John P Sackett, Sr.

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John P Sackett, Sr.

Also Known As: "John /Sackett/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Newtown (Now known as), Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Westfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA
Place of Burial: Westfield, Hampden, MA
Immediate Family:

Son of Simon Sackett, Sr. and Isabel Bloomfield
Husband of Sarah Sackett and Abigail Sackett (Hannum)
Father of John Sackett, Jr.,; Joseph Sackett; Abigail D Noble; Mary Sackett; William Sackett and 7 others
Brother of Simon Jr. Sackett, Jr.

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John P Sackett, Sr.

http://freepages.books.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~teking/simon/pafg04.htm#4

Weygant's record of John is as follows:

pp16-17

"4. JOHN SACKET, 1632 - 1719, son of (1) Simon Sackett and his wife Isabel, was, so far as known, the first white child born in Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass. In 1653 he became a resident of Springfield, Mass., receiving from the town commissioners a gift of four pieces of land, agreeable to an ordinance passed to encourage the speedy settlement of that place. On November 23, 1659, he was married to ABIGAIL HANNUM, 1640 - 1690, daughter of WILLIAM HANNUM (colonist), and his wife, HONOR CAPEN, of Dorchester, Windsor and Northampton. A short time after date of his marriage to Abigail Hannum, John Sacket sold his land at Springfield and removed to property he had purchased some fifteen miles up the Connecticut River at Northampton. There he and his family lived until 1665, when he again sold out and moved to a farm purchased of one Chapin near Westfield, on what are now called Sacket's Meadows. Mr. Sacket's removal to Westfield was at the date of the first permanent settlement of that town, and about ten years previous to the commencement of King Philip's Indian wars. There Mr. Sacket built a house and barn, both of which were burned, Oct. 27, 1675, by the Indians, who, at the same time, destroyed a large amount of other property, and drove off his cattle. He rebuilt his house and barn, and also erected a saw mill on a creek which ran through his farm and emptied into the Waronoco (now Westfield) River.

"The building of a dam on this creek was the occasion of a vexatious lawsuit, brought against him by Thomas, Jedediah and Jonah Dewey, who claimed that by reason of Sacket's saw mill dam the water was backed up on their grist mill. The case was tried at Springfield before a jury, who found for plaintiff, but the court in giving judgment, recited that it was a hard case for the defendant and "therefore ordered that the plaintiffs should, with a hired man and oxen, work with said Sacket 9 days in taking down and removing said dam."

"At a town meeting held in 1672 at Westfield, John Sacket was chosen a selectman, and as late as 1693 he held the same office.

"Abigail Hannum Sacket died October 9, 1690, and about a year later John Sacket was married to SARAH, daughter of JOHN STILES and widow of John Stewart of Springfield. He continued to reside on his Westfield farm to the day of his death."

[Weygant reproduces at pp17-18 a typescript of John Sacket's Will.]

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Weygant has the date of death for John as Oct 8, 1719 (page 14) which appears to be a typo. John's will is dated May 10, 1718 and on page 18 the probate record shows that the will was presented for probate on May 20, 1719. This is well in advance of the October date given by Weygant.

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Savage, James; "Genealogical Dictionary of New England Settlers"; gives the date of death as April 8, 1719

JOHN, Northampton, had John, b. 1660; William, 1662; Abigail, 1663; Mary, wh. d. 1667; had Hannah, 1669; rem. to Westfield, there had Mary, again, 8 June 1672; Samuel, 18 Oct. 1674; Eliz. 28 Aug. 1677, wh. d. at 5 yrs. His ho. was burn. by the Ind. 1675; his w. d. 9 Oct. 1690; and he m. 1691, Sarah, the only d. of John Stiles, wid. of John Stewart of Springfield; and d. 8 Apr. 1719.

The New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 6, July 1852, page 266, "Marriages, Births and Deaths in Westfield":

JOHN SACKET, wife Abigail; chn. Mary, b. June 8, 1672; Samuel, b. Oct.

18, 1674; Elizabeth, b. Aug. 28, 1677, d. June 15, 1682. Abigail, his

wife, d. Oct. 9, 1690. He married Sarah Steward, 1691. John Sacket, d.

Ap.8, 1719.

________________

Weygant's contention that John was born in Newtown has not been proved. Anderson gives John's date of birth as "say 1630". Since Anderson assumes the date of migration to have been 1632, he assumes, too, that John was born in England.

Riker's reference to John is brief: "His [Simon the colonist's] sons Simon and John removed in 1653 to Springfield, on the Connecticut River, where they took the oath of fidelity, Mar. 23, 1656. John afterwards removed to Northampton, and thence to Westfield, where he d. in 1719, a. 87. His posterity have been numerous in Westfield and its vicinity, and are also found in western New-York."

Burt, in his History of Springfield [see Appendix], includes several references to John Sacket:

p250. 10 Jan 1658. Jno Sackat is granted land.

p126-7. 23 Dec 1659. John Sacket is listed in the seating plan in the meeting house.

Lockwood, in his Westfield History (see Appendix], includes numerous references to John Sacket:

p58. 11 Feb 1667. A town meeting orders that a gate be erected by Sacket's house.

p80. 12 Mar 1667. John Sackett's "five acres over the brooke."

p62. 16 Feb 1669. John Sacket is appointed one of three men to lay out grants of land.

p63. 23 Mar 1669/70. The three men are sacked for neglecting their duties and are replaced.

p72. Sackett's Brook was originally called "Tomhaumucke."

p86/7. Original allotment of land.

p91.

In a short biography of John, Lockwood states that John was born in 1632, three years after Simon and Isabel came from England. This implies a migration in 1629.

p101. John is included in a list of settlers who have taken an oath of allegiance to the King.

p217/8. Autumn 1675. John's house and barn are burnt by the Indians.

p226-8.

15 Jan 1675/76. John Sacket, as Constable, writes with details of the expense of maintaining a garrison of soldiers.

p231.

26 Mar 1676. John Sacket is a co-signatory to a document setting out land improvements to be carried out by townsmen.

p179.

17 Aug 1684. John Sacket is a juror in a hearing into the death of Eleezer Weller. The jury finds that death was caused by suicide by hanging.

p183.

Autumn 1685. John Sackett is sued for infringing the rights of a neighbour by setting a mill higher up the brook.

__________________

References:

Appendix:

Anderson, Robert: Great Migration

Burt, Henry: History of Springfield

Lockwood, John: Westfield History -------------------- JOHN SACKET, 1632 - 1719, son of (1) Simon Sackett and his wife Isabel, was, so far as known, the first white child born in Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass. In 1653 he became a resident of Springfield, Mass., receiving from the town commissioners a gift of four pieces of land, agreeable to an ordinance passed to encourage the speedy settlement of that place. On November 23, 1659, he was married to ABIGAIL HANNUM, 1640 - 1690, daughter of WILLIAM HANNUM (colonist), and his wife, HONOR CAPEN, of Dorchester, Windsor and Northampton. A short time after date of his marriage to Abigail Hannum, John Sacket sold his land at Springfield and removed to property he had purchased some fifteen miles up the Connecticut River at Northampton. There he and his family lived until 1665, when he again sold out and moved to a farm purchased of one Chapin near Westfield, on what are now called Sacket's Meadows. Mr. Sacket's removal to Westfield was at the date of the first permanent settlement of that town, and about ten years previous to the commencement of King Philip's Indian wars. There Mr. Sacket built a house and barn, both of which were burned, Oct. 27, 1675, by the Indians, who, at the same time, destroyed a large amount of other property, and drove off his cattle. He rebuilt his house and barn, and also erected a saw mill on a creek which ran through his farm and emptied into the Waronoco (now Westfield) River.

"The building of a dam on this creek was the occasion of a vexatious lawsuit, brought against him by Thomas, Jedediah and Jonah Dewey, who claimed that by reason of Sacket's saw mill dam the water was backed up on their grist mill. The case was tried at Springfield before a jury, who found for plaintiff, but the court in giving judgment, recited that it was a hard case for the defendant and "therefore ordered that the plaintiffs should, with a hired man and oxen, work with said Sacket 9 days in taking down and removing said dam."

"At a town meeting held in 1672 at Westfield, John Sacket was chosen a selectman, and as late as 1693 he held the same office.

"Abigail Hannum Sacket died October 9, 1690, and about a year later John Sacket was married to SARAH, daughter of JOHN STILES and widow of John Stewart of Springfield. He continued to reside on his Westfield farm to the day of his death." -------------------- . John Sackett John Sackett [by Chris Sackett] Weygant's record of John is as follows: pp16-17 "4. JOHN SACKET, 1632 - 1719, son of (1) Simon Sackett and his wife Isabel, was, so far as known, the first white child born in Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass. In 1653 he became a resident of Springfield, Mass., receiving from the town commissioners a gift of four pieces of land, agreeable to an ordinance passed to encourage the speedy settlement of that place. On November 23, 1659, he was married to ABIGAIL HANNUM, 1640 - 1690, daughter of WILLIAM HANNUM (colonist), and his wife, HONOR CAPEN, of Dorchester, Windsor and Northampton. A short time after date of his marriage to Abigail Hannum, John Sacket sold his land at Springfield and removed to property he had purchased some fifteen miles up the Connecticut River at Northampton. There he and his family lived until 1665, when he again sold out and moved to a farm purchased of one Chapin near Westfield, on what are now called Sacket's Meadows. Mr. Sacket's removal to Westfield was at the date of the first permanent settlement of that town, and about ten years previous to the commencement of King Philip's Indian wars. There Mr. Sacket built a house and barn, both of which were burned, Oct. 27, 1675, by the Indians, who, at the same time, destroyed a large amount of other property, and drove off his cattle. He rebuilt his house and barn, and also erected a saw mill on a creek which ran through his farm and emptied into the Waronoco (now Westfield) River.

"The building of a dam on this creek was the occasion of a vexatious lawsuit, brought against him by Thomas, Jedediah and Jonah Dewey, who claimed that by reason of Sacket's saw mill dam the water was backed up on their grist mill. The case was tried at Springfield before a jury, who found for plaintiff, but the court in giving judgment, recited that it was a hard case for the defendant and "therefore ordered that the plaintiffs should, with a hired man and oxen, work with said Sacket 9 days in taking down and removing said dam."

"At a town meeting held in 1672 at Westfield, John Sacket was chosen a selectman, and as late as 1693 he held the same office. "Abigail Hannum Sacket died October 9, 1690, and about a year later John Sacket was married to SARAH, daughter of JOHN STILES and widow of John Stewart of Springfield. He continued to reside on his Westfield farm to the day of his death."

[Weygant reproduces at pp17-18 a typescript of John Sacket's Will.] ________________ Weygant's contention that John was born in Newtown has not been proved. Anderson gives John's date of birth as "say 1630". Since Anderson assumes the date of migration to have been 1632, he assumes too that John was born in England. Riker's reference to John is brief: "His [Simon the colonist's] sons Simon and John removed in 1653 to Springfield, on the Connecticut River, where they took the oath of fidelity, Mar. 23, 1656. John afterwards removed to Northampton, and thence to Westfield, where he d. in 1719, a. 87. His posterity have been numerous in Westfield and its vicinity, and are also found in western New-York." Burt, in his History of Springfield [see Appendix], includes several references to John Sacket: p250. 10 Jan 1658. John Sackat is granted land. p126-7. 23 Dec 1659. John Sacket is listed in the seating plan in the meeting house.

Lockwood, in his Westfield History (see Appendix], includes numerous references to John Sacket: p58. 11 Feb 1667. A town meeting orders that a gate be erected by Sacket's house. p80. 12 Mar 1667. John Sackett's "five acres over the brooke." p62. 16 Feb 1669. John Sacket is appointed one of three men to lay out grants of land. p63. 23 Mar 1669/70. The three men are sacked for neglecting their duties and are replaced. p72. Sackett's Brook was originally called "Tomhaumucke." p86/7. Original allotment of land. p91.  In a short biography of John, Lockwood states that John was born in 1632,

John married Abigail Hannum (daughter of William Hannum and Honor Capen) 23 Nov. 1659 in Springfield almost five months after the death of his brother Simon Jr. in the same town. Sometime after his marriage to Abigail, he sold his land at Springfield and removed to property he had purchased some fifteen miles up the CT River at Northampton (where his father-in-law William Hannum lived). The Pynchon Court records indicate that the move could have been as late as 1662: Page 165: "...; for John Sackett's 'not performing his bargayne in thatching the Town barne' (an action by the selectmen of Springfield)..." County Court (1660-1662) See Also: Page 240 "[*78] the selectmen of Springfield complayne contra John Sackett of the same town for not performing his bargayne in thatching the Town barne:" (c. 1658-59). From this it would appear that John Sackett had made an agreement to thatch the town's barn, but had not carried through with the agreement. This situation was dealt with between 1660 and 1662.

From a record in the account books of John Pynchon we have an indication that John Sackett had some problems while in Springfield. Volume II, 1657-1666; page 376 "An acot of what I haue Reed in of fines & c which were a County setled here would be due to the County" There are three listings for February 1659 and then: "(torn) 60 (1660?) Reed (read) John Sackuts fine for striking Henry Curtis in wampam (Note: Henry Curtis died in Northampton in 1661.)" [The administration of his estate is covered in Pynchon Court Records. There is nthing in the records concerning the estate of Henry Curtis to indicate whether or not Henry's death was related to the incident for which John Sackett was fined. - T. King] We then have the following case involving John Sackett: "John Sackett had been presented to the court at Springfield, September, 24 1661 upon suspicion of dealing in strong liquor. In the proceedings at Northampton in March 1661/62, he was fined 40s. for the offense, but additional questions had been raised. How, the magistrates asked, could a man of such small estate have in his house so large a quantity of Indian trading goods, among them trays, kettles, bear pelts, and deerskins. Sackett replied that he had bought them from the natives for corn and wampum, implying the he sold no liquor to obtain them. The court adjudged, however, that he had broken the law and stipulated full payment of the penalty of 100 pounds. When Sackett pleaded that the skins were acquired more than a year before, the fine was remitted, but he was sternly admonisshed to behave himself in the future or the present proceedings would be used against him." footnote: Where Sackett obtained his trading goods is a mystery, for his account with Pynchon shows no significant quantity (of purchses by John

The Pynchon Court Records give the following:  Page 255: "John Sackett being presented to this Corte uppon suspision of Sellig Strong Liquors to Indians: there appearinge some difficulty in it about the proofe of such offence, the matter was referred to the Corte at Northampton next March: And he was bound to this Corte in the summe of 10 pounds then and there to appeare to make further answer when he shalbe called: and his bond for appearance at this Corte is to be voyd:" "At the March 1662 sitting of the commissioners at Northampton, with the powers of the County Court:  Page 260: [11] "John Sacketts fyne." "John Sackett beinge at the Corte at Springfield September 24, 1661 bound in a bond of 10 pounds to appeare at this Corte to answer to suspicions of his selling of liquors to Indians: He appearinge at this Corte and there beinge many grounds of suspicions that he had Sold much liquors to the Indians: and it beinge proved that he had Sold unto them 1 pinte he was fyned 40s to the County: And it beinge pleaded aginst him considering his estate how he could have soe much goods in his house of Indian trade as trayes kettles peltry of Beare and deere Skins he said he bought them of the Indians for wampam and corne. The Corte adjudged he had broken the law about trading peltry incurring the penalty of 100 pounds which the Corte adjudges him to pay to the ounty: only execution thereof shalbe respited till the first Sessions of the Generall Corte be ended. John Sackett the next day pleadinge that these skins were traded above a yeere agoe and probability thereof appearinge: his 100 pounds fyne was remitted: Only he is to behave himselfe well in those respects for future. And if he be found suspicious in such matters hearafter: these things shall stand as witness against him which he sonsented to:" It would appear from these records that John Sackett was still living in Springfield in September 1661 and that he was probably still a resident of Springfield in March 1662 when he appeared before the court in Northampton. Because of the uncertainty as to when John moved from Springfield to Northampton, there is disagreement as to where some of his children were born. Some sources have John Jr., b. 1660; William, b. 1662; Abigaile, b. 1663 as being born in Springfield while others have them born in Northampton. I believe that the above court records would indicate that Springfield was probably the place of their birth. Then we have Mary, 1665, listed as probably born in Northampton followed by : Hannah, b. 1668/69; Mary, b. 1672; Samuel, b. 1674; Elizabeth, b. 1677 and Abigail, b. 1683; who are all listed as born in Westfield. After his move to Northampton he remained there until about 1665/6, when he sold that property and moved to a farm purchased of one (Samuel?) Chapin near Westfield, on what are now called Sackett's Meadows. His removal to Westfield was at the date of the first permanent settlement of that town, and was about ten years prior to the beginning of King Philip's Indian Wars in 1775. "The first house in Westfield was built by John Sackett; John Sackett, with Walter Lee and John Sexton, were the earliest settlers. Sackett had a house here before February, 1667. The house was probably a pioneer cabin and cellar, dug into hill and bank, boarded up and thatched over. It was located just east of the site of the old Springdale Paper Mill." - From: "Western Massachusetts History: Woronoco, The Present Westfield"; pages 2 and 3. The following record shows that John had a house there prior to February 1667: "At certain points it was necessary to establish gates to admit of passage into and across the large enclosed tract. At a meeting at Worronoco alias Streamfield, February 11, 1667, it was "ordered that a convenient Gate easy and handy shutting & opening shall by the proprietors of that field be set up by the last of March next, which gate is appointed to be set over the brook from Sackets house further into the meadow about a rod and a half further than formerly, and the fence to be made firm and good at both ends up to it." A little later it was ordered that "the gate by Sackets be well hung for the security of the field by the 25th of this inst. March and after yt time who ever shall leave open or not shut the gate shall pay 5s to the use of the proprietors." - From: Westfield and Its Historic Influences 1669 – 1919; The Life of an Early Town With a Survey of Events in New England and Bordering Regions to which it was related  in Colonial and Revolutionary Times; by Rev. John H. Lockwood, D.D.; page 58. p80 "March the 12th 1667 "The Inhabitants of Waranoco spetially those that live at the Cellars judging it necessary that there should be a highway across the wett meadow under the hill for their passage to the pyne plains. "The Committee doe determine order & appoint George Phelps & John Williams to lay out a high way where it is most convenient for the end aforesaid. And it is determined that if John Sacketts five acres over the brooke doe come within the common fence that then he shall fence for it

proportionally with other men in the common fence."

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On 19 Nov 1667 John Sackett's daughter Mary Sackett died. She was born in 1665 while John lived at Northampton.

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From: "Western Massachusetts History: Woronoco, The Present Westfield" ; pages 2 and 3. (Provided by: seeker@postnet.com (Linda Lewis)) .the first house in Westfield was built by John Sackett, a descendant of Simon Sackett who came to America in 1630 on the ship Lyon, ten years after the Mayflower. John Sackett, with Walter Lee and John Sexton, were the earliest settlers. Sackett had a house here before February, 1667. The house was probably a pioneer cabin and cellar, dug into hill and bank, boarded up and thatched over. It was located just east of the site of the old Springdale Paper Mill.

In October, 1675, the Indians burned Sackett's house, as well as three others. Sackett and his wife had been blessed with three children while living on this site; Mary, born in 1672; Samuel, born in 1674; and Elizabeth, born in 1676. Their other children were born in Springfield and two in Northampton. Sackett rebuilt his house right away after the burning, and it is not known whether Elizabeth was born in the rebuilt house or in a log house her father built a short time later on five acres of land at the end of what is now Western Avenue. The land for the new house had been taken by Sackett in trade for an equal amount of land at the site of his rebuilt home, which had been located in rather boggy meadow land. The well Sackett dug for his log house could be seen as late as 1961, when the area was graded and the well covered over. The log house stood just west of the Sackett Tavern which property today is owned by Mr. and Mrs. William A. Fuller.

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p62 "This Towne doth now therefore Order & appoynt mr James Cornish John Roote Thomas Dewey & John Sackett or any three of them to lay out the aforesaid graunt of land adjoyning to what is already allowed them from this Towne, or shalbe most to ye advantage of ye Inhabitants of Worronoco: only they are not to intrench uppon ye bounds fixt & Sett, or to be Sett as aforesaid between them & Vs. "That this is a true copy taken out of the Town Records at Springfeild. Feb. 16, 1669 Attest. Elizur Holyoke, Recorder."" p63

.the first house in Westfield was built by John Sackett, a descendant of Simon Sackett who came to America in 1630 on the ship Lyon, ten years after the Mayflower. John Sackett, with Walter Lee and John Sexton, were the earliest settlers. Sackett had a house here before February, 1667. The house was probably a pioneer cabin and cellar, dug into hill and bank, boarded up and thatched over. It was located just east of the site of the old Springdale Paper Mill.

In October, 1675, the Indians burned Sackett's house, as well as three others. Sackett and his wife had been blessed with three children while living on this site; Mary, born in 1672; Samuel, born in 1674; and Elizabeth, born in 1676. Their other children were born in Springfield and two in Northampton. Sackett rebuilt his house right away after the burning, and it is not known whether Elizabeth was born in the rebuilt house or in a log house her father built a short time later on five acres of land at the end of what is now Western Avenue. The land for the new house had been taken by Sackett in trade for an equal amount of land at the site of his rebuilt home, which had been located in rather boggy meadow land. The well Sackett dug for his log house could be seen as late as 1961, when the area was graded and the well covered over. The log house stood just west of the Sackett Tavern which property today is owned by Mr. and Mrs. William A. Fuller.

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p62 "This Towne doth now therefore Order & appoynt mr James Cornish John Roote Thomas Dewey & John Sackett or any three of them to lay out the aforesaid graunt of land adjoyning to what is already allowed them from this Towne, or shalbe most to ye advantage of ye Inhabitants of Worronoco: only they are not to intrench uppon ye bounds fixt & Sett, or to be Sett as aforesaid between them & Vs. "That this is a true copy taken out of the Town Records at Springfeild. Feb. 16, 1669 Attest. Elizur Holyoke, Recorder.""

On October 27, 1675, during the Indian uprising known as King Philips War, John's house and barn near Westfield were burned during an Indian raid. The normal proceedure for that time was for a few houses to be fortified. During Indian raids, those living in the unfortified houses would take refuge in the fortified houses. This left the Indians free to raid and burn the unprotected buildings. This incident is covered in the following account from Lockwood's Westfield: "The Indian Menace, Philip's War; p. 217-8 The people of Springfield had to depend upon the mills at Westfield for the grinding of their corn though the way there was long, rough, and precarious owing to the menace of skulking enemies. Rev. Mr. Taylor, writing of conditions during that frightful period (the autumn of 1675), says, "but summer coming opened a door unto that, desolating war began by Philip, Sachem of the Pakonoket Indians, by which this handful was sorely pressed, yet sovereignty preserved, but yet not so as that we should be wholly exempted from the fury of war, for our soil was moistened by the blood of three Springfield men, young Goodman Dumbleton, who came to our mill, and two sons of Goodman Brooks, who came here to look after the iron ore on the land he had lately bought of Mr. John Pynchon, Esq. who being persuaded by Springfield folk, went to accompany them, but fell in the way by the first assault of the enemy upon us, at which time they burnt Mr. Cornish's house to ashes and also John Sacket's with his barn and what was in it, being the first snowy day of winter; they also at this time lodged a bullet in George Granger's leg, which was the next morning taken out by Mr. Bulkley, and the wound soon healed. It was judged that the enemy did receive some loss at this time, because in the ashes of Mr. Cornish's house were found pieces of the bones of a man lying about the length of a man in the ashes."

"The following pathetic and reasonable plea must have been granted: "Worshipful Sir – together with the Hond Council. "The allwise Providence of God having brought these desolating wars into our parts the summer past, & thereby calling us not only to the expense of a great part of our estate on public occasions; but also threatening ruin both unto the rest & to ourselves, it was a question with some of us whether we were in our way or not to abide the event. The which seems the harder to resolve when there came (from whence we well know not) a report that there would be no allowance for such charges as should be expended in quartering soldiers (the which should be a truth would most certainly break up our plantation & now undo the most here) but seeing neither equity in any such report or thing, and considering what as our judgment it is for towns to be laid desolate and made ruinous heaps, as also that our calling & livelihood lay in this place, the hand of God seemed to point out unto us some special duty of self denial, wherein we stood bound with respect to the public benefit and hereupon we adventured (not troubling you for advice) in keeping our station to draw out our estates in public uses & in the service of God & his people, in quartering of soldiers in maintaining of a garrison here, sometimes consisting of about 20, sometimes above 40 & near about 30 soldiers as also in quartering Hartford soldiers in their passing to & from, sometimes being more & sometimes less, sometimes leaving 40 or 50 or 60 Indian soldiers with them as also in sending posts &c from the latter end of August until this instant. "Therefore having now expended a great part of our estate thus in obedience to the call of Providence we proceed to leave unto your consideration an account thereof & proceeding upon the common say, that things are with us, as for a man 4/ per week, for a horse 1/ at grass and 1/6 at hay, as for corn, wheat being at 3/6, Indian & oats 2/ per bushel, as for flesh meat, pork being at 3d and beef at 2d per pound. Also allowing a post 3d per mile he bearing all the charges (we say proceeding according to these rates of things) our public expenses on Hartford soldiers amounts to Ð124.16.7 from the latter end of August to the 19th of November and our public expenses from the 19th of Nov. to March 3d 1675-6 (being just 15 weeks) the which have been disbursed on the garrison soldiers left here by the Com. in Chief. Capt. Ap. amounts to Ð87.13.0. To which we add troopers arrearages 25/ and for killing 2 wolves 20/ which being added to the summers charges is Ð127.1.7 out of which subtracting the County rates last summer demanded which come to 36.0.8 the remainder 90.13.6 being that which we are still out on public credit, the which 90.13.6 of our charges on Hartford soldiers being added to the 87.13.0 the total is 178.6.6 that which we have still expended on public account which is believed to be a faithful account as we are able with the best diligence we could use to gather up. Only the last of the 3 county rates would not we judge have come to so much as is set down, being that the list of our estates did not arise to so much, as you may see; but not having at present to correct aright we let it go at present. Thus having faithfully laid down our expenses before you to your consideration & desiring the Almighty to give you in all your consultations unto such events as he of his grace shall bless to your good, & peace of his poor wilderness people, we remain your humble servts. John Sacket, Constable John Root, Commissary Westfield, 15.1.1675-6 [Mar. 15, 1676. Handwriting of Rev. E. Taylor] (Judd Ms. Forbes Library.) p231 "These operations [the Indian war] must have disturbed greatly the people of Westfield, and kept them in a state of perpetual alarm. This is pathetically evidenced by the following record in the town's archives: "March 26, 1676. "The town considering that the hand of God is upon us in having or letting loose the heathen upon us so that now wee cannot carry on our occasion for lively hood as formerly & considering that it is not a time now to advans our estates but to deny ourselves of our former advantages that so wee may carry on something together for the good of the whole, that so by God's blessing on our labours we may be in a way of getting food for our familyes, therefore in case the honored counsel did not cost * * * we agree to carry on as followeth –  We agree to fence only the northeast field and

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and we agree to plow and sow and carry on the improvement of this land in general, that is such as shall agree thereunto as it shall be ordered by some men we shall appoint, who shall go out to work and who shall tarry at home from day to day, and if it shall please God to give opertunity to rattfy the long fit of our labors each man shall receive an equal proporson according to his family; necessary publick charges being first cleared and the rest if any man sowes more seed than his proporson he shall receive that again in the first place. "The men chosen to order the whole matter for service and fencing are goodman Ashly Senr & goodman Gun. We who agree here unto do promise & engage to submit ourselves to the said propositions thereof as "Witness our hands "George Phelps Josiah Dewey Thomas Gun Nathaniel Weller Samuel Loomis Thomas Dewey Isaac Phelps John Sacket

David Ashley Edward Neal"

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Pynchon Court Records: Page 291 [*169] July 5th 1679. At A Court By Major Pynchon : John Sackut Plantiff against James Sexton for Beating and wounding his son William Sackut: As also for Pound breach or rescuing of swine goeing to Pound. John Sackut appearing also his son William charges James Sexton with Beating him at the Pound dore when some of the hogs were in the Pound he gave him 3 blows with his fist and tooke him by the Throat and hindered the putting the rest of the hogs into the Pound. It being not so cleare yet very suspicious by Samuell Loomis Oath I only Judge James Sexton to allow for the entry of action and summons 3s 6d. James Sexton fyned 20s I say: 20s [Marginal notation.] For the rescuing of the swine It being evident by Testymony on file: I find for the plantiff himself and sons attendance 4s 3 witness 6 Coming for Atachemnt 2s Atachment and for seerving it 3.6 2 sumons for witness 0.6 all is (total) 17s 6d And likewise for Rescuing the swine I fine James Sexton to the County 40s which I afterward abated to 20s And so he is to pay the County: I say 20s. I gave 6 Months tyme for the payment and John Minor Ingaged with him and for the payment of [illegible] in 6 months.

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Sacketts and Indians The records show that Elizabeth Sackett (b. 27 May 1777) died on June 15, 1682, but long research proves this was false. Elizabeth was actually captured by Indians during a raid, other members of the family managing to get safely into the log house. Rev. E. Davis, in a history of this area, mentions the fact that the Indians captured a daughter of John Sackett and took her to northern New York. Here she was raised as an Indian. Later, around 1710, Elizabeth visited Westfield with her Indian husband and son and daughter. As they were not used to living in a log house, they built a teepee where they lived while in Westfield. They eventually left and Elizabeth never returned, but her son grew up to be an Indian Chief and took his mother's name of Sackett. In later years Chief Sackett was well known around the area for his raids and he is mentioned by J.G. Holland in his History of Western Massachusetts as having attacked a detachment of soldiers near Heath, Massachuetts in 1748. - From: "Western Massachusetts History: Woronoco, The Present Westfield"; pages 2

and 3 [Additional information From Lockwood's Westfield; p. 367: "King George's War In June, 1748, Captain Humphry of Springfield was ordered to go from Charlestown, through the woods, to Fort Shirley, with a force of forty men. When they reached the present location of Marlborough in Vermont, about twelve miles northwest of Fort Dummer, he halted to rest his men. They were refreshing themselves on a piece of ground on which grew alders and many large trees, through which a rivulet flowed, when the guard posted by Hobbs on the trail was driven in by a large body of Indians, commanded by a chief named Sackett, a half-breed descendant of a captive taken at Westfield in an earlier war. Though startled by the sudden onslaught, and totally ignorant of the strength of his opponents, Hobbs and his company immediately prepared for action, each man selecting a tree for cover. The English had learned much about frontier warfare since the days of Bloody Brook in Philip's War. Hoyt's account says: "Confident of victory from their superiority of numbers, the enemy rushed up, and received Hobbs' well directed fire, which cut down a number and checked their impetuosity. Covering themselves also with trees and brush, the action became warm, and a severe conflict ensued between sharpshooters. The two commanders had been known to each other in time of peace, and both bore the character of intrepidity. Sackett, who could speak English, in a stentorian voice frequently called upon Hobbs to surrender, and threatened, in case of refusal, to rush in with the tomahawk. Hobbs, in a voice which shook the forest, as often returned a defiance, and urged his enemy to put his threats in execution. The action continued with undaunted resolution and not unfrequently [sic] the enemy approached Hobbs' line; but were driven back to their first position by the fatal fire of his sharp-sighted marksmen; and thus about four hours elapsed, with neither side given up an inch of their original ground. At length, finding Hobbs determined on either death or victory, and that his own men had suffered severely, Sackett ordered a retreat, carrying off his dead and wounded, and allowing his antagonist to continue his march without further molestation." (Indian Wars, p.250.) The size of Sackett's force is estimated by Hoyt at fully four times that of the English. Later in the same summer a part of the same band killed and wounded several settlers in the region of Fort Dummer and Northfield. This half-breed chief was probably familiar with the region about Westfield. Doctor Davis, in his historical sketch of Westfield, the only copy of which known to be extant is carefully preserved in the Westfield Atheneum, says, referring to an earlier period, "A daughter of the second wife of a Mr. Sackett (her name I do not know) was taken captive by the Indians and carried captive to the

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John P Sackett, Sr.'s Timeline

1632
1632
Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States
1656
1656
Age 24
1658
April 24, 1658
Age 26
Probably Wallingford, Connecticut Colony
1659
November 23, 1659
Age 27
Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, USA
1660
November 4, 1660
Age 28
Northampton, Hampshire, MA, USA
1662
April 20, 1662
Age 30
Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
1663
December 1, 1663
Age 31
Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA
1665
1665
Age 33
Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts
1672
June 8, 1672
Age 40
Westfield, Hampden Co., MA, USA
1674
September 16, 1674
Age 42
Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, USA