John Perkins, Sr. (1583 - 1654) MP

‹ Back to Perkins surname

Is your surname Perkins?

Research the Perkins family

John Perkins, Sr.'s Geni Profile

Records for John Perkins

4,010,642 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Nicknames: "John Immigrant Perkins Sr", "Issache Perkyns"
Birthplace: Newent, Gloucestershire, , England, Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England
Death: Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
Occupation: Arrived in Boston MA 1631, Baptized: 12-23-1583
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About John Perkins, Sr.

John Perkins, of Ipswich

  • Birth & Baptism: 1583 in Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England[9,10] and was baptized there on 23 December 1583.
  • Death: in Ipswich, Essex co., MA sometime between 28 March 1654, when he wrote his will, and 26 September 1654, when that will was probated; he was 71[8,10].
  • Parents: Henry Perkins, Elizabeth Sawbridge
  • Married: Judith Gater

From Find A Grave Memorial# 35398230:

John Perkins emigrated on 1-Dec-1630 from Bristol, Somerset, England; aboard the ship "Lyon." He immigrated on 5-Feb-1631. On 18-May-1631 John Perkins was listed as a freeman. He held the position of commitiee member to set the bounds of Roxbury and Dorchester on 7-Nov-1632. He was granted forty acres in 1634 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was granted three acres of upland; ten acres of meadow; an island at More's Point; ten acres where "he hath built a house"; six acres of meadow; six acres of upland in 1635 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was granted forty acres in 1636 at Chebacco-Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He held the position of Deputy to the General Court for Ipswich on 25-May-1636. He was granted six acres of plowland in 1639. He served on the Essex grand jury on 24-Dec-1641. He served on the Essex grand jury on 26-Sep-1648. On 26-Mar-1650 Being above sixty years old, is freed from ordinary training. He served on the Essex grand jury on 28-Sep-1652. He left a will on 28-Mar-1654 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

"John Perkines the Elder of Ipswich being at this time sick and weak in body" bequeathed to "my eldest son John Perkines a foal...also...to my son John's two sons John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heifers"; to "my son Thomas Perkines one cow and one heifer also...to his son John Perkines one ewe"; to my daughter Elizabeth Sargeant one cow and a heifer to be to her and here children after her decease"; to "my daughter Mary Bradley one cow and one heifer or a young steer...to her & to her children"; to "my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heifer or steer...to her children"; to "my grandchild Thomas Bradley one ewe"; to "my son Jacob Perkines my dwelling house together with all the outhousing and all my lands...according to a former covenant, after the decease of my wifte"; residue "to my dear wife Judith Perkines" sole executrix, "as also to dispose of some of the increase to children of my son Thomas and of my three daughters" at here direction.

The Inventory of his estate totalled £250 5s, including real estate valued at £132: "the dwelling house and the barn with outhousing," £40 60s "land about the house about 80 acres "more land unbroke up about 14 acres," £21; "a parcel of marsh about 6 acres," £12; "a parcel of upland and marsh being much broken about twenty acres," £20; "twelve acres of improved land," £24.

Links

--------------------

Left England in December 1630 for New England.

Arrived in New England 5 Feb 1631 with Roger Williams at Ipswich, Massachusetts.

John Perkins (son of Henry and Elizabeth Perkins) came on the Lyon, which left England on December 1, 1630, and arrived on February 5, 1631. Their voyage was described as tempestuous. John is listed as coming from Hilmorton, Warwickshire, England with his wife, Judith Gator.

Passenger listing:

John Perkins of Hilmorton, Warwick, going to Boston.

  • .....Mrs. Judith Perkins
  • .....John Perkins [b. 1614]*
  • .....Elizabeth Perkins [1610]
  • .....Mary Perkins [b. 1615]
  • .....Thomas Perkins [b. 1616]
  • .....Jacob Perkins [b. 1624](Passengers and Ships -1631)

John Perkins of Ipswich, Massachusetts was christened December 23, 1583 in Hillborough, Warwickshire, England. He emigrated from England to New England. John died on September 20, 1654, in Ipswich, Essex County, Massashusetts. John married Judith Gates/Gator on October 9, 1608, in Hillmorton. Judith was born on March 19, 1588, in Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England. Her parents were Michael Gater and Isabel Bailey. Judith Elizabeth died in 1684 in Ipswich. John and Judith's daughter, Mary Perkins, was accused as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692. John was a freeman in May 1631. In 1633, he was a settler in Ipswich, MA. John's will was witnessed by William Bartholomew of Ipswich. John was a representative of the General Court in 1636. John owned a large island at the mouth of the Ipswich River, called "Perkin's Island." In 1856, this island was still owned by the Perkins Family. His house was near Manning's neck and close to the Ipswich river.

John's will was dated March 38, 1654, and was proven September 1654. His estate was valued at 250 pounds, 5 shillings.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Alternate birth listing mentioned: Hillmorton, Warw., England

---------------------------------

------------------------------------

Hillmorton is about two miles from Rugby, near that point on the map where the three counties of Warwick, Northampton and Leicester come together. Some six miles to the north lies the parish of Cotesback, leicestershire, for where two sons of the parons?, Henry Dillingham, emigrated to New England, their father probably having Puritan leanings, while at Claybrooke, in the same neighborhood, preached John Higginson who left England in 1629 and became the first minister of Salem's congregation. Possibly, John Perkins came under the influence of one or the other of these nonconformist parsons. With five of their children Jon and Judith Perkins sailed from Bristol on 1 December 1630, on the Lyon William Pierce, master, one of their fellow passengers being the famous Roger williams. After a stormy voyage of sixty-seven days, during which one seaman was lost, the Lyyon made land at Nantasket on 5 February 1630/1, and entered Boston harbor the next day, the provisions with which the ship was loaded saving the colony from rapidly approaching famine.

John Perkins and Judith his wife were admitted to the Boston church as members #107 and #108 and John was admitted freeman 18 May 1631.

The Perkins family remained in Boston for over two years before joining the settlers who under the leadership of the younger John Winthrop went up the coast in 1633 to found a town at Agawan, soon to be named Ipswich, having joined the Boston church, John was sworn Freeman on 18 May 1631, and in 1632 he served on a committee to fix a boundary between Roxbury and dorchester. John Perkins was a man of forty-nine in 1632 and his son John was twenty-teo, so it is possible that young John was the man named in the order of the General Court on 3 april 1632: It was ordered thatno person whatsoever shall shoot at fowl upon Pullen Point or Noddle's Island but that said places shall be redserved for John Perkins to take fowl with nets. In Ipswich Perkins haf various ;and grants. In 1634 he was given 40 acres and in 1635, 3 acres of upland and 10 acres of meadow lying toward the head of Chebacco creek, also a little island of about 50 acres called More's point on the south side of the town river. 1635 he had 10 acres on part whereof he hath built a house and 6 acres of meadow and 6 acres of upland adjoining the house lot. In 1636 he was granted 40 acres oat Chebacco which he sold to Thomas Howlett in 1637, and in 1639 planting ground of 6 acres on the south side of the river.

Besides holding town offices he was the Ipswich Representative in the General Court of Massachusets Bay in 1636 and a grand juryman in 1641, 1648 and 1652. John Perkins, Sr., being abopve 60 years of age was freed from training in March 1649/50.

John Perkins the elder made his will 28 mar 1654 and it was proved on the following September 27. He divided his cattle, horses and sheep between his son John, John's two sons John and Abraham, his son Thomas and Thomas' son John, his daughter Elizabeth Sargent and her children, his daughter Mary Bradbury and her children, his daughter Lydia Bennett and her children and his grandson Thomas Bradbury. To his son Jacob, his dwelling-house, the outhousing and all his lands and improvements thereon, according to a former covenant, bur after the death of his wife and not before. Residue to his dear wife Judith Perkins, the sole executrix. Witnesses: William Bartholomew, Thomas Harris. The inventory, mostly of real estate was in the sum of 250 pounds 5s.

Estate of John Perkins, Sr. of Ipswich Essex Probate Docket # 21337 28th of ye mo called March, 1654.

I Joh Perkins the elder of Ipswich being at this tyme sick and weake in body yet through the mercy and goodness of the Lord retaining my understanding and memory: doe thus dispose of and bequeath my temporall estate as Followeth.

First. I do give and bequeath unto my eldest sonn John Perkins a foale of my young mare being now with foale it it pleases the Lord she foale it well also I give and bequeath to my sonn John's two sonnes John And Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heyfers: also I give an bequeath to my son Thomas Perkins one ow and one heyfer also I give and bequeath to his son John Perkins one ewe and to be delivered for his use at the next shearing time also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Sargent one cow and an heyfer tobe to her and her children after her decease as it may please ye Lord they may increase, the proffits or increase to be equally devided amongst the sayde children: also I do give to my daughter Mary Bradbury one cow and one heyfer for a young steere to remain to her and to her children in theyr increase or proffits as it shall please the Lord to bless them and to be equally devided to ye children: also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heyfer or steere to be equally devided to her children in theyr increase or proffits after her decease; I doe give unto my grandchilde Thomas Bradbury one ewe to be sett apart for his unse at ye next shearing tyme: also I do give and bequeathe unto my sonn Jacob Perkins my dwelling house together with all the outhowseing and all my landes of one kinde and other together with all improvements thereupon to be his in full possession according to a former covenant after the decease of my wyfe and nott before and so to remaine to him and to his heires forever; all the rest of my estate of one kinde and other I do wholy leave my deare wife Judith Perkins apointin and ordaining my sade wyfe the sole Executrix of this my last will and Testament Desiring my sayde wife to dispose of the cattell above mentioned according to her discretion as they shall prove steeres or heyfers, also to dispose of some of the increase of the sheep to ye children of my sonn Thomas and of my three daughters at the Discresion of my sayde wife and this I doe ordaine as my Last will and Testament subscribed with my own hand this twenty eight day of ye first month 1654.

John Perkins (signed)

Signed in presence of William Barthomew Thomas Harris

Proved in court held at Ipswich 27 (7) 1654 by the oath of William Bartholmew and Thomas Harris per me Robert Lord, cleric

Information obtained 19 Nov 2003 from Ancestry.com as listed by Mary Beth Wheeler <mb@thewheelers.com>. This note added 24 Mar 2004

--------------------

http://kristinhall.org/fambly/Perkins/JohnPerkins2.html

--------------------

Baptism: 23 DEC 1583 Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England

Immigration: 1631

Settled in "Ipswitch, Massachusetts" Misc AFT 5 FEB 1631 Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts

Sailed from England in the ship "Lion" with wife Judith Gater and daughter Elizabeth. Misc 11 DEC 1630 England

Arrived in Nantasket and next day anchored before Boston Misc 5 FEB 1631 New England Freeman Misc 18 May 1631

ORIGIN: Hillmorton, Warwickshire

MIGRATION: 1631 on first trip of the "Lyon"

FIRST RESIDENCE: Boston

REMOVES: Ipswich 1633 Church MaineMBERSHIP: "John Perkins and Judith his wife" were admitted to Boston church as members #107 and #108 (this would be in early 1631) [ BChR 14].

FREEMassachusettsN: 18 May 1631 [ MBCR 1:366].

EDUCATION: He made his mark to his will.

OFFICES: Deputy to General Court for Ipswich, 25 May 1636 [ MBCR 1:174]. Committee to set the bounds of Roxbury and Dorchester, 7 November 1632 [ MBCR 1:102]. Essex grand jury, 28 [December] 1641, 26 September 1648, 28 September 1652 [ EQC 1:37, 145, 260]. On 26 March 1650 "John Perkins Sr., being above sixty years old, is freed from ordinary training" [ EQC 1:187].

ESTATE: He had Ipswich land grants: forty acres in 1634, three acres of upland; ten acres of meadow; an island at More's Point; ten acres where "he hath built a house"; six acres of meadow; six acres of upland in 1635, and forty acres at Chebacco in 1636, and six acres of plowland in 1639 [ Dudley Wildes Anc 88]. On 10 December 1644 "John Perkins of Ipswich in America" and Thomas Perkins exchanged land in Ipswich [ ILR 3:1, 4:268].

In his will, dated 28 March 1654 and proved 26 September 1654, "John Perkines the Elder of Ipswich being at this time sick and weak in body" bequeathed to "my eldest son John Perkines a foal ... also ... to my son John's two sons John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heifers"; to "my son Thomas Perkines one cow and one heifer also ... to his son John Perkines one ewe"; to "my daughter Elizabeth Sarjeant one cow and a heifer to be to her and her children after her decease"; to "my daughter Mary Bradbery one cow and one heifer or a young steer ... to her & to her children"; to "my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heifer or steer ... to her children"; to "my grandchild Thomas Bradbery one ewe"; to "my son Jacob Perkines my dwelling house together with all the outhousing and all my lands ... according to a former covenant, after the decease of my wife"; residue "to my dear wife Judeth Perkines" sole executrix, "as also to dispose of some of the increase to children of my son Thomas and of my three daughters" at her discretion [ EPR 1:190-91]. The inventory of John Perkins was undated but totalled Ð250 5s., including real estate valued at Ð132: "the dwelling house and barn with out housing," Ð40 60s. [sic]; "land about the house about eight acres," Ð12; "more land unbroke up about fourteen acres," Ð21; "a parcel of marsh about six acres," Ð12; "a parcel of upland and marsh being much broken about twenty acres," Ð20; "twelve acres of improved land," Ð24 [ EPR 1:191].

BIRTH: Baptized Hillmorton, Warwickshire, 23 December 1583, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Sawbridge) Perkins [ Dudley Wildes Anc 87].

DEATH: Ipswich "1654 aged sixty four years" between 28 March 1654 (date of will) and 26 September 1654 (probate of will).

Marraige: Hillmorton 8 October 1608 Judith Gater, baptized Hillmorton 19 March 1588/9, daughter of Michael Gater [ Dudley Wildes Anc 87].

ASSOCIATIONS: Walter Goodwin Davis discusses the possibility that Isaac Perkins of Ipswich was a close relative [ Dudley Wildes Anc 89].

COMMaineNTS: On 3 April 1632 a Court of Assistants ordered "that no person whatsoever shall shoot at fowl upon Pullen Poynte or Noddle's Ileland, but that the said places shall be reserved for John Perkins to take fowl with nets" [ MBCR 1:94].

In the 1 April 1633 list of men authorized by the court to begin the settlement of Ipswich, the eighth name is "William Perkins" [ MBCR 1:103], which must be an error for this John Perkins, inasmuch as WILLIAM PERKINS was at Roxbury at this time, and would not move to Essex County for nearly two decades more.

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1959 Walter Goodwin Davis published the English origin of John Perkins and his wife, and pushed the Perkins ancestry back to 1475 [ Dudley Wildes Anc 81-90].[349362.ged]

REFN11466

!NOTE: Mary Walton Ferris, Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines; ; Milwaukee: privately printed, 1943; Vol. 1, p. 484; ; John Perkins said to have come from Hillmorton, co. Warwick with his wife, Judith and their children John, Eliza beth, Mary, Thomas and Jacob came to New England in the famous 'Lyon' with its more famous master, William Peirce sailing from Bristol on December 1, 1630, and arriving at Boston on February 5, 1630-1.... It is rather interesting to n ote that when Mr. William B. Weeden was writing his 'Economic and Social Histo ry of New England,' of all the families resident there in the mid-seventeenth century he chose the family and inventory of John Perkins as a symbol of the s imple but 'typical household economy.'

!CHRISTENING: Walter Goodwin Davis, The Ancestry of Dudley Wildes, 1759-1820; ; ; ; , Family History Library, Salt La ke City

!DEATH: Mary Walton Ferris, Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines; ; Milwaukee:p rivately printed, 1943; Vol. 1, p. 485; ; The will of John was proved on Septe mber 27, 1654, so his death had occurred at Ipswich between March 28 and Septe mber 27 when he was sixty fourt to seventy-one years old.

!MARRIAGE:Walter Go odwin Davis, The Ancestry of Dudley Wildes, 1759-1820; ; ; ; , Family History Library, Salt Lake City

--------------------

John Perkins emigrated on 1-Dec-1630 from Bristol, Somerset, England; aboard the ship "Lyon." He immigrated on 5-Feb-1631. On 18-May-1631 John Perkins was listed as a freeman. He held the position of committee member to set the bounds of Roxbury and Dorchester on 7-Nov-1632. He was granted forty acres in 1634 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was granted three acres of upland; ten acres of meadow; an island at More's Point; ten acres where "he hath built a house"; six acres of meadow; six acres of upland in 1635 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was granted forty acres in 1636 at Chebacco-Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He held the position of Deputy to the General Court for Ipswich on 25-May-1636. He was granted six acres of plowland in 1639. He served on the Essex grand jury on 24-Dec-1641. He served on the Essex grand jury on 26-Sep-1648. On 26-Mar-1650 Being above sixty years old, is freed from ordinary training.

He served on the Essex grand jury on 28-Sep-1652. He left a will on 28-Mar-1654 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

"John Perkines the Elder of Ipswich being at this time sick and weak in body" bequeathed to "my eldest son John Perkines a foal...also...to my son John's two sons John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heifers"; to "my son Thomas Perkines one cow and one heifer also...to his son John Perkines one ewe"; to my daughter Elizabeth Sargeant one cow and a heifer to be to her and here children after her decease"; to "my daughter Mary Bradley one cow and one heifer or a young steer...to her & to her children"; to "my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heifer or steer...to her children"; to "my grandchild Thomas Bradley one ewe"; to "my son Jacob Perkines my dwelling house together with all the outhousing and all my lands...according to a former covenant, after the decease of my wifte"; residue "to my dear wife Judith Perkines" sole executrix, "as also to dispose of some of the increase to children of my son Thomas and of my three daughters" at here direction.

The Inventory of his estate totalled £250 5s, including real estate valued at £132: "the dwelling house and the barn with outhousing," £40 60s "land about the house about 80 acres "more land unbroke up about 14 acres," £21; "a parcel of marsh about 6 acres," £12; "a parcel of upland and marsh being much broken about twenty acres," £20; "twelve acres of improved land," £24.

http://www.conovergenealogy.com/ancestor-p/p165.htm#i218518 less

--------------------

Emigration: 12 JAN 1629/30 Bristol, England on ship, "LYON" Immigration: 2 MAY 1631 Nantasket, Maine on ship, "LYON"

______

The Family of John Perkins of Ipswich, by George A Perkins, M.D. lists the following on Part 1, pages 1 through 7:

1. "John Perkins, senior," as he is called on the records, the immigrant ancestor, some of whose descendants we propose to give below, was probably born, if the traditions of the family are correct, in Newent, Gloucestershire, England, in the year 1590. He was among the earliest emigrants from the mother country, sailing from Bristol, England, Dec. 1, 1630, in the ship Lyon, William Pierce, master, bound for Boston in America, taking with him his entire family, consisting then of his wife and five children. His fellow passengers were, the afterward famous divine, Rev. Roger Williams, and others; twenty in all. After a stormy passage of sixty-seven days they arrived in Nantasket, Feb. 5, 1631, and on the 6th came to an anchor before Boston. The following extract from "Prince's Annals of New England" (Vol. I, p. 341) gives a graphic account of the condition of the colony at the time of their arrival and also of their stormy voyage.

"As the winter (1629-30) came on provisions are very scarce (in the Massachusetts Bay) and the people necessitated to feed on clams and muscles, and ground nuts and acorns; and these got with much difficulty in the winter season. Upon which people grew much tired and discouraged; especially when they hear that the governor himself has his last batch of bread in the oven. And many are the fears of the people that Mr. Pierce, who was sent to Ireland for provisions, is either cast away or taken by the pirates. Upon this a day of fasting and prayer to God for relief is appointed (to be on the sixth of February). But God, who delights to appear in the greatest straits, works marvellously at this time; for on February 5, the very day before the appointed fast, in came the ship Lion, Mr. William Pierce master, now arriving at Nantasket, laden with provisions. Upon which joyful occasion the day changed, and ordered to be kept (on the 22d) as a day of thanksgiving."[1]

February 8. The governor goes aboard the Lion riding at Long Island; (next day) the ship comes to an anchor before Boston (to the great joy of the people) where she rides very well, notwithstanding the great drifts of ice. And the provisions are by the governor, distributed to the people proportionable to their necessities."

"The Lion[2] (had) set sail from Bristol December first, brought about twenty passengers, and had a very stormy passage; yet through God's mercy all the people came safe except one[3] of the sailors, who had not far from our shore, in a tempest having helped to take in the spritsail, as he was coming down fell into the sea, where after long swimming was drowned, to the great dolour of those in the ship, who beheld so lamentable a spectacle, without being able to help him; the sea was so high and the ship drove so fast before the wind though her sails were taken down."

For about two years after their arrival in America the Perkins family resided in Boston, where the youngest child, Lydia was born, her baptism being recorded upon the parish books of the First Church there, June 3, 1632.

We are not able to determine with certainty just what employed the time of our ancestor during the two years he resided in Boston, but the record shows he was not idle, but engaged in the public business of the colony.

The following extract is from the Records of the General Court, Nov. 7, 1632. "Capt Traske, Willm Cheeseboro, Mr Conant and John Perkins are appoincted by the Court to sett downe the bounds betwixt Rocksbury and Dorchestr. Ralfe Sprague is chosen vmpire." Records of Col. Mass. Bay, Vol. 1, p. 102.

We also find the following concession made to him by the "General Court," April 3, 1632. "It was ordered that noe pson w'soeuer shall shoote att fowle vpon Pullen Poynte or Noddles Ileland, but that the sd places shalbe reserved for John Perkins to take fowle wth neets." Rec. of Col. Mass. Bay, Vol. 1, p. 103. On the 18th of May, 1631, he took the oath of freeman, admitting him to all civil rights of the colony. He removed from Boston in 1633 to the colony then newly founded by John Winthrop and others at Ipswich. Here he was largely engaged in agriculture, and had several grants of land; the location of his house was near the river; at the entrance to Jeffries neck, on what is now East street, where he had considerable land granted him. We copy the following from Ipswich book of Land Grants or "Commoner's" records."

1634. "Given and granted unto John Perkins the elder 40 acres of land, more or less, bounded on the east by Mr. Robert Coles his land, on the south by a small creek, on the west unto ye town side."

1635. Granted Jno. Perkins Sr. 3 acres of upland and 10 meadow lying toward the head of Chebacco creek, also a little island[4] called More's point about 50 acres on the south side of ye town river. Also 10 acres on part whereof he hath built an house, having Wm Perkins on S. W. -- Also 6 acres of meadow and 6 upland joining to the former 10 acres, all 3 lying at east end of the town having Wm White's land on N.E. and a highway to Jeffries neck on N.W."

1636. "John Perkins Sr. was granted 40 acres of meadow and upland at Chebacco, which he sold to Thomas Howlet 1637."

1639. "Granted to John Perkins 6 acres planting ground on South side river." Vol. 1, p. 174. He was a Deputy to the General Court and was among those present at its session holden in Boston May 25, 1636.

John Perkins was on the Grand Jury in 1648 and 1652, and his name is also found on trial juries. He was appraiser to the estate of Sarah Dillingham in 1645, and his autograph, as such, is here given. "John Perkins, sen., of Ipswich, being above 60 years of age, was freed from ordinary training by the Court in March, 1650."

John Perkins, besides holding town offices and occupying other places of trust, appears to have been one of the leading men of Ipswich, and was highly esteemed by his fellow townsmen. He died in 1654 at the age of 64 years. His will (which is of importance as settling the names of his wife and children and some of his grandchildren) and inventory are now on file in the Probate Office on Salem; a copy of each is given below, as also of his autograph which is appended to an agreement with is neighbors concerning the fencing of their land. An indorsement on the back of this paper reads thus: "This Paper Dos signifi yt those prsonsyt have land in ye nack are compeled to mack safisant fens acor Ding to yer proportions of land."* 15 February 1635

[1] This may have been the beginning of that now general custom of keeping Thanksgiving day, which is observed not only in New England but throughout the country.

[2] Sometimes written Lyon.

[3] The Captain's son, Way.

[4] This Island contains by measurement 30 acres, upon it is now seen the cellar of a house. The Island has been lately (1882) purchased by a namesake and descendant of John Perkins, Sen., - Mr. John Perkins, shoe manufacturer of Ipswich.

  • This signature resembles that of Quartermaster John Perkins, and may have been his, when younger.

"Will of John Perkins, senior, of Ipswich 28th of yee first mo called March, 1654. I John Perkins the elder of Ipswich being at his tyme sick and weake in body yet through the mercy and goodness of the Lord retaining my understanding and memory: doe thus dispose of and bequeath my temporall estate as Followeth: First. I do give and bequeath unto my eldest soon John Perkins a foale of my young mare being now with foale if it please the Lord she foale it well also I give and bequeath to my sonn John's two sonnes John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heyfers; also I give and bequeath to my son Thomas Perkins one cow and one heyfer also I give and bequeath to his son John Perkins one ewe & to be delievered for his use at the next shearing time also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Sargent one cow and an heyfer to be to her and her children after her decease as it may please ye Lord they may increase, the proffits or increase to be equally devided amongst the sayde children; also I do give to my daughter Mary Bradbury one cow and one heyfer or a young steere to remain to her and to her children in theyr increase or proffits as it shall please the Lord to bless them and to be equaly devided to ye children: also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heyfer or steere to be equally devided to her children in theyr increase or proffits after her decease; I doe also give unto my grandchilde Thomas Bradbury one ewe to be sett apart for his use at ye next shearing tyme: also I do give and bequeathe unto my sonn Jacob Perkins my dwelling house together with all the outhowseing and all my landes of one kinde and other together with all improvements thereupon to be his in full possession according to a former covenant after the decease of my wyfe and nott before and so to remaine to him and to his heires forever; all the rest of my estate of one kinde or other I do wholy leave my deare wife Judith Perkins apointing and ordaining my sade wyfe the sole Executrix of this my last will and Testament Desiring my sayde wife to dispose of the cattel above mentioned according to her discresion as they shall prove steeres or heyfers, also to dispose of some of the increase of the sheep to ye children of my sonn Thomas and of my three daughters at the Discresion of my sayde wife and this I doe ordaine as my Last Will and Testament subscribed with my own hand this twenty eight day of ye first month 1654. Signed in presence ofJohn Perkins William Bartholmew Thomas Harris Proved in court held at Ipswich 27 (7) 1654 by the oath of William Bartholmew and Thomas Harris per meRobert Lord, cleric."

"An Inventory of the Estate of John Perkins Senior deceased. It. the Dwelling house and barn with outhousing40.00.00 It. Land about the House about eight acres12.00.00 It. More land unbroake up about fourteen acres21.00.00 It. a parcel of Marsh about six at 40s per acres12.00.00 It. a parcel of upland and Marsh being much broken about 20 acres at 20s per acre20.00.00 It. 12 acres of improved land 50 per acre.24.00.00 It. one mare with a mare foal at25.00.00 It. six milch cows at30.00.00 It. four yearling Heyfers and a Steere at11.10.00 Item six ewes at 35s10.10.00 It. 5 ewe lambs at05.00.00 It. one yearling weather and two weather lambs02.00.00 It. one young Calf00.15.00 It. one cow at the pasture a sow & 3 piggs all08.00.00 It. one feather bed with bed & furniture04.00.00 It. Coverlid with other small thinges linen most02.10.00 It. left in mony at his decease10.00.00 It a Cart, plows, a harrow with several goods of lumber as casks tubbs cheares axes hoes etc. valuable05.00.00 It. Severall ketles pottes & Dishes in the Kitchin02.00.00 It his wearing aparell05.00.00

_______

250.05.00 Witnesses & Appraisers William Bartholmewred in the Court held at Ipswich the Jahn Anable26 of the (7) 1654. Robert Lord cleric."

The children of John Perkins and his wife Judith were: 2. John, b. 1614; d. Dec. 14, 1686. 3. Thomas, b. 1616; d. May 7, 1686. 4. Elizabeth, b. 1618; d. 1700. 5. Mary, b. 1620; d. 1700. 6. Jacob, b. 1624; d. Jan. 29, 1700. 7. Lydia, b.1632; d. ab' 1672; bapt. 1st Ch., Boston, June 3, 1632.

______

John Perkins grew up in Hillmorton, England, as had a t least four generations Of his Perkins ancestors before him. John and Judith lived in the parish Of Hillmorton where six Of their children were born and baptized. On 1 December 1630, the Perkins family Of father, mother, and fiv e children (one child having died young) set sail from Bristol, England, on t he ship LION (LYON), William Peirce, Master. (This ship was famous in the hist ory Of the early emigration to Massachusetts, and her Master was equally note d for his skillful seamanship and his sympathy with the policy Of the Purita n leaders. In 1630, 1631 and 1632 she made four voyages hither in quick suc cession under his command with the regularity and safety Of a ferry, and on o ne Of them saved the settlement from starvation and death by her timely arr ival with provisions and anti-scorbutics.) After a stormy passage Of 67 days, the ship arrived off Nantasket, MA, on 5 Feb. 1630/1, and the next day sailed on to anchor at Boston, MA. John and Judith were among the group that formed the First Church Of Boston, at Charlestown, MA. John took the oath Of "freema n" in Boston, MA, on 18 May 1631. From the records Of the Colony Of Massachu setts Bay on 3 April 1632, "It was ordered that noe pson wtsoever shall shoot e att fowle upon Pullen Poyntte or Noddles Ileland, but that sd places shalbe reserved for John Perkins to take fowle with netts." Later, on 7 Nov. 1632, he was one Of four persons, "appointed by the Court to sett downe the bounds betwixt Rocksbury and Dorchester." John and his family had lived in Boston, MA, for about two years when they moved to Ipswich, MA, where he had been gra nted some 40 acres Of land. He built his house near the river at the entrance to Jeffrie's neck and later received several additional grants Of land. Joh n and his wife Judith (Gater) Perkins had seven children, all except Lydia bo rn in Hillmorton, England: John, Jr., bpt. 8 Nov. 1609; m. Elizabeth -----. He received land in Ipswich, MA, in 1634 and opened the first public house in I pswich. Elizabeth, bpt. 3 March 1611/2; m. William Sargent Of Salisbury, MA. Mary, bpt. 3 Sept. 1615; m. Thomas Bradbury. Ann, bpt. 5 Sept. 1617; d. young, in England. Thomas, bpt. 28 April 1622; m. Phebe Gould. Jacob, bpt. 12 Sept. 1624; m. (1) Elizabeth Whipple; m. (2) Damaris Robinson, widow Of Nathaniel Robinson. Lydia, b. in Boston, MA; bpt. at First Church, 3 June 1632; m. Henry Bennet. (Above © Edward K. & Mildred True, and James D. True) John Perkins was born 23 Dec 1583 in Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England and was christened 23 Dec 1583 in St. John The Baptist Church, Hillmorton, Warwickshire, Englan d. He died 26 Sept 1654 in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He left Bri stol, England on Dec 1, 1630 on the ship "Lyon", William Pierce, master, sett ing sail for Boston, in the Americas, taking with him his entire family, at t he time, consisting then Of his wife and five children. In 1630, John Winthr op, Sr., governor Of the Massachusetts Bay Colony moved with settlers from Sa lem and founded Boston on the Charles River with about 800 people. Conditions were rough in the winter Of 1630-31, an idea Of the condition Of the colony may be gained by the following account in Prince's ANNALS OF NEW ENGLAND (Vol ume 1, page 341). "As the winter came on, provisions are very scarce and the p eople necessitated to feed on clams and mussels, and on ground nuts and acorn s; and these got with much difficulty in the winter. Upon which people beca me much tired and discouraged; especially when they hear that the Governor hi mself has the last batch Of bread in the oven. And many are the fears Of the people that Mr. Pierce, who has been sent to Ireland for provisions, is eithe r cast away or taken by the pirates. A day was appointed February 6 to be a d ay Of fasting and prayer. But God, who likes to -------------------- John Perkins (son of Henry and Elizabeth Perkins) came on the Lyon, which left England on December 1, 1960, and arrived on February 5, 1631. Their voyage was described as tempestuous. John is listed as coming from Hilmorton, Warwickshire, England with his wife, Judith Gator.

Passenger listing: John Perkins of Hilmorton, Warwick, going to Boston. .....Mrs. Judith Perkins .....John Perkins [b. 1614]* .....Elizabeth Perkins [1610] .....Mary Perkins [b. 1615] .....Thomas Perkins [b. 1616] .....Jacob Perkins [b. 1624](Passengers and Ships -1631) Other passengers on the Lyon were Rev. Roger Williams and his wife Mary were thought to be relatives of the Perkins family. The Thorkmorton family was on the same voyage; the Edmond Onge Family with his wife and two sons, of Lavenham, Suffolk County, England; and a William Parke.

John was a freeman in May 1631. In 1633, he was a settler in Ipswich, MA. John's will was witnessed by William Bartholomew of Ipswich. John was a representative of the General Court in 1636. John owned a large island at the mouth of the Ipswich River, called "Perkin's Island." In 1856, this island was still owned by the Perkins Family. His house was near Manning's neck and close to the Ipswich river.

His estate was valued at £250, 5 shillings. -------------------- The Great Migration Begins Sketches PRESERVED PURITAN

JOHN PERKINS

ORIGIN: Hillmorton, Warwickshire MIGRATION: 1631 on first trip of the Lyon FIRST RESIDENCE: Boston REMOVES: Ipswich 1633 CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "John Perkins and Judith his wife" were admitted to Boston church as members #107 and #108 (this would be in early 1631) [BChR 14]. FREEMAN: 18 May 1631 [MBCR 1:366]. EDUCATION: He made his mark to his will. OFFICES: Deputy to General Court for Ipswich, 25 May 1636 [MBCR 1:174]. Committee to set the bounds of Roxbury and Dorchester, 7 November 1632 [MBCR 1:102]. Essex grand jury, 28 [December] 1641, 26 September 1648, 28 September 1652 [EQC 1:37, 145, 260]. On 26 March 1650 "John Perkins Sr., being above sixty years old, is freed from ordinary training" [EQC 1:187]. ESTATE: He had Ipswich land grants: forty acres in 1634, three acres of upland; ten acres of meadow; an island at More's Point; ten acres where "he hath built a house"; six acres of meadow; six acres of upland in 1635, and forty acres at Chebacco in 1636, and six acres of plowland in 1639 [Dudley Wildes Anc 88]. On 10 December 1644 "John Perkins of Ipswich in America" and Thomas Perkins exchanged land in Ipswich [ILR 3:1, 4:268]. In his will, dated 28 March 1654 and proved 26 September 1654, "John Perkines the Elder of Ipswich being at this time sick and weak in body" bequeathed to "my eldest son John Perkines a foal ... also ... to my son John's two sons John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heifers"; to "my son Thomas Perkines one cow and one heifer also ... to his son John Perkines one ewe"; to "my daughter Elizabeth Sarjeant one cow and a heifer to be to her and her children after her decease"; to "my daughter Mary Bradbery one cow and one heifer or a young steer ... to her & to her children"; to "my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heifer or steer ... to her children"; to "my grandchild Thomas Bradbery one ewe"; to "my son Jacob Perkines my dwelling house together with all the outhousing and all my lands ... according to a former covenant, after the decease of my wife"; residue "to my dear wife Judeth Perkines" sole executrix, "as also to dispose of some of the increase to children of my son Thomas and of my three daughters" at her discretion [EPR 1:190-91]. The inventory of John Perkins was undated but totalled Ð250 5s., including real estate valued at Ð132: "the dwelling house and barn with out housing," Ð40 60s. [sic]; "land about the house about eight acres," Ð12; "more land unbroke up about fourteen acres," Ð21; "a parcel of marsh about six acres," Ð12; "a parcel of upland and marsh being much broken about twenty acres," Ð20; "twelve acres of improved land," Ð24 [EPR 1:191]. BIRTH: Baptized Hillmorton, Warwickshire, 23 December 1583, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Sawbridge) Perkins [Dudley Wildes Anc 87]. DEATH: Ipswich "1654 aged sixty four years" between 28 March 1654 (date of will) and 26 September 1654 (probate of will). MARRIAGE: Hillmorton 8 October 1608 Judith Gater, baptized Hillmorton 19 March 1588/9, daughter of Michael Gater [Dudley Wildes Anc 87]. CHILDREN (i-vi baptized Hillmorton, Warwickshire [Dudley Wildes Anc 89-90]): i JOHN, bp. 14 September 1609; m. by about 1636 Elizabeth _____ (eldest child b. about 1636 [EIHC 19:255, 265-66]; Elizabeth, wife to Quartermaster John Perkins, d. Ipswich 27 September 1684).

ii ELIZABETH, bp. 25 March 1611; m. by about 1636 WILLIAM SARGENT.

iii MARY, bp. 3 September 1615; m. by 1637 Thomas Bradbury (eldest child b. Salisbury 1 April 1637).

iv ANNE, bp. 5 September 1617; no further record.

v THOMAS, bp. 28 April 1622; m. by about 1644 Phebe Gould, daughter of Zacheus Gould (eldest child b. by 1644 [Dudley Wildes Anc 92]; in his will of 11 December 1685 Thomas Perkins bequeathed to his son Zacheus "the farm he lives upon which I had of my father Gould'" [Dudley Wildes Anc 92]).

vi JACOB, bp. 12 July 1624; m. (1) by 1649 Elizabeth _____ (eldest child b. 1 April 1649 [EIHC 19:264]) [EQC 1:389]; m. (2) after 12 February 1685 Damaris (_____) Robinson, widow of Nathaniel Robinson [Dudley Wildes Anc 90 (evidence not supplied)].

vii LYDIA, bp. Boston 3 June 1632 [corrected from 1631] [BChR 277]; m. by about 1651 Henry Bennett of Ipswich [NEHGR 19:165-69].

ASSOCIATIONS: Walter Goodwin Davis discusses the possibility that Isaac Perkins of Ipswich was a close relative [Dudley Wildes Anc 89]. COMMENTS: On 3 April 1632 a Court of Assistants ordered "that no person whatsoever shall shoot at fowl upon Pullen Poynte or Noddle's Ileland, but that the said places shall be reserved for John Perkins to take fowl with nets" [MBCR 1:94]. In the 1 April 1633 list of men authorized by the court to begin the settlement of Ipswich, the eighth name is "William Perkins" [MBCR 1:103], which must be an error for this John Perkins, inasmuch as WILLIAM PERKINS was at Roxbury at this time, and would not move to Essex County for nearly two decades more. BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1959 Walter Goodwin Davis published the English origin of John Perkins and his wife, and pushed the Perkins ancestry back to 1475 [Dudley Wildes Anc 81-90].

http://books.google.com/books?id=15Q6AQAAIAAJ&dq=related%3AHARVARD32044004530572&pg=PA570#v=onepage&q&f=false --------------------

Immigration: 1631 came to New England aboard the ship Lyon

-------------------- Source:

The Prominent Families of the United States of America, by Arthur Meredyth Burke, 1908, reprinted 1991, p. 158 (descent of Herbert Howland Sargent) -------------------- He is noted in the (NEHG Register 94:385) memorial as being son of Henry and Elizabeth (Sawbridge) Perkins, born at Hillmorton, co. Warwick, England and baptized there 23 December 1583." Sailed from Bristol, England, 1 December 1630 on the Lion to Boston, Mass., where he was admitted a freeman 18, May, 1631, later (1633) a settler at Ipswich, Mass. A successful farmer, a deputy to the General Court and town officer, and died in 1654.

Perkins Genealogy NEHGR 10:213+: John is this genealogy is noted as probably being a cousin of the Rev. Wm. He was born in Newent, Gloucestershire, Eng in 1590. Arrive at Boston, Feb 5, 1631 after a "very tempestuous voyage." Roger Williams was one of their fellow passengers. At this time their youngest child was about seven, and their oldest seventeen years. He was admitted freeman in May, 1631. He owned the large island at the mouth of Ipswich River, which was then, and nearly to our own day, called Perkins's Island. It is still (1856) believed to be in the family. His house stood near Manning's Neck and close to the river. His will is dated March 28th, 1654, and he probably died not long after, as he then says he was "sick and weak in body." It was proved Sept 1654, and his estate was valued at L250.05s. The name of his wife was Judith. Parents: Henry PERKINS and Elizabeth SAWBRIDGE. -------------------- He sailed with his wife and 5 children from Bristol, England on 5 Feb 1631, arriving in Boston May 1631 on the first trip of the Lyon after a very tempestuous voyage. -------------------- Excerpted from Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine (1909), by Henry Sweetser Burrage and Albert Roscoe Stubbs. Lewis Historical Pub. Co. Available online on Google Books or archives.org.

The ancestors of the American PERKINS family of this sketch are traced with more or less certainty through many generations in England, where the early ancestor and several of those following him held positions of trust and honor. Identity of name does not necessarily imply sameness of origin, and many families of this name are not of this stock, though this family is traditionally connected with the Perkins family of Boston. The arms of John Perkins of Ufton, County Berks, England, third generation, were: A shield or, a fesse dancette, ermine, three billets ermines above and below the fesse dancette. The arms of William Parkyns of the next generation were: Or, a fesse dancette, between eight billets ermines. This last appears on a seal used on a deed from William Parkyns to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester.

(I) Pierre de Morlaix, alias Perkins, was living in 1380-81 and was high steward of the estates of Hugo Despencer, at that time one of the richest and most powerful nobles of England, having no less than fifty-nine lordships in various counties.

(II) Henry (1) Perkins, who was known as Henry Pierrekin, or Henry the son of Pierre, succeeded to the stewardship held by his father. He had a son John next mentioned.

(III) John Perkins, the son of Henry Perkins, followed his father as steward of the Despencers, and in numerous transfers of land he was required to make, he wrote his name indifferently, John Perkins, Perkyns Armiger, and Parkyns. He was living in 1397-1400, in the reign of Henry VI. John Perkins, armiger, held the position of high steward to Despencer, when the heiress of this famous Despencer family married the Earl of Warwick, known as the king maker from the part he took in the Wars of the Roses. John Perkins, as shown by the court roll of Madresfield, 1390, held one messuage and eighteen acres of land there. He was seneschal to Thomas Despencer Earl of Gloucester—Lord Thomas Despencer married a kinswoman of Richard II.

(IV) William Parkyns, Lord of Ufton, was baillous, or agent, to Humphrey Plantaganet, Duke of Gloucester, who was brother to Henry V, and uncle and guardian to the young Henry VI, during his minority. His wife was Margaret.

(V) Thomas Parkyns, living 1452-1479, is supposed to be the ancestor of the Madresfield and Nottinghamshire Perkins family, which claims William Parkyns of the fourth generation as its ancestor, though there are no authentic records now known to prove the claim. This Thomas Parkyns married Ellen, sister of John Tompkins, of Nappend, Herefordshire.

(VI) James Perkins, of Shropshire, son of Thomas Parkyns, of Madresfield and Ufton, married and had a son Thomas, see next paragraph.

(VII) Thomas (2) Perkins, of Hillmorton, county of Warwick, is supposed to be a son of James Perkins above. His wife was Alys (Alice). His will, dated April 3, 1528, proved at Litchfield, April 21, 1528, mentions Thomas Clark and "Alys, my wife," as executors. Alice Perkins, of Hillmorton, made a will dated July 31, and proved by Henry Perkins, her son, October 15, 1538. She directs that her body shall be buried in the church of St. John the Baptist, at Hillmorton. The children of Thomas and Alys were Henry, Jone or Jane, and Jelyan or Julianna.

(VIII) Henry (2), eldest child of Thomas (2) and Alice Perkins, left but little of his life on record. His will was proved June 16, 1546. The name of his wife is unknown. His children were Thomas, William and Joan. The Madresfield Perkins arms are the same as used by the eighth generation of the Ufton Perkins, the same as used by the Hillmorton Perkins family, county Warwick, and their descendants in America. Arms: A shield or; a fesse dancette, ermine; between ten billets ermines, four above and six below the fesse; crest, a pineapple (cone) proper color, branched and leaved, vert.

(IX) Thomas (3), son of Henry (2) Perkins, resided at Hillmorton, where he was living in 1546. His will, dated September 16, 1588, was proved by his son Henry at Litchfield, May 11, 1592. He married Alice Kibble or Kebbell, who was living December 17, 1601. By this marriage there were fifteen children. The names of twelve of them have come down to us: Henry, John, Edward, Luke, William, Thomas, Isaache, Lewis, Elizabeth, Joan, and Lysle, and a daughter who married Edward Shawe.

(X) Isaache, seventh son of Thomas (3) and Alice (Kibble or Kebbell) Perkins, was living in 1603 and died December 1, 1629. He was appraiser of the estate of his brother Edward, August 18, 1619. The name of his wife is unknown. His children so far as known were: Isaache, three daughters, and Jacob, baptized March 23, 1605. John Perkins, of Ipswich, Massachusetts, and Abraham Perkins, of Hampton, New Hampshire, are supposed to be sons of Isaache Perkins.

(XI) Isaac (2), son of Isaache (1) Perkins, was probably born in January, 1611, as the record of his baptism, January 26, 1o11, appears in the register of the church of St. John the Baptist in Hillmorton, in the county of Warwick, England. Also is recorded there, in 1608, John Perkins and Judith Gater, married 9th of October. This is John Perkins, later of Ipswich, Massachusetts. Isaac Perkins died in Hampton, New Hampshire, November 13, 1685, aged seventy-four. This Isaac Perkins came to New England between 1630 and 1634. He was in Ipswich in 1637, as he received a grant of land there at that time. In 1638 the town of Hampton, New Hampshire, was settled, and among those who went there were Abraham and Isaac Perkins, believed to have been younger brothers of John Perkins, of Ipswich, and their families. According to tradition Abraham and Isaac were brothers. They appear to have made settlement about the same time and the house lots assigned to them by the town, each containing five acres, adjoined each other. Isaac's house was nearly on the site of the present Baptist parsonage, and there he lived more than ten years. In the list of shares of commons granted "23, 12 mo. 1645" unto tne proprietors of house lots were three shares each to Abraham and Isaac Perkins. In June, 1652, Rev. Timothy Dalton, reader of the church in Hampton, sold to Isaac Perkins, of Hampton, planter, for fifty pounds, his farm lying next to Salisbury line, in New Hampshire, with seventy acres of meadow and marsh, bounded by John Brown and John Wheelrite. Isaac Perkins probably removed there soon after the purchase. March 23, 1663, a committee presented a report of the owners of the shares in the cow common and how the title was derived. Among these "original rights" Isaac Perkins's • title is shown to be derived from Samuel Fogg, one share bought of Henry Roby. The old Norfolk records show conveyance by Isaac Perkins of small parcels of land and rights of way across his land. Among the names on a list of those permitted to vote at the first assembly of the Royal Province of New Hampshire, March 16, 1680, is that of Isaac Perkins. March 2, 1683, Isaac Perkins and eighteen others sign a petition to Edward Cranfield, Esq., his majesty's lieutenant governor of the province of New Hampshire, to be freed from head money, all being about and above seventy years of age, some above eighty, others near ninety, "being heartily willing our estates should pay their proportion to all public charges." In an address and petition from Hampton to the King against Cranfield signed by sixty-seven persons, there are the names of Isaac and six other male members of the Perkins family.

A note on the families in Hampton states that during the first summer Mr. Bachelor was in Hampton, the families of Abraham and* Isaac Perkins were among the number there. They were the first to have their children baptized by Mr. Bachelor at that place, and Abraham's son, born September 2, 1639, baptized December 15, 1639, is said to have been the first male white child born in Hampton. September 18, 1671, Abraham and Isaac Perkins and their wives, Susanna and Mary, were among the sixty-five persons in full communion in the church at Hampton. Isaac Perkins was a rich man; was a ship carpenter and settled in what is now called Seabrook.

Isaac Perkins married, about 1634, Susanna, daughter of Humphrey Wise, of Ipswich, and Abraham Perkins married Mary Wise, her sister. Susanna Perkins survived her husband and died a widow in 1699 in Newcastle, Delaware, where she was living with her daughter, Rebecca (Perkins) Hussey. Isaac and Susanna had two children born in Ipswich, the others were born in Hampton. They were: Lydia, Isaac, Jacob, Rebecca, Daniel, Caleb, Benjamin, Susanna, Hannah, Mary, Ebenezer and Joseph.

========
view all 59

John Perkins, Sr.'s Timeline

1571
December 20, 1571
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
1583
June 28, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
June 28, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
December 23, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England
December 23, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England
December 23, 1583
December 23, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwick, England
December 23, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England
December 23, 1583
Hillmorton, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
December 23, 1583
Hillmorton, England