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John P Overton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Essington Manor, Holderness, Yorkshire, England
Death: Died in Yorkshire,, England
Immediate Family:

Son of William Henry Overton and Anne Overton
Husband of Joan Snawsell
Father of Maj. Gen. Robert Overton; Thomas Overton; Germaine Overton; Francis Overton; Griselle (Griselda) Overton and 1 other

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John P Overton

Part I:

In Easington Church there is a marble plaque to John Overton Esquire and to his wife Joan, who died before 1651. During the English Civil War John was a faithful follower of Charles I and despised the Roundheads.

The marble tablet in Easington Church

 	to the memory of John and Joan Overton
 	Photograph courtesy of P.Crowther (2007)
 	 
 	The inscription on the tablet reads;
 	 
 	THIS MONUMENT SPEAKS THE MEMORY OF THE DECEASED
 	BUT NEVER TO BE DIVIDED JOHN OVERTON ESQ AND JOAN
 	HIS WIFE WHO LIVED BELOVED AND DIED LAMENTED
 	THEIR SACRED DUST ONE GRAVE CONTAINS UNTIL THE TRUMP OF
 	GLORY SHALL UNITE THEIR BODIES TO THEIR SOULS
 	PRETIO PRUDENTIA PRAESTAT
 	NE FAMAM PERIMAT MARMOR LONGAEVA VETUSTAS
 	VENTURIS MEMORA NOMINA GESTA VIRIS
 	NON OPUS HAEC ARTIS CONATU PINGERE TANTO
 	INCLYTA VIRTUTES SUNT MONUMENTA SIBI
 	NIL DECORAT LONGO CENSERE SANGUINE MENTES
 	SED QUAE NOBILITAT MENS GENEROSA VIROS
 	qUID MULTISS LECTOR VERAE VIRTUTIS IMAGO
 	CONDITUR HIC SINE QUA STEMMATA SPRETA IACENT
 	 
 	BE INDEX MARBLE TO THEIR FAMES
 	RECORD THEIR VIRTUES WITH THEIR NAMES
 	WHICH ART NEEDS NOT TO REPRESENT
 	VIRTUE ITS OWN VIVE MONUMENT
 	FOR BLOOD NOT MINDS BUT MINDS ADORN
 	THEIR BLODD WHO RE BETTER THAN GREAT BORN
 	IF SO KNOW READER IN ONE WORD
 	HERES MORE THAN MADAM OR MY LORD
 	ROBERTUS FILIUS MAERENS
 	SCRIPSIT ANNO 1651
 	 

The Overtons sold the Hall and lands to William Milner in 1720, and in 1771 at the parliamentary enclosure of Easington, Sir William Milner was allotted 88 acres of land. His son, Sir William Mordant Milner, sold the land to Robert Taylor in 1796. He died in 1798, and the land was sold in 1800 by his trustees to Robert Linsdall, later passing through other hands.

Source: http://www.skeals.co.uk/Articles/Overtonhall.html

Part II

A FEW EXCERPTS FROM: Historical Southern Families, Vol. 5, pp. 124-135

"OVERTON OF VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE and LOUISIANA"

"Tracing the name Overton from the days of the Seventeenth Century in

England has not been difficult, because of the life and activities of Major

General Robert Overton, who is described in history as "The Rebel General

Overton." He served under and was eventually imprisoned by Oliver Cromwell,

the "Protector" of the Commonwealth of Great Britain. He was a scholar as

well as a soldier, and the poet, Milton, who celebrated his exploits in the

DEFENSIO SECUNDA, addressed him as "bound to me these many years past in a

friendship of more than brotherly closeness and affection, both by the

similarity of our tastes and the sweetness of your manners.""

"MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT OVERTON, the son of John Over­ton and wife, Joan, was

born in Easington Parish, Yorkshire, England, in 1609. He erected a tablet

in honor of his father and mother in the church there in 1650. It is located

near the place where Overton Hall, his ancestral home, stood until about

1887. Overton Hall was continuously occupied by members of his family for

many generations. He married Ann Gardiner, daughter of Jeremy Gardiner of

Stratford Bow, Middlesex, England, in 1632. He is said to have been of the

same family as the famous Bishop William Overton of Coventry and Litchfield,

England. It is probable that he named his son, William, born December 3,

1638, for this relative. General Overton's eldest son, John, was ad­mitted

to practice Law at Gray's Inn on November 11, 1661."

"He was a staunch defender of the rights of the people in Eng­land and

of the interests of his country. Much of his correspond­ence will be found

among the "Thurloe Papers," and in one of them in 1654 he wrote, "If I be

called to seal the cause of God and my country with my blood, by suffering

death, or by bearing any testimony to the interests of my nation and the

despised truths of these times, he is able to support and save me, as the

sun to shine upon me-- if I can but keep faith and a good conscience, I

shall assuredly finish my course with joy." The dictionary of National

Biography states that General Overton flourished be­tween 1640 and 1668. He

was admitted to practice law at Gray's Inn November 1, 1631.

He was appointed deputy to Sir Thomas Fairfax, Governor of Pontrefact in

1645. In 1647 he was placed in command of a Regi­ment of Foot Soldiers and

shortly thereafter appointed Governor of Hull. In the second Civil War,

Overton's Regiment fought under Cromwell in Wales. In 1650, he accompanied

Cromwell to Scot­land and commanded a brigade of foot soldiers at the Battle

of Dunbar and was designated Governor of Edinburgh by Cromwell. He commanded

the reserve forces at Inverkeithing with Monck in Scotland and assisted in

the subjugation of Scotland and the gar­risoning of the Orkneys. At this

time, Cromwell accompanied King Charles I back into England.

Parliament paid him 400 pounds a year as a reward for his services and

General Deane designated Overton to command all the English forces in

Western Scotland. He was designated Gov­ernor of Aberdeen at that time. In

1653, he succeeded to the fam­ily estate at Easington, returned to England

and became Governor of Hull. At that time he hailed with enthusiasm Cromwell

's forci­ble dissolution of Parliament as he was dissatisfied with the slow

process of reformation under that body. But shortly afterwards when Cromwell

assumed the post of "Protector" and dissolved the "Little Parliament," he

became suspicious and told Cromwell that if he saw he did design to set up

himself and not the good of the nation, lie would not set one foot before

another to serve him, and retained his commission on the promise to

surrender it if he could not conscientiously serve Cromwell.

In December of 1654 he was arrested and sent prisoner to England on the

charge of intending to head a military insurrection against the Government,

and placed in the Tower of London, where King Charles II wrote him promising

forgiveness for past dis­loyalty and reward for service in effecting a

restoration.

After two years in the Tower, he was sent to Jersey and con­fined in

Elizabeth's Castle until March 1658. His sister petitioned Richard Cromwell'

s parliament on February 3, 1659, to release her brother, and on March 16,

after hearing Overton at his trial in London, Parliament voted his immediate

release and pronounced his imprisonment at Jersey illegal. On October 12,

1659, he was one of the seven Commissioners appointed by Parliament to

ad­minister the Armed Forces of England. He frustrated Moncks, who planned

to bring back King Charles, and was again arrested and sent to the Tower in

1660. Soon liberated, he was almost immediately arrested as "refusing to

take the oaths or give se­curity". In January 1664, the government again

sent him to Jersey, and he was still imprisoned there in February of 1668,

after which all trace of him in England was lost.

The custom of the times was to send political prisoners to the Barbadoes or

to Virginia and it is believed he was trans­ported to the Barbadoes, for

Hatton's Christ Church, Barbadoes, 22 December, 1679, includes one Robert

Overton, living there alone, without family and without servants, possessing

but five acres of land.

It is believed and family tradition has always had it, that his son,

William Overton, came to Virginia in search of his father about 1669 and

failing to locate him, remained in Hanover County, Virginia, where in 1670

he brought over his fiancée, Elizabeth Waters, daughter of Samuel and Ann

Waters of St. Sepulcher, London, England, and they were married on board the

ship No­vember 24, 1670, it having cost him fifty pounds of tobacco for her

passage from England to America. Their love story is said to be the basis

for the famous novel, "To Have and To Hold."

The Virginia Land Books contain records of a deed for 4600 acres on the

south side of Pamunky River on Falling Creek April 23, 1681, to William

Overton for transporting ninety-two persons to the colony. Another deed to

William Overton In 1690 was for additional land in St. Peter's Parish.

William Overton's marriage to Elizabeth Waters, daughter of Samuel and Ann

Waters of London, is proven by the will of Ann Waters, of the Parish of St.

Sepulchre, London, widow, dated Sept. 29, 1697, probated July 1700, by her

son Thomas Waters.(P.C.C. 108 Noel). She stated "I give unto my daughter,

ELIZABETH OVERTON, now in Virginia, the sum of ten shillings and to my

son-in-law, WILLIAM OVERTON, her husband, ten shillings.. I give unto my son

JOHN WATERS who for divers years past hath gone to Virginia.etc."

Samuel Waters, evidently the husband of Anne Waters, was buried from St.

Sepulchre-without-Newgate, London, September 6, 1665. He was the son of John

Waters who made his will July 20, 1626, as of Eastcott, Count of

Northampton, yeoman," and men­tioned his five youngest sons "Thomas, Joseph,

Ambrose, James and SAMUEL, the last two not 21 years of age. (Northants

W.B.T. (I) p.65). Samuel Waters was apprenticed to John West, Citi­zen and

Skinner of London, Feb.7, 1631, and on Sept. 3, 1639, was admitted to the

Freedom of the Skinners Company of London.

Samuel Waters was related to Sir Robert Peake, Citizen and Goldsmith of

London, whose will was proven in London, May 26, 1667. P.C.C. Carr - 96)

Sir Robert Peake bequeathed "to cou­sin James Waters, the son of Joseph

Waters, L. 50; to cousin Waters, relict of Samuel Waters, Skinner, deed. L.

20."

WILLIAM OVERTON, the immigrant, b. 12/3/1638 in Eng­land, rn.11/24/1670 at

Yorktown ELIZABETH WATERS. They had six children.

(Note: In tracing their descendants, reference is made to "The Early

Descendants of William Overton and Elizabeth Wa­ters of Virginia, and Allied

Families," published 1936 by W.P. Anderson, and page numbers in this book

are given for further reference to their descendants.)

I. Elizabeth Overton, b. 6-28-1673. Thought to have married Robert

Anderson II, b. about 1663, d. 1716. (See pp. 60-64)

II. William Overton, b. 8-14-1675, d. 6-18-1759, in. Peggy Garland.

III. Temperance Overton, b. 3-2-1679, d. 2-19-1716 (buried at "Cedar Hill",

Hanover County, Va.) m. about 1695 William Harris (b. 1669,

d. before 1733). They had nine children. (for further reference, see

pp.65-9l)

1. Major Robert Harris, b. about 1696-1700 in Hanover County, Va.

Will proved 1765 in Albemarle Co., Va., where most of his descendants

lived. Served in House of Burgesses in Hanover Co., appointed

Surveyor of new County of Louisa, cut off from Hanover in 1742, set­tled

there,

and afterwards moved to Albemarle Co. where he owned a large

estate. Married 1/13/1720 Mourning Glenn (will proven 1776 Albemarle Co.)

They had ten children.

2. Elizabeth Harris, baptized 11-27-1698.

3. George Harris, baptised 4-13-1701.

4. John Harris, baptised 3-28-1703, of Carolina Co., Va., m.

Ann -------. They had John Harris (b. about 1730) who had issue.

5. Benjamin Harris.

6. William Harris, b. 1707, believed to have married and had issue.

(See pp. 84-85)

7. Jemima Harris m. William Overton (her cousin, son of Capt. James

Overton) and had issue which will be given under William Overton.

8. Edward Harris, m. Ann --

9. David Harris.

IV. Samuel Overton, b. 8-14-1685, died before 1725, lived in Hanover Co.,

m. Miss Carr. They had six children:

1. Samuel Overton

2. John Overton

3. James Overton

4. William Overton, patentee of lands in Louisa Co. 1725, m. and had

Issue:

a. James Overton, died single

b. Samuel Overton, m. Elizabeth (he and his wife, of Hanover

County, deeded 10-14-1765 400 acres lying In Louisa County, described as

land left to his bro­ther James by their father, William,

and James, dy­ing intestate, it had descended to Samuel Overton, his other

son).

5. Daughter - who married John Ragland.

6. Ann Overton m. Dabney Pettus (b. about 1704). They had five

children. (See pp. 92-95)

V. CAPTAIN JAMES OVERTON, b. 8-14-1688, d. 6-18-1748, m. Elizabeth

Garland (Widow Truhart) 1690-1739. Captain James Overton,

Justice of Hanover Co., Captain of Militia (descendants entitled to

membership in Society of Colonial Wars). They had seven children.

VI. Barbara Overton, b. 2-5-1690, d. 10-30-1766, m. 1706 John (or James)

Winston. They lived in Hanover Co., Va., and had two sons. Her will,

dated 10-6-1754, mentions six children of each of these Sons.

1. John Winston, b. 6-9-1724 in Hanover Co., d. 1-23-1772 St.

Paul's Parish, Hanover Co., m. 2-3-1746 Alice Bickerton. They had eleven

children.

2. James Winston, b. about 1725/6, m. Anne Farrell (or Ferrell).

They had eight children. (See pp. 128 through 136 for descendants)

Source: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/HARRIS-COLONIALVA/2003-03/1049043432

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John P Overton's Timeline

1585
July 5, 1585
Essington Manor, Holderness, Yorkshire, England
1606
1606
Age 20
Yorkshire, England
1608
1608
Age 22
England
1608
Age 22
England
1609
1609
Age 23
Easington Manor, Holderness, Yorkshire, England
1610
1610
Age 24
England
1612
1612
Age 26
London, London, , England
1620
1620
Age 34
1650
October 8, 1650
Age 65
Yorkshire,, England
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