John Pease, of Great Baddow & Martha's Vineyard

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John Pease

Nicknames: "John Pease immigrant"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Great Baddow, Essex, England
Death: Died in Edgartown, Dukes, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Unknown
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert (The Locksmith) Pease and Margaret Pease
Husband of Mary Pease; Lucy Pease and Mary Creber
Father of Samuel Pease; James Pease, of Martha's Vineyard; John Pease, of Martha's Vineyard & Norwich; Mary Pease; David Pease and 8 others
Brother of Margaret Pease; William Pease; John Pease; Mary Pease; Elizabeth Page and 3 others

Managed by: Cory Brandon Ewing
Last Updated:

About John Pease

The ship in which John Pease came was bound to Port Penn, in the Delaware, with 140 persons on board; it was in the fall of the year, and they were short of provisions, and sickness prevailed. Owing to a head westerly wind they came to anchor near Stony Point. They landed in a boat at Pease's Point. The Indians came to meet them, holding forth a pine bough to denote their desire for peace. As the whites advanced, the Indians retreated. John Pease, who had on a red coat, took it off, laid it on the ground and made signs for the Sachem to put it on. The Indians approached it with caution, poking it with a stick, until gathering courage the chief put it on, when Pease by signs give him to understand that he gave it to him.

This story was written out fifty years ago, as told to him by the late Capt. Valentine Pease (born 1764). From another source, Rev. David Pease (born 1783), Mr. R. L. Pease was given the same story as told by the widow Susannah (Butler) Pease (born 1777), w^ho "had heard the story from a very aged person of your family." This account will be quoted lateroninthecourseofthischapter. Itisalsostatedbyother members of the Pease family as part of the story, that Obed Pease (born 1743) had talked about a "black book," which mysteriously disappeared in the early days and is supposed to have contained some records bearing upon this question. But of this collateral topic consideration will be given later. It will thus be seen that the legend is one which has its sup- port and origin, probably, among members of the family bearing this name, and unfortunately too, for it thus acquires the coloring of family sentiment and pride in a matter which depends so much upon impartial support for its acceptance. It may be said however that, if true, the descendants of John Pease would be quite as likely as any others to be more familiar with the story.

https://ia600301.us.archive.org/22/items/historyofmarthas01bank/historyofmarthas01bank_bw.pdf

John arrived at Boston, Suffolk Co., MA aboard the 'Francis' in 1634, together with his brother Robert and nephew Robert (age 3). John received land grants in Salem on Jan. 2, 1636/7 and on Apr. 23, 1638. John was absent from Salem in Aug. 1639, and likely had returned to England to bring his mother to America.

John Pease sailed with his brother, Robert, on the ship “Francis” from Ipswich, England on Nov. 1634 and arrived in Boston late 1634.

He lived a troubled life, emigrating to Salem at the age of 17, he married into the Weston Family, which was embroiled with the local authorities over theology. His father in law was banished and later died in prison for his heretical teachings. After Francis Weston died, his wife, Margaret Weston, went mad, and in Jun 1637 was sued with her husband by William Pester for defamation. She accused the pastors of the church of hypocrisy and was in turn accused of disorderly carriage by the church.

Margaret Weston's fanatic beliefs, and carrying on must have been too much for her son-in-law, as it appears he took matters into his own hands. A court record of Nov 03, 1635 in Essex County states: "Ordered that John Pease of Salem shall be whipt and bound to his good behaviour for striking his mother (in-law), Mrs. Weston and deryding of her for dyvers other misdemeanors and other evill carriage."

ON Jun 5, 1638, she was sentenced by the General Court to be set in the bilboes, two hours in Boston,, and two hours in Salem upon a lecture day. She was also a follower of Samuel Gorton, whose religious beliefs differed with those of the authorities and was also banished to Rhode Island. She later became “of hopelessly unsound mind.”

His wife, faced with arrest, was forced to recant shortly before she died in 1644, the year his father-in-law was banished, his mother and brother died and John Pease sold his property in Salem and “fled” to Martha’s Vineyard becoming one of the original settlers.

There he remarried and peaceably raised a second family unttil he joined in the rebellion against the autocratic rule of Governor Mayhew in 1673. In the wake of reprisals by the Governor following his reestablishment of authority,

John Pease left Martha’s Vineyard for the mainland probably for Portsmouth, NH, although it is not known for sure when or where he died.

http://history.vineyard.net/pease.htm

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John Pease came to America in 1634 on the ship Francis with his brother Robert. Margaret Weston's fanatic beliefs, and carrying on must have been too much for her son-in-law, as it appears he took matters into his own hands. A court record of Nov 03, 1635 in Essex County states: "Ordered that John Pease of Salem shall be whipt and bound to his good behaviour for striking his mother (in-law), Mrs. Weston and deryding of her for dyvers other misdemeanors and other evill carriage." In Jan 1637, Salem, John and Robert Pease were issued grants of land, John receiving twenty acres. On Jun 18, 1644, John Pease sold to Richard Ingersoll of Salem "one house and 75 acres of land adjoyning to the fearme wheron the said Richard dwelleth." After that date, he disappears completely from the Essex county and the Salem town records. The next appearance of his name occurs in the records of Edgartown, MA, under date of Mar 23, 1647, when he sold ten acres of land at Mattakeeset to Mister John Bland. On Martha's Vineyard, John owned a house lot of ten acres of upland and two acres of meadow at the north end of the town of Great Harbor. When the home lots were distributed, he drew the first in present day Edgartown at a place now known as Pease's Point, and a street to the south of this land is Pease Point Way. After the sale of his Mattakeeset property in 1647 to John Bland, he moved to Norwich, CT, where he purchased land that he retained until his death, bequeathing it to John Junior. His home lot was bequeathed to son Thomas. John Senior returned to the island before Mar 05, 1653 when he was involved in a land suit. On Nov 07, 1653, he was elected constable, and served on a jury Sep 25, 1677. His will is dated Mar 04, 1674. Excerpts: "...me John Peas, husbandman and inhabitant uppon Martins Vineyard...being now in some measure in good health...am stricken in years and Crasy in respect of what formerly ... give to my Eldest Son James Peas twelve pence...my second son John Peas...all that was given to me at Mohegin, with that frame of a house...(to the rest of the children)...all my landes and houseing that I have upon this land Martins Vineyard to be either equally devided or valued or sold or exchanged and the price thereof Equally devided to everyone of them...my now living wife Mary shall see meet whome I make my full and whole Executrix... and I give unto Mary Peas my wife all my cattle of every sort with all my household goodes whatsoever... in witness hereunto my hand and seal. " The will was witnessed by Thomas Birchard, Kathrin Birchard, and Thomas Trappe.

Note: There is a traditional story with variations of John Pease as follows: About seven to ten years before the 1641 purchase of the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket by Thomas Mayhew of Watertown, MA, a vessel from England on the way to Carolina landed on the island. (Another account was that the boat was headed for Port Penn in the Delaware). The boat anchored at what is now known as Starbuck's Neck near the present site of Edgartown. John Pease, a passenger of the vessel, was in the British Military, and was wearing his uniform which consisted of the traditional red coat. A band of Indians greeted the landing party, and Pease, as a sign of peace, offered the Chief, his coat. The Sachem was so grateful, he offered the new arrivals, a large section of land which now includes Edgartown. While the rest of the passengers continued south, John Pease, William Vinson, Thomas Trapp and Malachi Browning decided to settle on Martha's Vineyard, and built caves for the first winter in a place called Green Hollow. As the settlement grew, and more settlers arrived, John Pease kept all transactions, including the original gift of the land in a book, known as the "Black Book" because of the color of it's cover. When John died, two men went into his house, and stole the book, never to be seen again. The present day town records of Edgartown in preserved books contain dates before the record keeper transcribed them. It is supposed that some of these events were copied from the "Black Book" before it was destroyed. Without the records in the book, the Pease family lost the titles to their land. In 1853, George Cleveland, a farmer was tilling his land, and came upon the ruins of three separate underground rooms that were large enough for living quarters. The ruins were a short distance from the center of Edgartown, and near a road which is now called Pease's Point Way. These sites were supposedly the caves that those mentioned above spent the first winter in. The legend can almost certainly be proven not true because of the dates of the "landing party". Port Penn did not come into existence until after 1682; the early Pease family did not dispute any land claims with any other settler of the island; John Pease himself was in Salem from 1634 until at least 1644, although he may have visited the island after settling in Salem; and there is no evidence that he was in the British military. The earliest settlers of most areas probably did spend at least their first few months in caves or crude shelters, as building lumber was not an available commodity (see John Pease 1.2.1). There were pageants on Martha's Vineyard with scenes of early settler stories put on display by contemporary actors. The "Red Coat" story was one of more popular acts.

http://history.vineyard.net/pease.htm -------------------- John Pease came to America in 1634 on the ship Francis with his brother Robert. Margaret Weston's fanatic beliefs, and carrying on must have been too much for her son-in-law, as it appears he took matters into his own hands. A court record of Nov 03, 1635 in Essex County states: "Ordered that John Pease of Salem shall be whipt and bound to his good behaviour for striking his mother (in-law), Mrs. Weston and deryding of her for dyvers other misdemeanors and other evill carriage." In Jan 1637, Salem, John and Robert Pease were issued grants of land, John receiving twenty acres. On Jun 18, 1644, John Pease sold to Richard Ingersoll of Salem "one house and 75 acres of land adjoyning to the fearme wheron the said Richard dwelleth." After that date, he disappears completely from the Essex county and the Salem town records. The next appearance of his name occurs in the records of Edgartown, MA, under date of Mar 23, 1647, when he sold ten acres of land at Mattakeeset to Mister John Bland. On Martha's Vineyard, John owned a house lot of ten acres of upland and two acres of meadow at the north end of the town of Great Harbor. When the home lots were distributed, he drew the first in present day Edgartown at a place now known as Pease's Point, and a street to the south of this land is Pease Point Way. After the sale of his Mattakeeset property in 1647 to John Bland, he moved to Norwich, CT, where he purchased land that he retained until his death, bequeathing it to John Junior. His home lot was bequeathed to son Thomas. John Senior returned to the island before Mar 05, 1653 when he was involved in a land suit. On Nov 07, 1653, he was elected constable, and served on a jury Sep 25, 1677. His will is dated Mar 04, 1674. Excerpts: "...me John Peas, husbandman and inhabitant uppon Martins Vineyard...being now in some measure in good health...am stricken in years and Crasy in respect of what formerly ... give to my Eldest Son James Peas twelve pence...my second son John Peas...all that was given to me at Mohegin, with that frame of a house...(to the rest of the children)...all my landes and houseing that I have upon this land Martins Vineyard to be either equally devided or valued or sold or exchanged and the price thereof Equally devided to everyone of them...my now living wife Mary shall see meet whome I make my full and whole Executrix... and I give unto Mary Peas my wife all my cattle of every sort with all my household goodes whatsoever... in witness hereunto my hand and seal. " The will was witnessed by Thomas Birchard, Kathrin Birchard, and Thomas Trappe.

Note: There is a traditional story with variations of John Pease as follows: About seven to ten years before the 1641 purchase of the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket by Thomas Mayhew of Watertown, MA, a vessel from England on the way to Carolina landed on the island. (Another account was that the boat was headed for Port Penn in the Delaware). The boat anchored at what is now known as Starbuck's Neck near the present site of Edgartown. John Pease, a passenger of the vessel, was in the British Military, and was wearing his uniform which consisted of the traditional red coat. A band of Indians greeted the landing party, and Pease, as a sign of peace, offered the Chief, his coat. The Sachem was so grateful, he offered the new arrivals, a large section of land which now includes Edgartown. While the rest of the passengers continued south, John Pease, William Vinson, Thomas Trapp and Malachi Browning decided to settle on Martha's Vineyard, and built caves for the first winter in a place called Green Hollow. As the settlement grew, and more settlers arrived, John Pease kept all transactions, including the original gift of the land in a book, known as the "Black Book" because of the color of it's cover. When John died, two men went into his house, and stole the book, never to be seen again. The present day town records of Edgartown in preserved books contain dates before the record keeper transcribed them. It is supposed that some of these events were copied from the "Black Book" before it was destroyed. Without the records in the book, the Pease family lost the titles to their land. In 1853, George Cleveland, a farmer was tilling his land, and came upon the ruins of three separate underground rooms that were large enough for living quarters. The ruins were a short distance from the center of Edgartown, and near a road which is now called Pease's Point Way. These sites were supposedly the caves that those mentioned above spent the first winter in. The legend can almost certainly be proven not true because of the dates of the "landing party". Port Penn did not come into existence until after 1682; the early Pease family did not dispute any land claims with any other settler of the island; John Pease himself was in Salem from 1634 until at least 1644, although he may have visited the island after settling in Salem; and there is no evidence that he was in the British military. The earliest settlers of most areas probably did spend at least their first few months in caves or crude shelters, as building lumber was not an available commodity (see John Pease 1.2.1). There were pageants on Martha's Vineyard with scenes of early settler stories put on display by contemporary actors. The "Red Coat" story was one of more popular acts.

http://history.vineyard.net/pease.htm

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John Pease, of Great Baddow & Martha's Vineyard's Timeline

1608
November 20, 1608
Great Baddow, Essex, England
November 20, 1608
Great Baddow, Essex, England
November 20, 1608
Essex, , England
November 20, 1608
Great Baddow, Essex, England
1634
1634
Age 25
1637
March 15, 1637
Age 28
Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
1637
Age 28
1639
1639
Age 30
Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
1639
Age 30
1643
1643
Age 34