John Terrell, of Pamunkey Neck (1707 - 1787) MP

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Birthplace: Pamunkey Neck, St. Pauls Parish, New Kent, Virginia
Death: Died in Franklin, North Carolina, United States
Occupation: Planter, tavern keeper
Managed by: Bjørn P. Brox
Last Updated:

About John Terrell, of Pamunkey Neck

John Terrell

  • birth: 1707, Pamunkey Neck, New Kent, Virginia
  • death: 1785 Franklin, North Carolina, United States
  • Father:  William Terrell (1659 - 1744)
  • Mother:  Martha Waters (abt 1655 - 1734)
  • Wife: Sarah, Elizabeth Harrison

MISC TITLE/OCCUPATION: Planter

From http://02ec0a3.netsolhost.com/getperson.php?personID=I13447&tree=ncshawfamily

BIO: John Terrell born in New Kent County, Virginia, probably between 1705-1710, son of William and Susannah Terrell, died in Franklin County, North Carolina sometime after 20 September 1783, the date of 
his will. A copy of his will follows below.

He first established his home in Caroline County, where his brothers, William, David, Henry, and James lived. In the Land Patent Books, of the State Land Office at Richmond, there is a patent to John
Terrell, of Caroline County for 800 acres of land in Spottsylvania County, Virginia dated 28 Sept. 1730, given in two tracts of 400 acres each, in the first fork of the Rapidan River in St. Georges Parish.
(Bk. 14, pp. 38, 41). In 1736, he bought a tract of land in Caroline County from Zachary Martin. In 1741, Timothy Terrell acknowledged his deed of settlement with livery of and endorsed thereon, to John Terrell, which was ordered to be recorded. (Caroline O. B. 1741-1746, p. 49)

According to Emma Dicken, John Terrell was married twice while living in Caroline County, Virginia. She states that the first wife, Elizabeth, was probably the mother of his children. His will bears this out, as it names Elizabeth as the mother of John Terrell's children that are named in the will. Elizabeth was still alive as of the date of his will, 20 September 1783, as several bequests are made to her.

Emma Dicken mentions a second marriage to Sarah that seems to have been of short duration as 10 April, 1741, she was sueing for a divorce. While this case was pending in Chancery, they came to an agreement regarding alimony; and in April 1742, it was stated that he had conveyed to her a certain amount of property with John Mouldin acting as her trustee. No children were named in the suit. SEE THE BOTTOM NOTE ON FACT ELIZABETH WAS COMMON LAW WIFE.

There seems to be something of a discrepancy here. We know that Jeptha Terrell, John Terrell's son, was born in the 1730's. His mother is named as Elizabeth in the will. The only solution that seems to fit it that the marriage to Sarah may have been the first marriage, and the dates for the Chancery suit mentioned above may have been 1731 and 1732 rather than 1741 and 1742. Based on this assumption, we are going to show Sarah as the first wife and Elizabeth as the second wife of John Terrell.

It appears that he left someone to represent him in business matters and went on to North Carolina about 1743 or 1744. This move was probably made soon after the death of his father, William Terrell. In Orange County, Virginia in Deed Book 10, p. 443, is a deed dated 14 March, 1745 from John Terrell, of Edgecombe County, North Carolina to John Scott, Gentleman, of St. Margarets Parish, Caroline County, Virginia, conveying 400 acres of land lying on the north side of the Rapidan in the first fork thereof adjoining the land of John Scott and Col. John Grymes. This was no doubt the same tract of land patented to John Terrell in 1730, then in Spotsylvania, but in Orange County after 1734.

According to the Colonial Records of North Carolina, Vol. I, page 635, John Terrell's Petition for Warrant of Land for 500 acres, in two tracts of 200 and 300 acres respectively, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina was granted by the Council meeting in Edenton, North Carolina on 25 July 1743.

He seems to have settled in Edgecombe which originally was a very large county extending to the Virginia line on the northern boundary. His land first in Edgecombe became a part of Granville in 1746 when that county was created from a part of the northern section of Edgecombe. In 1764 he was placed in Bute by the erection of that county from a part of Granville. In 1779 Bute was obliterated, and Warren and Franklin were formed from that territory. This Land Grant was in what is now Franklin County, North Carolina on the south side of Sandy Creek.

Though he may never have changed his place of residence throughout the years he had lived in North Carolina, he had been a citizen of four counties, eighteen years of which had been spent in Granville, and accounts for the statement of John D. Terrell that he lived in that county.

According to the reference, the first appearance of John Terrell in the records of Granville County, NC, which was created in 1746, was in 1747 - "on Tar river."

At a session of Granville County Court, June 2, 1747 that was convened at the house of Mr. W'm Eaton, M'r Jn'o Tyrrell was Foreman of "The Grand Jury Impanneld & Sworn..."

According to Rev. E. H. Davis in "Historical Sketches of Franklin County", and others; John Terrell was reputedly the first European to settle on the south side of Sandy Creek in what was then Edgecombe County and is now Franklin County, North Carolina.

On Dec. 1, 1747, Joseph Hunt complains vs John Terrill that he "will either Murder him or do him some Bodily hurt." The Ct. ordered that he "stand committed to the custody of the Sheriff" until he give 40 pounds bond, with 2 surties for 20 pounds each, for his good behavior "for one twelve month & a day next coming." On the next day he gives bond, with James Paine & Wm. Person, surties. According to the reference, this was the first peace proceeding. Also, the first appearance of Hunt on records.

On Aug. 30, 1748, Jno Terril petitions Granville County Court setting "forth that he is oppressed w'th Coasters &c Leave is granted to the s'd Terril to keep a publick House., giving bond, etc.

The License of John Terril to keep a "publick House (Ordinary)" is renewed on Sept. 4, 1751 and again on Sept 20, 1759.

John Terrell and Jephthah Terrell were on the List of 1750 Taxables in Granville County, NC. John Terrell and his son, James, were listed at No. 31 on the 1762 List of Granville County Taxables in Terrell's District by Sol. Alston.
John Terrell made a Gift of Slaves to his "Reputed Children"; Daughter Loruhamah, wife of Jacob Bledsoe; son Jephtha Terrell; son John Terrell; daughter Ann(e), wife of William Martin; and Agnes, daughter of Ann and William Martin, who was the wife of Robert Washington. Deed dated July 7, 1764, recorded August Court, 1764.

On 18 Jan. 1765, John Terrell made a bond for building and maintaining a bridge over Sandy Creek for a period of seven years. (N. C. Mis. Ct. Papers, 1764-1779 Bute County.) In 1771 he was charged with twelve tithables in Bute County. On 4 Sept 1779 John Terrell sold 135 acres of land lying on the south side of Sandy Creek, and he was then in Franklin County.

On the 7th Sept 1779 he sold for 266 pds. Proc. money to Peter Tatum of Franklin County 25 acres of land lying on the south bank of Sandy Creek and on the millpond adjoining Thomas Hill, it being part of a tract that had been issued to him by Governor Gabriel Johnston. This sale was proved by Joel Terrell at September court. (Ct. Min Franklin Co.)

On 15 March 1780 Richard Caswell, governor, granted to John Terrell 640 acres of land in Franklin County on the south side of Tar River. (D. B. 2, p. 95)

Will of John Terrell of Franklin County, North Carolina


Dated: 20 September 1783


Interpreted by: James M. Allen, Jr.
Compiler's note: I have inserted question marks in the place of those letters or words that I have been unable to interpret or translate and would appreciate correction of any errors the reader may find. I have also indented each separate ITEM of bequest in an effort to make the document more readable. I have not changed any spellings or added any punctuation. Also, there is scholarly disagreement regarding the translation/use of the word reputed/respected in the will. Consequently, I have shown this word as (reputed/respected) wherever it occurs. Additional study will be needed to resolve this matter.

In the name of God amen I John Terrell of the County of Franklin in the State of North Carolina being somewhat in Disposed in body but of perfect sence & Memory thanks be to God for his Mercies but knowing the frailty of human nature & that it is Decreed that all men must surely die do make & ordain this my last will & testament as followeth that is I give & bequeath my soul to God who gave it & my body to the Earth to be Decently buried at the Discretion of my Executors & as to my worldly Estate
I give & bequeath to my (reputed/respected) wife Elizabeth who is called & known by the name of Elizabeth Terrell & with whom I have Cohabited ???? ????? my furniture I desire is then provided 5 Negro slaves towit Mingo big Jack old Saul Lidia & Willy also my Mill on Sandy Creek & all my household Furniture & such of my stock as she may think fit during her life & after her Decease to be Disposed of as hereafter shall be Decreed. ITEM I Give & bequeath to my (reputed/respected) Daughter Loruhimah born of the body of Elizabeth Harrison aforesaid (reputed/respected) wife the Four Negro slaves towit Mourning Phebe Patch & after her mother's Death old Sal together with the said Negros increase ITEM I give & bequeath to my (reputed/respected) son Jeptha called & known by the name of Jeptha Terrell born of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth the labour of the 5 negro slaves following During his life & after his decease to his children as he shall think proper to them & their heirs forever towit Sare & her child & their increase James & little Jack & after his mother Deceases big Jack ITEM I give & bequeath to my (reputed/respected) Daughter Anne born of the body of the afsd Elizabeth the 4 following Negro slaves towit Judy & her Child little Amy old Amys Child & little Jenny Lidias child together their increase to her & her heirs For Ever ITEM I give & bequeath to my (reputed/respected) son Joel born of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth 7 Negro slaves towit Bob Sam Old Amys Child Amy old Sals child little Saul Peter & Priscila Sabina Lidias Children & after his mothers Death Lady I also Give him the plantation & tract of Land whereon I now live together with another tract adjoining thereto to Him & his Heirs & assigns for ever. ITEM I give & bequeath to my (Reputed/respected) son Timothys children called & known in his lifetime by the Name of Timothy Terrell born of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth the 4 following Negro slaves towit Andi Buck & his increase Nat & after their grandmothers Decease Willy & his increase to be Equally Divided among them as they come of age that is the boys to the age of 21 & the girls to the age of 18 It is also my will & Desire that the widow of my (reputed/respected) Son Timothy shall have a childs part during her life that such part to return to the to the children of the said Timothy & be Equally Divided among them. ITEM I give & bequeath to my (reputed/ respected) son Johns children who was called & known in his Lifetime by the name of John Terrell begotten of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth as followeth to his daughter Elizabeth one Negro Slave old Amy to her & her heirs for ever. To his son Richmond one negro Girl Lucie to him & his heirs for ever. To his daughter Susannah one negro boy Will to her & her heirs forever I also give & bequeath to my (reputed/respected) son Johns Children above mentioned the value of One Good negro to be Equally Divided among them & lastly my will & desire is that all & every part of my Estate which I have not herein before particularly mentioned & disposed of in Legacies together with my Mill on Sandy Creek before mentioned be
divided into 6 Equal totts & Equally Divided by Drawing for the same by my 4 (reputed/respected) Children towit Jeptha Joel Lorihuma & Anne aforesaid & the Orphans of the two Deceased John & Timothy & whoever receives the Mill is not to have his till the Death their Mother or Grand Mother as the case may happen. I hereby Nominate & appoint Jeptha Terrell & Joel Terrell & Jenkins Devaney Executors of this my Last will & testament hereby revoking all other Wills heretofore made or Executed. In Witness Whereof I have hereunto affixed my hand & seal this 20 Day of Septm. 1783 cs. Signed sealed & acknowledged in the presence of
Elias Daviney his
Luckey Daviney John Terrell (Seal)
her mark
Susannah Brooks
mark
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In Deed Book 6, p. 192 Franklin County, NC, is recorded a deed made by Benjamin Sewell as Sheriff of Franklin County, dated 19 March 1789 to Jeptha Terrell, of Wake County. "By order of the Worshipful court of Franklin County and agreeable to the last will and testament of John Terrell, deceased, he the said Benjamin Sewell as Sheriff as aforesaid was authorized to sell a certain tract or parcel of land in the said county of Franklin hereafter to be mentioned, as also other property left by the deceased in order that a Division might be made among the Legatees, agreeable to the Order of the Court afs'd and after giving due and lawful notice...conveys 700 acres on both sides of the Mill Run granted James Terrell by Lord Granville 1761, conveyed to John Terrell 1764 and bounded as followeth:" etc. Consideration 170 pounds. Jeptha sold this tract which was on the north side of Tar River 9 Nov. 1793. Benjamin Burnitt of Lancaster County, SC appointed Captain Joseph Green Hill as his attorney to recover and receive all of his legacy due from the estate of John Terrell, Senr., late of Warren or Franklin Counties and formerly of Bute County, left in the hands of Jepthah and Joel Terrell, executors to the said John Terrell's estate, who was the grandfather to my wife, Elizabeth, daughter to John Terrell, Junr., deceased, this Feb. 20, 1787. WIT: Fed. Kimbell, Benjamin Kimbell, Harrison Hicks, Charles Cordle.
<
NAME: John Terrell, Sr.<
SPOUSE: Elizabeth Harrison< I received the below email 10/99 from Sharon Withers and that explains the two "wives" that John had: [As to John Terrell, Jeptha's father, and Elizabeth Harrison---the reason John refers to Elizabeth as his "reputed wife" and their children as "reputed children" is that they were never legally married. John married a Sarah ? in Caroline County, VA but soon took up with Elizabeth Harrison. They were cited repeatedly by the Caroline County Court for adultery and placed under a bond not to meet. He fled the colony with Elizabeth and in 1749 Sarah was granted permission to take over John's estate in Caroline County, him having "fled the colony" with Elizabeth Harrison. Since he didn't divorce Sarah and probably had no way of knowing when she died (they had no children), he couldn't marry Elizabeth.]

______________________________

John Terrell, his wife, Sarah Terrell, and his mistress, Elizabeth Harrison 1729-1738 , Carolina County, Virginia, American Colonies Excerpts copied from "Tidewater Virginia Families," pp. 271-272" "John Terrell was reported to be the son of William and Susannah Terrell by his great nephew, John D. Terrell.* He probably grew up in St. Paul's Parish and lived as an adult in Caroline County. He married Sarah, but her maiden name is not known. John was called into court several times for his relationship with Elizabeth Harrison.** It was reported that he had taken Elizabeth into his home, even though he had a wife, Sarah Terrell. Three children were born to John and Elizabeth out of wedlock. Each time, John and Elizabeth were tried by the court and placed under a bond of 50 (pounds) sterling money not to meet. Even this did not stop them, and they left the colony in 1738. The court was forced to bind out the three children, to be raised by other families. They would be required to help with the family to pay for their keep. Finally in 1749, Sarah Terrell asked the court to allow her separate maintenance from her husband. John sold land in Caroline County in March 1751, and in April of that year (1751), the chancery court ordered John to place two Negroes, Beck and Amey, and one grey mare in the possession of John Mauldin, in trust for Sarah. She was to "receive the profits from these for her maintenance during her separation and until she shall cohabit with the defendant or until the time of her death." It would have taken an act of the General Assembly to have granted her a divorce, but the county court could grant her separate maintenance. Sarah was granted permission to take over her husband's estate because he had "fled the colony" with Elizabeth Harrison. A number of the citizens of the colony of Virginia, who did not feel they could comply with the marriage laws of the colony went to North Carolina to live. John apparently went to Edgecombe County, North Carolina, and settled there with Elizabeth Harrison. He was granted 500 acres in Edgecombe County. Whether he realized all of the profits from the sale of his land in Caroline County or whether he was required to turn some over to his wife, Sarah, is not known. There was no mention in the Caroline records of children of Sarah and John. John had the following children: Lohamar, married Jacob Bledsoe; Hezekiah, married Phoebe Martin; Jeptha; John, married Susanna Douglas; Anne, married William Martin; and Agnes, married Robert Washington (of the Surry County Washingtons). There is no information as to whether any of these children were those who were born in Carolina County. John appears to have always lived in the same area, although he patented almost 3,000 acres of land, and though the boundaries of Edgecombe County changed a number of times. The last record of him was found in Franklin County, North Carolina, and he is believed to have died there, between 1780 and 1789."

  • John Dabney Terrell, 1773-1850, was the son of Col. Harry Terrell (the son of Joel Terrell, see Dicken for his line of descent). In his later years he wrote from memory, a family sketch in which he named William as the parent of his grandfather, Joel Terrell. "William lived and died in Hanover County, on the Pamunkey River...I cannot remember who he married. Of his daughters, I remember nothing; his sons of whom I have heard were James John, Joel and Timothy."
    • The laws concerning the consequences of adultery were exceedingly strict in the colony of Virginia. The General Assembly had enacted laws that called for severe punishment of women who had illegitimate children. The woman was whipped in public, unless the father stepped forward and claimed the child and thus, supported it. The colonists did not want their parish levies raised in order to support bastard children, and strict enforcement of the law did a lot to minimize the problem. A number of references in the court records ordering men to "keep the bastard child off the parish" meant that they must support the child to keep the parish from having to assume the responsibility."

___________________________________

(1) "Tidewater Virginia Families," by Virginia Lee Hutcheson Davis (Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1989) p.268,271-272. Cites: (a) Emma Dicken, "Terrell Genealogy" (1952) p.58,262-263. (b) Campbell, p.424. (c) CCCOB, 1737, p.460; 1738, p.425,477; 1741, p.41-42,93,437; 1742, p.100. (e) John Dabney Terrell (1773-1850, s/o Col. Harry Terrell, s/o Joel Terrell) Memoirs. (f) North Carolina Colonial Records, Vol. IV, p.635. (g) Orange Co., NC Deed Book 10, p.443.

(2) "Vital Records of Three Burned Counties: Births, Marriages and Deaths of King and Queen, King William and New Kent Counties, Virginia, 1680-1860," by Therese Fisher (Heritage Books, 1995) p.112. Cites: (a) VA State Archives, Richmond, VA, record #34209.

(3) "Tidewater Virginia Families," Vol. 5, No. 2, Aug/Sep 1996, "Connections: Broche-Broach-Brooks," by Lt. Col. James W. Doyle, Jr., p.71-82. Cites: (a) Letter from John Dabney Terrell to John Davis Terrell of Tuscaloosa, AL, undated, but probably written shortly before the writer's death in 1850, John D. Terrell manuscripts, AL State Archives, microfilm.

(4) "The Scott Family of Orange County," by Paul H. Scott, "Genealogies of Virginia Families" Vol. IV(1938; rpt. "Virginia Genealogies #2, 1600s-1800s," MyFamily.com, 10 May 2007) p.355-362. Cites: (a)Orange Co., VA Deed Bk 10, p.443.

A letter reportedly written by John Dabney Terrell, the g-grandson of this John's father William Terrell, says that this John lived in Granville Co., NC.

The line from John down and the huge amount of information below is from:
James Maxwell Allen JMAX_ALLEN@prodigy.com indirectly through another contact, Ramona Supensky

! Birth: (1e) William TERRELL of Hanover Co., VA was Joel's father, and Joel had a brother John. (2a) New Kent Co., VA, s/o William TERRELL/Susannah WATERS. (3a) s/o William TERRELL.

Marriage to Sarah __: (1)

Children by Elizabeth HARRISON: (1b,c) Had three children by Elizabeth HARRISON out of wedlock [NOTE: See notes below].

Death: (1a) Between 1780 and 1789, Franklin Co., NC. (2a) 1785, Franklin Co., NC.

(1) Lived in Caroline Co., VA.

(1b,c) Was called into Caroline Co., VA court several times for his relationship with Elizabeth HARRISON. It was reported that he had taken Elizabeth into his home, even though he had a wife Sarah. Three children were born to John and Elizabeth out of welock. Each time, John and Elizabeth were tried by the court and placed under a bond of 50 lbs. sterling money not to meet. Even this did not stop them.

(1c) 1738: Left the colony of Virginia with Elizabeth HARRISON. (1f,g) Went to Edgecombe Co., NC and settled there with Elizabeth HARRISON.

(1c) The Caroline Co., VA court was forced to bind out the three children of John TERRELL to be raised by other families. They were required to help the family to pay for their keep.

(1g) He was granted 500 acres in Edgecombe Co., NC. He appears to have remained living in the same area, although he patented almost 3000 acres of land, and though the boundaries of Edgecombe Co. changed a number of times. The last record of him was found in Franklin Co., NC.

(1c) 1741, Mar: Sold land in Caroline Co., VA.

(1c) 1742, Apr: The chancery court ordered John to place two Negroes, Beck and Amey, and one grey mare in the possession of John MAULDIN, in trust for Sarah. She was to receive the profits from these for her maintenance during her separation and until she should cohabit with him or until the time of her death. She was granted permission to take over John's estate because he had "fled the colony" with Elizabeth HARRISON.

(4a) 1745, 14 Mar: John TERRILL of Edgecombe Co., NC deeded to John SCOTT, Gentleman, of St. Margaret's Parish, Caroline Co., VA, 400 acres of land lying on the north side of the Rapidan River in the first fork thereof adjoining lands of John SCOTT and Col. John GRYMES.

(1c) 1749: Sarah TERRELL asked the Caroline Co., VA court to allow her separate maintenance from her husband.

(3a) Lived in Granville Co., SC.

(1a) Had children, but do not know which are the three who were born in Caroline Co., VA. Source does not say who the mother is: Lohamar, m. Jacob BLEDSOE; Hezekiah, m. Phoebe MARTIN; Jeptha; John, m. Susanna DOUGLAS; Ann, m. William MARTIN; Agnes, m. Robert WASHINGTON. -------------------- Will - John Terrell

1783 September 20 , Franklin County, North Carolina

In the name of God amen, I John Terrell of the County of Franklin in the State of North Carolina being somewhat in disposed in body but of perfect sence and memory thanks be to God for his Mercies but
 knowing the frailty of human nature and that it is decreed that all men must surely die do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament as followeth that is I give and bequeath my soul to God who gave it and my body to the Earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my Executors and as to my worldly estate 
I give and bequeath to my reputed wife Elizabeth who is called and known by the name of Elizabeth Terrell and with whom I have cohabited my furniture. I desire is then provided five Negro slaves to wit: Mingo, big Jack, old Saul, Lidia, and Willy; also my Mill on Sandy Creek and all my household furniture and such of my stock as she may think fit during her life and after her decease to be disposed of as hereafter shall be decreed.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my reputed daughter Loruhimah born of the body of Elizabeth Harrison aforesaid reputed wife the four Negro slaves to wit Mourning, Phebe, Patch, and after her mother's death old Sal together with the said Negroes increase.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my reputed son Jeptha called and known by the name of Jeptha Terrell born of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth the labour of the 5 negro slaves following during his life and after his decease to his children as he shall think proper to them and their heirs forever to wit Sare and her child and 
their increase James and little Jack and after his mother deceases big Jack.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my reputed daughter Anne born of the body of the afsd Elizabeth the 4 following Negro slaves
to wit Judy and her child little Amy old Amys Child & little Jenny Lidias child together their increase to her & her heirs For Ever

ITEM I give and bequeath to my reputed son Joel born of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth, seven Negro slaves to wit Bob, Sam, old Amy's child Amy old Sal's child little Saul Peter & Priscila Sabina Lidias Children & after his mothers death Lady. I also Give him the plantation and tract of Land whereon I now live together with another tract adjoining there to to Him & his Heirs & assigns for ever.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my reputed son Timothy's children called and known in his lifetime by the name of Timothy Terrell born of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth the four following Negro slaves to wit: Andi Buck and his increase Nat and after their grandmother's decease Willy and his increase to be equally divided
 among them as they come of age that is the boys to the age of 21 and the girls to the age of 18.

It is also my will and desire that the widow of my reputed son Timothy shall have a child's part during her life that such part to return to the to the children of the said Timothy and be equally divided among them.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my reputed son John's children who was called and known in his lifetime by the name of John Terrell begotten of the body of the aforesaid Elizabeth as followeth to his daughter Elizabeth, one Negro slave old Amy to her and her heirs forever. To his son Richmond, one negro Girl Lucie to him and his heirs forever. To his daughter Susannah, one negro boy Will to her and her heirs forever. I also give and bequeath to my reputed son John's children above mentioned the value of one good negro to be equally divided among them.

and lastly my will and desire is that all and every part of my estate which I have not herein before particularly mentioned and disposed of in legacies together with my Mill on Sandy Creek before mentioned be
divided into six equal totts & equally divided by drawing for the same by my four reputed children to wit: Jeptha, Joel, Lorihuma, and Anne aforesaid and the orphans of the two deceased John and Timothy &
 whoever receives the Mill is not to have his till the death their Mother or Grand Mother as the case may happen.

I hereby nominate and appoint Jeptha Terrell & Joel Terrell & Jenkins Devaney executors of 
this my Last Will and Testament hereby revoking all other Wills heretofore made or Executed.

In Witness Whereof I have hereunto affixed my hand & seal this 20 Day of Septm. 1783

Signed sealed & acknowledged in the presence of


Elias Daviney his 
Luckey Daviney

John Terrell (Seal)
 her mark
 Susannah Brooks
 mark



In Deed Book 6, p. 192, Franklin County, NC, is recorded a deed made by Benjamin Sewell as Sheriff of Franklin County, dated 19 March 1789 to Jeptha Terrell, of Wake County.

"By order of the Worshipful
court of Franklin County and agreeable to the last will and testament of John Terrell, deceased, he the said Benjamin Sewell as Sheriff as aforesaid was authorized to sell a certain tract or parcel of land in the said county of Franklin hereafter to be mentioned, as also other property left by the deceased in order that a Division might be made among the Legatees, agreeable to the Order of the Court afs'd and after giving due and lawful notice ... conveys 700 acres on both sides of the Mill Run granted James Terrell by Lord Granville 1761, conveyed to John Terrell 1764 and bounded as followeth:" etc. Consideration 170 pounds. Jeptha sold this tract which was on the north side of Tar River 9 Nov. 1793.

Benjamin Burnitt of Lancaster County, SC appointed Captain Joseph Green Hill as his attorney to recover and receive all of his legacy due from the estate of John Terrell, Senr., late of Warren or Franklin Counties and formerly of Bute County, left in the hands of Jepthah and Joel Terrell, executors to the said John Terrell's
estate, who was the grandfather to my wife, Elizabeth, daughter to John Terrell, Junr., deceased, this Feb. 20, 1787. WIT: Fed. Kimbell, Benjamin Kimbell, Harrison Hicks, Charles Cordle.


____________________________________

Land - John Terrell

, Franklin County, North Carolina

Virgi nia

28 September 1730 > Patent to John Terrell of Caroline County for 800 acres of land in Spottsylvania County ,Virginia, given in two tracts of 400 acres each, in the first fork of the Rapidan River in St. George's Parish (Book 14, pages 38, 41).

1736 > purchases a tract of land in Caroline County from Zachary Martin.

Marc h 1741 > Land sold in Caroline County, Virginia.

14 March 1745 > Deed from John Terrell, of Edgecombe County, North Carolina to John Scott, Gentleman, of St. Margarets Parish, Caroline County, Virginia, conveying 400 acres of land lying on the north side of the Rapidan in the first fork thereof adjoining the land of John Scott and Col. John Grymes. This was no doubt the same tract of land patented to John Terrell in 1730, then in Spottsylvania, but in Orange County after 1734. (Deed Book 10, page 443 in Orange County, Virginia)
North Carolina 
1761 > 700 acres on both side of the Mill Run granted to James Terrell (John's Uncle?) by Lord Granville.
1764 > Above land conveyed to John Terrell.

15 March 1780 > Governor grants John Terrell 640 acres of land in Franklin County on south side of Tar River.

19 March 1789 > Deed to Jeptha Terrell in accordance with the last Will and Testament of John Terrell, 700 acres on both side of the Mill Run (granted by Lord Granville and mentioned above), and other property left by the deceased to be sold in order to make division to legatees.

9 November 1793 > Tract of land on the north side of the Tar River sold by Jeptha Terrell.

  • * *

15 March 1780: Richard Caswell, governor, grants to John Terrell 640 acres of land in Franklin County on the south side of Tar River. (Deed Book 2, p. 95)

19 March 1789: Deed made by Benjamin Sewell as Sheriff of Franklin County to Jeptha Terrell, of Wake County. "By order of the Worshipful 
court of Franklin County and agreeable to the last Will and Testament of John Terrell, deceased, he the said Benjamin Sewell as Sheriff as aforesaid was authorized to sell a certain tract or parcel of land in the said county of Franklin hereafter to be mentioned, as also other property left by the deceased in order that a division might be made among the legatees, agreeable to the Order of the Court afs'd and after giving due and lawful notice ... conveys 700 acres on both sides of the Mill Run granted James Terrell by Lord Granville 1761, conveyed to John Terrell 1764 and bounded as followeth:" etc. Consideration 170 pounds. Jeptha sold this tract which was on the north side of Tar River 9 November 1793 (Deed Book 6, page 192).

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John Terrell was reported to be the son of William and Susannah Terrell by his great nephew, John D. Terrell. He probably grew up in St. Paul's Parish and lived as an adult in Caroline County. He married Sarah, but her maiden name is not known.

John was called into court several times for his relationship with Elizabeth Harrison. It was reported that he had taken Elizabeth into his home, even though he had a wife, Sarah Terrell.

Three children were born to John and Elizabeth out of wedlock. Each time, John and Elizabeth were tried by the court and placed under a bond of pound 50 sterling money not to meet.

The Caroline court called John and Elizabeth in 1734, 1735, and 1737 - each time Elizabeth had another child - and each time placed a larger bond on them. Finally, the church wardens bound over the three children "at John Terrell's, commonly known as children of Elizabeth Harrison" in 1738.

In 1740, the court granted Sarah Terrell the estate of John Terrell since he had fled the jurisdiction of the court.

John sold land in Caroline Count in March 1741, and in April of that year (1742), the chancery court ordered John to place two Negroes, Bekc and Amey, and one grey mare in the possession of John Mauldin, in trust for Sarah. She was to receive the profits from these for her maintenance during her separation and until she shall cohabit with the defendant or until the time of her death.

Finally, in 1749, Sarah Terrell asked the court to allow her separate maintenance from her husband.

I would have taken an act of the General Assembly to have granted her a divorce, but the county court could grant her separate maintenance. Sarah was granted permssion to take over her husband's estate because he had "fled the colony" with Elizabeth Harrison. (Earlier date of 1740 incorrect?)

A number of the citizens of the colony of Virginia who did not feel they could comply with the marriage laws of the colony went to North Carolina to live. Evidently feeling that the court wouldn't be satisfied with a peace bond, Elizabeth Harrison and John Terrell left Virginia to avoid prosecution for adultery. There is some evidence that they settled in a part of Edgecomb County, NC, that became Granville County, NC, in either 1738 or 1746.

John apparently went to Edgecombe County, North Carolina, and settled there with Elizabeth Harrison. He was granted 500 acres in Edgecombe County. Whether he realized all of the profits from the sale of his land in Caroline County or whether he was required to turn some over to his wife Sarah, is not known. There was no mention in the Caroline records of children of Sarah and John.

(list of children with Elizabeth Harrison)

John appears to have always lived in the same area, although he patented almost 3,000 acreas of land, and though the boundaries of Edgecombe County changed a number of time. The last record of him was found in Franklin County, North Carolina and he is believed to have died there, between 1780 and 1789.

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A letter reportedly written by John Dabney Terrell, the g-grandson of this John's father William Terrell, says that this John lived in Granville Co., NC. The line from John down and the huge amount of information below is from:
James Maxwell Allen JMAX_ALLEN@prodigy.com indirectly through another contact, Ramona Supensky MISC TITLE/OCCUPATION: Planter BIO: John Terrell born in New Kent County, Virginia, probably between 1705-1710, son of William and Susannah Terrell, died in Franklin County, North Carolina sometime after 20 September 1783, the date of
his will. A copy of his will follows below. He first established his home in Caroline County, where his brothers, William, David, Henry, and James lived. In the Land Patent Books, of the State Land Office at Richmond, there is a patent to John
Terrell, of Caroline County for 800 acres of land in Spottsylvania County, Virginia dated 28 Sept. 1730, given in two tracts of 400 acres each, in the first fork of the Rapidan River in St. Georges Parish.
(Bk. 14, pp. 38, 41). In 1736, he bought a tract of land in Caroline County from Zachary Martin. In 1741, Timothy Terrell acknowledged his deed of settlement with livery of and endorsed thereon, to John Terrell, which was ordered to be recorded. (Caroline O. B. 1741-1746, p. 49) According to Emma Dicken, John Terrell was married twice while living in Caroline County, Virginia. She states that the first wife, Elizabeth, was probably the mother of his children. His will bears this out, as it names Elizabeth as the mother of John Terrell's children that are named in the will. Elizabeth was still alive as of the date of his will, 20 September 1783, as several bequests are made to her. Emma Dicken mentions a second marriage to Sarah that seems to have been of short duration as 10 April, 1741, she was sueing for a divorce. While this case was pending in Chancery, they came to an agreement regarding alimony; and in April 1742, it was stated that he had conveyed to her a certain amount of property with John Mouldin acting as her trustee. No children were named in the suit. SEE THE BOTTOM NOTE ON FACT ELIZABETH WAS COMMON LAW WIFE. There seems to be something of a discrepancy here. We know that Jeptha Terrell, John Terrell's son, was born in the 1730's. His mother is named as Elizabeth in the will. The only solution that seems to fit it that the marriage to Sarah may have been the first marriage, and the dates for the Chancery suit mentioned above may have been 1731 and 1732 rather than 1741 and 1742. Based on this assumption, we are going to show Sarah as the first wife and Elizabeth as the second wife of John Terrell. It appears that he left someone to represent him in business matters and went on to North Carolina about 1743 or 1744. This move was probably made soon after the death of his father, William Terrell. In Orange County, Virginia in Deed Book 10, p. 443, is a deed dated 14 March, 1745 from John Terrell, of Edgecombe County, North Carolina to John Scott, Gentleman, of St. Margarets Parish, Caroline County, Virginia, conveying 400 acres of land lying on the north side of the Rapidan in the first fork thereof adjoining the land of John Scott and Col. John Grymes. This was no doubt the same tract of land patented to John Terrell in 1730, then in Spotsylvania, but in Orange County after 1734. According to the Colonial Records of North Carolina, Vol. I, page 635, John Terrell's Petition for Warrant of Land for 500 acres, in two tracts of 200 and 300 acres respectively, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina was granted by the Council meeting in Edenton, North Carolina on 25 July 1743. He seems to have settled in Edgecombe which originally was a very large county extending to the Virginia line on the northern boundary. His land first in Edgecombe became a part of Granville in 1746 when that county was created from a part of the northern section of Edgecombe. In 1764 he was placed in Bute by the erection of that county from a part of Granville. In 1779 Bute was obliterated, and Warren and Franklin were formed from that territory. This Land Grant was in what is now Franklin County, North Carolina on the south side of Sandy Creek. Though he may never have changed his place of residence throughout the years he had lived in North Carolina, he had been a citizen of four counties, eighteen years of which had been spent in Granville, and accounts for the statement of John D. Terrell that he lived in that county. According to the reference, the first appearance of John Terrell in the records of Granville County, NC, which was created in 1746, was in 1747 - "on Tar river." At a session of Granville County Court, June 2, 1747 that was convened at the house of Mr. W'm Eaton, M'r Jn'o Tyrrell was Foreman of "The Grand Jury Impanneld & Sworn..." According to Rev. E. H. Davis in "Historical Sketches of Franklin County", and others; John Terrell was reputedly the first European to settle on the south side of Sandy Creek in what was then Edgecombe County and is now Franklin County, North Carolina. On Dec. 1, 1747, Joseph Hunt complains vs John Terrill that he "will either Murder him or do him some Bodily hurt." The Ct. ordered that he "stand committed to the custody of the Sheriff" until he give 40 pounds bond, with 2 surties for 20 pounds each, for his good behavior "for one twelve month & a day next coming." On the next day he gives bond, with James Paine & Wm. Person, surties. According to the reference, this was the first peace proceeding. Also, the first appearance of Hunt on records. On Aug. 30, 1748, Jno Terril petitions Granville County Court setting "forth that he is oppressed w'th Coasters &c Leave is granted to the s'd Terril to keep a publick House., giving bond, etc. The License of John Terril to keep a "publick House (Ordinary)" is renewed on Sept. 4, 1751 and again on Sept 20, 1759. John Terrell and Jephthah Terrell were on the List of 1750 Taxables in Granville County, NC. John Terrell and his son, James, were listed at No. 31 on the 1762 List of Granville County Taxables in Terrell's District by Sol. Alston.
John Terrell made a Gift of Slaves to his "Reputed Children"; Daughter Loruhamah, wife of Jacob Bledsoe; son Jephtha Terrell; son John Terrell; daughter Ann(e), wife of William Martin; and Agnes, daughter of Ann and William Martin, who was the wife of Robert Washington. Deed dated July 7, 1764, recorded August Court, 1764. On 18 Jan. 1765, John Terrell made a bond for building and maintaining a bridge over Sandy Creek for a period of seven years. (N. C. Mis. Ct. Papers, 1764-1779 Bute County.) In 1771 he was charged with twelve tithables in Bute County. On 4 Sept 1779 John Terrell sold 135 acres of land lying on the south side of Sandy Creek, and he was then in Franklin County. On the 7th Sept 1779 he sold for 266 pds. Proc. money to Peter Tatum of Franklin County 25 acres of land lying on the south bank of Sandy Creek and on the millpond adjoining Thomas Hill, it being part of a tract that had been issued to him by Governor Gabriel Johnston. This sale was proved by Joel Terrell at September court. (Ct. Min Franklin Co.) On 15 March 1780 Richard Caswell, governor, granted to John Terrell 640 acres of land in Franklin County on the south side of Tar River. (D. B. 2, p. 95)

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John Terrell, his wife, Sarah Terrell, and his mistress, Elizabeth Harrison 1729-1738 , Carolina County, Virginia, American Colonies Excerpts copied from "Tidewater Virginia Families," pp. 271-272" "John Terrell was reported to be the son of William and Susannah Terrell by his great nephew, John D. Terrell.* He probably grew up in St. Paul's Parish and lived as an adult in Caroline County. He married Sarah, but her maiden name is not known. John was called into court several times for his relationship with Elizabeth Harrison.** It was reported that he had taken Elizabeth into his home, even though he had a wife, Sarah Terrell. Three children were born to John and Elizabeth out of wedlock. Each time, John and Elizabeth were tried by the court and placed under a bond of 50 (pounds) sterling money not to meet. Even this did not stop them, and they left the colony in 1738. The court was forced to bind out the three children, to be raised by other families. They would be required to help with the family to pay for their keep. Finally in 1749, Sarah Terrell asked the court to allow her separate maintenance from her husband. John sold land in Caroline County in March 1751, and in April of that year (1751), the chancery court ordered John to place two Negroes, Beck and Amey, and one grey mare in the possession of John Mauldin, in trust for Sarah. She was to "receive the profits from these for her maintenance during her separation and until she shall cohabit with the defendant or until the time of her death." It would have taken an act of the General Assembly to have granted her a divorce, but the county court could grant her separate maintenance. Sarah was granted permission to take over her husband's estate because he had "fled the colony" with Elizabeth Harrison. A number of the citizens of the colony of Virginia, who did not feel they could comply with the marriage laws of the colony went to North Carolina to live. John apparently went to Edgecombe County, North Carolina, and settled there with Elizabeth Harrison. He was granted 500 acres in Edgecombe County. Whether he realized all of the profits from the sale of his land in Caroline County or whether he was required to turn some over to his wife, Sarah, is not known. There was no mention in the Caroline records of children of Sarah and John. John had the following children: Lohamar, married Jacob Bledsoe; Hezekiah, married Phoebe Martin; Jeptha; John, married Susanna Douglas; Anne, married William Martin; and Agnes, married Robert Washington (of the Surry County Washingtons). There is no information as to whether any of these children were those who were born in Carolina County. John appears to have always lived in the same area, although he patented almost 3,000 acres of land, and though the boundaries of Edgecombe County changed a number of times. The last record of him was found in Franklin County, North Carolina, and he is believed to have died there, between 1780 and 1789."

  • John Dabney Terrell, 1773-1850, was the son of Col. Harry Terrell (the son of Joel Terrell, see Dicken for his line of descent). In his later years he wrote from memory, a family sketch in which he named William as the parent of his grandfather, Joel Terrell. "William lived and died in Hanover County, on the Pamunkey River...I cannot remember who he married. Of his daughters, I remember nothing; his sons of whom I have heard were James John, Joel and Timothy."
    • The laws concerning the consequences of adultery were exceedingly strict in the colony of Virginia. The General Assembly had enacted laws that called for severe punishment of women who had illegitimate children. The woman was whipped in public, unless the father stepped forward and claimed the child and thus, supported it. The colonists did not want their parish levies raised in order to support bastard children, and strict enforcement of the law did a lot to minimize the problem. A number of references in the court records ordering men to "keep the bastard child off the parish" meant that they must support the child to keep the parish from having to assume the responsibility."
view all 13

John Terrell, of Pamunkey Neck's Timeline

1707
1707
New Kent, Virginia
1725
1725
Age 18
1727
1727
Age 20
1730
1730
Age 23
Caroline, Virginia, United States
1731
January 18, 1731
Age 24
Caroline, Virginia, United States
1733
October 29, 1733
Age 26
Polecat Swamp, Caroline, Virginia, United States
1735
August 15, 1735
Age 28
Caroline, Virginia, USA
1739
July 10, 1739
Age 32
Polecat Swamp Caroline County Virginia
1740
1740
Age 33
Virginia, USA
1751
1751
Age 44