrisclan.com/GENEALOGY/MOULTON%20John%20F15138.html

John MOULTON. Born (in 1599-S1)(about 1599-S2) at Scratby, England; son of Robert MOULTON and Mary SMYTHE. He married Anne GREEN on 24 September 1623 at Ormsby, St. Margaret, Norfolkshire, England. Ormsby is in Norfolkshire, near Great Yarmouth.

John and his family were examined on 11 April 1637, and sailed from Yarmouth on the ship Rose with Mr. William Andrews, master. They embarked with five children, Henry, Mary, Ann, Jane, and Bridget, and two servants, Adam Goodwin, age 20, and Alice Eden, age 19. They arrived in Boston on 8 June 1637.

They settled first at Newbury (Winnacunnet), Massachusetts.

They were original grantees and settlers at Hampton, Newhampshire. They moved there in 1639. He was made a freeman on 22 May 1639 in Hampton, New Hampshire.

He was chosen the first deputy or representative of the town to the General Court at Boston in September 1639.

His will was written on 23 January 1649. It was proved on 1 October 1650 in Hampton, New Hampshire.

The will of John Moulton of Hampton, 1649/50

The last will & testamt of John Moulton of Hampton beeing in his perfitt sences Doth will & beequeath as ffolloweth: Imp to my Sonne Henry Moulton tenn acres of fresh marsh by the beach on ye South side of the river; Item one acre fresh marsh wch is given him for a way butting uppon his bridg towards the South and ye upground towards the north. It : give tenn acres & a halfe of Sale marsh butting on Willi ffullars towards ye south west, & ye river towards the east liing in the south side of Willi Sanborne. It : I give to henry tenn acres of upground : in ye East feild in ye East side of Willi ffifeild, & one share of com'onage att my decese: It : I give to Ann my wife my house & house Lott, & ten acres liing att ye end of ye sayd house Lott & seven acres of fresh medow more or lesse in the west medowes, two acres of ffresh medow liing on ye South side of my Sonn Henry's fresh medow att ye beach, & tenn acres of Salt marsh & halfe liing on ye being more or less, & five acres of salt marsh that is yett to bee appointed, all this I doe give to my beeloved wyfe duering hir life It : I doe make my wife my Sole Executrix & doe give to ye say'd Ann my wyfe all my cattell, & all my moveable goods, excepting one calfe to John. The rest to hir disposeing according to hir discression : It : I give to my Sonn John Mouton after my wyfes decease the house, & house Lott, & the tenn Acres adjoyning to itt : It : I give to ye say'd John my sonne two Cowe Com'onages. It : I give to my Sonne John one Oxe com'onage It : I give to my Sonne seven acres of fresh medow more or lesse in ye west meddowes. It : I give to my Sonne John tenn acres of Salt marsh more or less liing on ye south side of my Sonne Henry's & five acres of Salt marsh wch is yett to be appointed) all these several guifts I doe give to my Sonne John after my wyfe's decease wth this Proviso yt wthin one whole yeare after my wyfe's decease my sonne John shall pay or cause to bee payd five pounds to my daughter Jane Moulton, & in two whole yeares after my wyfe's decease five pounds to my Daughter Bridgett & in case my Sonne John doth not pay unto his two sisters afore sayd ye tenn pound, then my will is my two daughters shall have the two acres of fresh marsh liing on ye South side of my Sonne Henry's, & tenn acres & halfe of Salt marsh more or less liing on ye South side of my Sonne Henry's marsh, & in case my Sonne John doth die before hee bee possest, of thes house & lands then my will is yt the house & all the lands shalbee equally divided, to all my childeren excepting Henry. And I give twelve acres of upland more or less in ye East feild, on ye east side of willi Esto's twelve acres to bee equally devided between Mary Samborne & my daughter Ann, & my daughter Jane, & my daughter bridgett, & I give unto my Sonn Samborne tenn acres of Salt marsh wch is yett to be appointed, & I give to my Sonne Samborne fower acres of Salt marsh liing on ye South side of Christopher Pallmers, & ye north side of my Sonn Henries) It I give in to my daughter Ann three acres of fresh marsh att ye beach next John Brownes, fresh meddow. It : I give to my daughter Ann tenn acres of salt marsh wch is yett to bee appointed : Also my will is yt my Sonne John shall have a way to his ten acres & a halfe of Salt marsh through his brother Henry's Salt marsh this I doe confirme to bee the true intent of my will witness my hand this prsent day being ye (23d) of January (1649)

by mee John Moulton

witnessed to this Robert Tuck Willi Estowe [Proved Oct. 1, 1650.] [Norfolk County, Mass., Deeds, vol. 1, p. 7.]

WIFE: Anne GREEN Born about 1600 in England; daughter of Edward GREEN. She was christened on 6 September 1601 in Ormesby, St Margaret, Norfolkshire, England. Age was listed as 38 on the exam for passage to America in Apr 1637. She died on 12 April 1668 at Hampton, Rockingham county, New Hampshire.

CHILDREN of John MOULTON and Anne GREEN:

Henry MOULTON. He was christened on 12 November 1623 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England. Henry settled on the third lot east of his father’s in Hampton. He married Sobriety HILTON, daughter of Edward Hilton, on 20 November 1651 in Hampton, New Hampshire. He died on 8 September 1701 in Hampton, New Hampshire. [F7569]. Mary MOULTON. (Merey). She was christened on 24 November 1626 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England. She married William SANBORN [F7568]. She died on 11 October 1686 at Hampton, Rockingham county, New Hampshire. Anne MOULTON. She was christened on 27 September 1629 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England. She died after 1664. Bridgett MOULTON. She was christened on 8 April 1632 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England. she died in February 1634 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England; and was buried on 17 February 1634 in Hemsby. Jane MOULTON. (twin). She was christened on 8 April 1634 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England. She died on 19 March 1699. 9see below). Bridgett MOULTON. (twin). She was christened on 8 April 1634 in Hemsby, Norfolkshire, England. She died on 19 March 1699. From Dow’s History of the Town of Hampton: “The twins, Jane and Bridget, for many years lived in a small house built for them by the roadside, near the site of Mr. Joseph Johnson’s barn. Anecdotes illustrative of some peculiarities in their temperment and character have been handed down by tradition. there is also preserved (N. H. Hist. Soc. Col. III: 122) a letter of Rev. Cotton Mather, to a gentleman of London, in 1716, wherein he says of them: “‘At Hampton, a Town about Fifty miles from this place [Boston], there were Twin sisters, whose names were Bridget and Jane Moulton. The perpetual Harmony and Sympathy between the sisters was the observation of all the neighbourhood. They were never contented except they were together. If the one were desirous to go abroud, the other would be impatient of staying at home. If the one were merry, the other would be airy. If the one were troubled, the other would be chaagrin[ed]. When one was for carding, the other was for spinning. for their Dispositions and Satisfaction there was a very strange Agreement betwixt them. The particulars wherein every body with pleasure and wonder saw how they were agreed, and how like your famous Twins of Hippocrates, which you tell us would Flere et Ridere simul [weep and laugh at the same time], were numberless. They lived a Virgin life, and in this good accord, reached about three-score years. Thyen Death after a short sickness arrested the one of them. The other grew full of pain, and bid her friends not be in a hurry about her sister’s funeral for her’s must accompany it. By dying within a few hours after her sister, she answered their expectations. Mr. John cotton, the worthy minister of the place, preached a funeral sermon for this occasion on those words, 2 Samuel 1:23, “In their Death they were not divided.”’” (Lieut.) John MOULTON. He was christened on 16 March 1639 in Newbury, Massachusetts. He was called The Giant. He lived on the family homestead. He married Lydia Taylor, daughter of Anthony Taylor and Philippa Mingay, on 23 March 1666 in Hampton, New Hampshire. He died on 4 March 1706. Ruth MOULTON. She was christened on 7 May 1641 in Newbury, Massachusetts. She married Peter JOHNSON on 3 April 1660 in Hampton, New Hampshire. She died on 7 September 1718 in Hampton, New Hampshire.

SOURCES: [S1]. Patty's Place. Patty Cox. http://www.geocities.com/pattyc.geo/fam00062.htm. QUOTES as sources: a) NEGHR The English Background of Some Early Settlers of Hampton NH from Ormsby, St.Margaret, Norfolk, vol 141, pgs 313-328. Vol 142, pgs 260-263, 313-328, 342. b) NEGHR Some Doubts About The English Background of The Moulton Family vol 144, pgs 245-263. [S2]. Pane-Joyce Genealogy. http://math.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/report/rr02/rr02_045.htm. QUOTES as sources: a) Joy Wade Moulton, “Some doubts about the English background of the Moulton family,” New Eng. Hist. Gen. Reg., 144 (1990): 245-263. b) Joseph Savage, Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Originally published 1860. c) Joseph Dow, History of the Town of Hampton, New Hampshire, from its Settlement in 1638, to the Autumn of 1892, Salem, Mass., 1893. d) (will) http://www.hampton.lib.nh.us/hampton/history/probate/johnmoulton1649.htm e) Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: immigrants to New England 1620-1633, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1995, Three volumes.

---------------------------------------------

John Moulton

Born: 1599

Ormsby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Died: 1 Oct 1650

Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA

Spouse

Anne Green

Born: 6 Sep 1601 in Ormsby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Died: 12 Apr 1668 in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA

Marriage: 24 Sep 1623 in St Margaret, Ormesby, Norfolk, England View Info

Children Sex Birth

Henry Moulton M 12 Nov 1623 in St Margaret, Ormesby, Norfolk, England

Ann Moulton F 1624 in Ormsby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Anne Moulton F 1624 in St Margaret, Ormesby, Norfolk, England

Mercy Moulton F abt 1625 in Ormsby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Mary Moulton F 27 Dec 1626 in Ormsby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Miriam Moulton F 1630 in Ormsby, [parish], Norfolk, England

William Moulton M 1633 in Ormesby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Bridget Moulton F 8 Apr 1634 in Ormesby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Jane Moulton F 8 Apr 1634 in Ormesby, [parish], Norfolk, England

John Moulton M 16 Mar 1638 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA

Ruth Moulton F 7 Jan 1640 in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA

Thomas Moulton M abt 1644 in Ormesby, [parish], Norfolk, England

Sanborn Moulton M 1650 in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA

Anne Moulton F 1762 in Ormesby, [parish], Norfolk, England -------------------- •Name: JOHN MOULTON

•Sex: M

•Birth: ABT 1599 in Scratby, Norfolkshire, England

•Death: BEF 01 OCT 1650 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire

•Note:

From Austin, p. A: John "was in a large group of Moultons and connections examined at Ipswich before sailing in the "John and Dorothy" and the "Rose" on April 11, 1637. He registered as a husbandman, ae. 38, with wife Anne, 38, children Henry, Mary, Ann, Jane and Bridget, and two servants, Adam Gooddens, 20, and Alice Eden, 18. John and his family landed at Boston June 8, 1637, and settled first at Newbury, where their son was born in 1638, and they were original grantees and settlers at Hampton, N.H., where Ruth was born. He was made a freeman May 22, 1639, appears in most early town and church records, and was a grand-juror 1648-9."

From Joseph Dow's History of Hampton, N.H., 1893, Chapter on the Township Grant:

"In the autumn of 1638, Winnacunnet remaining still unsettled, and the time allowed to the inhabitants of Newbury for a removal hither having nearly expired, a petition, signed by Steven Bachiler and others, was presented to the General Court, asking leave to settle here. Their prayer was granted. The record stands thus: "The Court grants that the petitioners, Mr. Steven Bachiler, Christo: Hussey, Mary Hussey, vidua, Thom: Cromwell, Samuell Skullard, John Osgood, John Crosse, Samul Greenfield, John Molton, Tho: Molton, Willi: Estow, Willi: Palmer, Willi: Sergant, Richard Swayne, Willi: Sanders, Robert Tucke, with diverse others, shall have liberty to begin a plantation at Winnacunnet and Mr. Bradstreete, Mr. Winthrope, Junior and Mr. Rawson, or some two of them, are to assist in setting out the place of the towne, and apportioning the severall quantity of land to each man, so as nothing shalbee done therein without leave from them, or two of them." (Mass., Rec., I:236.) "

From Dow, Section on Land Grants:

"December 24, 1639, the town granted to the following persons the number of acres of land denoted by the figures annexed to their names, viz.:

Mr. Steven Bachiler, 300 (besides his house lot),

Mr. Timothy Dalton, 300

Mr. Christopher Hussey, 250

John Cross, 250

John Moulton, 250

William Palmer, 100

Philemon Dalton, 100

Abraham Perkins 80 (granted Jan 14, 1640)

Richard Swaine, 100

William Eastow, 100

Thomas Moulton, 80

Robert Saunderson, 80

Thomas Jones, 100

William Wakefield, 150

James Davis, 80"

Father: ROBERT MOULTON b: ABT 1565 in Ormesby St. Margaret, Norfolk, England

Mother: MARY SMYTH b: ABT 1575 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

Marriage 1 ANNE GREEN b: BEF 06 SEP 1601 in Ormesby, St. Margaret, Norfolk, England

•Married: 24 SEP 1623 in Ormesby, St. Margaret, Norfolkshire, England

Children

1. JOHN MOULTON b: ABT MAR 1639 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts

2. Henry Moulton b: BEF 12 NOV 1623 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

3. Mary Moulton b: BEF 24 NOV 1626 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

4. Ann Moulton b: BEF 27 SEP 1629 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

5. Jane Moulton b: BEF 08 APR 1634 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

6. Bridget Moulton b: BEF 08 APR 1632 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

7. Ruth Moulton b: BEF 07 MAR 1641 in Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire

8. Bridget Moulton b: BEF 08 APR 1634 in Hemsby, Norfolk, England

9. John Moulton b: BEF 16 OCT 1636 in Ormesby, Norfolkshire, England -------------------- Will 22 June - 1 Oct. 1573 Ormesby

John is mentioned in numerous records from 1544 through 156 3. In the 1563 rentall roll he is listed as having paid a t ax of L15/6/5.

In his will dated 22 June 1573, John requested burial in th e middle aisle of the parish church of Ormesby. He gave th e curate William Ballard 3/4, 12d toward the repairs of th e church, and 12d to the poor box.

To his son John he gave the house and land where he was liv ing, but "I will he shall not enter the same until he accom plishes the full age of 21 years..." He also received two g eldings valued at L3 each, or else to have L6 for them both . HE also received his bed standing in the solar eave, a be dstead,fetherbed, bolster and sheets, comforter, pillow an d pillowbeare, a milk cow, ten ewes and ten lambs, his bes t and biggest brass pot, two pewter platters, a latten canl estick, and a table "as it standeth in the house". At the t ime of his taking possession of his land he was to have fiv e combs of wheat and five of barley with which to seed it.

His son Robert received the house and land that had belonge d to "Margaret Multon my Late Mother" and some land in Cais ter, except four acres "lienge in the fylde of Ormesby whic h I have soulde unto William Greene my brother in law..." J ohn appointed his brother Thomas to deliver the four acre s to William Greene, but he was not to have them until he r eached the age of 21. Robert also received a mare valued a t 40/, amilk cow, five ewes, five lambs, "my trmbrell or ma rket cartt", a pair of sheets, a flocke bed with a transome , a coverlet, a brass pot, two pewter platters or dishes, f ive combs of food wheat and barley at the time of his takin g possession of this house and land.

To his daughters, Margaret and Grace, he left #5 to be pai d at the time of their marriages or at age 20. Everything e lse was to go to his wife Thomasine. She was named executri x with William Battololy of Caster "to be a friendly ayde a nd helpe unto hir". His brother Thomas was appointed superv isor.

The will was witnessed by William Burywey, scriptor, Willia m Green, and Robert Green and was proved 1 Oct. 1573.

2) From Mac Allen, p. 1358 Will: Dated June22, 1573 and prove d Oct. 1, 1573 "A summary of this evidence produces the fol lowing conclusions: John Moulton was married at least twice , his last wife and widow was named Thomasine, and she wa s the mother of his son John. The other three children name d in his will, including Robert, may have been the issue o f an earlier marriage." From Austin, p. A: John "was in a large group of Moultons a nd connections examined at Ipswich before sailing in the "J ohn and Dorothy" and the "Rose" on April 11, 1637. He regis tered as a husbandman, ae. 38, with wife Anne, 38, childre n Henry, Mary, Ann, Jane and Bridget, and two servants, Ada m Gooddens, 20, and Alice Eden, 18. John and his family landed at Boston June 8, 1637, and sett led first at Newbury, where their son was born in 1638, an d they were original grantees and settlers at Hampton, N.H. , where Ruth was born.

He was made a freeman May 22, 1639, appears in most early t own and church records, and was a grand-juror 1648-9."

From Joseph Dow's History of Hampton, N.H., 1893, Chapter o n the Township Grant: "In the autumn of 1638, Winnacunnet remaining still unsettl ed, and the time allowed to the inhabitants of Newbury fo r a removal hither having nearly expired, a petition, signe d by Steven Bachiler and others, was presented to the Gener al Court, asking leave to settle here. Their prayer was gra nted. The record stands thus: "The Court grants that the pe titioners, Mr. Steven Bachiler, Christo: Hussey, Mary Husse y, vidua, Thom: Cromwell, Samuell Skullard, John Osgood, Jo hn Crosse, Samul Greenfield, John Molton, Tho: Molton, Will i: Estow, Willi: Palmer, Willi: Sergant, Richard Swayne, Wi lli: Sanders, Robert Tucke, with diverse others, shall hav e liberty to begin a plantation at Winnacunnet and Mr. Brad streete, Mr. Winthrope, Junior and Mr. Rawson, or some tw o of them, are to assist in setting out the place of the to wne, and apportioning the severall quantity of land to eac h man, so as nothing shalbee done therein without leave fro m them, or two of them." (Mass., Rec., I:236.) "

From Dow, Section on Land Grants: "December 24, 1639, the town granted to the following perso ns the number of acres of land denoted by the figures annex ed to their names, viz.:

Mr. Steven Bachiler, 300 (besides his house lot), Mr. Timothy Dalton, 300 Mr. Christopher Hussey, 250 John Cross, 250 John Moulton, 250 William Palmer, 100 Philemon Dalton, 100 Abraham Perkins 80 (granted Jan 14, 1640) Richard Swaine, 100 William Eastow, 100 Thomas Moulton, 80 Robert Saunderson, 80 Thomas Jones, 100 William Wakefield, 150 James Davis, 80"

First Deputy to the General Court

Ancestor of General Jonathan Moulton described below:

General Jonathan Moulton BY

Henry W. Moulton EDITED BY HIS DAUGHTER

Claribel Moulton [From the Moulton Annals] PUBLISHED BY

Edward A. Claypool - 1906 The ancestors of General Jonathan Moulton were among the tr aditional fifty-six inhabitants from the County of Norfolk , England, who first settled in the town of Hampton--then W innicumet--in the year 1638.

The names of John Multon (sometimes "Moulton") and Thomas M oulton appear in a partial list of these original settlers , which may be found in Belknap's History of New Hampshire , Vol. I, page 37.

General Jonathan Moulton was a descendent of John above nam ed: he was born in Hampton, New Hampshire, June 30th, 1726 , and died at Hampton in the year 1788, at the age of 62. H e was a large proprietor in lands, and several flourishin g towns in the interior of this State owe their early settl ement to his exertions and influence. This fact is mentione d in "Farmer and Moore's Gazetteer," published in 1823. Whe n he was thirty-seven years old, the town of Moultonboroug h was granted to him and sixty-one others, by the Masonia n proprietors, November 17, 1763. He was already noted fo r the distinguished service which he had rendered in the In dian wars, which ended with the Ossipee tribe, along the no rtherly borders of Moultonborough, in 1763. Many of his adv entures during this bloody period have been preserved and t ransmitted to the present time; enough indeed, to fill a la rge space in this brief sketch.

It may be well to preserve one of these incidents in this r ecord:

An octogenarian in the vicinity of Moultonborough relates t hat, during the Indian wars, Colonel, afterwards General Jo nathan Moulton went out with a scouting party from Dover. A fter numerous adventures, they met with and attacked a part y of six Indians, near a place now known as Clark's Landing , on the shore of Lake Winnipesaukee, all of whom fell in t he skirmish which ensued, with one exception. The Colonel h ad a large dog with him, which, after the affray was over , he placed upon the track of the escaped Indian. The dog r an off on to the ice. The party followed, and as they appro ached the entrance, of what is now Green Bay they saw in th e distance that the dog had the Indian down upon the ice; a nd when they reached the spot the Indian was dead, -- kille d by the dog.

The active services of the General in these border wars ha d made him, at an early age, well and favorably known to th e leading men of that day. His numerous raids and scouts, i n the region occupied by the Ossipee tribes, had made him w ell acquainted with the wilderness, and with the adjacent c ountry upon the western shores of the lake, and no doubt se cured to him the land grant which he obtained, in common wi th many of his companions in arms. He was rightly placed a t the head of the grantees, by the Masonian proprietors, an d the town of Moultonborough, which was named after him, pe rpetuates the memory of his rugged virtues and of his enter prising character. His descendants have been inhabitants o f Moultonborough and of Centre Harbor to the present time.

After obtaining the grant, the General devoted much of th e remainder of his life to this territory, he obtained fro m Governor Wentworth the grant of land now known as the tow n of New Hampton, which was formerly a part of Moultonborou gh gore, then called "Moultonborough Addition." The followi ng amusing account of the way in which General Moulton secu red this last grant appears in Fogg's Gazeteer, and is to b e found in other histories of those early times:

"In 1763, General Jonathan Moulton, of Hampton, having an o x weighing one thousand four hundred pounds, fattened for t he purpose, hoisted a flag upon his horns, and drove him t o Portsmouth as a present to Governor Wentworth.

The General refused any compensation for the ox, but said h e would like a charter of a small gore of land he had disco vered adjoining the town of Moultonborough, of which he wa s one of the principal proprietors. The Governor granted th is simple request of General Moulton, and he called it Ne w Hampton, in honor of his native town.

This small gore of land contained nineteen thousand four hu ndred and twenty-two acres, a part of which now constitute s Centre Harbor."

Thus it appears that General Moulton, by his energy and ent erprise largely contributed to the formation of three town s -- named New Hampton, by him; another named Moultonboroug h for him; and the third, Centre Harbor, was carved fro m a part of his grant called "Moultonborough Addition."

Many curious traditions are still extant with regard to Gen eral Moulton. He is said to have traded his soul to Satan f or a boot full of gold and then to have cheated the Devil b y removing the bottom of the boot so it could not be filled . After his death the ghosts of himself and his wife were t hought to revisit the old mansion by night, he, thumping wi th his heavy gold headed cane, and his wife moving along i n her rustling silk gown. The ghosts were "laid" with forma l exercises and afterwards walked no more.

General Moulton is the hero of Whittier's poem, "The New Wi fe and the Old."

From Dow's History of Hampton we take the following:

We have met General Moulton often in these pages; but her e let us pause and take our leave of him, for we shall mee t him no more. We have seen him honoured year after year t o represent his townsmen in the Legislature. We have seen h im the intrepid commander, in responsible positions, amid t he perils of war. We have never seen him false to his trus t or incompetent in its execution. A certain reticence an d lofty bearing in the mastship affair once aroused the dis pleasure of his fellow citizens; and perhaps the same quali ties, with his general characteristics as a man in advanc e of his age, and shrewd in his business may have held th e envy and dislike of many through life.

And yet one cannot believe he would have been so honored an d trusted through a most critical period of our history, ha d he been unworthy.

General Jonathan was a descendant of John, of the fourth ge neration. (Jacob', John', John'.)* Updated from RootsWeb's WorldConnect via father Robert De Moulton by SmartCopy: Feb 22 2015, 18:44:49 UTC

view all 17

John Moulton, of Hampton's Timeline

1599
1599
Ormsby, Norfolk, England
1608
June 16, 1608
Age 9
Great Ormsby, Norfolk, United Kingdom
1619
June 20, 1619
Age 20
Martham, Norfolk, England, Uk
1623
September 24, 1623
Age 24
St. Margaret,Ormesby,Norfolk,England
November 12, 1623
Age 24
St. Margaret, Ormesby, Norfolk, England
1624
1624
Age 25
St. Margaret, Ormesby, Norfolk, England
1625
1625
Age 26
St. Margaret, Ormesby, Norfolk, England
1626
November 24, 1626
Age 27
Ormsby, Norfolk, England
1630
1630
Age 31
Ormsby, Norfolk, England, England
1634
April 8, 1634
Age 35
Ormesby, Norfolk, England