John Quincy Adams, 6th President of the United States (1767 - 1848) MP

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Nicknames: "Old Man Eloquent", "President John Quincy Adams"
Birthplace: Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts
Death: Died in Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Cause of death: massive cerebral hemorrhage
Occupation: 6th President of the USA, Lawyer (Harvard College), Congressman
Managed by: David Prins
Last Updated:

About John Quincy Adams, 6th President of the United States

John Quincy Adams was the Sixth President 1825-1829 • Son of John Adams 2nd President

Born: July 11, 1767 in Braintree, Massachusetts.

Died: February 23, 1848, after collapsing on the floor of the House of Representatives in the Capital, Washington DC two days earlier. He died doing what he loved to do. He felt that the House of Rep. was the place where the people are truly represented.

Married to Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams.

John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767–February 23, 1848) was an American diplomat and politician who served as the sixth President of the United States from March 4, 1825 to March 4, 1829. At various times he was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties.

Adams was the son of the second President John Adams and his wife Abigail Adams. He is most famous as a diplomat involved in many international negotiations, and for formulating the Monroe Doctrine as Secretary of State. As president he proposed a grand program of modernization and educational advancement, but was stymied by a hostile Congress. Adams decisively lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson.

Adams became a U.S. Representative after leaving office, the only president ever to do so, serving for the last 17 years of his life. In the House he became a leading opponent of the Slave Power and argued that if a civil war ever broke out the president could abolish slavery by using his war powers, which Abraham Lincoln did during the American Civil War in the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. Two tears after the war started.

"Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish" - John Quincy Adams.

First of all, let me tell you something I learned the hard way. It's pronounced [quinzy] not [quintsy]. I was told that by two tour guides plus four pedestrians I asked directions from. John Quincy, John Q. Adams' maternal great grandfather, specifically stated in his will that his name was pronounced [quinzy]. And the folks roundabout call the town [quinzy]. So as you are reading this (if you are), say [quinzy], not [quintsy]. Thank you.

Child of JOHN ADAMS and ABIGAIL SMITH is:

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, b. July 11, 1767, Braintree, Massachusetts; d. February 23, 1848, Washington, D.C.; m. LOUISA CATHERINE JOHNSON; b. February 12, 1775, London, England; d. May 15, 1852, Washington, D.C.

Notes for JOHN QUiNCY ADAMS: The first President who was the son of a President, John Quincy Adams in many respects paralleled the career as well as the temperament and viewpoints of his illustrious father. Born in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1767, he watched the Battle of Bunker Hill from the top of Penn's Hill above the family farm. As secretary to his father in Europe, he became an accomplished linguist and assiduous diarist. After graduating from Harvard College, he became a lawyer. At age 26 he was appointed Minister to the Netherlands, then promoted to the Berlin Legation. In 1802 he was elected to the United States Senate. Six years later President Madison appointed him Minister to Russia.

Serving under President Monroe, Adams was one of America's great Secretaries of State, arranging with England for the joint occupation of the Oregon country, obtaining from Spain the cession of the Floridas, and formulating with the President the Monroe Doctrine. In the political tradition of the early 19th century, Adams as Secretary of State was considered the political heir to the Presidency. But the old ways of choosing a President were giving way in 1824 before the clamor for a popular choice.

Within the one and only party--the Republican--sectionalism and factionalism were developing, and each section put up its own candidate for the Presidency. Adams, the candidate of the North, fell behind Gen. Andrew Jackson in both popular and electoral votes, but received more than William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. Since no candidate had a majority of electoral votes, the election was decided among the top three by the House of Representatives. Clay, who favored a program similar to that of Adams, threw his crucial support in the House to the New Englander. Upon becoming President, Adams appointed Clay as Secretary of State. Jackson and his angry followers charged that a "corrupt bargain" had taken place and immediately began their campaign to wrest the Presidency from Adams in 1828. Well aware that he would face hostility in Congress, Adams nevertheless proclaimed in his first Annual Message a spectacular national program. He proposed that the Federal Government bring the sections together with a network of highways and canals, and that it develop and conserve the public domain, using funds from the sale of public lands. In 1828, he broke ground for the 185-mile C & 0 Canal. Adams also urged the United States to take a lead in the development of the arts and sciences through the establishment of a national university, the financing of scientific expeditions, and the erection of an observatory. His critics declared such measures transcended constitutional limitations.

The campaign of 1828, in which his Jacksonian opponents charged him with corruption and public plunder, was an ordeal Adams did not easily bear. After his defeat he returned to Massachusetts, expecting to spend the remainder of his life enjoying his farm and his books. Unexpectedly, in 1830, the Plymouth district elected him to the House of Representatives, and there for the remainder of his life he served as a powerful leader. Above all, he fought against circumscription of civil liberties. In 1836 southern Congressmen passed a "gag rule" providing that the House automatically table petitions against slavery. Adams tirelessly fought the rule for eight years until finally he obtained its repeal. In 1848, he collapsed on the floor of the House from a stroke and was carried to the Speaker's Room, where two days later he died. He was buried--as were his father, mother, and wife--at First Parish Church in Quincy. To the end, "Old Man Eloquent" had fought for what he considered right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Quincy_Adams

WIKIPEDIA: John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth President of the United States from March 4, 1825, to March 4, 1829. He was also an American diplomat and served in both the Senate and House of Representatives. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of President John Adams and Abigail Adams. The name "Quincy" came from Abigail's maternal grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, after whom Quincy, Massachusetts is named.[2][pn 1] As a diplomat, Adams was involved in many international negotiations, and helped formulate the Monroe Doctrine as Secretary of State. Historians agree he was one of the great diplomats in American history.[3]

As president, he proposed a program of modernization and educational advancement, but was stymied by Congress, controlled by his enemies. Adams lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson. In doing so, Adams became the first President since his father to serve a single term. As president, Adams presented a vision of national greatness resting on economic growth and a strong federal government, but his presidency was not a success as he lacked political adroitness, popularity or a network of supporters, and ran afoul of politicians eager to undercut him.

Adams is best known as a diplomat who shaped American's foreign policy in line with his deeply conservative and ardently nationalist commitment to America's republican values. More recently he has been portrayed as the exemplar and moral leader in an era of modernization when new technologies and networks of infrastructure and communication brought to the people messages of religious revival, social reform, and party politics, as well as moving goods, money and people ever more rapidly and efficiently.[4]

Adams was elected a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts after leaving office, the only president ever to do so, serving for the last 17 years of his life. In the House he became a leading opponent of the Slave Power and argued that if a civil war ever broke out the president could abolish slavery by using his war powers, which Abraham Lincoln partially did during the American Civil War in the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. Deeply troubled by slavery, Adams correctly predicted the dissolution of the Union on the issue, though the series of bloody slave insurrections he foresaw never came to pass. _______________________________________________________________________________ His father's advice: Late in life, John Adams looked over the wreckage of his family and advised his presidential son that family and kindness were paramount. But they had educated John Quincy too well for too long. In John Quincy’s own words, he was a rigid, cold, unyielding martinet. esource: http://www.historynet.com/abigail-adams ________________________________________________________________________________

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Hon. John Quincy Adams, 6th President of the USA's Timeline

1767
July 11, 1767
Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts

Braintree is now known as Quincy.

1794
1794
- 1797
Age 26
Netherlands
1794
- 1797
Age 26
1797
July 26, 1797
Age 30
London, England

This couple had 4 children.

1797
- 1801
Age 29
Prussia
1797
- 1801
Age 29
1799
1799
Age 31
1801
April 12, 1801
Age 33
Berlin, Germany
1802
1802
- 1803
Age 34
1802
- 1803
Age 34
Massachusetts, United States