Jonathan Pugmire, IV (1823 - 1880)

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Birthplace: Carlisle, Cumberland, England
Death: Died in Saint Charles, Bear Lake, Idaho, USA
Managed by: Tiffany Anne Dudley
Last Updated:

About Jonathan Pugmire, IV

Biographical Summary:

JONATHAN PUGMIRE, JR.

Cumberland, England was the birthplace of Jonathan Pugmire, Jr., son of Jonathan and Elizabeth Barnes Pugmire. He was born on the 7th day of December, 1823. He, and his father, became members of the Liverpool Branch of the Latter-day Saint Church. On the 11th day of February, 1844 the family sailed from Liverpool to New Orleans. Jonathan married Elizabeth Mackay, who had come on the same ship, April 13, 1844.


From that city they went to Winter Quarters and it was here Jonathan enlisted in the Mormon Batalion in Company "E". After his release from service he returned Winter Quarters where he found his wife and son, George. Preparations were then made to come to the Valley. While en route, at Elk Horn, another child, Jonathan Mackay, was born. They arrived in the Valley in the month of September, 1848. Early in the spring of 1864 he and his family move to Bear Lake Valley, settled in St. Charles, and took up farming and later went into mercantile business. He died September 18, 1880 at St. Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho.

SOURCE: "The Mormon Battalion, 1846-7", by Kate B. Carter, and published by The Daughters of Utah Pioneers in 1956; page 137.

____________________________

From: FindAGrave.com:

Son of Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. and Elizabeth Barnes was at Carlisle, Cumberland, England. Little is known of his youth, except that he was trained as a blacksmith by his father. When he was eighteen, the family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and they began plans to emigrate. In February of 1844, he sailed from Liverpool with his father's family on the Isaac Allerton. Aboard the ship, he met Elizabeth McKay, a convert from Scotland. They were married 30 April 1844, after arriving in Nauvoo, Illinois.

Their early married life was spent at Montrose, Iowa, making preparations for the move west. Jonathan helped to prepare many wagons. Their journey began in April of 1846, but was interrupted by Jonathan's service in the Mormon Battalion. After the long march was over, he returned to his family at Winter Quarters and continued on to Utah in the Heber C. Kimball company of 1848. For the next sixteen years, the Pugmire's resided in Salt Lake City where Jonathan served for many years as the foreman of the Public Works blacksmith shop. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion and spent three months in Echo Canyon preparing to resist Johnston's Army. He also served for three years as bishop of the Salt Lake 7th Ward.

In 1864, Jonathan went to help settle Bear Lake Valley, making his home at St. Charles, Idaho. There he established a farm, worked as blacksmith, and managed a co-op store that was built on his property. He also served as the tithing agent for the Bear Lake Stake. He practiced plural marriage and had three families. Jonathan died suddenly at age fifty-seven. (See history of Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. and Elizabeth Barnes.)

Dedicated to the memory of the late Bishop Pugmire, of St. Charles.

During the period this Journal was in prospective, one of its friends and supporters, Bishop; Jonathan Pugmire, of St. Charles, has paid the last debt of nature, and has learned from actual experience, the great secret of immortality. He died September the 20th 1880. Deceased had become a veteran among the Latter-day Saints; he was interested in all their interests, participated in all their sorrows, rejoiced in all their hope, exulting in their prosperity, and confidently assured of their final triumph over all their enemies through our Lord Jesus Christ. At the sudden fiat of the Almighty, he has departed on his immortal mission, with a sure and certain hope of a resurrection to eternal life. He has left behind him a bright and honorable record, with a name fame that will be imperishable among the people of God, while eternity goes and eternity comes.

We sincerely regret the dispensation of Divine Providence that has so suddenly deprived us of a true and valuable friend; his wives and children, of a good husband and kind father, a generous provider and a faithful protector. His numerous friends and the stranger passing his borders, will lose a kind-hearted and beneficent host, whose profuse hospitality was ever noticeable. His obituary has already appeared in the "Deseret News," written by his esteemed friend Andrew Galaway. We shall not therefore enter into details of his life and history, nor the particulars of his un-looked for and sudden death; but we simply make the mention of our friend and brother, that his faithful labors as an Elder of Israel, and his generous deeds as a fellow citizen may be recorded in the first Journal published in the county where he has made his home during the last sixteen years.

There may be more true and generous friends than our deceased brother, if so, we do not know them. There may be men more faithful to God and to his people, men who would suffer more for the cause of truth than he, would suffer, men that more respected and loved by wives, children and friends, but if so, we do not know them. There may be more generous and devoted followers of Apostles and Prophets through evil and through good report; if so, we do not know them. We do not claim perfection for our deceased brother, by any means, but we do claim for him those noble qualities of heart and soul that constitutes a true, brave, and honest man, of whom his family and friends may be justly proud; and in whom the Lord and his co-workers must be well pleased.

Therefore a few left of the noble five hundred, who with our deceased brother, shouldered their muskets and traveled thousands of miles on foot into Mexican territory, to fight the battles of a government that would not protect their wives, children, and their friends. Those few may know more of his sufferings and endurance during those weary months than we do. There are others who know more of his kind-hearted deeds, of his generous spirit, and devoted soul, than we do; but we yield precedence to none in the respect, affection, and honor the memory of our fellow laborer, our brother and our friend. We have associated with him in business circles; in political assemblies; in theological schools; in private councils, and in public conferences. He has been closely identified with out missionary travels, and our public teachings, in which capacity he was ever prompt and energetic. We have met him in holy places where he has received ordinations and blessing greater than which, none have received; which has formed a cord of sympathy, and cemented a bond of union that will doubtless remain when time shall be ____ (few words illegible).

We condole with his immediate friends in their irespirable loss, and commend them to the kind protecting care of Him who claims to be the Father to the fatherless, and the husband of the widow.

We have been permitted to publish a letter written to our deceased brother by Niels Wilhelmson, President of the Scandinavian mission, with which many of our readers will be interested, which will appear in our next issue.

(Obituary courtesy of Wes & Debi Grossnickle)

Parents:

Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. 1799 - 1876


Spouses:

 

Elizabeth McKay Pugmire 1822 - 1887

 

Mary Elizabeth Staniforth Pugmire 1841 - 1922


Children:

 

George McKay Pugmire 1846 - 1910

 

Jonathan McKay Pugmire 1848 - 1866

 

Vincent McKay Pugmire 1850 - 1888

 

James McKay Pugmire 1854 - 1910

 

Elizabeth McKay Pugmire Rich Aulguire 1854 - 1911


Robert McKay Pugmire 1856 - 1886

 

Charlotte McKay Pugmire 1859 - 1870

 

Edward McKay Pugmire 1861 - 1943

 

Henry Nelson Pugmire 1862 - 1901

 

William Nelson Pugmire 1863 - 1940

 

Ellen Nelson Pugmire Keetch 1865 - 1930

 

Thomas Staniforth Pugmire 1866 - 1941

 

Sarah Nelson Pugmire 1867 - 1875

 

Mary Mckay Pugmire 1867 - 1867

 

Annie Staniforth Pugmire Keetch 1868 - 1958

 

David Nelson Pugmire 1870 - 1950

 

Heber Staniforth Pugmire 1870 - 1948

 

Alma Nelson Pugmire 1872 - 1875

 

Richard Staniforth Pugmire 1872 - 1947

Moroni Staniforth Pugmire 1874 - 1931

 

Nora Nelson Pugmire Cleveland 1875 - 1962


Burial: Saint Charles Cemetery, Saint Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho, USA


Maintained by: Wes & Debi Grossnickle

Originally Created by: Carl W. McBrayer

Record added: Aug 22, 2006

Find A Grave Memorial# 15467137 -------------------- Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Mormon Battalion Sick Detachments (1847) Age 23


Departure: 24 May 1847 Arrival: 29 July 1847

Company Information: Three sick detachments of disabled men in the Mormon Battalion, along with some women and children, spent the winter in 1846-47 at Pueblo, Colorado. An advance party of 13 soldiers met Brigham Young's company on 4 July while trailing livestock. The remainder of the sick detachments left Pueblo on 24 May and, in company with some Saints from Mississippi, arrived in Salt Lake City five days after Brigham Young had entered the valley.

Find A Grave

Birth: Dec. 7, 1823, England

Death: Sep. 18, 1880 Saint Charles Bear Lake County Idaho, USA

Son of Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. and Elizabeth Barnes was at Carlisle, Cumberland, England. Little is known of his youth, except that he was trained as a blacksmith by his father. When he was eighteen, the family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and they began plans to emigrate. In February of 1844, he sailed from Liverpool with his father's family on the Isaac Allerton. Aboard the ship, he met Elizabeth McKay, a convert from Scotland. They were married 30 April 1844, after arriving in Nauvoo, Illinois.

Their early married life was spent at Montrose, Iowa making preparations for the move west. Jonathan helped to prepare many wagons. Their journey began in April of 1846, but was interrupted by Jonathan's service in the Mormon Battalion. After the long march was over, he returned to his family at Winter Quarters and continued on to Utah in the Heber C. Kimball company of 1848. For the next sixteen years, the Pugmires resided in Salt Lake City where Jonathan served for many years as the foreman of the Public Works blacksmith shop. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion and spent three months in Echo Canyon preparing to resist Johnston's Army. He also served for three years as bishop of the Salt Lake 7th Ward.

In 1864, Jonathan went to help settle Bear Lake Valley, making his home at St. Charles, Idaho. There he established a farm, worked as blacksmith, and managed a co-op store that was built on his property. He also served as the tithing agent for the Bear Lake Stake. He practiced plural marriage and had three families. Jonathan died suddenly at age fifty-seven. (See history of Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. and Elizabeth Barnes)

Dedicated to the memory of the late Bishop Pugmire, of St. Charles.

During the period this Journal was in prospective, one of its friends and supporters, Bishop; Jonathan Pugmire, of St. Charles, has paid the last debt of nature, and has learned from actual experience, the great secret of immortality. He died September the 20th 1880. Deceased had become a veteran among the Latter-day Saints; he was interested in all their interests, participated in all their sorrows, rejoiced in all their hope, exulting in their prosperity, and confidently assured of their final triumph over all their enemies through our Lord Jesus Christ. At the sudden fiat of the Almighty, he has departed on his immortal mission, with a sure and certain hope of a resurrection to eternal life. He has left behind him a bright and honorable record, with a name fame that will be imperishable among the people of God, while eternity goes and eternity comes.

We sincerely regret the dispensation of Divine Providence that has so suddenly deprived us of a true and valuable friend; his wives and children, of a good husband and kind father, a generous provider and a faithful protecter [sic-protector]. His numerous friends and the stranger passing his borders, will lose a kind hearted and beneficent host, whose profuse hospitality was ever noticeable. His obituary has already appeared in the "Deseret News," written by his esteemed friend Andrew Galaway. We shall not therefore enter into details of his life and history, nor the particulars of his unlooked for and sudden death; but we simply make the mention of our friend and brother, that his faithful labors as an Elder of Israel, and his generous deeds as a fellow citizen may be recorded in the first Journal published in the county where he has made his home during the last sixteen years.

There may be more true and generous friends than our deceased brother, if so, we do not know them. There may be men more faithful to God and to his people, men who would suffer more for the cause of truth than he, would suffer, men that more respected and loved by wives, children and friends, but if so, we do not know them. There may be more generous and devoted followers of Apostles and Prophets through evil and through good report; if so, se do not know them. We do not claim perfection for our deceased brother, by any means, but we do claim for him those noble qualities of heart and soul that constitutes a true, brave, and honest man, of whom his family and friends may be justly proud; and in whom the Lord and his co-workers must be well pleased.

Therefore a few left of the noble five hundred, who with our deceased brother, shouldered their muskets and traveled thousands of miles on foot into Mexican territory, to fight the battles of a government that would not protect their wives, children, and their friends. Those few may know more of his sufferings and endurance during those weary months than we do. There are others who know more of his kind hearted deeds, of his generous spirit, and devoted soul, than we do; but we yield precedence to none in the respect, affection, and honor the memory of our fellow laborer, our brother and our friend. We have associated with him in business circles; in political assemblies; in theological schools; in private councils, and in public conferences. He has been closely identified with out missionary travels, and our public teachings, in which capacity he was ever prompt and energetic. We have met him in holy places where he has received ordinations and blessing greater than which, none have received; which has formed a cord of sympathy, and cemented a bond of union that will doubtless remain when time shall be ____ (few words illegible).

We condole with his immediate friends in their irrespirable loss, and commend them to the kind protecting care of Him who claims to be the Father to the fatherless, and the husband of the widow.

We have been permitted to publish a letter written to our deceased brother by Niels Wilhelmson, President of the Scandinavian mission, with which many of our readers will be interested, which will appear in our next issue.

(Obituary courtesy of Wes & Debi Grossnickle)

Family links:

Parents:
  • Jonathan Pugmire (1799 - 1876)
Spouses:
  • Elizabeth McKay Pugmire (1822 - 1887)*
  • Mary Elizabeth Staniforth Pugmire (1841 - 1922)*
Children:
  • George McKay Pugmire (1846 - 1910)*
  • Jonathan McKay Pugmire (1848 - 1866)*
  • Vincent McKay Pugmire (1850 - 1888)*
  • James McKay Pugmire (1854 - 1910)*
  • Elizabeth McKay Pugmire Rich Aulguire (1854 - 1911)*
  • Robert McKay Pugmire (1856 - 1886)*
  • Charlotte McKay Pugmire (1859 - 1870)*
  • Edward McKay Pugmire (1861 - 1943)*
  • Henry Nelson Pugmire (1862 - 1901)*
  • William Nelson Pugmire (1863 - 1940)*
  • Ellen Nelson Pugmire Keetch (1865 - 1930)*
  • Thomas Staniforth Pugmire (1866 - 1941)*
  • Mary Mckay Pugmire (1867 - 1867)*
  • Sarah Nelson Pugmire (1867 - 1875)*
  • Annie Staniforth Pugmire Keetch (1868 - 1958)*
  • Heber Staniforth Pugmire (1870 - 1948)*
  • David Nelson Pugmire (1870 - 1950)*
  • Alma Nelson Pugmire (1872 - 1875)*
  • Richard Staniforth Pugmire (1872 - 1947)*
  • Moroni Staniforth Pugmire (1874 - 1931)*
  • Nora Nelson Pugmire Cleveland (1875 - 1962)*

Burial: Saint Charles Cemetery Saint Charles Bear Lake County Idaho, USA -------------------- Find a Grave

Birth: Dec. 7, 1823, England Death: Sep. 18, 1880

Saint Charles Bear Lake County Idaho, USA

Son of Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. and Elizabeth Barnes was at Carlisle, Cumberland, England. Little is known of his youth, except that he was trained as a blacksmith by his father. When he was eighteen, the family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and they began plans to emigrate. In February of 1844, he sailed from Liverpool with his father's family on the Isaac Allerton. Aboard the ship, he met Elizabeth McKay, a convert from Scotland. They were married 30 April 1844, after arriving in Nauvoo, Illinois.

Their early married life was spent at Montrose, Iowa making preparations for the move west. Jonathan helped to prepare many wagons. Their journey began in April of 1846, but was interrupted by Jonathan's service in the Mormon Battalion. After the long march was over, he returned to his family at Winter Quarters and continued on to Utah in the Heber C. Kimball company of 1848. For the next sixteen years, the Pugmires resided in Salt Lake City where Jonathan served for many years as the foreman of the Public Works blacksmith shop. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion and spent three months in Echo Canyon preparing to resist Johnston's Army. He also served for three years as bishop of the Salt Lake 7th Ward.

In 1864, Jonathan went to help settle Bear Lake Valley, making his home at St. Charles, Idaho. There he established a farm, worked as blacksmith, and managed a co-op store that was built on his property. He also served as the tithing agent for the Bear Lake Stake. He practiced plural marriage and had three families. Jonathan died suddenly at age fifty-seven. (See history of Jonathan Pugmire, Sr. and Elizabeth Barnes)

Dedicated to the memory of the late Bishop Pugmire, of St. Charles.

During the period this Journal was in prospective, one of its friends and supporters, Bishop; Jonathan Pugmire, of St. Charles, has paid the last debt of nature, and has learned from actual experience, the great secret of immortality. He died September the 20th 1880. Deceased had become a veteran among the Latter-day Saints; he was interested in all their interests, participated in all their sorrows, rejoiced in all their hope, exulting in their prosperity, and confidently assured of their final triumph over all their enemies through our Lord Jesus Christ. At the sudden fiat of the Almighty, he has departed on his immortal mission, with a sure and certain hope of a resurrection to eternal life. He has left behind him a bright and honorable record, with a name fame that will be imperishable among the people of God, while eternity goes and eternity comes.

We sincerely regret the dispensation of Divine Providence that has so suddenly deprived us of a true and valuable friend; his wives and children, of a good husband and kind father, a generous provider and a faithful protecter [sic-protector]. His numerous friends and the stranger passing his borders, will lose a kind hearted and beneficent host, whose profuse hospitality was ever noticeable. His obituary has already appeared in the "Deseret News," written by his esteemed friend Andrew Galaway. We shall not therefore enter into details of his life and history, nor the particulars of his unlooked for and sudden death; but we simply make the mention of our friend and brother, that his faithful labors as an Elder of Israel, and his generous deeds as a fellow citizen may be recorded in the first Journal published in the county where he has made his home during the last sixteen years.

There may be more true and generous friends than our deceased brother, if so, we do not know them. There may be men more faithful to God and to his people, men who would suffer more for the cause of truth than he, would suffer, men that more respected and loved by wives, children and friends, but if so, we do not know them. There may be more generous and devoted followers of Apostles and Prophets through evil and through good report; if so, se do not know them. We do not claim perfection for our deceased brother, by any means, but we do claim for him those noble qualities of heart and soul that constitutes a true, brave, and honest man, of whom his family and friends may be justly proud; and in whom the Lord and his co-workers must be well pleased.

Therefore a few left of the noble five hundred, who with our deceased brother, shouldered their muskets and traveled thousands of miles on foot into Mexican territory, to fight the battles of a government that would not protect their wives, children, and their friends. Those few may know more of his sufferings and endurance during those weary months than we do. There are others who know more of his kind hearted deeds, of his generous spirit, and devoted soul, than we do; but we yield precedence to none in the respect, affection, and honor the memory of our fellow laborer, our brother and our friend. We have associated with him in business circles; in political assemblies; in theological schools; in private councils, and in public conferences. He has been closely identified with out missionary travels, and our public teachings, in which capacity he was ever prompt and energetic. We have met him in holy places where he has received ordinations and blessing greater than which, none have received; which has formed a cord of sympathy, and cemented a bond of union that will doubtless remain when time shall be ____ (few words illegible).

We condole with his immediate friends in their irrespirable loss, and commend them to the kind protecting care of Him who claims to be the Father to the fatherless, and the husband of the widow.

We have been permitted to publish a letter written to our deceased brother by Niels Wilhelmson, President of the Scandinavian mission, with which many of our readers will be interested, which will appear in our next issue.

(Obituary courtesy of Wes & Debi Grossnickle)

Family links:

Parents:
  • Jonathan Pugmire (1799 - 1876)
Spouses:
  • Elizabeth McKay Pugmire (1822 - 1887)*
  • Mary Elizabeth Staniforth Pugmire (1841 - 1922)*
Children:
  • George McKay Pugmire (1846 - 1910)*
  • Jonathan McKay Pugmire (1848 - 1866)*
  • Vincent McKay Pugmire (1850 - 1888)*
  • Elizabeth McKay Pugmire Rich Aulguire (1854 - 1911)*
  • James McKay Pugmire (1854 - 1910)*
  • Robert McKay Pugmire (1856 - 1886)*
  • Charlotte McKay Pugmire (1859 - 1870)*
  • Edward McKay Pugmire (1861 - 1943)*
  • Henry Nelson Pugmire (1862 - 1901)*
  • William Nelson Pugmire (1863 - 1940)*
  • Ellen M. Nelson Pugmire Keetch (1864 - 1930)*
  • Thomas Staniforth Pugmire (1866 - 1941)*
  • Sarah Nelson Pugmire (1867 - 1875)*
  • Mary Mckay Pugmire (1867 - 1867)*
  • Annie Staniforth Pugmire Keetch (1868 - 1958)*
  • Heber Staniforth Pugmire (1870 - 1948)*
  • David Nelson Pugmire (1870 - 1950)*
  • Richard Staniforth Pugmire (1872 - 1947)*
  • Alma Nelson Pugmire (1872 - 1875)*
  • Moroni Staniforth Pugmire (1874 - 1931)*
  • Nora Nelson Pugmire Cleveland (1875 - 1962)*

Burial: Saint Charles Cemetery Saint Charles Bear Lake County Idaho, USA

Maintained by: Wes & Debi Grossnickle Originally Created by: Carl W. McBrayer Record added: Aug 22, 2006 Find A Grave Memorial# 15467137

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Jonathan Pugmire, IV's Timeline

1823
December 7, 1823
Carlisle, Cumberland, England
1844
April 30, 1844
Age 20
Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA
1846
March 31, 1846
Age 22
Montrose, Lee County, Iowa, United States
1848
June 4, 1848
Age 24
Elkhorn, NE, USA
1850
August 19, 1850
Age 26
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah
1854
February 27, 1854
Age 30
July 8, 1854
Age 30
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
1861
October 20, 1861
Age 37
Salt Lake City Utah
1862
February 11, 1862
Age 38
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT
1863
August 16, 1863
Age 39
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah