John Wright, of Kelvedon Hall

Is your surname Wright?

Research the Wright family

John Wright, of Kelvedon Hall's Geni Profile

Records for John Wright

9,006,473 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

John Wright, of Kelvedon Hall

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kelvedon, Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, England
Death: Died in Kelvedon, Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, England
Place of Burial: Kelvedon Hatch Church Cemetery, Kelvedon
Immediate Family:

Son of Rev. John Wright, of Kelvendon and Lady Agnes Wright, of Kelvendon
Husband of Lady Agnes Wright and Olive Wright
Father of Elizabeth Wright; Hellena Wright; John "The Elder" Wright, Jr, of Kelvedon Hall; Katherine Wright; Robert "of the Moat House" Wright, of Great and Little Ropers and 6 others
Brother of Frideswold Greene; Edmund Wright, Sir; Thomas Wright; Nicholas Wright; James Wright and 1 other

Occupation: Yeoman
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John Wright, of Kelvedon Hall

Overview

John Wright, of Kelvedon Hall (1448-1551), yeoman from South Weald. Despite family tradition, he was not granted a baronetcy and was not entitled to sit in the House of Lords. He was, however, lord of the manor of Kelvedon Hall which he purchased in 1538 for £493.

Family

He was the son of John Wright (b: 27 OCT 1450 in Dagenham, Essex, England) and Agnes (b: ABT 1452 in Dagenham, Essex, England)

He married Olive HUBBARD (b: 1486 c: 22 FEB 1487 in Dagenham, Essex, England) in 1509 in Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, England

Children:

  • John WRIGHT b: 1510
  • Katherine WRIGHT b: 1513
  • Robert WRIGHT b: 1516
  • Alice WRIGHT b: 1519
  • John WRIGHT b: 19 JUN 1522 in Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, England
  • John WRIGHT b: 1524
  • Elizabeth WRIGHT b: 1526
  • Margaret WRIGHT

Biography

As a young man he apparently was a very useful servant to King Henry VIII in his fight with the Pope and became quite wealthy through support from the King. He was at least wealthy enough to be considered a yeoman of substance. It is said that he was given a seat in the King's council, parliament, and was known as Lord Wright, but the records are only suggestive of it.

In 1538 "Lord" John Wright purchased the tenancy to a former monastery estate from Richard Bolles. He paid 493p 6s 8d for the tenancy rights. Sir Richard Rich was Lord of the Ongar Hundred in which this estate lay at the time of this purchase. This estate was already very old, having been originally owned by a pre-Normand invasion Saxon named Ailric who had willed it to Westminster Abby at his death. Westminster Abby had granted the tenancy of the estate to the Multon family by 1225, and the seller, Richard Bolles, was a descendant of the female line of that family. The estate is located a little northwest of the village of Kelvedon Hatch, in County Essex.

Although "Lord" John Wright made "Kelvedon Hall", as the estate came to be known, the seat of the family, he owned a large number of other estates in the area of west Co. Essex bounded by Kelvedon Hatch on the North, Havering on the West and Brentwood on the South. These estates he bequeathed to his four sons in generous measure through his will.

John Wright's descendants would hold the estate for nearly four centuries, until 1922, through John the Elder's line of descent. In fact there were to be ten successive John Wrights. They extended the estate further by purchasing Germains, a former manor. As land ownership meant power and money the family were able to confirm their status as minor gentry. The manor house was rebuilt by the seventh John Wright in the 18th century. The manor house and grounds are still in good shape and occupied to this day.

The control of the community and its well being was an important task for the Lord of the Manor. The manorial records for this period reveals some interesting facts. There was a bye-law introduced whereby only tenants could remove heath, gorse and furze from the Lord's waste. Dried furze was used to make malt and to repair houses - a writer of the Elizabethan period wrote of this style of vernacular building as 'with whinnies or with furze thy hovel renew'.

Parishioners had an obligation to work on the parish roads - Robert Pane failed to do this and received a fine. If a tenant wanted timber, even from his own land, he required a licence to do it from the Lord, unless custom allowed it. If the timber was on the waste then he would pay for leave to fell it.

Other community fines were for John Petit of Brizes who failed to clean ditches and cut trees which were a nuisance to the Queen's highway; and another parishioner failed to repair his hedge which was next to the common well. John Harrison and his son kept beagles and hunted coneys on the Lord's waste, they received a fine for their troubles.

Rarely a crime occurred so serious that it could could only be dealt with the Quarter Sessions. In 1579 a London silk weaver and four others broke into the Rectory at night 'intending to murder and plunder' the rector and his wife.

The advowson descended with the manor of Kelvedon Hall until the 19th century. However, from the early 17th century the Wrights became Roman Catholics and lost the right to present incumbents. In 1674 the Luther family of Great Myles's, another manor in the parish, gave to the church a silver cup and paten which the church still possesses. The medieval church was completely rebuilt in 1753 at a cost of £1,681. Sir John Wright of Kelvedon Hall,Kelvedon Hatch,Essex. Lord of the manor and patron of the church. The will of Sir John Wright was drawn in th reign of Edward VI, the boy king (1547-1553),son of Henry VIII. Lady Wright's will was drawn 23 June,1560 Sir John purchased the manor of Kellydon (Kelvedon) in 1538 and erected Kelvedon Hall. The old manor house has since been replaced with a more modern structure Arms were granted in June 20,1509. Arms-Azure,two bars, Argent: in chief three leopards heads or,Crest-Out of ducal coronet or dragons head proper.

The earliest record of a church in Kelvedon Hatch is 1344, although the dedication to St Nicholas can be traced back to before the Norman Invasion and to Ailric,a Saxon who was possibly a sailor or Captain of a vessel.Ailric had a small church built and dedicated to St NIcholas the patron saint of sailors and children.

Next to the manor house was St Nicholas's church which had been on the site since at least 1372 and may have dated back to before 1066.The first three John Wrights were protesants,but early in the 17th century, the next John Wright converted to Roman Catholicism. He was encouraged to do this by William Byrd the composer, who lived in nearby Stondon Massey. The Wrights were to remain Catholics for the remainder of their time in Kelvedon Hall. In the new house a chapel was built, the existence of which was kept secret,during the time Catholics were being persecuted. In 1753 the church was rebuilt but in 1895 it was abandoned for a new church built in the village. In 1540 Kelvedon Hall was purchased by John Wright a yeoman, and it was to remain in his family for the next 100 years Note:

(Research):The records of Sir Richard Rich list John Wright of Kelvedon Hall as a "Yeoman" of the Ongar Hundred over which Sir Richard Rich had governance in 1538. This designation is not an entirely accurate description of John Wright and was likely made by a scribe for Sir Richard Rich who was in total ignorance of John Wright's status as a "Gentleman" who could show a coat of arms, held the right to wear a rapier at his own wish, and the right to challenge to a duel any other "gentleman" from a Duke on down. Yes, John Wright certainly was a yeoman, in the sense that he owned estates of his own that he farmed. But he was a very wealthy yeoman who had been granted a coat of arms. This grant of arms made him a wealthy landed "gentleman" who had long before been shown the favor of the King and was a visible supporter of the King's (and Sir Richard Rich's) policies. Sir Richard Rich's 1538 listing for the Ongar Hundred was an initial inventory of the inhabitants of that Hundred, over which Sir Rich had just acquired governance from the King. So, it is not surprising that many of the entries designating the individual's class were not entirely accurate, and remember, too, that the list was made for the purpose of establishing the income value of the Hundred for the Crown, so the designation of "yeoman" for someone who may also have been a "gentleman" is entirely correct for the list's purpose. But, in any of this is there evidence of a peerage, or anything that would qualify him as a representative to Parliament from Essex at that time. To have been mistaken as a mere yeoman of the realm of the Ongar Hundred would argue strongly that he was of neither higher status beyond gentleman. I think he was just a landed "gentleman." Certainly we find no evidence that he was ever knighted or held a peerage of any kind. Not finding a record does not necessarily mean it never happened, so we look to other, more circumstantial evidence. What we also lack is any evidence that John Wright attained a college education or studied law, which was one of the most often used avenues from humble beginnings to peerage employed in those days. That, in fact was exactly what Richard Rich had done to attain his knighthood. What may have transpired for John Wright between this 1538 functional listing as a "yeoman" and his death in 1551 seems to have escaped record. So, if John Wright was subsequently raised to knight we just have no record of it and the circumstantial evidence argues against it.

Timeline

1488

P. 39 Wright Fam (1915): Assuming that John Wright was 21 at the time of marriage, this would be his birth year; and this is in harmony with the claim that "Rev. John Wright had a son John of full age in 1509" when the minister died. Since his father was pastor at Upminister, Essex, it is possible that son John was born there. 1509

May 9 P 37 Do: On the death of his father, John Wright inherited the manor of White Notley which his father possessed. Tradition says that he was the son of an eminent divine of Dagenhams, Essex. Dagenhams, as well as Upminiser, were located about five miles south of Kelvdon Hatch. His marriage took place probably very shortly after this inheritance. June 20 P 10 Do: Arms were granted to him on this date, but little more than a month after his father's death. (Burke's General Armory, p 1139). This would give him a rank but the proper rank does not appear of record and his will simply calls him a yeoman, though yeoman in that day carried the meaning of "land owner, land man, or lesser baron" and did not mean simply "a tiller of the soil." Morant dominates him "gentleman" and as lord of the manor he possessed the right to hold "courts of baron." The origin or beginning of a manor was when the King gave 1,000 acres, more or less, to one of his subjects and his heirs, which tenure is Knights' service at the least. In English law a manor is an estate to which is incident the right to hold certain courts, called courts of baron, and the holder of the manor is called in relation thereto, the lord. The times of our John was before feudalism was extinct, when knights had their tenants and villains, made their own local laws, and held their own courts, of which they were both judge and jury. 1517

P 20 Do: The estate of Henry Roper, pursuivant (herald) to Queen Katherine of Aragon, located in the parish of South Wealde, County Essex, on Brook Street, including the mansion (Moat House) with the place and the mill, was conveyed by Constance Roper to William Ipgrave. He appears to have sold it to a Mr. Lawrence who in turn sold it to John Wright of Kelvedon Hatch, when it ceased to be called Ropers. "Brook Hall" was the name of it under the Wrights. South Wealde parish contains about 6,000 acres divided into six manors and the uplands. Just when John Wright bought the above property does not appear but it is probable that he lived here prior to his purchase of Kelvedon Manor and earlier (1509) in Dagenhams. "The Moat House stood a little back from and to the left of the road towards London; having been much repaired and partly rebuilt, it is still standing. It was built at a very early date - time unknown -as evidenced by the Norman style of the interior finish, and by its having been surrounded by a moat filled with water for protection against tribes and clans, before stable government. Part of the moat still remains a relic and landmark of feudal or earlier times. It is now (1914) in good repair, its exterior having been modernized by brick of a yellowish color, tile walks, graveled roadway, spacious lawn, shrubbery and flowers, largely roses, conservatory, gardener's cottage and out-buildings; yet it still retains the air of a quaint old, old place, suggestive of the pomp and grandeur of the times of Knights and ladies, and yet further back to age of marauders - of attack and defense - to almost unwritten history." This property remained in the Wright family for some 200 years, it being sold by a descendant in 1721 to William Wheatley of London. Brook street was a small hamlet by the brook at the foot of Brentwood hills being practically a suburb of Brentwood, noted as the scene of one of "Bloody Mary's" tragedies in 1555, when she caused William Brown to be burned there at the stake. St. Peter's Church is a handsome building with five pillars dividing the nave from the chancel. It is a mile north of Brook street on an eminence; here a rich fund of Wright vital statistics is to be found. 1524-1538

P 19 Do: Sir John Wright purchases Kelvedon manor and erects Kelvedon Hall, according to one authority, indicating that it took 14 years to complete the work. Kelvedon Manor is in Ongar Hundred, parish of Kelvedon Hatch, County Essex. It was on an eminence near the west end of the little Kelvedon church of which he was patron (dedicated to the Virgin Mary, before England renounced allegiance to the Church of Rome, in 1531). On the chancel floor is a large slab, with a brass tablet now much defaced, "To the body of John Wright, lord of the manor and patron of the church ( ) had ( [4] ) sons, and four [three?] daughters." The word Kelvedon is derived from the Saxon words "celd" or "keld," meaning spring, and "dun" meaning hill. Kelvedon therefore means Spring Hill. By this acquisition he becomes known as Lord of Kelvedon Manor. It is a fine large brick building some 60ft. front by 45 ft. back, three stories high, with annex buildings, large stables and gardener's cottage; with large well kept lawn with shrubbery, and a pleasure lake in the foreground. It is interesting to know that the estate is now vested in the Wright family, the owner (1914) being Edward Carington Wright. 1547

P 11 Do: Morant's "Hist of Essex" (1776) says: "John Wright, gent., presented in 1547." In other words "he presented the benefice, the living being 2,070 acres." It was two years later that the first "Book of Common Prayer" was given to the church of England. 1551

Sept. 25 P 37 Do: Abstract of the will of John Wright of Kelvedon Arch., Essex; Register Thomder 117 and Register Bastwick: "In the name of God Amen: John Wright of Kellydon, Essex, Yoeman. Beying in bode feble and weak yet of pfect mynde make my will , etc. Soul to God. Body to be buried within the Chancell of Kellydon Church. To poor mens box 20/. To the parish of Southweld 40/, and to the ten poorest parishes about me 20/ each. To my loving wife (not named) 40 marks by the yere to be paid of my lands by my four sons equally-L6, 13, 4 each. And the best end of my house of Kelvedon Haule at her choice. Also to her by household stuff and 100L 20 Kyne and a gelding. To each daughter (not named) L13, 6, 8. To every godchild 6/8, and to every godchild of my own children 20/. To Kelydon Strete towards the reparation of the way L3, 6, 8. To mending the way to the Common L3, 6, 8. To the reparation of Geedy Hall Lane 40/. To my eldest son John Wright and his heirs Kelydon Hall, Weldsyde Knights, Hubbards Land with the two houses in Brentwood and Layndon. To Robert Wright and his heirs, Ropers in Brook Street, and house meadow and orchard in Brook Street, Smythes land, Powres wherein now gladden dwelleth with Fyners, Barnecks Land and Webbs. To my son called Myddle John I give all the land I have in Havering and houses and Millers house and a tenement in Childerditch wherein Gibbes doth dwell. To my son called Young John I give Bishops Hall, Wilchins Pownde Mead, Welde Lyes, Bulffandes and Dichars in Ramsden Bellhouse and Trays. To John Wright son to my son John the younger, all my land in Navestock. To John Wright son to my son John the elder, a tenement called Drywoods. To John Wright son of my son Robert, a tenement called Argents. To every child (if any) of my childrens children 20/ apiece. To each servant 6/8. "Executors: Sons John the elder and Robert. Overseers: Sons, middle and young John (middle John is here styled "John Wright of Wrights Bridge.") "Witnesses: Thomas Wood, clerk (i.e., parsons), Robert Sheparde, John Symonde, and Thomas Lytman." Oct. 5 Do: Sir John dies and is buried in Kelvedon Hatch Church (of Virgin Mary) as directed in the will. Nov. 21 P 38 Do: Will proved at Stapleford Abbots by the two executors named (Register Bostwick states it was proved at Brentwood but agrees in the date). Oct. 5 P 37 Do: On the death of her husband he leaves "to my loving wife (not named) 40 marks by the yere to be paid of my lands by my four sons equally, L6-13-4 each. And the best end of my house of Kelvedon Haule at her choice. Also to her my household stuff and L100, 20 Kyne and a gelding." The name Hubbard is given only as probable. 1560

June 22 P 38 Do; fm Act Book I, p 17 Somerset House, London, abstract of will, original examined by William Gilbert on January 17th, 1910, there being no registered copy: "In the Name of God Amen. Olyve Wryght of the parish of Kelvedon, County Essex, sick of body but whole of minde. Soul to God. To be buried in the chancel of Kelvedon Church. To the reparation of that church L4. Ditto South Weald Church 40s. To poor L5 at burial and L5 at the mouths mind. 30s a year fo twenty years after my decease to the poor people of Kelvedon and South Weald equally. "To Katryne my daughter L5. To Richard, Thomas, Reignold, Parnell, and Elizabeth Green 40/ each. To Mary Green 13/4. To Olyffe her daughter 20/ and to every other one of Katrynes children now living 6/8. To Olive, daughter of my son Robert Wright 20/. To Katherine, Dorothy and Thomas Wright, his children, 20/ each. To Joan, daughter of John Wright of Kelvedon, 40/ and to Thomas his son 20/ and to his other two children (not named) 6/8 each. To Olive and Dorothy, daughters of John Wright of the Bridge, my son last deceased, 20/ each, and to John, Robert and Agnes his children 13/4 each. "To Katryne Green my daughter three chests and a cupboard, etc. To Alice Perkyns my daughter L5, and to each of her children 20/. To Elizabeth Shepherd my daughter L5. To William Owtred 20/ and to his two sons now living 20/ each. "To Robert Wright my son a chest. To John Wright my son of Wealdsyde a pot, and to John, Omfrey and Mary his children 40/ each and to Anthony and Dorothy 20/ each and to his two youngest childen (not named) 6/8 each. To John Wright of Kelvedon my son a table and to his children John, Robert and Dorothy 20/ each. To John son of Robert Wright 20/. To daughter Katherine, my bed. To Olive Combers my god-daughter 20/. To John, Omfrey and Mary Wright two silver spoons each. To Olive Stace widow, of Weald Church Gate, 20/. Residue of goods to be distributed amongst the poor of Kelvedon, Weald and Navestock. "Executors: John Wright of Wealdsyde, and John Green of Navestock, 20/ to each of them. Overseers: John Wright of Kelvedon and Robert Wright, 10/ to each of them. "Witnesses: Paull Spence curate of Kelvedon, John Chesson, Thomas Nevell." 1560

Oct P 39 Do: "Duodecimo die mensis prefati (Oct. 1560) probatum uit testm Olavi Wright nuper de Kelydon def jurum to Executor Quibus commissa fuit administraco, etc. Jurat ad sea dei evangelia." Fact 1: 20 JUN 1509 peer in the house of lords by King Henry VIII Fact 2: Lord of Manor of Kelvedon, 16mi NE London Fact 3: buried in chancel of St Mary's Church or Kellydon church Fact 4: 1538 took lease on Kelvedon Hall then owned by the Abbey of Westminster for 493lbs 1 Fact 5: At the dissoulution Sir Richard Rich acquired estate which John Wright remained Fact 6: as tenants Fact 7: They were also tenants of Anthony Browne in the South Brook Area Fact 8: Inherited the Manors and titles of his father with coat of arms of his forefather Fact 9: with coat of arms of his forefathers which was confirmed to him Event: Comment 1 1524-1538 erected Kelvedon Mansion == Kelvedon Hall ==

In 1538 Kelvedon Hall was sold to John Wright, a yeoman of South Weald, for £493. For nearly the next 400 years the estate remained in the hands of the Wright family. Tradition was clearly important in the family for there were to be ten successive John Wrights. They extended the estate further by purchasing Germains, a former manor. As land ownership meant power and money, the family were able to confirm their status as minor gentry. The manor house was rebuilt by the seventh John Wright in the 18th century.

Next to the manor house was St.Nicholas' Church which had been on the site since at least 1372, and may have even dated back to before 1066. The first three John Wrights were Protestants, but early in the 17th century the next John Wright converted to Roman Catholicism. He encouraged to do this by William Byrd, the famous composer, who lived in nearby Stondon Massey. The Wrights were to remain devout Roman Catholics for their remaining time in Kelvedon Hall. In the new house a chapel was built, the existence of which was kept secret during the time Catholics were being persecuted. In 1753, the church was rebuilt, but in 1895 it was abandoned for a new church built in the village.

The remains of St Nicholas's Church is situated to the left of the house, in the trees. In 1837, the estate consisted of 880 acres which included the Hall and grounds, Germains Farm, Langford Bridge Farm and Pump House Farm. The last John Wright died in 1868. The estate then passed to his nephew Edward Carrington Wright. He in turn left it to his own nephew, Sir Henry J. Lawson. However, from 1891 onwards, the house had been occupied by a tenant, John Algernon Jones. Upon his death, his widow purchased it from Sir Henry. After her death, the house was sold in 1932 by her son to St Michael's Roman Catholic School. The text of a leaflet about the school can be viewed here <khschool.html>. Their occupancy of Kelvedon Hall was short lived as there were a number of unfortunate accidents which resulted in a number of deaths. The school closed in 1937. Despite the rumours that the house was haunted, it was purchased by Henry (Chips) Channon M.P., who restored it to its former elegance and added a pair of entrance lodges. The Hall was used as a convelesance home during the 2nd World War. The Hall is now occupied by his son, Lord Kelvedon.

WILL OF JOHN WRIGHT

September 21, 1551 - Kelvedon, Essex, England:

In the Name of God, Amen. 25 Sept 1551 of Kellydon Essex, Yoeman. Beying in bode feble and weak yet of pfect mynde make my will, etc. Soul to God. Body to be buried within the Chancell of Kellydon Church. To poor mens box 20s. To the parish of Southweld 40s. And to the ten poorest parishes about me 20s. Each. To my loving wife (not named) 40 marks by the yere to be paid of my lands by my four sons equally, £6, 13, 4 each. And the best end of my house of Kelvedon Haule at her choice. Also t her my household stuff and 100 £, 20 kyne and a gelding. To each daughter (not named) £13, 6, 9. To every godchild 6s. 8d. And to every godchild of my own childrens 20s. To Kelydon Strete toward the reparation of the way £3, 6, 8. To mending the way to the Common £3, 6, 8. To the reparation of Geedy Hall Lane 40s. To my eldest son John Wright and his heirs Kelydon Hall, Weldsyde Knights, Hubbords Land with the two houses in Brentwood and Layndon. To Robert Wright and his heirs, Ropers in Brook Street, and house meadow and orchard in Brook Street, Smythes Land, Powres wherein now gladden dwelleth with Fyners, Burnecks Land and Webbs. To my son called Myddle John, I give all the land I have in Havering and houses and millers house and a tenement in Childerditch wherein Gibbes doth dwell. To my son called Young John, I give Bishops Hall, Wilchins Pownde Mead, Welde Lyes, Bulffandes and Dichars in Ramsden Bellhouse and Trays. To John Wright, son to my son John the younger, all my land in Naavestock. To John Wright son to my son John the elder, a tenement called Drywoods. To John Wright, son of my son Robert, a tenement called Argents. To every child (if any) of my childrens children 20s apiece. To each servant 6s. 8d.

     Executors: Sons John the elder and Robert.
     Overseers: Sons middle and young John (note middle John is here styled "John Wright of Wrights Bridge")
     Witnesses: Thomas Wood, clerk (I.E. parson) Robert Sheparde, John Symonde, and Thomas Lytman.
     Proved 21 November 1551 at Stapleford Abbots by the two Executors named. (Register Bastwick states it was proved at Brentwood but agrees in the date.

Sources

  1. Genealogical and biographical notices of descendants of Sir John Wright of Kelvedon Hall, Author: Curtis Wright, Publication: Carthage, Missouri; 1915
  2. Samuel Wright Descendants, Author: Ellen Baker

-------------------- Below is an exerpt taken from THE GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES OF DESCENDANTS OF SIR JOHN WRIGHT OF KELVEDON HALL, ESSEX, ENGLAND IN AMERICA

THOMAS WRIGHT, OF WETHERSFIELD, CONN.

DEA. SAMUEL WRIGHT, OF NORTHAMPTON, MASS.

1610-1670

1614-1665

COMPILATION AND ANNOTATIONS

BY

CURTIS WRIGHT

CARTHAGE, MISSOURI (1915):

THE WRIGHT FAMILY OF KELVEDON HATCH, ESSEX, ENGLAND.

Tradition, in which is, it is said, always the seed of truth, tells us that Sir John Wright of Kelvedon Hall was the son of an eminent divine of Dagenhams, Essex.

No special effort has been made to trace the family lineage back of Sir John.

The following is of interest and suggests research which might give much information as to the early history of the family.

"Thomas Whitebread's daughter, Anna, married Henry Wright, father of John Wright." (Hist. Essex., Vo1. I, p. 233.)

"Before Lord William Vaux died he sold the manor of White Notley to John Wright of Kelvedon Hatch. John Wright, whose wife was Agnes, died May 9, 1509, possessed of White Notley and the advowson of Upminster Church, holden of the manor of Hoohall in Co. Suffolk. His son John, was of full age." (Moranfs Esx., p 121.)

This "son of full age," whose father was Rev. John Wright of Upminster Church, appears to be the Sir John to whom arms were granted June 20, 1509but little more than a month after his father's death, who inherited his estate and later purchased Kelvedon manor. Upminster was very near Wrightsbridge and Cranham Hall, both seats of the Wrights. (See 9-a.)

In 1538 Sir John Wright purchased Kelvedon manor, in the parish of Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, and erected a mansion near the west end of the church. He died in this mansion (Kelvedon Hall) Oct. 5, 1551, and was buried, as was also his wife ,Olive, and many other Wrights, in the chancel of "Kellydon" (St. Mary's) church, of whom memorial inscriptions are there to be found.

On the chancel floor is a large slab, with a brass tablet now much defaced, "To the body of John Wright, lord of the manor and patron of the church * * (defaced) had * * (defaced) sons, and four daughters." (Hist, of Esx.)

Strange as it may appear, he had three sons named John, all living at the same time. This came from the custom of using the father's given name in speaking of his son, as "John's eldest son," who became known as "Eldest John," and the youngest son as "Young John," his middle son as "Middle John," as is shown in his will, in part as follows:

"In the name of God, Amen, 25 Sep. 1551, of Kellydon Hall, Essex, Yeoman. Beying in body febel and weak yet of perfect mynde, make my wil1.

"Soul to God, body to be buried within the chancel of Kellydon church.

"To poor men's box 20s. To parish of South Weald 40s and to the ten poorest parishes about me 20s each.

"To my loving wife 40 marks by the year, to be paid of my lands by my four sons equally £6-13-4 each, and the best end of my house, Kcllydon Hall, at her choice, also my household stuff and £100, 20 kyne and gelding.

"To each daughter £13-6-8. To every godchild 6-8, and every godchild of my own children 20s.

"To Kcllydon Street toward the reparation of the way £3-6-8.

"To the reparation of Greedy Hall lane 40s.

"To mending the way to Common £6-8.

"To eldest son John Wright and his heirs. Kcllydon Hall, Wildside. Knights. Hubbards Land, with the two houses in Brentwood and Layndon.

"To Robert Wright and his heirs I give Ropers in Brook Street, Smythes land, Powers wherein now Gladden dwelleth, with Fyners, Burnecks land and Webba.

"To my son called Myddle John, I give all the land I have in Havering and house and millers house, and a tenement in Childerditch wherein Gibbs doth dwel1.

"To my son called Young John, I give Bishops Hall, Wilchins, Pownds Mead, Lyes, Bulfanders and Dichars in Ramsden and Crays.

"To John Wright, son to my John the younger, all my lands in Nave-stock.

"To John, son to my John the elder, a tenement called Drywoods.

"To John Wright, son to my son Robert, a tenement called Argents.

"To every child (if any) of my children's children 20s apiece.

"To each servant 6-8.

"Executors:—Sons John the elder, and Robert.

"Overseers:—Sons Myddle and Young John.

"Witnesses:—Thomas Wood, Robert Shepards, John Symonde, Thomas Lytman." "Proved 21 Nov., 1551." (P. C. C.)

It is understood that the sixteen tracts of land bequeathed to his sons included the manors of Kelvedon, in which was Kclvedon Hall; Great and Little Ropers, in which was Brook Hall (Moat House); Dagenhams. of Wright of Wrightsbridge, and Southside Weald, in which was Bishops Hall.


-------------------- Lord of Kelvedon Manor

John Wright purchased Kelvedon Manor, Essex, England in 1538. He was granted a Coat Arms on June 20, 1509. _____

WILL OF JOHN WRIGHT - September 21, 1551 - Kelvedon, Essex, England:

In the Name of God, Amen. 25 Sept 1551 of Kellydon Essex, Yoeman. Beying in bode feble and weak yet of pfect mynde make my will, etc. Soul to God. Body to be buried within the Chancell of Kellydon Church. To poor mens box 20s. To the parish of Southweld 40s. And to the ten poorest parishes about me 20s. Each. To my loving wife (not named) 40 marks by the yere to be paid of my lands by my four sons equally, £6, 13, 4 each. And the best end of my house of Kelvedon Haule at her choice. Also t her my household stuff and 100 £, 20 kyne and a gelding. To each daughter (not named) £13, 6, 9. To every godchild 6s. 8d. And to every godchild of my own childrens 20s. To Kelydon Strete toward the reparation of the way £3, 6, 8. To mending the way to the Common £3, 6, 8. To the reparation of Geedy Hall Lane 40s. To my eldest son John Wright and his heirs Kelydon Hall, Weldsyde Knights, Hubbords Land with the two houses in Brentwood and Layndon. To Robert Wright and his heirs, Ropers in Brook Street, and house meadow and orchard in Brook Street, Smythes Land, Powres wherein now gladden dwelleth with Fyners, Burnecks Land and Webbs. To my son called Myddle John, I give all the land I have in Havering and houses and millers house and a tenement in Childerditch wherein Gibbes doth dwell. To my son called Young John, I give Bishops Hall, Wilchins Pownde Mead, Welde Lyes, Bulffandes and Dichars in Ramsden Bellhouse and Trays. To John Wright, son to my son John the younger, all my land in Naavestock. To John Wright son to my son John the elder, a tenement called Drywoods. To John Wright, son of my son Robert, a tenement called Argents. To every child (if any) of my childrens children 20s apiece. To each servant 6s. 8d.

Executors: Sons John the elder and Robert.

Overseers: Sons middle and young John (note middle John is here styled "John Wright of Wrights Bridge")

Witnesses: Thomas Wood, clerk (I.E. parson) Robert Sheparde, John Symonde, and Thomas Lytman.

Proved 21 November 1551 at Stapleford Abbots by the two Executors named. (Register Bastwick states it was proved at Brentwood but agrees in the date.) _____

John Wright of Kelvedon Hall (1488 - 1551) was granted arms 20 June 1509, and his grandson, Lord John Wright (1548 - 1624) was granted a peerage and a seat in the House of Lords, 20 June 1590 ["32 Elizabeth" (Vis. Essex 1633)], and his son, John Wright, Esq. (1569-1644) served as a member of the House of Commons and its Clerk from 1612 through at least 1633. _____

John Wright's support of Henry VIII's accession to the crown (and his likely support of the reign of Henry's very unpopular father) resulted in him being granted coat armor June 20, 1509, which grant was among some of the first official acts as King that Henry VIII performed. Clearly Henry VIII believed it important to immediately raise up John Wright from his status as a wealthy priest's son, clearly a yeoman of the realm, to one of landed gentry in his own right. The support of John Wright and other middle-class "Gentlemen," like him in the matter of the Supremacy of the King over the Pope would later be crucial to the stability of Henry VIII's reign. This later support in religious matters may have been nothing more than an astute, pragmatic, move by John Wright in order to preserve the Wright family church related inheritances of his Reverend Father during Henry VIII's sacking of the church and monasteries. It is interesting to note, that John Wright's grandson would later, in 1604, return that branch of the family which held Kelvedon Hall back to the Catholic Church in defiance of King James and the Anglican Church.

-------------------- http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~legends/wright.html http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/o/Lawrence-D-Cook/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1506.html

view all 26

John Wright, of Kelvedon Hall's Timeline

1472
1472
Of,Brownridge Hall,Gillingham,Dorset,England
1488
July 12, 1488
Kelvedon, Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, England
1508
August 9, 1508
Age 20
Kelvedon, Essex, England, United Kingdom
1509
1509
Age 20
Of, Kelvedon, Essex, England
1510
October 10, 1510
Age 22
Havering or Kelvedon, Essex, England
1513
1513
Age 24
1516
April 9, 1516
Age 27
Kelvedon, Essex, England
1519
May 10, 1519
Age 30
Kelvedon, Essex, England
1522
June 19, 1522
Age 33
of, Bishops Hall or Kelvedon Hatch or Havering, Essex, England
1524
May 4, 1524
Age 35
Kelvedon Hall, Essex, England