Capt. John Stanton

Is your surname Stanton?

Research the Stanton family

Capt. John Stanton's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

John Stanton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Stonington, New London, Connecticut
Death: Died in Stonington, New London, Connecticut
Place of Burial: on his homestead farm, Stonington, New London, CT
Immediate Family:

Son of Hon. Thomas Stanton and Ann Stanton
Husband of Hannah Anna Stanton
Father of John Stanton, Jr.; Joseph Stanton, Sr.; Thomas Stanton; Anne Stanton; Theophilus Stanton and 1 other
Brother of Thomas Stanton, Jr.; Mary Rogers; Daniel David Stanton; Sarah Tibbits; Hannah Lord Palmer and 4 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Stanton

  • 'A record, genealogical, biographical, statistical, of Thomas Stanton, of his descendants. 1635-1891 (1891)
  • http://archive.org/details/cu31924029771999
  • http://archive.org/stream/cu31924029771999#page/n70/mode/1up
  • Pg. 65
  • Thomas(1) Stanton m. Ann Lord ch: Thomas(2) (m. Sarah Denison), 'John(3) (m. Hannah Thompson)', Mary(4) (m. Samuel Rogers), Hannah(5) (m. Nehemiah Palmer), Joseph(6) (m. Hannah Mead, Hannah Lord, Unknown, possibly Miss Prentice), (Pg. 66 Daniel(7), Dorothy(8) (m. Rev. James Noyes), Robert(9) (m. Joanna Gardiner), Sarah(10) (m. Thomas Prentice, Wm. Denison), Samuel(11) (m. Borodell Denison) Stanton
  • http://archive.org/stream/cu31924029771999#page/n141/mode/1up
  • Pg. 136
  • 'children of Capt. John(3) and Hannah (Thompson) Stanton', were John(137) (m. Mary), Joseph(138) (m. Margaret Cheseboro), Thomas(139) (m. Anna), Ann, Theophilus(140) (m. Elizabeth Rogers), Dorothy Stanton
  • _____________

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~md600/Stanton-08-08.html

  • ==================

From http://www.genealogysf.com/Stanton-p/p19.htm#i1268

John was born at Hartford, Conn, in 1641. He was the son of Thomas Stanton and Ann Lord. He married Hannah Thompson in 1664. John died on 31 October 1713 A few years before his death, Capt. John Stanton gave his real estate to his sons by deed, as follows: to Joseph he gave the homestead farm in Stonington; to John and Thomas he gave all his lands in Preston. Theophilus, was not living then. John and Thomas, settled on the lands in Preston. His will, dated in 1713, confirms these gifts of land. In 1737, his son John, then of Preston, applied to the Probate Court in New London, for an equitable division of the Preston lands between him and his brother Thomas. A few years ago (from 1891), in opening a gravel bank near the site of Capt. John's house, the laborers came to a space about six by eight feet, well stoned, containing a few portions of bones. Dr. George D. Stanton visited the place and is of the opinion that it was the burying place of Capt. John and his family. at Stonington, New London, CT. A few years before his death, Capt. John Stanton gave his real estate to his sons by deed, as follows: to Joseph he gave the homestead farm in Stonington; to John and Thomas he gave all his lands in Preston. Theophilus, was not living then. John and Thomas, settled on the lands in Preston. His will, dated in 1713, confirms these gifts of land. In 1737, his son John, then of Preston, applied to the Probate Court in New London, for an equitable division of the Preston lands between him and his brother Thomas. A few years ago (from 1891), in opening a gravel bank near the site of Capt. John's house, the laborers came to a space about six by eight feet, well stoned, containing a few portions of bones. Dr. George D. Stanton visited the place and is of the opinion that it was the burying place of Capt. John and his family..

John studied at Harvard and was a Captain in King Phillips War. Before his death he gave his son Joseph the homestead farm in Stonington, and John and Thomas all the lands in Preston, Connecticut. Capt. John was Captain of one of the four Connecticut Regiments in King Phillips War. He captured Canochet the chief sachem of the Narragansetts. John Stanton was a pupil of that famous old school-teacher of the Puritans, Elijah Corlet. In 1654, he and John Minor, son of Thomas Minor, were selected for teachers of the Gospel to the Indians. Both young men, however, ultimately left their studies, and devoted themselves to other pursuits. In 1664, John became the first Recorder of the town of Southertown (now Stonington). Feb. 18, 1675, John Stanton was commissioned captain of one of the four Connecticut Regiments in King Philip's War. He served with distinction in this war, and was in command at the time of the capture of Canonchet, the chief sachem of all the Narragansetts. This service was acknoledged by the "Courte" in the remittance of a fine imposed in 1675. The circumstance was a follows: He, as agent of Stonington, with five selectmen (of whom Thomas Stantonm, his father, was one), presented a petition and protest to the General Assembly of Connecticut, on behalf of the town. They protested against certain laws deemed by them unjust to their rights, peace and liberty. For so doing, one of them, Capt. Denison, was fined 10 pounds, and forbidden to hold office. Another one, Mr. John Statnon, "the towne's agent, for management of his agency, is fined ten pounds for that boldness to be paid at the latter end of summer, at Boston, in money or corn, according to order." Meanwhile came the war, and in May, 1677, the fine not yet paid, was revoked. May 10, 1710, a deed of trust was executed in favor of Capt. John Stnaton and four others, by which the eastern part of the Mohegan lands was forever settled on the Mohegan tribe, under the regulation of said five and their successors, "so long as there shall be any Mohegans found or known of alive in the world." For litigation that arose from this and futher notes as to Capt. John see Historical Part. The Stantom homestead farm in Stonington is on the banks fo the Mystic River. The site of Capt. John's mansion is still to be seen (1891). His farm of 300 acres adjoined John Gallup's on the west and Capt. George Denison's on the north. A map of it, made by Capt. Denison in 1661, in connection with his own and other farms, is still still (1891) in the possession of the Denison famly living on their ancestral homestead. The Pe-quot-se-pos brook was the dividing line between the Stanton and Denison lands. The present owner of Capt. John's lands is Joseph Stanton Williams whose mother was a Stanton. It has never passed out of possession of the family.

Last Edited=29 Jun 2008 Children of Capt John Stanton and Hannah Thompson

   * John Stanton Jr+ b. 22 May 1665, d. Jul 1755
   * Joseph Stanton+ b. 22 Jan 1668, d. 1751
   * Thomas Stanton+ b. Apr 1670
   * Ann Stanton b. 1 Oct 1673, d. 23 Mar 1680
   * Theophilus Stanton+ b. 16 Jan 1676, d. 1705
   * Dorothy Stanton b. 1680, d. 28 Apr 1699
  • --------------------

CAPTAIN JOHN STANTON

Military Service: King Philip's War

Excerpt from "Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs," Cuyler Reynolds (ed.), Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, 1911, Vol. III

"Captain John, second son of Thomas and Ann (Lord) Stanton, was born in 1641, died in Stonington, Connecticut, October 3, 1713. He was a pupil of that famous old teacher of the Puritans, Elijah Corlet. In 1654 John Stanton and John Minor were selected by the court commissioners to be educated as teachers of the Gospel to the Indians. Both young men, however, left their studies and engaged in other pursuits. In 1664 John Stanton was first reader in the Southertown (Stonington) Church. February 16, 1675, he was commissioned Captain of one of the four Connecticut regiments raised to fight in King Philip's war. He served with distinction and was in command at the capture of Canonchet, the chief Sachem of all the Narragansetts. This service was acknowledged later by the "Courts" in the remission of a fine imposed for "boldness" in protesting against certain laws passed by the assembly. He married Hannah Thompson, daughter or sister of Rev. William Thompson, missionary to the Pequots, who resided in Stonington and New London until 1663, when he removed to Surrey county, Virginia. His grave is in the old burial ground at Wickaquack Cove, Connecticut. Children of John and Hannah (Thompson) Stanton: John, see forward; Joseph, married Margaret Cheeseboro, 1696; Thomas, married his cousin Anna, 1692; Ann, born October 1, 1673, died aged seven years; Theophilus, married Elizabeth Rogers, 1698; Dorothy, born 1680, died April 28, 1699."

Additional Notes: John was born in Hartford, Middlesex Co., CT in 1641. He married Hannah Thompson in 1664.

He studied war at Harvard. He was a Captain of one of the four Connecticut regiments in King Phillips War. He captured Canochet, the chief Sachem of the Narragansetts.

Before his death he gave his son, Joseph, the homestead farm in Stonington, CT., and John and Thomas all the lands in Preston, CT.

  • _____

1. John had studied at Harvard but never graduated. He was a pupil of t he famous old school teacher of the Puritans, Elijah Corlet. In 165 4, he and John Minor, son of Thomas Minor, were selected by the Court of C ommissioners to be educated for teachers of the Gospel to the Indians. Bo th left their studies and followed other pursuits

2. In 1664 John became the first Recorder of Southertown, Massachusetts w hich later became Stonington, Connecticut.

3. February 18, 1675, John was commissioned captain of one of the four Co nnecticut Regiments in King Philip's War. His command captured Canoche t, the Chief Sachem of the Narragansetts Indians. During this year John a nd four other selectmen presented a petition and protest to the General As sembly of Connecticut, on behalf of Stonington about laws unjust to the ir rights, peace and property. For doing so Captain George Denison was fi ned 10 pounds and forbidden to hold office and John "the towne's agent, f or management of his agency, is fined ten pounds for that boldnes s, to be paid at the latter end of summer, at Boston, in money or corn, ac cording to order." King Philip's War ended and May, 1677 the fine had n ot been paid and was revoked.

4. May 10, 1710, a deed of trust was executed in favor of Captain John St anton and four others, by which the eastern part of the Mohegan Indian lan ds was forever settled on the Mohegan tribe, under the regulations of sa id five and their successors, "so long as there shall be any Mohegans fou nd or known of alive in the world."

5. A few years before his death, John gave son Joseph the homestead fa rm in Stonington, and sons John and Thomas all the land in Preston, Connec ticut. Theophilus was living at the time. His will confirms these gif ts of land. In 1737 his son John applied to the New London probate cou rt for an equitable division of the Preston lands between him and his brot her Thomas. The homestead farm in Stonington was on the banks of the Myst ic River where the mansion was still standing ca 1891. The farm, of 300 a cres, adjoined John Gallup's on the west and Captain George Denison's on t he north. The pe-quot-se-pos brook was the dividing line between the Stan ton and Denison lands. A few years before 1891, while opening a gravel ba nk near the site of John's house, laborers found bones in a space of abo ut six or eight feet and well stoned. Doctor George D. Stanton visited t he location and believed it was the burying place of John and his family.

  • --------------------

He was the 2nd child of 3 children born to Thomas and Ann Lord Stanton.

Information typed by Ruth B. Porter and taken from selected portions of the "History of the Stanton Family in America".

entered by Virginia Porter Harkness 1/22/2009

  • --------------------

Military Service: King Philip's War

1. Joseph by 1669 had removed with his parents from Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut to Stonington, New London County, Connecticut where he settled on a great tract of land which his father Thomas had bought from a Narranganseet sachem for a half bushel of wampum. The sachem's child was a captive and was redeemed by the aid of Thomas for which the land was part repayment.

While in Stonington, Joseph was appointed assistant magistrate to hold court in New London, New London County, Connecticut with his father who was magistrate.

2. Boston records describe Joseph as "Joseph Stanton of Squanicot, Narranganset county, King's Province" and on a lease dated November 20, 1685 "half the farm or neck named Quannecontague, where I do now live." This land, then part of Charlestown, Washington County, Rhode Island later became part of Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island.

3. May 1714, Ben Uncas and 54 other Mohegans signed a paper affirming Oweneco had wrongfully sold a great part (western) of their lands and they th en consigned what was left to a "Joseph Stanton" and 4 others. It is not know if this Joseph was Joseph Senior or Joseph Junior but the land continued to be owned by descendants of Joseph through at least 1858.

4. Joseph received half of the estate of his father-in-law's (Joseph Mead) will of 168

  • ______________________
view all 28

Capt. John Stanton's Timeline

1641
1641
Stonington, New London, Connecticut
1645
March 21, 1645
Age 4
Hartford
1646
March 21, 1646
Age 5
Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
March 21, 1646
Age 5
Hartford, Litchfield, Connecticut
March 21, 1646
Age 5
Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
1664
1664
Age 23
Stonington, New London, Connecticut
1665
May 22, 1665
Age 24
1668
January 22, 1668
Age 27
Stonington, New London Co., CT
1671
April 30, 1671
Age 30
Stonington, New London, Connecticut
1673
October 1, 1673
Age 32
Stonington, New London Co., CT, USA