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John Perkins

Birthdate:
Birthplace: England, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Ipswich, Essex County, MA, USA
Place of Burial: Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Perkins, Sr. and Judith Perkins
Husband of Elizabeth Eveleth
Father of Jacob Perkins, Corp.; John Perkins, III; Samuel Perkins, Sr.; Isaac Perkins; Nathaniel Perkins and 7 others
Brother of Elizabeth Sargent (Perkins); Mary Perkins Bradbury, Salem Witch Trials; Thomas Perkins, Reverend / Deacon; Sgt. Jacob Perkins and Lydia Bennett

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Perkins

  1. Emigration: 1 DEC 1630 Bristol, England in the ship Lyon 3
  2. Immigration: 6 FEB 1630/31 Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 3
  3. Event: Moved 1633 from Boston to Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts 1
  4. Residence: BET 6 FEB 1630/31 AND 1633 Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1
  5. Baptism: 14 SEP 1609 Hillmorton, Warwickshire
  6. Reference Number: 42622
  7. Note:
   The Family of John Perkins of Ipswich, by George A Perkins, M.D. lists the following on Part 1, pages 7 through 11:
   The children of John Perkins and his wife Judith were:
   2. John, b. 1614; d. Dec. 14, 1686.
   2. John Perkins, jr. (John1) born in England in1614, came, with others of the same family, to Boston in New England in 1631, and with them removed to Ipswich in 1633. The next year ha had a grant of land, as appears from the book of land grants of Ipswich.
   1634. "Given and granted unto John Perkins, jr., 6 acres of land in equal shares with Thomas Hardy and Francis Jordan lying East and West of him." At this time he was only 20 years of age. The next year he had still further grants, as appears upon the same record.
   1635. "John Perkins, jr., was granted 6 acres of planting ground beyond John Manning's house, lying between Francis Jordan on the one side and Thomas Hardy on the other. Also there was granted to him 6 acres of marsh lying upon the brook commonly called "Labor-in-vain," having Mr. Bartholomew's on the one side and the great river on the other. Also a house-lot containing an acre, lying by the river, having Thomas Hardy's and Robert Andrew's house-lot on the southeast side, upon which John Perkins hath built an house and enclosed it with paleing. Also 5 and 40 acres of ground lying beyond great Chebacco river; right against the Ware, bounded by the river on the northwest and by a swamp on the southwest. - There was liberty granted to build a ware which he hath built and is to enjoy the profits for 7 yrs. beginning 1636, for the which he is to sell alewives he there has taken at 5s per 1000, according to his agreement with the town expressed in the town book, which 5 and 40 acres and the wares the said John Perkins hath sold to Mr. John Cogswell, his heirs and assigns."
   1637. "John Perkins, Jr., is posseded of an Island having on the south side the Chebacco river, on the north an arm of the same running between the said Island and another Island called Hog Island, bounded east by Chebacco Bay, west by a meeting of many brooks coming out of the marshes."
   Feb. 1, 1637. He had also a grant of 70 acres of land against his Island beyond Chebacco river, which land he is to relinquish within four years to the town, if called upon to do so.
   He married Elizabeth ----- about 1635, and entered upon the duties of life with a vigor which made him a desirable citizen of this new settlement.
   We here give some account of a most important service which he rendered the infant colony, as this is related by Rev. Thomas Cobbet in a paper entitled "New England's Deliverances." He says:
   "About 5 or 6 yeares after (an intended attack upon "Nahumkeick" by the Indians), in the first planting of Ipswich (as a credible man informs me, namely Quartermaster Perkins), the Tarratines or Easterly Indians had a design to cut them off at the first, when they had but between 20 or 30 men, old and young belonging to the place (and that instant most of the men had gone into bay about their occasions, not hearing thereof). It was thus in Robin, a friendly Indian, came to this John Perkins, then a young man living in a little hut upon his father's island on this side of Heofrye's Neck, and told him that on such a Thursday morning, early there would come four Indians to draw him to goe down the Hill to the water side, to truck with them, which if he did he and all neare him would be cut off: for their were 40 burchen canoues, would lie out of sight, in the brow of the Hill, full of Armed Indians for that purpose: of this he forthwith acquaints Mr. John Winthrop, who then lived there, in a howse near the water, who advised him if such Indians came, to carry it ruggedly toward them and threaten to shoot them if they would not be gone, and when their backs were turned to strike up the drum he had with him beside his two muskets, and then discharge them; that hose 6 or 8 young men, who were in the marshes hard by a mowing, haveing theyr guns each of then ready charged, by them, might take the Alarme and the Indians would perceive theyr plot was discovered and haste away to sea againe: which was accordingly so acted and tooke like effect: for he told me that presently after he discovered 40 such canowes sheare off from under the Hill and make as fast as they could to sea. And no doubt many godly hearts were lifted up to heaven for deliverance, both in that deliverance at Salem and this at Ipswich.
   He opened the first public house in Ipswich, and was chosen Quartermaster of the military organization of the settlement, a title which he ever after retained. That he was one of the leading men of his day is evident by the frequency with which his name is mentioned in connection with the varied affairs of the colony. In deeds and other public documents and papers he styles himself "I, John Perkins Quartermaster and ordinary keeper."
   We find upon the records of the General Court the following:
   June 1, 1677. "The account of Quartermaster Perkins being exhibbited to ye Gennerall Court by Phillip ffowler; being pervsed, the Court finds many articles too highly charged, and doe therefore referr the consideration thereof to the comittee of the army to examine and passe what they find just and meet to be allowed."
   May 12, 1675. "Quartermaster John Perkins, sargent Belchar, Henry Bennett with several others petition the Genl Court for liberty to lay out a new plantation, which the Court allow, provided it be 6 miles square and not more then 10 long, etc., etc., etc."
   February 16, 1681-2. "Quartermaster John Perkins was one of the first signers of a petition to the King to resist the claims of Robert Mason to a title to lands about Gloucester, Cape Ann and places adjacent."
   He was engaged in the coast fisheries, and used a part of what is Little Neck for curing his fish as early as 1645. County Records, Vol. VIII, p. 61.
   His autograph, here given, was taken from a deed of land given to his son Nathaniel.
   He acquired a large landed property, as numerous purchases and sales of real estate appear upon record. He made no will at his decease, having given to each of his sons a good farm or houselot "in some part of my estates." He also made provision, sometime before his death, for the maintenance and clothing of his wife, if she should outlive him, and also of his youngest son, Thomas, who seems to have been an invalid and incapable of supporting himself, thus administering upon his own estate. The record of his death and that of his aged companion read upon the Town Records thus:
   "Elizabeth, wife to Quart. John Perkins died Sept. 27, 1684."
   "Quart. John Perkins died Decr the 14, 1686."
   His family was quite large, consisting of eight sons and one daughter, and perhaps more.
   The children of Quartr John Perkins and Elizabeth his wife were:
   8. John, b. 1636; m. Lidia; d. 1659.
   9. Abraham, b. 1640; m. Hannah Beamsley; d. 27 Apr., 1722.
   10. Jacob, b. 1646; m. 1st Sarah Wainwright; 2d Sarah Kinsman; d. Nov. 26, 1719.
   11. Luke, b. 1649; m. 1st, Eliz. Jaques; 2d Sarah --; d. after 1694.
   12. Isaac, b. 1650; m. Hannah Knight; d. 1726.
   13. Nathaniel, b. 1652; m. Judith ---.
   14. Samuel, b. 1655; m. Hannah West; d. 1700.
   15. Thomas.
   16. Sarah.

-------------------- John Perkins, jr. (John1} born in England in 1614, came, with others of the same family, to Boston in New England in 1631, and with them removed to Ipswich in 1633. The next year he had a grant of land as appears from the book of land grants of Ipswich.

1634. "Given and granted unto John Perkins, Jr., 6 acres of land in equal shares with Thomas Hardy and Francis Jordan lying East and West of him." At this time he was only 20 years of age. The next year he had still further grants, as appears upon the same record.

1635. "John Perkins, jr., was granted 6 acres of planting ground beyond John Manning's house, tying between Francis Jordan on the one side and Thomas Hardy on the other. Also there was granted to him 6 acres of marsh lying upon the brook commonly called " Labor-in-vain," having Mr. Bartholomew's on the one side and the great river on the other. Also a house-lot containing an acre, lying by the river, having Thomas Hardy's and Robert Andrew's house-lot on the southeast side, upon which John Perkins hath built an house and enclosed it with paleing. Also 5 and 40 acres of ground lying beyond great Chebacco river, right against the Ware, bounded by the river on the northwest and by a swamp on the southwest.— There was liberty granted to build a ware which he hath built and is to enjoy the profits for 7 yrs. beginning 1636, for the which he is to sell alewives he there has taken at 5s pr 1000, according to his agreement with the town expressed in the town book, which 5 and 40 acres and the wares the said John Perkins hath sold to Mr. John Cogswell, his heirs and assigns."

1637. "John Perkins, Jr., is possessed of an Island having on the south side the Chebacco river, on the north an arm of the same running between the said Island and another Island called Hog Island, bounded east by Chebacco Bay, west by a meeting of many brooks coming out of the marshes."

Feb. 1, 1637. He had also a grant of 70 acres of land against his Island beyond Chebacco river, which land he is to relinquish within four years to the town, if called upon to do so.

He married Elizabeth about 1635, and entered upon the duties of life with a vigor which made him a desirable citizen of this new settlement.

We here give some account of a most important service which he rendered the infant colony, as this is related by Rev. Thomas Cobbet in a paper entitled "New England's Deliverances." He says:

"About 5 or 6 yeares after (an intended attack upon "Nahumkeick" by the Indians), in the first planting of Ipswich (as a credible man informs me, namely Quartermaster Perkins), the Tarratines or Easterly Indians had a design to cut them off at the first, when they had but between 20 or 30 men, old and young belonging to the place (and that instant most of the men had gone into bay about their occasions, not hearing thereof). It was thus one Robin, a friendly Indian, came to this John Perkins, then a young man then living in a little hut upon his father's island on this side of Jeofrye's Neck, and told him that on such a Thursday morning, early, there would come four Indians to draw him to goe down the Hill to the water side, to truck with them, which if he did, he and all neare him would be cut oft': for there were 40 bur- chen canoues, would lie out of sight, in the brow of the Hill, full of Armed Indians for that purpose : of this he forthwith acquaints Mr. John Winthrop, who then lived there, in a bowse near the water, who advised him if such Indians came, to carry it ruggedly toward them, and threaten to shoot them if they would not be gone, and when their backs were turned to strike up the drum he had with him beside his two muskets, and then discharge them; that those 6 or 8 young men, who were in the marshes hard by a mowing, haveing theyr guns each of them ready charged, by them, might take the Alarme and the Indians would perceive theyr plot was discovered and haste away to sea againe : which was accordingly so acted and tooke like effect: for he told me that presently after he discovered 40 such canowcs sheare off from under the Hill and make as fast as they could to sea. And no doubt many godly hearts were lifted up to heaven for deliverance, both in that deliverance at Salem and this at Ipswich."

He opened the first public house in Ipswich, and was chosen as Quartermaster of the military organization of the settlement, a title which he ever after retained. That he was one of the leading men of his day is evident by the frequency with which his name is mentioned in connection with the varied affairs of the colony. In deeds and other public documents and papers he styles himself, "I, John Perkins Quartermaster and ordinary keeper." We find upon the records of the General Court the following:

June 1, 1677. "The account of Quartermaster Perkins being exhibbited to ye Gennerall Court by Phillip ffowler, being pervsed, the Court finds many articles too highly chardged, and doe therefore referr the consideration thereof to the comittee of the army to examine and passe what they find just and meet to be allowed."

May 12, 1675. "Quartermaster John Perkins, sargent Belchar, Henry Bennett with several others petition the Gen1 Court for liberty to lay out a new plantation, which the Court allow, provided it be 6 miles square and not more than 10 long, etc., etc., etc."

February 16, 1681-2. "Quartermaster John Perkins was one of the first signers of a petition to the King to resist the claims of Robert Mason to a title to lands about Gloucester, Cape Ann and places adjacent."

He was engaged in the coast fisheries, and used a part of what is Little Neck for curing his fish as early as 1645.

He acquired a large landed property, as numerous purchases and sales of real estate appear upon record. He made no will at his decease, having given to each of his sons a good farm or houselot " in some part of my estates." He also made provision, sometime before his death, for the maintenance and clothing of his wife, if she should outlive him, and also of his youngest son, Thomas, who seems to have been an invalid and incapable of supporting himself, thus administering upon his own estate. The record of his death and that of his aged companion read upon the Town Records thus:

"Elizabeth, wife to Quart. John Perkins died Sept. 27, 1684."

" Quart. John Perkins died Dec. the 14, 1686."

His family was quite large, consisting of eight sons and one daughter, and perhaps more.

The children of Quartr John Perkins and Elizabeth, his wife, were:

8 John, b. 1636; m. Lidia; d. 1659.

9 Abraham, b. 1640; m. Haunah Beamsley; d. 27 Apr., 1722.

10 Jacob, b. 1646; m. 1st, Sarah Wainwright; 2d, Sarah Kinsman; d. Nov. 26, 1719.

11 Luke, b. 1649; m. 1st, Eliz. Jaques; 2d, Sarah ; d. after 1694.

12 Isaae, b. 1650; m. Hannah Knight; d. 1726.

13 Nathaniel, b. 1652; in. Judith .

14 Samuel, b. 1655; m. Hannah West; d. 1700.

15 Thomas.

16 Sarah.

From: Essex Institute historical collections

By Essex Institute, Peabody Essex Museum

Published by Essex Institute Press, 1882

view all 33

John Perkins's Timeline

1608
November 8, 1608
Hillmorton, Warws, Eng
November 8, 1608
Hillmorton, Warws, Eng
November 8, 1608
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
November 8, 1608
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
November 8, 1608
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
1609
September 14, 1609
England, United Kingdom
September 14, 1609
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
November 8, 1609
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England
November 8, 1609
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
November 8, 1609
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom