Jonathan Gillett (Gillette), Sr. (1609 - 1677) MP

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Nicknames: "Jonathan Gylette"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Chaffcombe, Somerset, England
Death: Died in Windsor, Hartford , Connecticut, New England
Occupation: Jonathan Gillet - born about 1610 at Chaffcombe, Somerset, England - died August 23, 1677, in Windsor, Connecticut about 67 years old - although he came to America in 1630 he returned to marry Mary Dolbere on March 29, 1634, at Colyton, County Devonshire
Managed by: Devlin Foster
Last Updated:

About Jonathan Gillett (Gillette), Sr.

Overview: Jonathan Gillet - born about 1610 at Chaffcombe, Somerset, England - died August 23, 1677, in Windsor, Connecticut about 67 years old - although he came to America in 1630 he returned to marry Mary Dolbere on March 29, 1634, at Colyton, County Devonshire

Jonathan Gillett, the immigrant

1630 , Dorchester, MA

Jonathan "belonged, with his brother, Nathan, to the company of about one hundred and forty Puritans, which was formed in the counties of Devonshire, Dorsetshire and Somersetshire, England; sailed ....[aboard] the Mary and John, March 20, 1630, and arrived off Nantasket, May 30th following, settlement being made at Dorchester." Circa 1633, he returned to England. And circa June 1634, he returned to New England with his wife.

New England Historical Genealogical Register: Vol. 47:168 Descendants of Jonathan Gillet, of Dorchester, Mass., and Windsor, Conn. Salmon Cone Gillette

Progenitors of the Gillet Family in America

1953 , Appleton, Wisconsin

Jonathan, Nathan, and Jeremiah Gillet, early settlers of Windsor, Connecticut, were the progenitors of the Gillet family in America. On March 20, 1630, in company with one hundred and forty (140) Puritans from the counties of Devonshire, Dorsetshire, and Somersetshire, England. Jonathan and Nathan sailed with the Rev. John Warham and Rev. John Maverick as pastors, in the ship “Mary and John” arriving off Nantasket, Massachusetts on May 30, 1630. They first settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts, but removed to Windsor, Connecticut in 1636.

The ancestors of Jonathan, Nathan, and Jeremiah Gillet were French Huguenots living in Guyenne Bergerac, France. They fled from France about the time of the massacre of the French Protestants beginning on St. Bartholomew’s Day, August 24, 1572, during the reign of King Henry II, and went to Scotland. They remained in Scotland about thirty years and then moved to Devonshire, England.

The descendents of these three brothers remained in Windsor, Connecticut for the first four or five generations, after which time some moved westward and today the name of Gillette is known all over the United States. The name is spelled Gillett or Gillette, but the original spellings were Gylet or Gillet.

suzysclanadded this on 16 May 2010

millerbrosoriginally submitted this to Miller-White-Avery-Arrowood on 3 Jun 2008

From the Forward of the Genealogical Data Concerning the Families of Gillet-Gillett-Gillette compiled by Ester Gillett Latham.

The Gillette-Holcomb Bible

1630 , Windsor

The version of Bible that Jonathan Gillett brought with him from England to America is known as the ‘Breeches Bible’ because the ‘fig-leaf garment’ worn by Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden - which is called ‘apron’ in the King James Version - is called ‘breeches’ in this edition.

Jonathan's Bible was printed in Amsterdam in 1599 and was one of numerous editions of that translation, which was first printed in Geneva in 1559. This edition was favored by the Puritans in England, and it had a profound effect on the King James translation in 1611.

The ‘Breeches Bible’ remains in Windsor. It has been torn and damaged, with many of its pages missing. The Bible passed into the hands of the present Holcomb family. The Gillett-Holcomb Bible became known as the "Bear Bible," because it was placed in a window to keep the sash raised, when a bear, wanting to effect an entrance, clawed it, leaving the marks of his claws so deep upon the edges of its leaves, where it can still be plainly seen. The blank pages between the Old and New Testaments are still intact, and their pen and ink entries establish the copy as having belonged to the early Gillett family. The script of the entries is the very old style, which was in use in England around 1600, in the hand of Jonathan Gillett of the second generation.

suzysclanadded this on 16 May 2010

ssgillette9813originally submitted this to Jack Gillette's Family Tree on 8 Jun 2007

information about Jonathon Gillett from http://mysite.verizon.net/marcinia/id11.html

Jonathan Gillett

Many people came to the shores of the New World as a way to escape religious persecution. For the Gillette family, the flight to freedom had begun two generations, and nearly a hundred years before. Jonathan Gillett’s grandfather was Reverend Jacques de Gylet, a resident of Bergerac in France, and a minister in the French Reformed or Huguenot church. In August 1572, in Paris, on Saint Bartholomew's Day, the Catholics, under the influence of Catherine de Medicis, the mother of King Charles of France, killed between 5,000 and 10,000 Protestants in a massacre that lasted three days and nights. Reverend Gylet escaped the massacre, but was banished from Bergerac, and so fled to Scotland. Between 400,000 and 800,000 French Huguenot’s found safety in England, Switzerland, Holland or Germany, leading to the end of France’s commercial superiority and the enhancements of the other countries.

Two years after the massacre, safe, for the time being, in England, Jacque de Gylet and his wife, Jeanne Mestre, welcomed a son into the world. His name was William and he was born in Devon, England in 1574. William grew and became a minister. He married Habiathia Pye or Chafcombe, England, and they had nine children: Abiah, 1598; Mary, 1600; Nathan, 1602; Jonathan, 1604; William, 1606; Thomas, 1608; Jeremiah, 1610; Elias, 1612 and Andrew in 1623. In 1610 William became the rector of the Anglican Church at Chaffcombe, Somersetshire, in southwestern England, where he served until his death in 1641.

In 1630, Jonathan and Nathan, aligned themselves with a group of separatists who had decided to flee the religious persecution of the old world, for the freedom to worship as they pleased in the new world. This was the group, that under the direction of John Warham, sailed on the ‘John and Mary’ on March 20, 1630. (Since no official passenger list exists for the ‘John and Mary’ it is always possible that someone who was said to have sailed on her, did not.)

Although, the 70-day voyage was probably uncomfortable, and often unpleasant, the passengers were a Church Society, and the word of God was preached every day aboard ship. Jonathan arrived with his copy of the ‘Breeches Bible’

The first year in the New World, at the settlement they would name Dorchester, was very difficult, marked by sickness and deprivation. But through hard work and perseverance, they thrived, and by October 1633, Dorchester was the largest and wealthiest town in Massachusetts.

With things going so well in his new home, Jonathan decided to briefly return to his old home. In 1634 he sailed for England, and once there, on March 29, 1634, he married Mary Dolbiar (Dolbere), the third of seven children of Yeoman Rawkey and Marie (Mitchell) Dolbere, of Devonshire. The newly weds left almost immediately for New England, arriving in June 1634. Their first child, Jonathan, was born in December 1634.

Problems were brewing in Dorchester, however, and many people were considering leaving for the still unsettled areas of Connecticut. A group had gone the year before and set up a trading post in what would become Windsor – talk began of a migration to that area. By 1635 the population of Dorchester had grown to nearly 6,000 and the earliest settlers, those who had come over on the ‘John and Mary’ were not happy with the way that Governor Winthrop was imposing his will upon the inhabitants. They had come to Massachusetts so that no one would interfere with their right to worship as they saw fit. Winthrop, by imposing rules regarding church government and discipline was doing just that.

In April 1635, Jonathan was given the right to fence in half an acre around his house and on May 6 1635 Jonathan became a freeman of Massachusetts Bay. In June 1635 the first group of people from Dorchester emigrated to Windsor. Jonathan’s brother Nathan may have been among this group, but Jonathan stayed in Dorchester for awhile In fact, he stayed until his wife Mary gave birth to their twins, Cornelius and Mary, in early 1636. Shortly after the babies were born, Jonathan joined the many others of his church in the new settlement of Windsor.

Although the settlers in Windsor seemed to get along very well, and to have agreed who should live where quickly and without major argument, things were not peaceful in Windsor. In 1637 the Peqoud Indian war broke out. Fourteen men from Windsor were among the 77 white men to fight in it, including Jonathan’s brother Nathan.

Jonathan and Mary’s family continued to grow. In 1639 their daughter Anna was born, and that same year Jonathan was granted a four-acre plot of land in Windsor. He was granted additional land in 1640, and had another son, Joseph, in 1641. There followed nearly a child a year, with Samuel in 1642, John in 1644, Abigail in 1646 (she died in 1648), Jeremiah in 1647 and finally Josiah in 1650.

Between 1653 and 1671, Jonathan served on the Jury of the County Court ten times. He served as Constable in 1655. The constable was a town officer that ‘inspired awe.’ After 1650, the constable duties were of a purely civil character and included warning the freemen to attend meetings and collecting the county rate and transmitting it to the collectors. At the time, Connecticut town life was ‘pure, simple and natural,’ and nearer the law that governs today than anywhere else in America.

By 1675, Windsor taxpayers were divided into five classes. Class 1, which was a family with a horse and four oxen, had nineteen families. Class 2, was a family with a horse and two oxen; 42 families were in class 2. Class 3, was a family with a horse. Jonathan Gillett and his sons Jonathan, Jr., Cornelius and John were among the 37 in that category. The other two classes were ‘only families’ with 15 and ‘Single men’ with 24, (seventeen of them owned horses).

The King Philip’s War, between the settlers and the Indians, took place between 1675 and 1677, two of Jonathan’s sons, Joseph and Samuel, were killed during this time. Joseph died on Sep 18, 1675 at the Bloody Brook Indian Massacre, and Samuel died May 19, 1676 at the Turner Falls battle with the Indians.

Jonathan died on August 23, 1677, and eight years later, Mary died on January 5, 1685, age 81.

rootweb bio

  1. ID: I7301
  2. Name: Jonathan Gillett 1 2
  3. Sex: M
  4. Change Date: 12 OCT 1997
  5. Birth: ABT 1607 3

Father: William Gillett

Marriage 1 Mary Dolbiar

   * Married: 29 MAR 1634 4 2 in St. Andrew's Church, Colyton, Devonshire, England 4 2

Children

  1. Jonathan Gillette b: ABT DEC 1634 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co, MA
  2. Cornelius Gillette b: ABT 1635/36 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co, MA
  3. Mary Gillette b: ABT 1635/36 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co, MA
  4. Anna Gillette b: 29 DEC 1639 in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT
  5. Joseph Gillette b: 25 JUL 1641 in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT
  6. Samuel Gillette
  7. John Gillette b: 05 OCT 1644 in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT
  8. Abigail Gillette
  9. Jeremiah Gillette b: 12 FEB 1647/48 in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT
 10. Josiah Gillette

Sources:

  1. Coddington, John Insley, "Jonathan Gillett of Dorchester, Mass., and Windsor, Conn., and Mary Dolbere or Dolbiar, his wife," The American Genealogist Vol. 15, p. 208.
  2. "Jonathan and Nathan Gelletts' Descendants," New England Historic Genealogical Register Vol. 100. Need to get full article - have one p. printed from CD-ROM version, p. 273.
  3. Supposition.
  4. Coddington, John Insley, "Jonathan Gillett of Dorchester, Mass., and Windsor, Conn., and Mary Dolbere or Dolbiar, his wife," The American Genealogist Vol. 15, p. 208, 209. 

suzysclanadded this on 27 Jul 2010

http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/EditStory.aspx?tid=17078169&pid=486677304&pg=32768&pgPL=pid

family tree bio

1. Jonathan2 Gillett I (William1 Gylette) was born 11 Aug 1609 in Chaffcombe, Somerset, England, and died 29 Aug 1677 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. He married Mary Dolbere 29 Mar 1634 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA, daughter of Rawkey Dolbere and Mary Mitchell. She was born 07 Jun 1607 in Colyton, Devon, England, and died 01 May 1686 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT.

More About Jonathan Gillett I: Immigration: 30 May 1630, arrived Nantucket on the Mary and John Religion: Puritan

Children of Jonathan Gillett and Mary Dolbere are:

+ 2 i. Cornelius3 Gillett I, born 10 Jan 1633/34 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA; died 26 Jun 1711 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. + 3 ii. Jonathan Gillett, born Dec 1634 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA; died 27 Feb 1697/98 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. + 4 iii. Mary Gillett, born 1638 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA; died 27 Aug 1719 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. 5 iv. Anna Gillett, born 29 Dec 1639 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT (Source: NEHGS, Records of Windsor, Ct, 226.); died 18 Nov 1711 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. + 6 v. Joseph Gillett I, born 25 Jul 1641 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT; died 18 Sep 1675 in Bloody Brook, Deerfield, Franklin Co., MA. + 7 vi. Samuel Gillett, Sr., born 22 Jan 1642/43 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT; died 19 May 1676 in Turners Falls, MA. + 8 vii. John Gillett I, born 05 Oct 1644 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT; died Nov 1682 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. 9 viii. Abigail Gillett, born 28 Jun 1646 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT (Source: NEHGS, Records of Windsor, Ct, 226.); died 01 Mar 1648/49 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. + 10 ix. Jeremiah Gillett, born 12 Feb 1647/48 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT; died 01 Mar 1692/93 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. + 11 x. Josiah Gillett I, born 14 Jul 1650 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT; died 29 Oct 1736 in Colchester, New London Co., CT.

suzysclanadded this on 27 Jul 2010

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/a/d/Cindy-Radway-TX/FILE/0001page.html

--------------------

AFN: FXG8-PJ -------------------- Many people came to the shores of the New World as a way to escape religious persecution. For the Gillet(t) family, the flight to freedom had begun two generations, and nearly a hundred years before. Jonathan Gillett's grandfather was Rev. Jacques de Gylet, a resident of Bergerac in France and a minister in the French Reformed or Huguenot church.

In August, 1572, in Paris, on Saint Bartholomew's Day, the Catholics, under the influence of Catherine de Medicis, the other of King Charles of France, killed between 5,000 and 10,000 Protestants in a massacre that lasted three days and nights. Rev. Gylet escaped the massacre, but was banished from Bergerac, and so fled to Scotland with his family where they resided for about 57 years. King Henry II was the ruling monarch at this time. The Gillett family started an exodus to England. Many French Huguenots found safety in England, Switzerland, Holland or Germany, leading to the end of France's commercial superiority and the enhancements of the other countries. -------------------- Also seen as "Gillett".

Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, vols. 1-3

Abbrev: Great Migration Begins Author: Robert Charles Anderson

Publication: New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Suffolk, MA 1995.

Repository: Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society Date: 17 Dec 2002

Text: JONATHAN GILLETT from The Great Migration Begins Immigrants to New England 1620 - 1633 by Robert Charles Anderson, Boston 1995

ORIGIN: Chaffcombe, Somersetshire

MIGRATION: 1633

FIRST RESIDENCE: Dorchester

REMOVES: Windsor 1638

RETURN TRIPS: To England in 1633 and return 1634

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: Admission to Dorchester church prior to 6 May 1635 implied by freemanship.

FREEMAN: 6 May 1635 (as "Jonathan Jellett," second in a sequence of five Dorchester men) [MBCR 1:370].

OFFICES: Connecticut jury, December 1653, 7 June 1655, 26 August 1657, 3 March 1658/9, 15 May 1660, 6 December 1660, 5 September 1661, 9 October 1661, 13 May 1662, 20 January 1662[/3] [RPCC 119, 143, 181, 197, 211, 219, 238, 240, 246, 261]. Windsor constable, March 1655/6 [RPCC 161].

ESTATE: Allowed by town of Dorchester "to fence in half an acre of ground about his house leaving a sufficient highway," and granted four acres of marsh; also "Jonathan Gillet's house" mentioned, 17 April 1635 [DTR 11]; "Jellets" to have two acres of marsh, 27 June 1636 (no first name is given, so this grant may be to both Jonathan and Nathan) [DTR 17]. (In the grant of meadows beyond Neponset, Lot #32, marked only "J.," may have belonged to Jonathan Gillet, since it was immediately next to the lot of N[athan] Gillet [DTR 321].) In Thomas Treadwell's deed of land to Edward Breck, dated 20 June 1638, one of the abutters to a parcel of land was "Mr. Parker on the other side which was once Jonathan Gillete's" [DTR 35].

On 9 June 1662 Jonathan Gillett Sen. was granted two parcels of swampland totalling five or six acres by the court-appointed committee to dispose of land without the west bounds of Windsor [WiLR 1:41]. Other "Jonathan Gillett" land entries appear to pertain to Jonathan Jr.

In his will, dated 8 August 1677 and proved 6 September 1677, "Jonathan Gillett sen. of Windsor ... being at present very ill and under distemper of body above ordinary" named "my wife ... sole executrix " and "my son Josiah Gillett to take care for the improvement of his mother's estate," she to have the use of "both my houselots, my one and that which was my brother Nathan Gillett's, which are both nine acres, also at the upper end of the first meadow, or that which is Timothy Phelpes," and "all that remains of that to me I set out three acres to my son John"; after "my decease ... my son Josias" to assist his mother, and after her death "he shall enjoy for his own ... my now dwelling house and all the appurtenances with it, with five acres of houselands & all other parcels of land, as are expressed to be his mother's for her use whilst she lives, only excepting the house & four acres of the houseland to it, which my son Jeremy shall possess for his own after my wife's decease" and "the six acres in the second meadow I set out to him, he is to possess for his own at the present"; "thirdly, my will is that if the Lord should take me and my wife both of us away by death within four years after the date hereof, my son Josiah shall pay some legacies, as to his brother Jonathan Gillett £4 and a gun, and to his brother Cornelius Gillett £4, & to my daughter, Peter Browne's wife, £2, and to my daughter, Samuel Fyllye's wife, £2, and to the two children which I have taken that were my son Joseph's, deceased, as the little son Jonathan £5, and the girl £5. My son Jonathan is to have the other twenty acres of woodland joining to the twenty acres expressed to my wife. He is to have his twenty acres next to Thomas Barber, ten acres of it I give him, the other ten he hath bought. Also, Jonathan and Cornelius my sons are to have my eleven acres without the west bounds of Windsor, betwixt them, after my decease. And my son John Gillett to have six acres of the other parcel without the bounds at present, and Jeremie to have the remainder of it" [Hartford PD Case #2202; Manwaring 1:200-01].

The inventory of "Jonathan Gillett Senior who died the 23 day of this August" was taken 31 August 1677 and totalled £273 10s., including real estate valued at £188: "his dwelling & barn house land five acres," £70; "his dwelling house that was his brother Nathan's & four acres of houseland," £40; "the first meadow, near four acres," £20; "the second meadow eight acres," £30; "twenty acres of woodland," £10; "six acres of upland," £12; and "without the west bounds of Windsor common land fifteen acres," £6 [Hartford PD Case #2202].

More than a generation later, on 25 August 1719, Jonathan Filley, Josiah Filly, John Filly, Thomas Gillett and Joseph Gillett petitioned the probate court that their "grandfather Jonathan Gillit late of Windsor" had left unadministered estate and they requested that someone be appointed to administer the property [Hartford PD Case #2202].

BIRTH: By about 1609 (based on presumed age at marriage), son of Rev. William Gillett.

DEATH: Windsor 23 August 1677 (from inventory).

MARRIAGE: Colyton, Devonshire, 29 March 1634 Mary Dolbiar, bp. Colyton, Devonshire, 7 June 1607 [TAG 15:208-17]. She died Windsor 5 January 1685[/6] [CTVR 56; TAG 15:210].

ASSOCIATIONS: He was brother of NATHAN GILLETT of Dorchester and Windsor.

Ever since the publication of the will of Rev. William Gillett, Rector of Chaffcombe, Somersetshire [NYGBR 41:282-83], Jonathan and Nathan Gillett of Dorchester and Windsor have been considered his sons, although there have been some nagging doubts. In 1979 George E. McCracken published additional information which makes the identification solid [TAG 55:170-73]. McCracken suggested that Jonathan, Nathan and some of their siblings were born before 1610, when William Gillett was instituted at Chaffcombe; but we only have scattered Bishops' Transcripts for some of the years after 1610, and there is a ten-year gap when several Gillett children could have been born. Jonathan was probably older than Elias, who was baptized on 11 February 1611/2 and so could well have been born at an earlier residence for the family. Nathan, however, need not have been born until 1613, and he could have been born at Chaffcombe, next after Elias, during a period when neither the parish register nor the Bishops' Transcripts survive for that parish.

COMMENTS: Jonathan Gillett and his brother Nathan are frequently included in passenger lists of the Mary & John. While this is not impossible, it is also not a necessary conclusion. They were both from the West Country, and both settled first in Dorchester, but were they first here in 1630? The first record of Nathan is his admission to freemanship in 1634, which implies arrival by 1633, and nothing more. From the statement of Jonathan's son Benjamin in their copy of the "Breeches Bible" that "My father Gille[tt] came into new-inglan the second time in June in the year 1634...," we know that Jonathan arrived for the second time in 1634, and he does appear on the 1634 passenger list of the Recovery [TAG 15:210; NGSQ 71:171, 77:250]. But he could have come for the first time in 1633, turned around immediately to return to England to marry early in 1634 and board ship in time to sail back to New England. There was a ship from the West Country in 1633 that could have brought the Gillett brothers to New England, and as a result we would not be justified in placing them on the Mary & John. Any evidence which might overturn this conclusion would almost certainly have to come from England.

Jonathan Gillett had left Dorchester by 20 June 1638 [DTR 35]. Anna, born December 1639, was the first of his children to be born in Windsor. Since the chronology for the births of his children is tight, the previous child, Mary, was probably born late in 1637 or early in 1638, and in Dorchester, so the date for the move from Dorchester to Windsor would be in the first half of 1638.

In his 17 August 1677 accounting of "what children has been born in Windsor from our beginning hither," Matthew Grant said that "Jonathan Gellet senior" had seven [Grant 90], which accords with the actual list of children given by Grant elsewhere.

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: George E. McCracken surveyed the literature on the Gillett family in 1979, providing some brief commentary on the relative reliability of the many publications [TAG 55:170-71].

"GILLETT, or JELLETT, ...(4944) JONATHAN, Dorchester, freem. 6 May 1635, rem. next yr. to Windsor with ch. (4945ii) Cornelius, (4945i) Jonathan, and (4945iii) Mary, wh. m. 16 July 1658, (4945iii[1]) Peter Brown; there he had (4945iv) Ann, bapt. 29 Dec. 1639, wh. m. 29 Oct. 1663, (4945iv[1]) Samuel Filley; (4945v) Joseph, 25 July 1641; (4945vi) Samuel, 22 Jan. 1643; (2472)John, 5 Oct. 1644; (4945viii) Abigail, 28 June 1646, d. at 2 yrs.; (4945ix) Jeremiah, 12 Feb. 1648; and (4945x) Josiah, 14 July 1650; was a constable 1656, and d. 1677."

-- James Savage, "A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers of New England, Before 1692"

FamilySearch has 15 or 20 names farther back

Search Results | Download GEDCOM

8 Jacques De GYLET B: 1549

Bergerac, Guyennc, France

D: Deceased


M: Abt 1572

French Church, Crispin, London, England


 
     

4 William GYLETTE B: 1574

Of Chaffcombe, Somerset, , England

D: 16 Apr 1641

Chaffcombe, Somerset, England

M: 1604

England, Somerset, England


     
         

9 Family Jeanne MESTRE B: 1552

French Church, Crispin, London, England

D: Deceased

, , , Eng.

   

 
  

2 Jonathan GYLETTE B: 11 Aug 1609

Chaffcombe, Somerset, England, England

D: 23 Aug 1677

Windsor, Hartford, Conn.

M: 29 Mar 1634

Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts


         
      Family   

10

   
   

 
      

5 Mrs-William GYLETTE B: 1578

Of, Chaffcombe, Somerset, England

D: 14 May 1681

Chaffcombe, Somerset, , Eng.

   

    

1 Joseph GILLETT B: 25 Jul 1641

Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut

D: 18 Sep 1675

Bloody Brook, Deerfield, Franklin, Mass.

M: 24 Nov 1663

Haddam, Middlesex, Massachusetts


     

11

   
   

 
        
   Family Elizabeth HAWKES B:  10 Jan 1647

Windsor, Hartford, Conn.

D: 11 Oct 1681

Bloody Brook, Deerfield, Franklin, Mass.

   

      

12 Robert (Dolbiar) DOLBERE B: 1514/1515

Cadhayne, Colyton, Devon, England

D: 25 Jan 1641

Colyton, Devon, England

M: 26 Apr 1563

Colyton, Devon, England


 
     

6 Rawkey Or Rochee DOLBERE(DOLBIAR) B: 17 Aug 1571

Colyton, Devon, England

D: 12 Nov 1641

Barretshayes, Colyton, Devon, England

M: 10 Oct 1602

Barretshayes, Colyton, Devon, England


     
         

13 Family Agnes SAMPSON B: 1540

Hawkchurch, Devon, England

D: 30 Oct 1613

Colyton, Devonshire, England

   

 
  

3 Family Mary (Dolbiar) DOLBERE B: 7 Jun 1607

Colyton, Devon, England

D: 5 Jan 1686

Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut

   

         
      Family   

14 John (Mychell) MITCHELL B: 26 Sep 1541

Rockershayne, Colyton, Dev., England

D: 2 Jun 1620

Rawkerayne, Devon, England

M: 26 Nov 1569

Colyton, Devonshire, England


 
      

7 Mary Mitchell MITCHELL MICHELL B: 4 Dec 1576

Colyton, Devon, England

D: 20 Dec 1648

Barretshayes, Colyton, Devon, Eng

   

     
         

15 Family Emlyn WEEKS B: 1551

Gittisham, Devon, England

D: 30 Aug 1628

Colyton, Devon, Eng




Search Results | Download GEDCOM

8

   
   

 
     

4 John MITCHELL B: Abt 1490

Rawkerayne, Devon, England

D: 10 Aug 1590


M: Abt 1514

Colyton, Devon, England


    
         

9

   
   

 
  

2 John MITCHELL B: Ca 1515

Rawkerayne, Devon, England

D: 10 Aug 1590

Colyton, Devonshire, England

M: 5 Oct 1539

Colyton, Devon, England


        
      Family   

10

   
   

 
      

5 Mrs. MITCHELL B: Abt 1494

Rawkerayne, Devon, England

   
   

    

1 John (Mychell) MITCHELL B: 26 Sep 1541

Rockershayne, Colyton, Dev., England

D: 2 Jun 1620

Rawkerayne, Devon, England

M: 26 Nov 1569

Colyton, Devonshire, England


     

11

   
   

 
        
   Family Emlyn WEEKS B:  1551

Gittisham, Devon, England

D: 30 Aug 1628

Colyton, Devon, Eng

   

      

12

   
   

 
     

6 Henry VYE B: 1496

Cadhayne, Devon, England

D: 11 Aug 1558

Colyton, Devonshire, England

M:



    
         

13

   
   

 
  

3 Family Agnes VYE B: Ca 1518

Rawkerayne, Or Cadden, Devon, Eng

D: 12 Mar 1564

Colyton, Devonshire, England

   

        
      Family   

14

   
   

 
      

7 Agnes B: 1498

Cadhayne, Devon, England

D: 7 Jan 1566

Colyton, Devonshire, England

   

    
         

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-------------------- from: hudson-mowhawk gealogical and and Family Memoirs:

Gillett http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/families/hmgfm/gillett.html

(I) Jonathan Gillet, progenitor of this branch of the family, belonged to the company of about one hundred and forty Puritans which was formed in the counties of Devonshire, Dorsetshire and Somersetshire, England. They sailed with Rev. John Warham and Rev. John Maverick as pastors in the "Mary and John," March 20, 1630, and arrived off Nantasket, May 30 following, settlement being made at Dorchester. He was made a freeman there May 6, 1635, and had various lots of ground granted to him. With the Dorchester church and Rev. Mr. Warham he and Nathan removed about 1636 to Windsor, Connecticut, where he had a lot granted to him near Mr. Warham. He and his wife Mary are included in Matthew Grant's church list, made thirty-seven years after the settlement, of twenty-one "members who were so in Dorchester and cane up with Mr. Warham and are still of us." They were also privileged, having paid six shillings, to sit in the long seats in the church. He gave four shillings six pence to the fund in aid of sufferers by the Indian war at Simsbury and Springfield, and was one of the committee of distribution. He died August 23, 1677, and his wife January 5, 1685

view all 35

Jonathan Gillett, Sr.'s Timeline

1609
August 11, 1609
Chaffcombe, Somerset, England
August 11, 1609
Chaffcombe, Somerset, England
August 11, 1609
Chaffcombe, Sommerset, England
1634
January 10, 1634
Age 24
Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts
March 29, 1634
Age 24
Dorchester, Suffolk, MA
March 29, 1634
Age 24
Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
October 5, 1634
Age 25
Dorchester (within present Boston), (Present Suffolk County), Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1638
October 18, 1638
Age 29
Dorchester, Suffolk, MA
1639
December 29, 1639
Age 30
Windsor, Hartford, CT
1641
July 25, 1641
Age 31
Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)