Joseph Alexander Henry

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Joseph Alexander Henry

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Albany, Albany, New York, United States
Death: Died in Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, United States
Cause of death: Brights Disease
Place of Burial: Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, DOC, Distrct of Columbia, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of William Henry and Ann Henry
Husband of Harriet Anna Henry
Father of William Alexander Henry; Mary Anna Henry; Helen Louisa Henry and Caroline Henry
Brother of Harriett Alexander Henry; Nancy Henry; 1st Child Henry; 2nd Child Henry and James Henry

Managed by: Private User
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About Joseph Alexander Henry

Wikipedia Biographical Summary:

"...Joseph Henry (December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was an American scientist who served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, as well as a founding member of the National Institute for the Promotion of Science, a precursor of the Smithsonian Institution. He was highly regarded during his lifetime. While building electromagnets, Henry discovered the electromagnetic phenomenon of self-inductance. He also discovered mutual inductance independently of Michael Faraday, (1791-1867), though Faraday was the first to publish his results. Henry developed the electromagnet into a practical device. He invented a precursor to the electric doorbell (specifically a bell that could be rung at a distance via an electric wire, 1831) and electric relay (1835). The SI unit of inductance, the henry, is named in his honor. Henry's work on the electromagnetic relay was the basis of the practical electrical telegraph, invented by Samuel F. B. Morse, (1791-1872), (who was also an accomplished artist) and Sir Charles Wheatstone, (1802-1875), separately..."

"...Henry was born in Albany, New York to Scottish immigrants Ann Alexander Henry and William Henry. His parents were poor, and Henry's father died while he was still young. For the rest of his childhood, Henry lived with his grandmother in Galway, New York. He attended a school which would later be named the "Joseph Henry Elementary School" in his honor. After school, he worked at a general store, and at the age of thirteen became an apprentice watchmaker and silversmith. Joseph's first love was theater and he came close to becoming a professional actor. His interest in science was sparked at the age of sixteen by a book of lectures on scientific topics titled Popular Lectures on Experimental Philosophy. In 1819 he entered The Albany Academy, where he was given free tuition. Even with free tuition he was so poor that he had to support himself with teaching and private tutoring positions. He intended to go into medicine, but in 1824 he was appointed an assistant engineer for the survey of the State road being constructed between the Hudson River and Lake Erie. From then on, he was inspired to a career in either civil or mechanical engineering.

Historical marker in Academy Park (Albany, New York) commemorating Henry's work with electricity. Henry excelled at his studies (so much so, that he would often help his teachers teach science) and in 1826 was appointed Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at The Albany Academy by Principal T. Romeyn Beck. Some of his most important research was conducted in this new position. His curiosity about terrestrial magnetism led him to experiment with magnetism in general. He was the first to coil insulated wire tightly around an iron core in order to make a more powerful electromagnet, improving on William Sturgeon's electromagnet which used loosely coiled uninsulated wire. Using this technique, he built the strongest electromagnet at the time for Yale. He also showed that, when making an electromagnet using just two electrodes attached to a battery, it is best to wind several coils of wire in parallel, but when using a set-up with multiple batteries, there should be only one single long coil. The latter made the telegraph feasible..."

"...As a famous scientist and director of the Smithsonian Institution, Henry received visits from other scientists and inventors who sought his advice. Henry was patient, kindly, self-controlled, and gently humorous. One such visitor was Alexander Graham Bell, who on 1 March 1875 carried a letter of introduction to Henry. Henry showed an interest in seeing Bell's experimental apparatus, and Bell returned the following day. After the demonstration, Bell mentioned his untested theory on how to transmit human speech electrically by means of a "harp apparatus" which would have several steel reeds tuned to different frequencies to cover the voice spectrum. Henry said Bell had "the germ of a great invention". Henry advised Bell not to publish his ideas until he had perfected the invention. When Bell objected that he lacked the necessary knowledge, Henry firmly advised: "Get it!"

On 25 June 1876, Bell's experimental telephone (using a different design) was demonstrated at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia where Henry was one of the judges for electrical exhibits. On 13 January 1877, Bell demonstrated his instruments to Henry at the Smithsonian Institution and Henry invited Bell to demonstrate them again that night at the Washington Philosophical Society. Henry praised "the value and astonishing character of Mr. Bell's discovery and invention."

Henry died on 13 May 1878, and was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery in the Georgetown section of northwest Washington, D.C. John Phillips Sousa wrote the Transit of Venus March for the unveiling of the Joseph Henry statue in front of the Smithsonian Castle..."

SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry,_Joseph

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Joseph Alexander Henry's Timeline

1797
December 17, 1797
Albany, Albany, New York, United States
1798
January 1798
Albany, NY
1804
1804
- 1814
Age 6
Galway, NY

w birth of brother Joseph sent away.

1814
1814
Age 16
Albany, NY

Apprenticed by William Selkirk(Paternal Cousin) / Silversmith/Watchmaker

1830
May 3, 1830
Age 32
Schenectady, NY
1832
October 1832
Age 34
Albany, NY
1834
1834
Age 36
Princeton, NJ
1836
February 1836
Age 38
Princeton, NJ
1839
August 18, 1839
Age 41
Princeton, NJ
1855
1855
- 1878
Age 57
Washington, District Of Columbia, USA

Family moves into suite of 8 rooms constructed on 2nd floor of East Wing of Smithsonian.