Is your surname de Bailleul?

Research the de Bailleul family

John de Baliol's Geni Profile

Records for Jean de Bailleul

10,800 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Jean de Bailleul (de Baliol), I

Also Known As: "(Founded Balliol College of Oxford University)/(Devorguilla)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Barnard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
Death: Died in Barnard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
Place of Burial: New Abbey, Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Hugh de Baliol, of Barnard Castle; Hugh de Baliol; Cecily (Cicely) de Fontaines and Cecily Baliol Fontaine
Husband of Devorguilla (Dearbhfhorghaill) of Galloway
Father of Hugh de Baliol; Ada de Bailleul; Eleanor de Baliol, Princess of Scotland; Mary de Baliol; John de Balliol, King of Scots and 5 others
Brother of Eustace Baliol; Tiphaine de Baliol; Bernard Baliol; Jocelin Baliol; Hugh Baliol and 2 others
Half brother of Alicia de Congigburg

Occupation: Sherif of Cumberland and châtellenie de Carlisle (1248 - 1255), sherif of Nottingham and Derby (1260 - 1264), regent of Scotland, of Barnard Castle
Managed by: Noah Gregory Tutak
Last Updated:

About John de Baliol

John de Balliol (Baliol)

From Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_de_Balliol

(died 25 October 1268) was a leading figure of Scottish and Anglo-Norman life of his time. Balliol College, in Oxford, is named after him.

Life

He was born before 1208 to Hugh de Balliol, Lord of Balliol and of Barnard Castle and Gainford (c. 1177–February 2, 1229) and Cecilia de Fontaines, daughter of Aleure, lord of Fontaines and Longpré-les-Corps-Saints.

In 1233, Lord John married Dervorguilla of Galloway and Scotland, who was the daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon. By the mid-thirteenth century, he and his wife had become very wealthy, principally as a result of inheritances from Dervorguilla's family. This wealth allowed Balliol to play a prominent public role, and, on Henry III's instruction, he served as joint protector of the young king of Scots, Alexander III. He was one of Henry III's leading counsellors between 1258 and 1265.[1] and was appointed Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire from 1261 to 1262. He was captured at the Battle of Lewes in 1264 but escaped and rejoined King Henry.

Following a dispute with the Bishop of Durham, he agreed to provide funds for scholars studying at Oxford. Support for a house of students began in around 1263; further endowments after his death, supervised by Dervorguilla, resulted in the establishment of Balliol College.

Issue

John and Dervorguilla had issue:

Sir Hugh de Balliol, who died without issue before April 10, 1271. He married Agnes de Valence, daughter of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[2] Alan de Balliol, who died before 10 April 1271 without issue.[2] Sir Alexander de Balliol, who died without issue before November 13, 1278. He married Eleanor de Genoure.[2] King John I of Scotland, successful competitor for the Crown in 1292.[2] Margaret de Balliol, who might have married Thomas de Moulton. Cecilia de Balliol, who married John de Burgh and perhaps had two daughters.[2] Ada de Balliol, who married in 1266, William Lindsay, of Lambarton, and had a daughter, Christian de Lindsay.[2] Eleanor de Balliol, who married John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, and had a son, John 'The Red Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (d. 1306).[2] Maud (or Matilda) de Balliol, married to Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan, and feudal Baron of Bedale. They were parents to Agnes FitzAlan (b. 1298), who married Sir Gilbert Stapleton, Knt., of Bedale [3] (1291-1324). Gilbert is better known for his participation in the assassination of Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall.

Sources

Beam, Amanda (2008). The Balliol Dynasty, 1210-1364. Edinburgh: John Donald. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis; pages 44–1, 141-2 Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, G.E. Cokayne; page V:474 [1] [edit] Notes1.^ ODNB 2.^ a b c d e f g SCOTTISH ROYAL LINEAGE - THE HOUSE OF ATHOLL Part 2 of 6 Burkes Peerage. Retrieved on 2007-11-01 3.^ Norcliffe of Langton, M.A., Charles Best, editor, The Visitation of Yorkshire, 1563-64 by William Flower, Norroy King of Arms, London, 1881, p. 294 and footnotes

'''External links'''
Normandy portal 

Balliol College History of the Baliol Family in Scotland Preceded by Hugh Lord of Balliol Succeeded by John II

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_de_Balliol

John de Balliol (Baliol) (died 25 October 1268) was a leading figure of Scottish and English life of his time. Balliol College, Oxford is named after him.

He was born before 1208 to Hugh de Balliol, Lord of Balliol and of Barnard Castle and Gainford (c. 1177–February 2, 1229) and Cecilia de Fontaines, daughter of Aleure, lord of Fontaines and Longpré-les-Corps-Saints.

In 1233, Lord John married Dervorguilla of Galloway and Scotland, who was the daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon. By the mid-thirteenth century, he and his wife had become very wealthy, principally as a result of inheritances from Dervorguilla's family. This wealth allowed Balliol to play a prominent public role, and, on Henry III's instruction, he served as joint protector of the young king of Scots, Alexander III. He was one of Henry III's leading counsellors between 1258 and 1265.

Following a dispute with the Bishop of Durham, he agreed to provide funds for scholars studying at Oxford. Support for a house of students began in around 1263; further endowments after his death, supervised by Dervorguilla, resulted in the establishment of Balliol College.

John and Dervorguilla had issue:

Sir Hugh de Balliol, who died without issue before April 10, 1271. He married Agnes de Valence, daughter of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke.

Alan de Balliol, who died before 10 April 1271 without issue\

Sir Alexander de Balliol, who died without issue before November 13, 1278. He married Eleanor de Genoure.

King John I of Scotland, successful competitor for the Crown in 1292.

Margaret de Balliol, who might have married Thomas de Moulton.

Cecilia de Balliol, who married John de Burgh and perhaps had two daughters.

Ada de Balliol, who married in 1266, William Lindsay, of Lambarton, and had a daughter, Christian de Lindsay.

Eleanor de Balliol, who married John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, and had a son, John 'The Red Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (d. 1306).

Maud (or Matilda) de Balliol, married to Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan, and feudal Baron of Bedale. They were parents to Agnes FitzAlan (b. 1298), who married Sir Gilbert Stapleton, Knt., of Bedale [3] (1291-1324). Gilbert is better known for his participation in the assassination of Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall. -------------------- Sir John de Baliol1

M, d. 27 October 1268, #2733

	

Father Hugh de Baliol2,3 b. circa 1182, d. circa 2 May 1229

Mother Cicely de Fontaines2 b. circa 1186

Pop-up Pedigree

Reference 3228

Of* Sir John de Baliol was of at Bywell, Northamptonshire, England.3

Event-Misc He was Sheriff of Cumberland for 6 years and governor of the Castle of Carlisle.4

Name Variation Sir John de Baliol was also styled Balliol.5

Arms* His arms were De goules ove ung faux escochon d'argent (Glover). Gu. An orle arg. (M. Paris I, Guillim).6

Marriage* He married Devorguilla of Galloway, daughter of Alan of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon, in 1233.1,2,7,5

Residence* He lived at Barnard Castle.8

Event-Misc* Roger de Quency and Jn. Bayllol are to conduct the King and Queen of Scotland to england to speak with the King, her father on 17 August 1260.9

(Henry) Battle-Lewes On 14 May 1264, Richard of England, Sir Henry of Cornwall, Sir Roger de Mortimer, Sir Robert de Tateshal, Sir John FitzAlan, Sir John de Warenne, Sir Henry Percy, Sir John de Baliol, Sir Humphrey V de Bohun Earl of Hereford and Essex and Sir John FitzAlan fought on the side of King Henry III at the Battle of Lewes in Sussex when King Henry and Prince Edward were captured by Simon of Montfort, Earl of Leicester. Simon ruled England in Henry's name until his defeat at Evesham. John Baliol was captured but later escaped. See also a href=http://www.wargames.co.uk/Library/ArticlesH/Lewes.htmlThe Battle of Lewes /a.10,11,12,4,13,14

Event-Misc* He witnessed the charter of Rog. Bertram of Mitford (P.R.) on 28 October 1267.6

Death* He died on 27 October 1268.2,3

Death He died in 1269.

Note* The founder of Balliol College, Oxford at Balliol College, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.8,6

Family Devorguilla of Galloway d. 28 January 1289/90

Marriage* He married Devorguilla of Galloway, daughter of Alan of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon, in 1233.1,2,7,5

Children

Eleanor de Baliol

Cecily de Baliol d. b 1273

Sir Hugh Baliol d. b 10 Apr 1271

Alan Baliol

Ada Baliol

William Balliol, Sir d. 1313

John Baliol b. c 1249, d. 4 Jan 1314/15

Sir Alexander Baliol b. c 1251, d. b 13 Nov 1278

Last Edited 24 Feb 2005

Citations

[S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 95-28.

[S218] Marlyn Lewis, Ancestry of Elizabeth of York.

[S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 11.

[S342] Sir Bernard Burke, Extinct Peerages, p. 21.

[S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 12.

[S325] Rev. C. Moor, Knights of Edward I, p. 36.

[S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 141-2.

[S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 140-2.

[S325] Rev. C. Moor, Knights of Edward I, v. 4, p. 107.

[S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, Plantagenet 4.

[S325] Rev. C. Moor, Knights of Edward I, v. 5, p. 10.

[S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, Fitz Alan 7.

[S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 218.

[S347] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans, p. 34.

SOurces:

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pmcbride/rfc/gw5.htm#I5290

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=85736567

-------------------- John de Balliol (died 25 October 1268) was a leading figure of Scottish and Anglo-Norman life of his time. Balliol College, in Oxford, is named after him.

Contents [hide] 1 Life 2 Issue 3 Sources 4 Notes 5 External links Life[edit]

He was born before 1208 to Hugh de Balliol, Lord of Balliol and of Barnard Castle and Gainford (c. 1177–February 2, 1229) and Cecily de Fontaines, daughter of Aleure, lord of Fontaines and Longpré-les-Corps-Saints.

In 1223, Lord John married Dervorguilla of Galloway, the daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon. By the mid-thirteenth century, he and his wife had become very wealthy, principally as a result of inheritances from Dervorguilla's family. This wealth allowed Balliol to play a prominent public role, and, on Henry III's instruction, he served as joint protector of the young king of Scots, Alexander III. He was one of Henry III's leading counsellors between 1258 and 1265.[1] and was appointed Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire from 1261 to 1262. He was captured at the Battle of Lewes in 1264 but escaped and rejoined King Henry. In 1265 Thomas de Musgrave owed him a debt of 123 marks. About 1266 Baldwin Wake owed him a debt of 100 marks and more.

Following a dispute with the Bishop of Durham, he agreed to provide funds for scholars studying at Oxford. Support for a house of students began in around 1263; further endowments after his death, supervised by Dervorguilla, resulted in the establishment of Balliol College.

Issue[edit]

John and Dervorguilla had issue:

Sir Hugh de Balliol, who died without issue before 10 April 1271. He married Agnes de Valence, daughter of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[2] Alan de Balliol, who died before 10 April 1271 without issue.[2] Sir Alexander de Balliol, who died without issue before 13 November 1278. He married Eleanor de Genoure.[2] King John I of Scotland, successful competitor for the Crown in 1292.[2] Margaret de Balliol, who might have married Thomas de Moulton. Cecily de Balliol, who married John de Burgh and perhaps had two daughters.[2] Ada de Balliol, who married in 1266, William Lindsay, of Lambarton, and had a daughter, Christian de Lindsay.[2] Eleanor de Balliol, who married John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, and had a son, John 'The Red Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (d. 1306).[2] Maud (or Matilda) de Balliol, married to Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan, and feudal Baron of Bedale. They were parents to Agnes FitzAlan (b. 1298), who married Sir Gilbert Stapleton, Knt., of Bedale [3] (1291-1324). Gilbert is better known for his participation in the assassination of Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall. Sources[edit]

Beam, Amanda (2008). The Balliol Dynasty, 1210-1364. Edinburgh: John Donald. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis; pages 44–1, 141-2 Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, G.E. Cokayne; page V:474

view all 40

John de Baliol's Timeline

1207
1207
Barnard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
1233
1233
Age 26
Galloway, Wigtownshire, , Scotland
1234
1234
Age 27
Barnard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
1241
1241
Age 34
1246
1246
Age 39
Bernard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
1247
1247
Age 40
Barnard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
1249
1249
Age 42
Bernard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
1249
Age 42
1250
1250
Age 43
Bernard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England
1257
1257
Age 50
Barnard Castle, County Durham, England, United Kingdom