Capt. John Ward, Ancient Planter

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John Ward, II

Also Known As: "Warde", "Ancient Planter and Mariner"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Abington, Cambridgeshire, England
Death: Died in Henrico, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of John Ward, of Great Abington and Isabell Ward
Husband of Marye Polly Ward and Elizabeth Ward
Father of Seth Ward
Brother of Katherine Todd; Martha Ward; Marie Ward; Ellin Ward and Anne Ward
Half brother of Martha Ward; Marie Ward; Ellin Ward and Anne Ward

Occupation: Fisherman aiding Virginia's food supply
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Capt. John Ward, Ancient Planter

Charles E. Hatch, Jr. in his book, The First Seventeen Years Virginia 1607-1624 (pp 73-74) writes that CAPTAIN JOHN WARD arrived in the Colony of Virginia on April 22, 1619 aboard the ship Sampson with about 50 emigrants to establish a private plantation. Samuel Argall later placed the date as 1618. He selected 1,200 acres west of Martin's Brandon, adjoining a creek on the south side of the James River which still bears his name. He was in some sort of association with CAPTAIN JOHN BARGRAVE who was involved in Virginia trade and colonization. Several members of the Bargrave family were with Captain Ward. CAPTAIN BARGRAVE in 1622 claimed the distinction of having "undertaken to be the first planter of a private colony in Virginia." [The plantation was located between Captain Spilmans Divendent established before 1622 and Martin's Brandon, established in 1616. Captain Thomas Spilman came to Virginia in 1616 or 1617. Two people were slain in 1622 at his plantation and he relocated in Elizabeth City and by 1625 was established with his wife and child born in Virginia and 4 servants.]

Both CAPTAIN WARD and CAPTAIN BARGRAVE were among those granted patents in the year 1619. They were included in the eleven people "Who had undertaken to transport to Virginia great multitudes of people, with store of cattell."

Soon after arriving in the Colony, CAPTAIN WARD found himself on the New England coast fishing in order to aid Virginia's food supply. When he returned in July he made his contribution to the general store.

Captain Ward's plantation was among those that sent representatives to the first Assembly of Jamestown in July and August 1619. His Lieutenant, JOHN GIBBS, attended and CAPTAIN WARD served on the Assembly committee that examined the first and third books of the "Great Charter." Initially the Burgesses challened his representation on the grounds that he had seated in Virginia without authority or commission. They did recognize his support of the Colony and that he had adventured his person. He was allowed to take his seat with the cavea that he agree to a lawful commission. Perhaps he fulfilled his obligation when his old indenture was passed again under the seal on May 17, 1620 in the name of "CAPT JOHN WARDE and his associates."

In the fall of 1620 Captain Ward was again trading on the Potomas. "The people there, are said, to have dealt falsely with him, so he took 800 bushels of corne per force." Such acts probably had a bearing on the massacre of 1622, which may have ended the Ward Plantation story as it did the story of other settlements in early Virginia. Most likely the twelve people killed at Lieutenant Gibbs' "Dividend" referred to the Ward Plantation. Mention of the plantation ceased after that date although CAPTAIN WARD received a new grant or reaffirmation of his old one in June 1623.

The relationship between SETH WARD and JOHN WARD has not been established. SETH WARD was the ancestor of the Ward family of Henrico, Virginia and later of Chesterfield, Amelia, Nottoway, and other locals in Virginia, and North Carolina.

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Birth Date //1598 //1595 -------------------- Charles E. Hatch, Jr. in his book, The First Seventeen Years Virginia 1607-1624 (pp 73-74) writes that CAPTAIN JOHN WARD arrived in the Colony of Virginia on April 22, 1619 aboard the ship Sampson with about 50 emigrants to establish a private plantation. Samuel Argall later placed the date as 1618. He selected 1,200 acres west of Martin's Brandon, adjoining a creek on the south side of the James River which still bears his name. He was in some sort of association with CAPTAIN JOHN BARGRAVE who was involved in Virginia trade and colonization. Several members of the Bargrave family were with Captain Ward. CAPTAIN BARGRAVE in 1622 claimed the distinction of having "undertaken to be the first planter of a private colony in Virginia." [The plantation was located between Captain Spilmans Divendent established before 1622 and Martin's Brandon, established in 1616. Captain Thomas Spilman came to Virginia in 1616 or 1617. Two people were slain in 1622 at his plantation and he relocated in Elizabeth City and by 1625 was established with his wife and child born in Virginia and 4 servants.]

Both CAPTAIN WARD and CAPTAIN BARGRAVE were among those granted patents in the year 1619. They were included in the eleven people "Who had undertaken to transport to Virginia great multitudes of people, with store of cattell."

Soon after arriving in the Colony, CAPTAIN WARD found himself on the New England coast fishing in order to aid Virginia's food supply. When he returned in July he made his contribution to the general store.

Captain Ward's plantation was among those that sent representatives to the first Assembly of Jamestown in July and August 1619. His Lieutenant, JOHN GIBBS, attended and CAPTAIN WARD served on the Assembly committee that examined the first and third books of the "Great Charter." Initially the Burgesses challened his representation on the grounds that he had seated in Virginia without authority or commission. They did recognize his support of the Colony and that he had adventured his person. He was allowed to take his seat with the cavea that he agree to a lawful commission. Perhaps he fulfilled his obligation when his old indenture was passed again under the seal on May 17, 1620 in the name of "CAPT JOHN WARDE and his associates."

In the fall of 1620 Captain Ward was again trading on the Potomas. "The people there, are said, to have dealt falsely with him, so he took 800 bushels of corne per force." Such acts probably had a bearing on the massacre of 1622, which may have ended the Ward Plantation story as it did the story of other settlements in early Virginia. Most likely the twelve people killed at Lieutenant Gibbs' "Dividend" referred to the Ward Plantation. Mention of the plantation ceased after that date although CAPTAIN WARD received a new grant or reaffirmation of his old one in June 1623.

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Capt. John Ward, Ancient Planter's Timeline

1598
1598
Abington, Cambridgeshire, England
1613
1613
Age 15
Varina, Henrico, Virginia, United States
1616
1616
Age 18
Virginia, USA
1619
April 22, 1619
Age 21
Virginia, USA
1619
Age 21
Virginia, USA
1619
Age 21
Henrico, Virginia, USA
1623
June 1623
Age 25
Henrico, Virginia
1633
1633
Age 25
Jamestown, James City, Virginia, USA
1636
1636
Age 25
Henrico, VA, USA
????