Sir John Petre (1549 - 1613) MP

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Birthplace: Ingatestone, Essex, England
Death: Died in Ingatestone, Essex, England
Occupation: Created 'Lord Petre, of Writtle, Co. Essex' in 1603
Managed by: Lars Erik Sellegard
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About Sir John Petre

Family and Education b. 20 Dec. 1549, 3rd but 1st surv. s. of Sir William Petre by his 2nd w. educ. M. Temple 1567. m. 1570, Mary, da. of Sir Edward Waldegrave†, of Borley, surv. s. inc. William. suc. fa. 1573. Kntd. 1576; cr. Baron Petre 1603.

Offices Held

J.p. Essex from 1573, sheriff 1575-6, dep. lt. 1590-8, commr. musters 1599-1603.1

Biography Petre inherited considerable estates in Essex, and in 1574 completed his father’s purchase of Thorndon Hall. In 1588 he was listed by Lord Burghley among ‘knights of great possessions’; and in 1595 out of an income of £4,280 from rents, £2,900 came from his Essex properties. He was an active county official, a member of the victualling commission in 1573, the piracy commission in 1577, the grain commission in 1586, a commissioner for the subsidy of 1587, and a collector of loans in 1590, 1591 and 1596-8.2

He was acquainted with the Heneage, Mildmay and Radcliffe families, and in 1575 Lord Burghley was godfather to his heir William. Twice knight of the shire, Petre served on committees concerned with tithes (3 Dec. 1584), grain (19 Dec.) and cloth (13 Feb. 1585). Of particular interest, in view of the inclusion of his name in a list drawn up in her interests in 1574, is his membership of the committee which asked for the execution of Mary Queen of Scots (4 Nov. 1586). He was one of those appointed by the House to attend the Queen about the subsidy, 18 Mar. following. In fact Petre is an example of an Elizabethan who resolved conflicting loyalties to Church and State. Though its fortunes had been founded upon the proceeds of the dissolution of the monasteries, the family was, and remained, Catholic. Both Petre’s wife and his mother were presented for recusancy in 1581. Petre himself conformed to the extent of attending Anglican services (though not taking communion), and as an MP he must be presumed to have taken the oath of supremacy. In 1591 he served on a commission against seminaries and Jesuits. Clearly he would have nothing to do with ‘traitorous priests’ or any attempt to subvert the constitution. Still, he was evidently aware of the delicacy of his position: there is a draft and copy of a letter of apology, written in 1605, to be made by a Mr. Bernarde ‘for accusing Lord Petre of being a Papist’.3

Given a peerage by James I, Petre was henceforth less active in local affairs. Perhaps he was already suffering from the ‘long languishing consumption’ of which he died. He was present in 1610 at the creation of Prince Henry as Prince of Wales, and at his funeral in 1612. In 1613 Petre made settlements providing portions of £5,000 each to his grandchildren and settling properties on his eldest son William and his heirs. He died 11 Oct. that year at Thorndon and was buried at Ingatestone 29 Oct. His will, drawn up 10 Jan. 1612, and signed 1 Sept. 1613, was proved 18 Nov. He left money to the poor of local parishes, and to prisoners in London, Southwark and Colchester, to London hospitals and to old retainers. He bequeathed £20 to Exeter College, Oxford, £10 for repairs to Ingatestone church, and £5 for repairs to Thorndon church. He also made other monetary bequests to his surviving children.4

Ref Volumes: 1558-1603 Author: J.H. Notes 1. CP; APC, xxix. 643, 701; R. B. Colvin, Lts. and Keepers of Rolls of Essex. 2. C. T. Kuypers, Thorndon, 17; Lansd. 33, f. 146; 66, f. 208; 104, f. 51 seq.; 146, f. 18; Essex RO, D/DP, E6, D/DP 04; APC, viii. 144; xix. 186; xxviii. 559. 3. Lansd. 33, f. 146; 103, f. 266; F. Chancellor, Ancient Sepulchral Mons. Essex, 316; PCC 108 Windebanck, 82 Leicester; D’Ewes 335, 343, 349, 394, 416; Cath. Rec. Soc. Misc. viii. 96; Collinson thesis 504; H. Foley, Recs. Soc. of Jesus, ii. 580 seq.; Essex RO, 2/SR 78/46, 79/100; D/DP 060; D/DP, Z 30/7, 7A; CSP Dom. 1581-90, p. 88. 4. Chamberlain Letters ed. McClure, i. 479; Nichols, Progresses Jas. I, ii. 335, 497; Essex RO, D/DP, F 14, 22, 23, 24, 29; 17 D/DP, F 18; PCC 105 Capell.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Petre,_1st_Baron_Petre
  • 'John Petre, 1st Baron Petre (20 December 1549 – 11 October 1613) was an English peer.
  • 'Petre was the only surviving son of the statesman Sir William Petre by his second wife Anne, daughter of William Browne. He sat as a Member of Parliament for Essex from 1584 to 1587 and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Essex. In 1603 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Petre, of Writtle in the County of Essex[1]. He publicly acknowledged that he was a Roman Catholic and his descendants have remained loyal to Catholicism ever since.
  • 'Lord Petre married Mary, daughter of Sir Edward Walgrave (or Waldegrave). They had four sons. He died in October 1613, aged 63, and was succeeded in the barony by his son William.
  • Biography
  • 'Sir William was succeeded by his only son John, 1st Baron Petre (1549–1613). A talented amateur musician, he kept a full set of musical instruments (lute, five viols, virginals and organ) and was a patron of the composer William Byrd, a fellow catholic who lived at nearby Stondon Massey. On several occasions, Byrd brought a group of musicians to Ingatestone to entertain at Christmas and dedicated a collection of his Graduale settings to Lord Petre. John Petre was not endowed with the ability of his father and a much less forceful character but being a diligent landowner, public figure and a competent musician along with his great possessions and his father’s fame served him well. We know little more about him. Like his descendants, he was a Roman Catholic, but he must have kept his religious opinions in the background, or James would hardly have made him a peer.
  • 'In 1570, he married Mary ( – 02/08/1604), eldest daughter of Sir Edward ‘Walgrave’ (or Waldegrave) of Borley. By the time of her marriage, Mary was fatherless and poor but gave her parents-in-law ‘much joy in his choice’. She left four sons, of whom the eldest, William, 2nd Lord Petre, was father of William Petre (1602–1677). He probably erected the beautiful recumbent tomb of Sir William, and is himself commemorated by the magnificent one in the north chapel, now the vestry.
  • 'When Sir William had died in 1572, his widow continued to reside at Ingatestone Hall and so John and wife Mary Waldegrave, then resident at Writtle Park, looked for another property to suit their status. In 1574, John added West Thorndon Hall and a further 12,000 acres (49 km2) to the family estate, which became the principal seat of the family.
  • 'He became a Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Essex, 1575–1603 and was knighted, in 1576, by Elizabeth after his father’s death. There were no baronetcies at that time as they were created by James I as a means of raising money. The domestic papers of Queen Elizabeth’s time not infrequently notice Sir John. To maintain national unity Elizabeth had appointed some of her most loyal Catholic gentry to offices, he was MP for Essex in 1585–1586 apparently by the direction of the Privy Council and was appointed as JP, Sheriff (1575), and Knight of the shire.
  • 'In 1589 his father’s friend, William Cecil, now Lord Burghley, writes to the Deputy Lieutenants of Essex that he has appointed three gentlemen to be captains of the ‘600 foot formerly entrusted to Sir J. Petre’.
  • 'The year 1590 finds these foot soldiers trained and in readiness, but the Deputy Lieutenants reports to Lord Burghley that the horse are not ready; they have provided sufficient powder, and assure him that the observances of Lent have in all things been confirmed. This was just after the Spanish Armada, and the county still lived in fear of invasion. The same year found John Petre joined with Sir Thomas Mildmay investigating the grievance of the mariners, gunners, fishermen, and other sea-faring men within the county, who complained they were kept from their ordinary occupation by being constrained to attend at three hours’ warning for Navy service.
  • 'The portraits of John and Mary thought to be by Marcus Gheeraedts in 1590 are colourful and relaxed showing fashionable changes in costume. John wears a white ruff over a lace collar, embroidered doublet, the full breeches, bobbed hair, moustache and slight beard and, in the fashion of the time, the minute patch of hair below the bottom lip. It is unfortunately much restored after the fire at Thorndon Hall. His wife is equally in fashion – the cartwheel-topped skirt, the full upper sleeves and a variation of ruff open in front to show the neck, a delicate silver tiara and the splendid necklace of pearls, 1466 in all. These pictures are now thought to be his son and daughter-in-law.
  • 'In 1600, Sir John installed his newly married son in Ingatestone Hall, to gain experience in the ‘government’ of a house, and the in-going inventory gives a vivid picture of it within a generation of the builder’s death.
  • 'On the accession of James I, the Scotsman found himself short of money, and his predecessors having disposed of all the Abbey and Church lands, he ingeniously started selling peerages. Eight years later James created baronetcies, and sold them instead of the peerages. By 1615, James was selling peerages at £100,000 each, just over £11 million today).
  • 'John Petre’s vast properties and position in the county would have justified James I elevating him to the peerage which he was in the accession honours on 21 July 1603 and thus created Baron Petre of Writtle. But we can be reasonably sure that John’s ennoblement was for more honourable reasons, as J.P., High Sheriff, Deputy Lieutenant, Knight of the Shire and militia commander, he was a loyal servant of the Crown.
  • 'He died at West Horndon, Essex on 11 October 1613, and was buried in Ingatestone Church, leaving three sons and one daughter. He augmented his father’s benefactions to Exeter College, contributed £951 to the Virginia Company, and became a Roman Catholic. Exeter College published in his honour a thin quarto entitled ‘Threni Exoniensium in obitum … D. Johannis Petrei, Baronis de Writtle’, Oxford, 1613.
  • Descendants
  • DIRECT PETRE LINE[2]
  • 'John Petre, 1st Baron Petre (1549-1613)
  • William Petre, 2nd Baron Petre (1575-1637)
  • Robert Petre, 3rd Baron Petre (1599-1638)
  • William Petre, 4th Baron Petre (1626-1684)
  • John Petre, 5th Baron Petre (1629-1684)
  • Thomas Petre, 6th Baron Petre (1633-1706)
  • Robert Petre, 7th Baron Petre (1689-1713)
  • Robert James Petre, 8th Baron Petre (1713-1742)
  • Robert Edward Petre, 9th Baron Petre (1742-1801)
  • Robert Edward Petre, 10th Baron Petre (1763-1809)
  • William Henry Francis Petre, 11th Baron Petre (January 22,1793 - July 3,1850)
  • William Bernard Petre, 12th Baron Petre (December 20,1817 - 1884)
  • William Joseph Petre, 13th Baron Petre (1847-1893)
  • Bernard Henry Philip Petre, 14th Baron Petre (1858-1908)
  • Philip Benedict Joseph Petre, 15th Baron Petre (1864-1908)
  • Lionel George Carroll Petre, 16th Baron Petre (1890-1915)
  • Joseph William Lionel Petre, 17th Baron Petre (1914-1989)
  • John Patrick Lionel Petre, 18th Baron Petre (b. 1942)
  • The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Dominic William Petre (b. 9 August 1966)[3]
  • References
  • 1.^ http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/252411
  • 2.^ http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/252411
  • 3.^ http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/252411
  • Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990.
  • Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages
  • _____________________
  • http://www.thepeerage.com/p20876.htm#i208753
  • 'John Petre, 1st Baron Petre1
  • M, #208753, b. 20 December 1549, d. 11 October 1613
  • Last Edited=18 Mar 2009
  • ' John Petre, 1st Baron Petre was born on 20 December 1549 at Ingatestone, Essex, England.1 He was the son of Sir William Petre and Anne Browne.2,1 He died on 11 October 1613 at age 63 at West Horndon, Essex, England.1
  • ' John Petre, 1st Baron Petre gained the title of 1st Baron Petre.
  • Child of John Petre, 1st Baron Petre
    • 1.William Petre, 2nd Baron Petre+1 b. 24 Jun 1575
  • 'Child of John Petre, 1st Baron Petre and Mary Waldegrave
    • 1.Thomas Petre+2 b. 2 Nov 1584
  • Citations
  • 1.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume X, page 506. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • 2.[S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family."
  • _____________
  • http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/PETRE.htm#John PETRE (1° B. Petre of Writtle)
  • 'John PETRE (1° B. Petre of Writtle)
  • Born: 20 Dec 1549, Ingatestone
  • Died: 1613
  • Notes: John Dudley, later Duke of Northumberland, and Imperial Ambassador Van Der Delft were his godfathers; and lady Paget his godmother.
  • Father: William PETRE (Sir Secretary of State)
  • Mother: Anne BROWNE
  • 'Married: Mary WALDEGRAVE 17 Apr 1571, Ingatestone
  • Children:
    • 1. Mary PETRE (b. 1572)
    • 2. William PETRE (2° B. Petre of Writtle)
    • 3. Elizabeth PETRE (b. 1579)
    • 4. Margaret PETRE (b. 1581)
    • 5. Catherine PETRE (b. 1586)
    • 6. Edward PETRE (b. 25 Oct 1577)
    • 7. Anne PETRE (b. 15 Jun 1592 - d. 25 Oct 1593)
    • 8. John PETRE
    • 9. Thomas PETRE
    • 10. Robert PETRE (b. 20 Nov 1587 - d. 20 Dec 1590)
  • ____________________
  • 'Ancestors of Robarts
  • http://www.stepneyrobarts.co.uk/14876.htm
  • ___________________

-------------------- John Dudley, later Duke of Northumberland, and Imperial Ambassador Van Der Delft were his godfathers; and lady Paget his godmother. -------------------- •'John Petre, 1st Baron Petre (20 December 1549 – 11 October 1613) was an English peer. •'Petre was the only surviving son of the statesman Sir William Petre by his second wife Anne, daughter of William Browne. He sat as a Member of Parliament for Essex from 1584 to 1587 and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Essex. In 1603 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Petre, of Writtle in the County of Essex[1]. He publicly acknowledged that he was a Roman Catholic and his descendants have remained loyal to Catholicism ever since. •'Lord Petre married Mary, daughter of Sir Edward Walgrave (or Waldegrave). They had four sons. He died in October 1613, aged 63, and was succeeded in the barony by his son William. •Biography •'Sir William was succeeded by his only son John, 1st Baron Petre (1549–1613). A talented amateur musician, he kept a full set of musical instruments (lute, five viols, virginals and organ) and was a patron of the composer William Byrd, a fellow catholic who lived at nearby Stondon Massey. On several occasions, Byrd brought a group of musicians to Ingatestone to entertain at Christmas and dedicated a collection of his Graduale settings to Lord Petre. John Petre was not endowed with the ability of his father and a much less forceful character but being a diligent landowner, public figure and a competent musician along with his great possessions and his father’s fame served him well. We know little more about him. Like his descendants, he was a Roman Catholic, but he must have kept his religious opinions in the background, or James would hardly have made him a peer. •'In 1570, he married Mary ( – 02/08/1604), eldest daughter of Sir Edward ‘Walgrave’ (or Waldegrave) of Borley. By the time of her marriage, Mary was fatherless and poor but gave her parents-in-law ‘much joy in his choice’. She left four sons, of whom the eldest, William, 2nd Lord Petre, was father of William Petre (1602–1677). He probably erected the beautiful recumbent tomb of Sir William, and is himself commemorated by the magnificent one in the north chapel, now the vestry. •'When Sir William had died in 1572, his widow continued to reside at Ingatestone Hall and so John and wife Mary Waldegrave, then resident at Writtle Park, looked for another property to suit their status. In 1574, John added West Thorndon Hall and a further 12,000 acres (49 km2) to the family estate, which became the principal seat of the family. •'He became a Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Essex, 1575–1603 and was knighted, in 1576, by Elizabeth after his father’s death. There were no baronetcies at that time as they were created by James I as a means of raising money. The domestic papers of Queen Elizabeth’s time not infrequently notice Sir John. To maintain national unity Elizabeth had appointed some of her most loyal Catholic gentry to offices, he was MP for Essex in 1585–1586 apparently by the direction of the Privy Council and was appointed as JP, Sheriff (1575), and Knight of the shire. •'In 1589 his father’s friend, William Cecil, now Lord Burghley, writes to the Deputy Lieutenants of Essex that he has appointed three gentlemen to be captains of the ‘600 foot formerly entrusted to Sir J. Petre’. •'The year 1590 finds these foot soldiers trained and in readiness, but the Deputy Lieutenants reports to Lord Burghley that the horse are not ready; they have provided sufficient powder, and assure him that the observances of Lent have in all things been confirmed. This was just after the Spanish Armada, and the county still lived in fear of invasion. The same year found John Petre joined with Sir Thomas Mildmay investigating the grievance of the mariners, gunners, fishermen, and other sea-faring men within the county, who complained they were kept from their ordinary occupation by being constrained to attend at three hours’ warning for Navy service. •'The portraits of John and Mary thought to be by Marcus Gheeraedts in 1590 are colourful and relaxed showing fashionable changes in costume. John wears a white ruff over a lace collar, embroidered doublet, the full breeches, bobbed hair, moustache and slight beard and, in the fashion of the time, the minute patch of hair below the bottom lip. It is unfortunately much restored after the fire at Thorndon Hall. His wife is equally in fashion – the cartwheel-topped skirt, the full upper sleeves and a variation of ruff open in front to show the neck, a delicate silver tiara and the splendid necklace of pearls, 1466 in all. These pictures are now thought to be his son and daughter-in-law. •'In 1600, Sir John installed his newly married son in Ingatestone Hall, to gain experience in the ‘government’ of a house, and the in-going inventory gives a vivid picture of it within a generation of the builder’s death. •'On the accession of James I, the Scotsman found himself short of money, and his predecessors having disposed of all the Abbey and Church lands, he ingeniously started selling peerages. Eight years later James created baronetcies, and sold them instead of the peerages. By 1615, James was selling peerages at £100,000 each, just over £11 million today). •'John Petre’s vast properties and position in the county would have justified James I elevating him to the peerage which he was in the accession honours on 21 July 1603 and thus created Baron Petre of Writtle. But we can be reasonably sure that John’s ennoblement was for more honourable reasons, as J.P., High Sheriff, Deputy Lieutenant, Knight of the Shire and militia commander, he was a loyal servant of the Crown. •'He died at West Horndon, Essex on 11 October 1613, and was buried in Ingatestone Church, leaving three sons and one daughter. He augmented his father’s benefactions to Exeter College, contributed £951 to the Virginia Company, and became a Roman Catholic. Exeter College published in his honour a thin quarto entitled ‘Threni Exoniensium in obitum … D. Johannis Petrei, Baronis de Writtle’, Oxford, 1613.

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John Petre, 1st Baron Petre of Writtle's Timeline

1549
December 20, 1549
Ingatestone, Essex, England
1571
April 17, 1571
Age 21
Ingatestone, Essex, United Kingdom
1575
June 24, 1575
Age 25
Brentwood, Essex, England
1581
1581
Age 31
1613
October 11, 1613
Age 63
Ingatestone, Essex, England
October 29, 1613
Age 63
Ingatestone, Essex, England
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