John Warriner Noble, Sr.

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John Warriner Noble (Nobles), Sr.

Nicknames: "John Noble"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, Massachusetts
Death: Died in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut, New England
Place of Burial: New Milford, CT, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Noble, II; Thomas Nobles and Hannah Noble
Husband of Mary Nobles; Abigail D Noble and Mary Noble
Father of Stephen Noble; Abigail Nobles; Abigail Noble; John Nobles, Jr.; Mary Noble and 8 others
Brother of Elizabeth Church; Luke Warriner Noble, Seargent; James Nobles; Hannah Nobles; Thomas Nobles, Jr. and 11 others
Half brother of Matthew Noble

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Warriner Noble (Nobles), Sr.

John NoBLES son. of Thomas, was b. in Springfield, Mass., March 6, 1662, and d. in New Milford, Conn., Aug. 17, 1714, m. 62. He removed in childhood with his father to Westfield. In her will, executed at Deerfield, Maae., Feb. 25, 1692, and proved on the 29th of the succeeding March, Mary, widow of Richard Goodman, formerly of Hadley, names her son-in-law, John Noble, her executor, and declares: <<My will is, that my son Noble shall possess, im- prove, b enjoy my house. Barn & all my Lands in Hadley, till y* term of his foure years be fully accomplished and Completed." It is probable that he was at that time a resident of Hadley, and an occupant of the above-named house. Certain it is, that he was of Hadley, November, 1694, and at that date purchased of John Pynchon, skins to the value of nearly £6. Possibly he was then a furrier, though it may be that he bought these skins to sell again, for in 1702 he is styled " trader.'* On the 12th of February, 1695, he was still at Hadley, and then, for £10, bought of Stephen Lee of Westfield, five and three-quarter acres of land in Westfield. ^ He returned to Westfield as early as March 2, 1696, at which date he was chosen constable, and on the 20th April, 1702, is called '<trader,"and on the 1st September, 1703, "innholder,"and con- tinued, doubtless, to make that the place of his residence until 1707. In the last-named year, as is supposed, he was the pioneer settler of New Milford, Conn.

CoL Robert Treaty and other inhabitants of Milford, Conn., hav- ing purchased, for £60 in money, and £30 in goods, '<a certain tract of land, formerly called Weantenuck, now New Milford," of the Indians, the same was confirmed to them by the General Court, Oct 22, 1703. On the 22d June, 1706, John Noble, then of West- field, purchased land at New Milford, Conn., of John Woodruffe of Milford, an original proprietor.

Rev. Stanley Oriswold, pastor of the Congregational church at New Milford, in a century sermon preached January, 1801, full extracts from which are entered on the town records) has the following in relation to John Nobles:

A PETITION

To the honbl genl Court or Assembly now sitting in New haven:-The inhabitants of New Milford, being twelve families and about 70 souls, having since ye time of our first settlement, which is about three years, been without ye advantages of ye ministry of ye gospel, and of themselves as [un]able to give necessary encouragement thereto, humbly apply themselves to your honours for relief therein, and for that end your humble petitioners put into a capacity to levy the same, or that your honors would contrive some other way for ye health of our souls as in your wisdom shall be thought meet, and your humble petitioners shall ever pray for your honor's prosperity. Dated in New Milford, October 17th, 1711 John Nobles,, Sen. Samuel Prindle. John Bostwick, Sen. John Bostwick, Jr. Benjamin Bostwick, Sen. Zachariah Ferriss. John Nobles, Jr. Roger Brownson. Isaish Bartlet. John Weller. Samuel Brownson Thomas Weller. tract of land, formerly called Weantenuck, now New Milford," of the Indians, the same was confirmed to them by the General Court, Oct 22, 1703. On the 22d June, 1706, John Noble, then of West- field, purchased land at New Milford, Conn., of John Woodruffe of Milford, an original proprietor.

Rev. Stanley Oriswold, pastor of the Congregational church at New Milford, in a century sermon preached January, 1801, full extracts from which are entered on the town recoidS) has the following in relation to John Noble:

BRANCH OF JOHN. 29

" The lint white trader, who came to this town, was John Noble from Westfleld, Mass., who came here in the year 1707. He brought with him at first one of his daughters, then about eight years old. He first built a hut under what is called Fort Hill, but afterwards moved, and pitched here in the centre of the town. His house here was for some time the last house on this side of Albany, and General Nicholson once lodged in it, ' during the reign of Queen Anne. It deserves to be mentioned to the credit of the natives, that Mr. Noble once left his little daughter, then eight years old, with them for the space of three m four weeks, while he was necessarily absent from the town, and on his return found she had been well treated and taken exceedingly good care of. Another daughter of his, the late Mrs. Margaret Hine, who died here in the 80th year of her age, was then three years old, and the fact was fresh in her memory, as she had heard it while young, though she herself was not then brought hither."

No one who has seen New Milford in the summer, will call in question the good taste of Mr. Noble, in selecting that town as his future home, for in the whole valley of the Housatonic, no place, surpassing it in the beauty of its natural scenery, can be found.

" At a meeting of y* Proprietors of New Milford, held at Milford, Dec y*27th 1710. Voted, That there be a Committee chosen for ordering y« settlement of New Milford, and dividing y lands according to y* several limitations, here after agreed upon by y Proprietors. Committee chosen are MaJ' Wells, Capt Joseph Treat, Lieut. Joseph Peck, Sergt Sam^ Clark, Jonathan*Law, John* Nobles, Jn* Bostick, Berg* Zachariah Baldwin.

Voted, that any five shall be a sufficient number or Quorum for doing any matter proper for y* Committee to do.

Voted, That y Committee consider how many families may be accom- modated, in and ab* y place where y Town platt is already pitched, with a sufficiency of land, taking care that they do not exceed their Proportion of y whole tract of land and fall short of it according to their best Judge- ment, and when those accommodations are filled or taken up with Inhabi- tants, to pitch upon some other convenient place and there lay out another number of accommodations as y adjacent land will admitt of, taking y same care as before specifyd and so to proceed as there shall be occasion, untill y whole is laid out leaving suitable Commons, Highways, &c."

On the 10th January, 1710, several years previous to the organ- isation of the church in New Milford, Mr. Nobles joined the First Congregational church in Woodbury, Conn. Shortly after this date, the inhabitants of New Milford, though few in numbers, feel- ing their need of religious privileges, petitioned the (General Court of Connecticut for liberty to lay a tax upon all their lands, for the support of the gospel A copy of the original petition, preserved in the Secretary's office, is here inserted : 5

30 DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS NOBLE.

'*2btke han^ gen* (hurt or AmnMff n&w Ming in New Hat$n :

The Inhabitants of New Milford, being twelve families and about 70 souls, haTing since y* time of our first settlement, which is about three years, been without y* advantages of y* ministrey of y* gospell and of themselves as able to giue necessary Encouragement there unto, humbly i^ply themselves to your honours for relief therein, and for that End your humble petitioners put into a Capacity to Levy y* same, or that your hon- ors would contriye some other way for y* health of our souls, as In your wisdoms shall be thought meet, and your humble petitioners shall ever pray for your honors' prosperity. Dated in New Milford, Octob^ 17*^, 1711.

John Noble, sen', Samuel Grindel,

John Bostwick, sen', John Bostwick, jun',

Benjamin Bostwick, Zachariah Ferris,

John Noble, jun', Roger Brunson,

Isaiah Bartlet, John Weller,

Samuel Brunson. Thomas Weller."

" Upon the petition of the Inhabitants of New Milford, this Assembly do order that a tax of seven shillings each pr. annum, for the space of four years, shall be laid upon the proprietors of Lands within s* town (viz.,) so much on whole share, and proportionate upon lesser shares, or rights there, and the s* inhabitants have hereby liberty to choose a collector to gather the s* Rates or taxes, always provided the Money gathered as above S*, shall be emproved for promoting the Ministry in s* Town.'*

" New Milford, May 29th, 1712. Pursuant to y* Act or agreement of y* Proprietors of New Milford December 27th, 1710, authorizing a Committee for ordering y* settlement of New Milford as ores' and dividing y lands. The Committee whose names are hereunto subscribed, did meet and take a view of y* lands, and situation of y* same.

Whereupon they have considered and ordered as followeth: .... That in y* first forty acre Division, the Liberty of Choice shall be first to those who have already settled or built here in such order as they agree or otherwayes, as they came here first to settle here, but with this Limitation that they shall not make y* pitch further Southward than an East and West line across y* fishing f aUs nor farther Northward than an East and West line half a mile above y* mouth of Aspatuck river, excepting only Mr. John Nobles, who has already improved land att Hockey river, who has Liberty to take his pitch in that place. ....

Ordered that twenty acres on a square be left on Aspatif hill to sett a Meetingouse on, Ac. ....

Signed by SAM^* EELLS,

JOSEPH PECK,

JOSEPH TREAT,

SAMi^ CLARE.

JOHN NOBLE.

JOHN BOSTICK,

JON** LAW.

The town records of New Milford show, that "May y« 11th, 1718, at a

OmdUee qf

y* Proprietor

qf New Maford.**

BEAKGH or JOHN. 31

Iflgall meting John Noble senyr was chosen as an attorney to serve y* peti- tion to 7* general court holden at Hartford, may 14th, 1718.*'

" At a town meeting November y* 80, 1718, agreed y* John Noble and', John Weller, or Sam^ Bionaon ahould go to Milford, to discover y* comity about y* settlement of a minister."

"March y* 4th 171f at a leagall town meeting y* was agreed by a vot y* 8am> bronson, John Weller A John Noble sen' ahonld lay out y* ministers land y* is to say one home lot with y ten aoer division for a pastor lot & a forty acre lot, it is y* that y proprietors did agree to give Mr. Daniel Boaidman if he becomes a settled minister at New Milford.'*

passed in the Lower House.

Test, R BTJ8HNSLL, Clerk,

New Milford became a town, Oct 9, 1712, by act of the legisla- tore. Its growth, howevar, waa slow. Permission was granted to gather a church in May, 1715, the church was organized Nov. 21, 1716, and a meeting-bouee commenced in the spring of 1719. In May, 1719, the number of families in the town was twenty- three. In October, 1727, the inhabitants asked the General Court for their county rate, to aid their school, and help finish the meeting- house, and their request was granted for two years. They again asked, May, 1730, for their country rate, to be used in 'finishing their meeting-house, and the Legislature granted their petition.

But in midsummer of 1714, before the plans which he had so fondly cherished had been carried out, even before the establish- ment of a church John Nobles, the enterprising founder of this new town, was, in the full strength of manhood, suddenly removed by death.

The proceedings in the settlement of his estate, from the New Haven probate records, are as follows:

  • 'At a Court of Probates held at Newhaven Nov* 8d, 1714.

"Administration of the estate of John Noble, late of New Milford, dec*, is granted unto Stephen Noble, son of y« dec*, on his bond and surety. [V6L 4, p. 899.]

"Att a Court of Probates held at Newhaven, Monday, Jan>T 8«. 171}.

"Stephen Noble, ad' of the Estate of John Noble, late of New Mil- ford dee*, exhibited an inventory of the said dec** estate, which was approved forieoord.

"New Milford, December 9d, 1714. An Inventory of the estate of John Noble, Sr^, lately deceased is as followeth :»

£ $. d. "First, the house and homestead y* is all the Land from y

^ highway at y« East end to the highway at y« west end, 80 00

40 acres over Bocky River, . . 06 00

all y« out land not taken up yett, . 04 00

32 DECENDANTS OF THOMA8 NOBLB.

£ i. d.

"Secondly, y Stock, 1 Cam £210$., one diUo £2 S«.,2 yoang

mein 2 y old £4 lOf., 09 05

a heUFer 2 y* old iMt spring £2: one bona £4, one ditto

£1 St. 07 05

el^t amall swine, . 02 15

"9^. by Iron Tackling by boop and boxes 15«., . 00 15

byaLinspinand washer It: by bona chain 5«., . . 00 06

by a plow chain St. by Double hooks and single books

2t.8tf, 00 10 8

a stabing hoe 5t. and two broad hoes (U., . ^ . 00 11

a cart [ . ] and pin 8t. and one ring 2«., . 00 05 a staple and ring 2t. 6d. faUng ax 4f., . 00 06 6

old btmSd. one bottle ring and wedge 2«. 6(2., . 00 08 2

2 p^ fork tinee and sn old spade, . 00 08

old sytbs and tackling, 00 06

1 old Coulter 8t. 6d. : plough and part of two harrows, . 00 06 6

1 shoyell Scf. flesh fork U, 00 01 8

1 old plow share and bolt 4f., . 00 04

i share in a wolf pitt, 00 04

part of a Grin stone, 00 08 6

6 bushells Rye, 00 18 4

15ibudiels wheat, 08 06

60 bushk Indian at U 8d. p. busbi, . .» . 04 08 4^

8bushelsoates8t. 6d. hay lOt. flat £12«. Off., . 01 16 6

"4*^, by wearing cloths, a loose coat, . 00 04

a flaneUyestTt. a broadcloth vest 6t., . 00 12

ahat2«. 6d. twopairstockens2t.2d, . 00 04 8

a p' of shoes 8i. a flaneU coat 16t., . . 00 19

a neckcloth Is. bed stead and cord 7«. 6d., . . 00 08 6

a bolon shirt 12«. two linen shirts 7s., . 00 19

afeatherbed£2 8s. Oil. and bolster 2t., . 02 10

two piUows 6s. 8d. 8 old coYerUds lU, . 00 17

a trundle bed stead 6s., 00 05

a bed stead and cord 10«. a trundle bedstead and cord 6s., . 00 16

a feather bed £1 15t. Od. two feather bolsters, . 02 08

another bolster 8t. 4 coyerlids 2s., . 00 05

2 old beds and a Quilt lOt., 00 10

a set of Curtains 20s. another set of curtains, . 01 05

nine sheets £1 5s. Od. 5 napkins, a table cloth. . 01 09 8

2 table cloths Is., a chest ft Drawers, . 00 16

a linen wbeeU Is. 6d. a woollen wbeall, . 00 04

2tubs2s. 6d.8cnshens2s. 9d. 00 06 8

ahalfbushiU half peck. 00 01 8

a cow hide 8s. 5* f linen yem, . 00 17 7

7* tow yem 8s. 9d. 12> blankett yem lis., . . 00 19 9

6* woolen yem course 4s. 6d. flne linen yem 6* 10s., . 00 14 6

a p^amall sheets 00 08

twotrameIls5s. apairtongs2s. OJ., . . 00 07 6

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BBAKOH or JOHN.

33

m PaA U. Iron pot and hooka 6b,,

an IroD ketle (U. a brass ketle ISi., .

a table U. a mashing tub and cheesepress, .

8 brass pans 2$. one skillet It. a skimer U. 6d.,

6 pewter platen 9i. nine plates (U., .

2 bassons 8t. 6<2. Are poringers 2t. 6d.,

8 spoons It. a half pint and jill caps,

a dram cop and salt cellar It. a flagen St., .

an earthen pott 8d. two small cask 8t.6<2., .

a tab and beef 14$. an old cupboard and tubs,

a frying pan St. 6d. a wanning pan St.,

a mortar and pestle 8t. a TreTitt 16d.,

a shreding knife It. a salt box and desk It.,

a looking glass 8t. two pails St. 6d., .

atable St. 6<2., one old side 6d. wooden dishes St.,

loldladleSt. a pr. bridle bits id., .

an old coulter It. 8d. a knife 8d., . r

a trowell It. a smoothing iron and heaters, .

a hatchell St. books one bible 7t. Sd.,

books Sf. a pr. spectides It. and case,

soap Sd tallow It. (id. a brush Sd., .

8 glass botles St. id. four chairs if. 6d.,

part of three wohres £5 lOf. Od. ten pound woll,

S^ooarsewooUU. apilionSt. 6d., .

a grid iron Sd. lins^ woolsey St. Sd. ,

1* and f tow yem, ....

a bee tree and half St. a yerd and part of a yx^ cotten

it. id.,

old iron St., .....

Totally "Tttken l^ Samuel Brownson, Roger Brownson."

HISTORY OF MONTVILLE, Ct.

Commissioners appointed were James Wads worth, John Hooker, and Captain John Hall. They were empowered to hear and settle the complaints of the Indians and to remove all persons from the lands who held them by no legal right. The num- ber of the Indians as returned to the Assembly at this time was upwards of two hundred. At the May session of the General Assembly in 1720, the commissioners made 1 their report, which was substantially in favor of the white claim- ants. Nearly every claim of the settlers was allowed, the hunting grounds to Colchester was confirmed, the nine-mile tract to Lyme and three-quarters of the sequestered lands to the several persons who had obtained titles to them. The decision was ratified by the government of Connecticut, and thus ended the proceedings resulting from the complaint which Hallum had made to the Queen seventeen years before. As to the religious condition of the Mohegans, very little was done at this period to instruct them in the Christian faith. It is presumed that but few of them had become converts to the Christian faith; the remainder were still heathen, believ- ing not perhaps in all their ancient deities, but at least in some of them, and asserting that while the English were bound to worship the English God, the Indians were equally bound to worship and serve the Indian gods. About this time com- plaint was made to the government by the Indians, asserting that several of the settlers had encroached upon their lands. The governor summoned the chiefs to appear before him at New London and state their complaints. Cesar, Sachem, Ben Uncas and several of the council appeared before the governor, Ghirdon Saltonstall, June 18, 1720, when he asked them who the persons were that had intruded upon their lands. They replied that they were Stephen Maples, Jona- than Hill, Ralph Eargo, Joshua Baker, Alexander Baker, and John Nobles, and also that a saw-mill * had been built upon their land by Peter Mason, and was then in the hands of

  • This saw-mill stood -where the Fox Mills, as they -were afterward

called, stood. HISTORY OF MONTVILLE, Ct.. 33

Samuel Allyn, by which means their timber was destroyed. The governor then informed them that the persons complained of should be sent for and required to give an account of their pretention to their claims, which should be a preliminary step to bring the matter before the General Court. Cesar and his council were to have notice to be present and be heard in what they had to say relative to their complaints. The per- sons complained of were accordingly notified to appear before the governor's council on the Monday after the opening of the General Court, in September, 1720, which day fell on the third day of October of that year. All parties being present, the Indians were requested to state their particular complaints. Whereupon Ben Uncas declared " that the land which Jonathan Hill held as coining from his father, did not rightfully belong to him, and that Hill had offered him and Cesar four pounds apiece to be quiet and not com- plain against him," to which assertion Jonathan Hill replied, " he had offered it only for peace sake," upon which the Indian said, " the land was not theirs to dispose of, but was to de- scend to their children." Mr. Hill declined to give any ac- count of the right he had to the land " because on a former occasion he had given his reasons to the committee appointed by the General Court to settle all disputed claims." Stephen Maples also refused to make any statement relative to his claim to title before the council, as he said, because he had previously shown his right to his land before the committee.

Ralph Fargo declared the same, Jonathan and Alexander Baker also alleged that they had shown their titles to the committee, and the committee made no objection to them. John Nobles gave the same reasons for not showing his title as the others had. Upon the consideration of the complaints made by the Indians, and the answers by the claimants, the matter was, by the council, referred to the General Assembly, which body appointed James Wadsworth, John Hooker, and Captain John Hall, or any two of them, to be a committee to effect, if possible, a final settlement of the controversy per- 3 V. ADONTJAH (140), b. 18 Nov., 1754, eldest son of Thomas Rogers and Sarah Fitch; married Anna Nobles, daughter of James Nobles and Anna Vibber, widow of Wil- liam Vibber. He settled at Montville.

Children.

309. Charles Lee, b. 4 Nov., 1777; in. Abbv Adams of

Groton.

310. Nehemiah, b. 19 Sept., 1781.

311. Peletkh, b. L5 July, L783.

312. Andrew, 1>. 5 Aug." 1785.

313. Sarah, b. 27 Oct., L787.

314. Betsey, b. 13 Jan., 17'."'.

315. Adonijah, b. 7 Oct., 1702; m. and settled at Nobles-

town, N. Y. III. SAMUEL (18), b. 4 Feb., 1690-1, son of Samuel Leffingwell and Ann Dickerson; married 2 March, 1714-15, Hannah Gifford. He -ruled in Norwich. She died there 7 Oct., 1742.

Children.

24. Caleb, b. L3 May, 1716; m. Mary — ; .

25. Samuel, b. 28 Mnv, 1718; m. Hannah Buck.

26. Hannah, b. 1 1 Feb., 1719-20.

27. Ann, I.. 28 J<une, 1722; m. 1st, William Vibber; 2d,

dames Noble.

28. Andrew, b. 12 Dec, 1724; m. Marcy Nobles.

29. Mary, b. 8 Oct., 1726; m. John Nobles.

30. Elizabeth, b. 9 dune, 1729; m. Samuel Copp.

31. Jonathan, b. 22 May, 1731.

32. Abigail, b. 29 May, 1734.

33. Sarah, b. 28 Aug., 1736.

IV. ANDREW (28), b. 12 Dec, 1724, son of Samuel Leffingwell and Ann Dickerson; married Marcy Nobles, b. 5 April, 1726, (laughter of Stephen Nobles and Marcy Wil- liams. He died in Bozrah, 27 Sept., 1803. She died 5 Oct.,

1808. V. GURDON (53), b. 1768, son of Andrew Leffingwell and Marcy Nobles; married Polly Avery, daughter of . He was a resident of Montville, a farmer, and died 16 Jan., 1844. She died 17 Dec, 1869.

Children.

81. Elisha, b. 6 Feb., 1796; m. Betsey Beebe.

82. Marvin, b. 20 July, 1798; m. 1st, Abby Ann Chapman;

2d, Sarah Whaley.

83. Gardner, b. 10 Jan., 1801; died unm.

84. Mary, b. 4 April, 1803; m.

85. Amanda, b. 4 Nov., 1805; m. Alfred Rogers.

86. Andrew, b. 9 July, 1808; m. Sally Sabin.

87. George, b. March, 1811; died 28 Nov., 1881, unm.

88. Fitch, b. 1813; died June, 1827.

89. Ira, b. 1816; died 4 Aug., 1872, unm.

90. Harriet, b. 25 Aug., 1819; m. Joseph Kelso.

VI. JOHN (69), b. 22 March, 1774, son of Benjamin Lefflngwell and Lettis Camp; married Eunice Ford, b. May, 1782, daughter of Joseph Ford and Rebecca Bradford. He was a resident of Montville, a farmer, and died 19 Oct., 1856. She died 10 Jan., 1873 October 5, 1724, it was voted " to build a school-house near the meeting-house, the same to be 19 feet long, 14 feet wide, and 7 feet posts." The house was completed before the close of the year and a teacher hired. Mr. Allen Mullan was the first teacher approved by the committee. The parish settled upon him a salary of 24 pounds a year and ten acres of land forever. December 31, 172S, liberty was granted to John Vibber, Peter Wickwire, Jason Allen, Joseph Atwell, Samuel Fox, Jr., and John Nobles, " to build a stable on the southeast corner of the meeting-house lot, for the accommo- dation of le use- when attending church." Since the Church families' record has been in type, facts have come into the possession of the writer, through the cour- tesy of Mrs. Mary F. W. Church, wife of Frederick Fargo Church, Esq., a lawyer of Rochester, N. Y., that scatter much of the mist that has hitherto surrounded the more remote an- cestry of this branch of the Church families. It now appears to be clearly established that Richard Church of Westfield, Mass.. born in 1664, and married 3 March, 1692, Elizabeth Nobles, b. 9 Feb., 1673, daughter of Thomas Nobles of Bos- ton, was the father of Jonathan Church, who married Abigail Fairbanks of North Parish, 24 Feb., -1724. 1730, in the 67th year of his age. His wife afterwards mar- ried Deacon Samuel Loomis, and died 10 Aug., 1741, aged 78 years 6 months 1 day. The children of Richard Church, as found recorded at Westfield, Mass., were 1st, Hannah, b. 5 Oct., 1692; 2d, John, b. 12 Jan., 1693-4; 3d, Rachel, b. 1 March, 1694-5; 4th, James, b. 26 Oct., 1696; 5th, Joseph, b. 7 Dec, 1698; 6th, Jonathan, b. 7 Dec, 1700; 7th, Samuel, b. 28 'Nov;, 1702; 8th, Elizabeth, b. 26 March, 1705; Jonathan, 6th child of Richard Church and Elizabeth Nobles, b. 7 Dec, 1700; m. 24 Feb., 1724, Abigail Fairbanks. He had a son, Jonathan, b. about 1726, and was twice married. The name

of his first wife is unknown, and may have been Amy ,

that being the name of her daughter, b. 1 April, 1754, and in. V. ADONTJAH (140), b. 18 Nov., 1754, eldest son of Thomas Rogers and Sarah Fitch; married Anna Nobles, daughter of James Nobles and Anna Vibber, widow of Wil- liam Vibber. He settled at Montville.

Children.

309. Charles Lee, b. 4 Nov., 1777; in. Abbv Adams of Groton.

310. Nehemiah, b. 19 Sept., 1781.

311. Peletkh, b. L5 July, L783.

312. Andrew, 1>. 5 Aug." 1785.

313. Sarah, b. 27 Oct., L787.

314. Betsey, b. 13 Jan., 17'."'.

315. Adonijah, b. 7 Oct., 1702; m. and settled at Noblestown, N. Y. 28. Andrew, b. 12 Dec, 1724; m. Marcy Nobles.

29. Mary, b. 8 Oct., 1726; m. John Nobles.

30. Elizabeth, b. 9 dune, 1729; m. Samuel Copp.

31. Jonathan, b. 22 May, 1731.

32. Abigail, b. 29 May, 1734.

33. Sarah, b. 28 Aug., 1736. V. GURDON (53), b. 1768, son of Andrew Leffingwell and Marcy Nobles; married Polly Avery, daughter of . He was a resident of Montville, a farmer, and died 16 Jan., 1844. She died 17 Dec, 1869.

Children.

81. Elisha, b. 6 Feb., 1796; m. Betsey Beebe.

82. Marvin, b. 20 July, 1798; m. 1st, Abby Ann Chapman;

2d, Sarah Whaley.

83. Gardner, b. 10 Jan., 1801; died unm.

84. Mary, b. 4 April, 1803; m.

85. Amanda, b. 4 Nov., 1805; m. Alfred Rogers.

86. Andrew, b. 9 July, 1808; m. Sally Sabin.

87. George, b. March, 1811; died 28 Nov., 1881, unm.

88. Fitch, b. 1813; died June, 1827.

89. Ira, b. 1816; died 4 Aug., 1872, unm.

90. Harriet, b. 25 Aug., 1819; m. Joseph Kelso. 140. Adonijah, b. at K P. 18 Nov., 1754; m. Anna Nobles.

141. Thomas, b. at K P. 10 April, 1757; m. Mary Baker. 1 12. Sarah, twin to Thomas, in. Peletiah Tuttle.

143. Andrew, b. at K P. 24 July, 1759; m. Elizabeth Rogers.

Whereupon they have considered and ordered as foUoweth: .... That in y* first forty acre Division, the Liberty of Choice shall be first to those who have already settled or built here in such order as they agree or otherwayes, as they came here fbrst to settle here, but with this Limitation that they shall not make y* pitch further Southward than an East and West line across y* fishing f aUs nor farther Northward than an East and West line half a mile above y* mouth of Aspatuck river, excepting only

Mr.

John Nobles,=

who has already improved land att Hockey river, who has 

Liberty to take hiB pitch in that place. ....

Ordered that twenty acres on a square be left on Aspatiftk hill to sett a Meetin^ouse on, Ac. ....

Signed by SAM^* EELLS,

JOSEPH PECK,

JOSEPH TREAT,

SAMi^ CLARE.

JOHN NOBLE.

JOHN BOSTICK,

JON** LAW.

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John Warriner Noble, Sr.'s Timeline

1661
March 6, 1661
Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, Massachusetts
1663
December 1, 1663
Age 2
Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States
1682
September 13, 1682
Age 21
Westfield, Hampden Co., MA
1683
June 30, 1683
Age 22
1684
1684
Age 22
Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
1685
1685
Age 23
Massachusetts, USA
1686
1686
Age 24
MA, USA
1689
1689
Age 27
Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
1692
1692
Age 30
Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
1696
January 25, 1696
Age 34
Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA