Joseph Loomis, Sr.

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Joseph Loomis, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Braintree, Essex, England
Death: Died in Windsor, (Present Hartford County), Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: Loomis Homestead, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
Immediate Family:

Son of John (Lummys) Lummys, II and Agnes Loomis
Husband of Mary Loomis
Father of Deacon John Loomis; Joseph Loomis, Jr.; Mary Skinner; Sarah Loomis; Elizabeth Hull (Loomis) and 6 others
Brother of Ann Warr; Sarah Loomis; Elizabeth Preston; Jane Loomis; Geoffrey Loomis and 1 other

Occupation: woolen draper, farmer, of Windsor, Conn, Woolen-draper
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Joseph Loomis, Sr.

Joseph Loomis was one of the first settlers of Windsor, Connecticut. He was born probably before 1590 at Braintree, in Essex county, England and died in Windsor Connecticut on 25 Nov. 1658.[1]

Parents: John and Agnes Loomis

  1. Married: on 30 June in 1614 to Mary White at Messing, a small village near Braintree, County Essex, England. Mary was baptized on August 24, 1590, at Shalford, England, daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White, of Messing. She died on 23 Aug 1652 at Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut.

Children:

  1. Joseph, born in England, about 1615; died at Windsor, June 26, 1687 married 1st, Sarah Hill, Sept. 17, 1646, who died Aug. 23, 1653 ; married 2d, Mary Chauncey, June 28, 1659. On the 3d of July, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation four acres of land, bounded north by the land of Joseph Loomis the elder, and in 1660 by purchase he acquired land on the east side of the Connecticut. In 1686 he conveyed a part of this land to his son Joseph, and a part to his son John. He was freeman in 1654.
  2. Sarah, born 1617, who married Capt. Nicholas Olmsted of Hartford in 1640. He died Aug. 31, 1684.
  3. Elizabeth, born 1619, married Josiah Hull May 20, 1641. Mr. Hull was deputy to the General Court in 1659, '60 and '62. He then removed to Killingworth, from which place he was deputy 1667-74. He died Nov. lo, 1675 ; his wife was living in 1665.
  4. Mary, 1620. married 1st, John Skinner; married 2d, Owen Tudor, Nov. 18, 1651. She d. Aug. 19, 1680. He d. Oct. 30, 1690, Windsor.
  5. Deacon John, born in England in 1622 ; admitted to the Windsor church Oct. 11, 1640; married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Scott of Hartford, Feb. 3, 1648-9. On the 3d of May, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation 40 acres of land. He resided in Farmington from 1652 to 1660, when he returned to Windsor, and was deacon of the church. He was deputy to General Court in 1666 and '7, also from 1675 to 1687. He died Sept. 1,1688, and his monument is still preserved in the Windsor burying ground. His wife survived him. His will is preserved in the Probate office at Hartford, and his name is signed John Loomys. The will is dated Aug. 27, 1688, and mentions land on both sides of the Connecticut river.
  6. Thomas, born in England, married 1st, Hannah Fox, Nov. 1, 1653, who died April 25, 1662; married 2d, Mary, daughter of Thomas Judd, Jan. 1, 1662-3, who died Aug. 8, 1684. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church April 3, 1666. He owned a farm in East Windsor and died Aug. 28, 1689.
  7. Nathaniel, 1626;
  8. Lieut. Samuel, born in England, married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Judd, Dec. 27, 1653. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church Nov. 26, 1661. He was a lieutenant, and removed to Westfield, Mass., between 1672 and '75. He sold his dwelling house in Windsor in 1679, and died Oct. 1, 1689. His widow died May 7, 1606.

Biography

You can see here that the surname has changed from Lummys to Loomis. Actually, this generation spelled the surname Loomys. It comes down to us as Loomis.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general.

Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White.

Joseph Loomis was married in the church of Saint Michaels, where the family worshipped and where they are buried. This ancient church was founded in 1199, in the first year of the reign of King John. The coat of arms of the Loomis family is carved on one of the ancient Loomis tombs.

He had access to the funds to make the break with the old world to New England, His goods came from Maiden in Essex by way of Ipswich to London, when he started on his journey to America, and he and his family proceeded by land. He sailed with his wife, five sons, and three daughters, from London on 11 April 1638, in the ship “Susan and Ellen” which ship arrived at Boston on July 17th.

After about a year spent in Dorchester, the family moved with the Rev. Ephraim Huet party to Windsor, Connecticut, there arriving August 17, 1639.

By February 1640 Loomis had settled at Windsor, receiving on the 2nd of February, from the Connecticut Plantation, 21 acres adjoining the Farmington River, on the west side (Town Records, Vol. 1). The Massachusetts Bay Colony then had jurisdiction, and he also became owner of several other tracts which he purchased.

Located on a slight elevation above a bend of the Farmington River, the Loomis family homestead dates from 1640, making it one of the oldest houses in Connecticut. Its historical prestige and close ties with the early colonial life of Windsor have made it a symbol of the enduring virtues of those who founded this country.

Joseph Loomis built as his first home a dug-out cabin. His house was erected before 1652 and located on the “Island” near the mouth of the Farmington River, so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an island by the overflowing of the Connecticut River. Cabin and house are both preserved on the grounds of the The Loomis Chaffee School, 4 Batchelder Road, in Windsor, Connecticut.

Weblinks

Sources

  • 1906 revision of the "The Loomis Family in America", from the 1875 original by Elias Loomis, L.L.D., by Elisha S. Loomis, Ph.D.
  • Abstract of the Disposition of the Estate of Joseph Loomis, Windsor, Connecticut." Found in original records, Vol. 2 page 115-116, and in the printed Digest of Manwaring, Vol. 1 page 135.

Citations

[1] "Joseph Loomis, Son of John and Agnes Loomis, was probably born before 1590, England: married in Messing , Co, Essex, England, June 30, 1614, Mary White, bap. Aug 24, 1590, d. Aug. 23, 1652."..."He died Nov. 25, 1658." Loomis, page 121 of 859 The data appeared on page 121 of 859 pages. It is citation #1 of 12,670.

-------------------- JOSEPH LOOMIS b. probably 1588 in England, s. of John and Agnis Loomis, m. 30 June 1614 in Messing, Co. of Essex, England, Mary White. He d. 25 Nov. 1658 at Windsor, Conn. His wife, Mary (White) Loomis, was dau. of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White of Messing, Co. of Essex, England, who were m. 24 June 1585. Her mother, Bridget (Allgar) White, was bap. 11 Mar 1562, dau. of Wm. Allgar, Co. of Essex Eng. Mary was probably a sister-in-law of John Porter, another prominent Windsor, Connecticut settler. Mary Loomis d. 1652.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen-draper in Braintree, Essex Co., England. He sailed from London, England 11 April 1638, on the ship "Susan and Ellen," arrived Boston, Mass. 17 July 1638. Records indicate he stayed about a year in Dorchester, Mass. Town records of Windsor, Conn. show that on 2 Feb. 1640, he was granted 21 acres from the Plantation adjoining Farmington River on the west side of the Conn. River. This acreage included the site of the first English settlement made in Conn. Also there were several large tracts of land on the east side of the Conn., partly from the town and partly purchased. Rev. Ephraim Huet arrived in Windsor, Conn. 17 Aug. 1639. It is believed that Joseph Loomis was in the company with him. In that case it is likely he arrived in Windsor, Conn. in the summer or autumn of 1639. His house was near the mouth of the Farmington River on "The Island." That area was called "the Island" because when raining, the Connecticut River overflowed, causing it to temporarily become an island.

Joseph and Mary Loomis had 8 ch., all born in England, and came to America with them. Their five sons were freeman--believed to mean those who enjoy political liberty (7 Oct 1669). Their children:

Issue of Joseph and Mary (White) Loomis

Joseph b. 1615 in Messing, Co Essex, England

Sarah b. 1617 in Braintree, Essex, England -m. Capt. Nicholas Olmsted

Elizabeth b. 10 June 1619 in Braintree, Essex, England

Mary b. 1620 in England

John b. 1622 in Messing, Co Essex, England

Thomas b. 1624 in Co Essex, England

Nathaniel b. 1626 in Braintree, Essex, England

Samuel b. 1628 in Co Essex, England

-------------------- Joseph LOOMIS, Sr. Mary WHITEHusband: Joseph LOOMIS, Sr. Birth: 1590, Braintree, co. Essex, England Death: 25 Nov 1658, Windsor, Hartford Co., CT Occupation: woolen draper Y-DNA Haplogroup: R1b Father: John LOOMIS Mother: Agnes LYNWOOD

The original spelling of the name was probably LOOMYS, as Joseph was probably of Dutch ancestry (many skilled Dutch were brought to England to work in the textile industry).

Marriage: 30 Jun 1614, Shalford, co. Essex, England Transhumance-1: 17 Jul 1638, arrived Boston on the Susan and Ellen Transhumance-2: 1639, settled in Windsor, CTWife: Mary WHITE Baptism: 24 Aug 1590, Shalford, co. Essex, England Death: 23 Aug 1652, Connecticut Father: Robert WHITE Mother: Bridget ALLGARChildren — born in co. Essex, England:1. Joseph LOOMIS, Jr., b. 1615, Messing 2. Sarah LOOMIS, b. 1617 3. Elizabeth LOOMIS, b. ca. 1619 4. Mary LOOMIS, b. ca. 1620 5. (Dea.) John LOOMIS, b. 1622 6. Thomas LOOMIS, b. 1624 7. Nathaniel LOOMIS, b. 1626 8. (Lt.) Samuel LOOMIS, b. 1628Keywords for search engines: UK, United Kingdowm; USA, United States, Connecticut -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources: 1. Elisha S. Loomis. 1908. Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America and His Antecedents in the Old World: the Original Published by Elias Loomis, 1875. Self-published (facsimile available from the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston).

2. Gary Boyd Roberts. 1995. Ancestors of American Presidents. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, pp. 28, 240.

3. Crow-Lewis-Goodwin by Stephen M. Lawson.

4. Charles Edwin Booth. 1910. One Branch of the Booth Family Showing the Lines of Connection with One Hundred Massachusetts Bay Colonists. Self-published, New York (online at GenealogyLibrary.com). Although self-published, the book is heavily documented. See list of resources below, for the "Loomis" section only. Booth takes descendants to six generations. I stop quoting with the second, where we daughter-out with Sarah.

p. 073His [John Porter's] home lot was situated near the junction of what is now the Farmington river with the Connecticut, between the houses of George Phelps and Joseph Loomis, and nearly opposite those of Henry Wolcott and Matthew Allyn.p. 211LOOMIS.

   Joseph Loomis came on the Susan and Ellen to Boston, July 17, 1638, and after staying a year in Dorchester, he is supposed to have accompanied Rev. Ephraim Hewitt to Windsor, Aug. 17, 1639.  He was b. 1590. d. Nov. 25, 1658, in Windsor. m. Mary White, June 30, 1614, in Shalford. bap. Aug. 24, 1590. d. Aug. 23, 1652. 
   Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. 
    He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general. 
   Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law,Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times.  Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White. 
   Joseph Loomis settled at Windsor near the junction of the Farmington river with the Connecticut, on the island.  The island was high land and so called because it became an island at every great freshet of the river.  His house has been in the perpetual possession of the family down to the present time and is probably the oldest one now standing in Connecticut, which is still owned by the descendants of the pioneer builder.  It was on this island that Capt. William Holmes and a few other men of the Plymouth colony established a trading house in 1633, which was the first permanent English settlement in Connecticut. 
   Joseph Loomis was Deputy in 1643, 1644. In Feby. 1640 he had granted him 21 acres on the west side of the Connecticut river; he also had several large tracts on the east side, partly from the town and partly by purchase.p. 212SECOND GENERATION. 
    Lieut. Samuel Loomis, b. in Eng. 1628. d. Oct. 1, 1689, in Westfield. m. Elizabeth Judd, Dec. 27, 1653. b. 1633 to 1636.  d. after 1716.  He was of Farmington, but moved to Windsor 1660, and to Westfield about 1674.  Freeman, 1669. He was made Ensign, May 27, 1674, and Lieutenant later. 
    Sarah Loomis, b. 1617, in Eng. d. ___ m. Capt. Nicholas Olmstead, Sept. 28, 1640. b. in Eng. d. Aug. 31, 1684.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes.

He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general.

Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White.

Joseph Loomis settled at Windsor near the junction of the Farmington river with the Connecticut, on the island. The island was high land and so called because it became an island at every great freshet of the river. His house has been in the perpetual possession of the family down to the present time and is probably the oldest one now standing in Connecticut, which is still owned by the descendants of the pioneer builder. It was on this island that Capt. William Holmes and a few other men of the Plymouth colony established a trading house in 1633, which was the first permanent English settlement in Connecticut.

Joseph Loomis was Deputy in 1643, 1644. In Feb. 1640 he had granted him 21 acres on the west side of the Connecticut river; he also had several large tracts on the east side, partly from the town and partly by purchase.

Descendants of Joseph Loomis built the Loomis-Chaffee Institute in Windsor, Connecticut, an endowed school for boys located at the south end of Island Road. Northeast of the main buildings is the old Joseph Loomis house (primate) in excellent condition. A girls' department was added later called Chaffee School. (A Loomis and a Chaffee married.) Elias Loomis was a major contributor to the school.

While digging for the Institute buildings, remains of a dugout cabin were found; the earliest type of refuge made by the settlers. According to records, Joseph Loomis took up his claim there in 1639 and died in 1658. It is not known whether he built the dugout, the only one remaining to modern times, or even the salt-box ell of the house. Tradition is that this was his house built before 1652 and the main part of the house was built in 1688 to 1690.

In a few instances whole families came to the U.S. The Loomis family was one that did and paid their own passage which required 5 or 6 pounds. Those who paid their own passage were among the productive groups in England's working population such as farmers and skilled workers.

Noted events in his life were:

� Occupation: woolen draper, farmer.

� Emigration: in the Susan and Ellen, 11 Apr 1638, London, Middlesex, England.

� Immigration: 17 Jul 1638, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

� Admitted to the church: of Windsor, 11 Oct 1640, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.

Joseph married Mary White 30 Jun 1614 in Shalford, Co. Essex, England.,2 4 daughter of Robert White and Bridget Allgar. Mary was born in 1590 in Shalford, Co. Essex, England, was baptized 24 Aug 1590 in Shalford, Co. Essex, England,5 died in Aug 1652 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, New England5 at age 62, and was buried 23 Aug 1652 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.6 They had eight children: Joseph, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, John, Thomas, Nathaniel, and Samuel.

2-Joseph Loomis, Jr. was born 1 Mar 1614/15 in Braintree, Co. Essex, England7 8 and died 26 Jun 1687 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, New England6 9 at age 72. Ancestral File Number: 3J0W-RV.

Notes: 1. Joseph was made freeman 1654. He owned land granted him by town of Windsor, in 1643, 12 rods, 6 ft wide, bordered South and East by Matthew Allyn, North by Joseph Loomis Sr., West by John Porter's lot. In 1660 he purchased land on the East side of the Conn. river, which he divided 1686 to sons Joseph and John.

2. From "A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England," by James Savage, Vol. 3, p. 112: LOOMIS, JOSEPH, Windsor, s. of the preced. b. in Eng. m. 17 Sept 1646, Sarah Hill, had Sarah, b. 22 July 1647, d. young; Joseph, 15 July 1649; John, 1 Oct. 1631; Mary, 3 Aug. 1653. His w. d. 23 of the same mo. and by sec. w. Mary Chauncy, m. 28 Ju ne 1659, had Sarah, again, 1 Apr. 1660, d. young; Hannah, 2 Feb. 1662; Matthew, 4 Nov. 1664; Isaac, 10 July 1666; Stephen,1 Sept. 1668; James, 31 Oct. 1669; Nathaniel, 8 Aug. 1673; and [p. 113] Isaac, 28 Oct. 1677; was freem. 1654, and d. 26 Jun e 1687, when nine of the ch. were alive.

3. From "History of Ancient Windsor," Vol. II, by Henry R. Stiles, p.433: He [was freeman 1654] contributed �1, 0s, 3d to Conn. Relief Fund for Poor of Other Colonies, 1676; owned ld. gr. by town of W., 1643, 12 rds 6 ft. wide, bord. S. and E. by Matt. Allyn, N. by Jos. Loomis, Sr. W. by John Porter's lot [1660, purchas ed land on E. side Conn. River, which he div. 1686, to sons Joseph and John]; he d. 26 June, 1687. Ch. (b. W.; bp. O.C.R.)

4. On May 3, 1643, Joseph had granted him for the Plantation four acres of land, The land was granted by town of Windsor, 1643, 12 rods, 6 ft. wide, bordered south & east by Matthew Allyn, north by Joseph Loomis, Sr., west by John Porter's lot . In Vol. I, of lands, in Office of Sec'y of Conn., this entry occurs: Joseph Lumas Jr. owner of land before 1653 at Windsor, Conn. In 1660 by purchase, he acquired land on the east side of the Conn. River. In 1686 he conveyed a part of this land to his son Joseph and a part to his son John. He was a member of Windsor Troop of horse. In King Phillip's war, 1675-76, and was granted 6s 8d "on war account." He was a freeman in 1654, and d. Jun3 26, 1687. (Source: Sue Loomis and James Holcombe, Jr.)

According to To Albert D. Hart, Jr., Joseph Loomis, the immigrant, was a woolen draper in Braintree, Essex, England. The date or method of his arrival in Windsor, Conn. is not certain. Several sources say that he and his family sailed from London 11 Apr 1638 on the vessel Susan and Ellen, arriving in Boston, Mass. 17 Jul 1638. It is perhaps more likely that he came to Windsor in the summer or autumn of of 1639 in the company of the Rev. Ephraim Huit, or Huet, who arrived in Windsor on 17 Aug 1639. Joseph Loomis's name does not appear at Dorchester, Mass. (the source of the first comers to Windsor), and the first record of his presence in Windsor is the admission of his eldest son, John, to the Windsor church on 11 Oct 1640. On 2 Feb. 1640 Joseph was listed in Windsor town records as owning 21 acres including land granted by the plantation adjoining the Farmington River on the west side of the Great River, or Conecticut River, as well as tracts on the east side of the river, partly from the town, and partly purchased. He made his home on an area known as "The Island," so named because it was near the mouth of the Farmington River, and when raining, the Connecticut River overflowed, causing it temporarily to become an island. Joseph Loomis and wife Mary were accompanied by 8 children, all of whom had been born in England, and each of their five sons became a freeman.

Sources: Albert D. Hart, Jr., "Loomis Family Genealogy." Home Page: Our Folk at http//www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/loomis.htm. Accessed 4/3/2008.

Joseph Loomis 1639 pioneer to Windsor CTPosted by: Loomis Families (ID *****8217)Date: August 19, 2007 at 19:57:04In Reply to: Joseph Loomis 1639 pioneer to Windsor CT by Richard Goode of 2741 Dear Richard,

Be aware that all details found on the web are not always true. In your posting, several errors stand out, while others not so much, but still errors. For a more detailed account of the Joseph Loomis family, please refer to the "Loomis Family in America" published 1908 by Dr. Elisha Scott Loomis. Many libraries have or can obtain a copy of the 1982 reprint of this work through inter library loan. As to when Joseph and his family arrived in the new world, this date is solid, 1638. In the passenger lists for the "bark", named the "Susan and Ellen", you will find the entry for the Loomis (Lomas) family and they sailed from London on April 11, 1638 and arrived in Boston on July 17, 1638. I know of only one prior Loomis family member which is a cousin to Joseph Loomis, Edward Lomas of Ipswich, Mass., who sailed to America in 1635 and who most likely sent a word of encouragement for Joseph to come and join him in America.

As to arriving in Windsor, CT., Joseph and his family wintered over in Dorchester, Mass, and arrived the summer of 1639 at what is known as the "Island", a piece of real estate at the mouth of the Farmington river.

Of those early pioneers arriving in 1639, there were no other relatives or persons by the name Loomis (Lomas) among those who settled Windsor. Joseph's cousin Edward had homesteaded in Ipswich and his family line radiated from this location. Most all of Edward's descendants to this day spell their name Lomas or Lummis. Most all Joseph's descendants spell their names Loomis.

Over the next couple centuries, some other Loomis/Lomas/Lummis etc. families have migrated to the United States, but they and their offspring have been small in number and may have no connection to Joseph. Our Loomis Families of America DNA project has had several Lomas family members from England and here in the US participate and through the testing have found little or no connection between those families. Of course, a larger pool of participants could help refine this research, but for the moment, the facts tend to show that the various spellings of the Loomis name which we used to think all went back to an earlier ancestor seems now to not be the case.

Lance D. Loomis Loomis Families of America

found on Ancestry.com: Search> Stories, Memories and Histories added by cinlu on 31 Oct 2007 Joseph Loomis1,2 (M) b. circa 1590, d. 25 November 1658

    Joseph Loomis was born circa 1590. He married Mary White, daughter of Robert White and Bridget Allgar, on 30 June 1614 at Messing, County Essex, England. Joseph Loomis died on 25 November 1658.  Joseph and Mary had 8 children, all born in England, and came to America with them. Their five sons were freeman--believed to mean those who enjoy political liberty.
    

from Joseph Loomis by Elisha S. Loomis:

"Joseph was a woolen-draper in Braintree, Essex county, England; sailed from London April 11, 1638, in the ship Susan and Ellen, and arrived at Boston July 17, 1638, tarrying about 1 year at Dorchester, Mass., it is thought. It is mentioned in the town records of Windsor, Vol. I, that on the 2nd of Feb., 1640, he had granted him from the plantation 21 acres adjoining Farmington river, on the west side of the Connecticut river, this 21 acres including the site of the first English settlement made in Conn; also several large tracts of land on the east side of the Connecticut, partly from the town and partly by purchase.

"He therefore probably came to Windsor in the summer or autumn of 1639, and he is generally supposed to have come in company with Rev. Ephraim Huet, who arrived at Windsor, Aug. 17, 1639. He brought with him five sons, all of whom were freemen, Oct. 7, 1669, and three daughters. His house was situated near the mouth of the Farmington River on "The Island," so called because when raining, the Connecticut River overflowed, causing it to temporarily become an island. Beverly Schonewolf provided the following information about Joseph's origin and immigration. We are trying to find the original source.

The proof that Joseph Loomis came from Braintree, England is established by the deposition of Joseph Hills of Charlestown, Mass., taken July 30, 1639.

"Joseph Hills of Charlestowne, in New England, Woolen Draper, aged about 36 yeares, sworne, saith upon his oath that he came to New England undertaker in the ship called the Susan and Ellen of London whereof was master Mr. Edward Payne, in the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred thirty and eight, the 14th yeare of the raigne of our souraigne Lord the King that now is, and this dpt knowes that divers goods and chattells, victualls & commodities of Joseph Loomis late of Brayntree in the County of Essex, Woolen-draper, wch were put up in three butts, two hogsheds, one halfe hogshed, one barrell, one tubb & three firkins, transported from Malden in the County of Essex to London in an Ipswch Hye, were shipped in the said ship upon the eleventh day of Aprill in the yeare aforesayd, and this deponent cleared the said goods wth divers other goods of the said Joseph Loomis and other mens, in the Custom-house at London, as may appeare by the Customers bookes, and this dept saith that the said goods were transported into New England in the said ship where she arrived on the seventeenth day of July in the yeare aforesayd."

Beverly Schonewolf also provided the following information about Joseph's will and probate.

In Vol. 2, Records of Particular Court for the colony of Connecticut, p. 116, there is an inventory of the estate of Mr. Joseph Loomis, deceased Nov. 25, 1658, in which it is stated that there is a debt in England against Mr. Loomis's estate amounting to 12 pounds, 14 s. 8d.

His estate was inventoried at 178 pounds 10s. 00d, taken by Henry Clarke, John Moore.

Court Record Page 115, 2 December 1658. An agreement for a division of the estate by the children of Joseph Loomis, Decd, and approved by this court of Magistrates to be an equal division. To Joseph Loomis, to Nicholas Olmsted, to Josiah Hull, to John Loomis, to Thomas Loomis, to Nathaniel Loomis, to Mary Tudor, to Samuel Loomis.

The agreement of the children of Mr. Joseph Loomis respecting the division of the estate of ye father deceased approved by The Court 2 December 1658: We whose names are hereunto subscribed doe by these prsents testify that it is our mutual and joynt agreement to attend an equal division of the estate of Mr. Joseph Loomis, our father, lately deceased, wch said estate being distributed in an equal prption we doe by these prsents engage to set down Satisfied and Contented respecting any future trouble or demands about the fore said estate now pr sented by Inventory to ye Court of Magistrates. Witness our hand, 2nd December, 1658. Joseph Loomis, Josias Hull, Thomas Loomis, Mary Tudor, Nicholas Olmsted, John Loomis, Nath. Loomis, Samll Loomis.3

Children of Joseph Loomis and Mary White Joseph Loomis Jr.+ b. c 1615, d. 26 Jun 1687 Sarah Loomis+ b. 1617 Elizabeth Loomis+ b. c 1619 Mary Loomis+ b. c 1620, d. 19 Aug 1680 Deacon John Loomis+ b. c 1622, d. 1 Sep 1688 Thomas Loomis+ b. 1624, d. 28 Aug 1689 Nathaniel Loomis+ b. c 1626, d. 19 Aug 1688 Lt. Samuel Loomis+ b. c 1628, d. 1 Oct 1689 Lucille Ball is also descended from Joseph & Mary Loomis.

Joseph Loomis “late of Brayntree in the County of Essex, woollendraper,” sailed to New England in 1638 on the Susan & Ellen and settled at Windsor [Lechford 137-8; Dawes-Gates 2:566-72]. His wife was the sister of JOHN WHITE of Messing, Essex, who came to New England on the Lyon in 1632 and resided at Cambridge, Hartford and Hadley [GMB 3:1976-79].

Comment: the original spelling of the name was probably LOOMYS, as Joseph was probably of Dutch ancestry (many skilled Dutch were brought to England to work in the textile industry).

http://www.familyorigins.com/users/m/c/w/William-J-Mcwilliams/FAMO1-0001/d50.html Joseph Loomis was born in 1590 in England. He emigrated on Apr 11 1638 from London. Ship "Susan and Ellen" He immigrated on Jul 17 1638 to Boston, Massachusetts. from Descendants of Joseph Loomis by Elias Loomis, LL.D.,Prof Natural Philosophy & Astronomy in Yale College... "It is mentioned in the town records of Windsor, vol.1, that on the 2nd. of Feb., 1640 he had granted him from the Plantation 21 acres adjoining Farmington river, on the east side of the Connecticut, partly from the town and partly by purchase. he therefore probably came to Windsor in the summer or autumn of 1639, and he is generally supposed to have come in company with Rev. Ephriam Huet, who arrived at Windsor Aug 16, 1639. He brought with him five sons and three daughters. His house was situated near the mouth of Farmington river on the Island, so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an island by the overflowing of Connecticut river. ... In 1874, James C. Loomis, Hezekiah B. Loomis, Osbert B. Loomis, H. Sidney Hayden and his wife, and John Mason Loomis were constituted a corporate body by the name of the LOOMIS INSTITUTE. This institute is designed for the gratuitous education of persons of the age of twelve years and upwards, and is to be located on the original homestead of Joseph Loomis on "The Island", in Windsor, Conn. This homestead is situated on elevated ground on the west bank of the Connecticut river, and commands an uncommonly fine view of the river and valley. Since the death of Joseph Loomis this site has always been in the possession of some one of his lineal descendants to the present time. It is the design of the corporators to do what they can to endow this Institution and in this they desire the Co-operation of all the Loomis family, that the Institution may become a lasting monument to the memory of Joseph Loomis, and a blessing to the town which he selected for his refuge from the annoyances to which Puritans were subjected in the mother country." He moved on Aug 16 1639 to Windsor, Connecticutt. He died on Nov 25 1658 in Windsor, Connecticutt. He was a Woolendraper. Parents: John Lummys and Agnes Lyngwood.

He was married to Marie White on Jun 30 1614 in Messing, Co. Essex, England. Children were: Lt. Samuel Loomis, Joseph Loomis, Sarah Loomis, Elizabeth Loomis, Mary Loomis, John Loomis, Thomas Loomis, Nathaniel Loomis. _______________ LOOMIS. Joseph Loomis came on the Susan and Ellen to Boston, July 17, 1638, and after staying a year in Dorchester, he is supposed to have accompanied Rev. Ephraim Hewitt to Windsor, Aug. 17, 1639. He was b. 1590. d. Nov. 25, 1658, in Windsor. m. Mary White, June 30, 1614, in Shalford. bap. Aug. 24, 1590. d. Aug. 23, 1652. Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general. Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White. Joseph Loomis settled at Windsor near the junction of the Farmington river with the Connecticut, on the island. The island was high land and so called because it became an island at every great freshet of the river. His house has been in the perpetual possession of the family down to the present time and is probably the oldest one now standing in Connecticut, which is still owned by the descendants of the pioneer builder. It was on this island that Capt. William Holmes and a few other men of the Plymouth colony established a trading house in 1633, which was the first permanent English settlement in Connecticut. Joseph Loomis was Deputy in 1643, 1644. In Feby. 1640 he had granted him 21 acres on the west side of the Connecticut river; he also had several large tracts on the east side, partly from the town and partly by purchase. [p. 211] http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/7/NRoots/FGS/JosephLoomis-MaryWhite.htm _____________ [From Vivian M. Lumbard (at vmlumbard@aol.com) on her Rootsweb Site.]

That pioneer Joseph Loomis was a man of "respectable pecuniary means" is also evidenced by the fact that his name appears on the tax list of Braintree, England, for building a ship of 800 tons, to be built at Portsmouth, March 1, 1636, said ship to cost ?8,000, the parish of Braintree being assessed ?951-12-4 1/2. Moreover Joseph Loomis's father-in-law, Robert White, was considered a rich man for his time, and this is fully verified by his will, which see hereinafter.

It is already known, of official evidence, that the "Joseph Lummys" ("Lommys"), who resided in the town and parish of Braintree in Essex, England, left that place in the spring of the year of 1638; also, that without any appreciable delay thereafter, he became a passenger of record in a vessel of goodly register, known as the "Susan and Ellen," and that this vessel did depart on the eleventh day in the month of April, of that year, from the port of London, bound for Boston in New England, carrying quite a number of other voyagers with their personal properties.

In this connection it is the writer's duty to deal with facts that have not been made manifest hitherto--with respect to the scenes and circumstances amid which he lived; and as well, to the elements contributing chiefly to his taking leave of England. Thereunto let attention first be directed to the ways and the means by which Joseph Lummys, with his family and worldly goods, had "come up to London" from Braintree. By the sworn deposition, or affidavit, of one Joseph Hills of Charlestown, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony (see herein page 21), made thereat on the 30th day of July, 1639, he, (Hills) being the "undertaker"--the manager or promoter of this particular vessel, voyage or emigration--it is learned that the various parcels embracing the goods of Joseph Loomis (we shall principally refer to him as Loomis hereinafter) were "transported from Malden, in the county of Essex, to London, in an Ipswich hye." This place of "Malden" being Maldon, the Essex port, and an "Ipswich hye" meaning a smart craft of small size and especially engaged, we may retrace the journey of the said Loomis, his family and friends, from London, viz: down the Thames, up the Essex coast, across the Maplin and Foulness Sands, into the wide and long reach of the mouth of the river Blackwater, and continuing thence up the river some ten miles, and so, back to Maldon. This small port was one through which there long had passed commerce and people between England and the Continent. That Joseph Loomis and family attended personally the transportation, from Maldon in this hye, of their eleven separate and varying pieces of baggage and "divers other goods," which the above-noted deposition recounts, may well be believed.

The inland Blackwater river, though but a very small stream of only a few feet in width, reaches northwestward from Maldon, to and past "Six Bells Corner" in the end of Bocking parish, by Braintree. But by so devious a route does it flow, that Joseph Loomis, in his journey seaward, only followed it in its lower half, viz: from Witham to Maldon. The "River Brain,"--a mere brook--lightly slips down direct from the southern slope of Braintree to Witham, there uniting with the Blackwater. So it was that the emigrants came out of Braintree by the pleasant highway, paralleling the Brain. They passed through Black Notley, White Notley and Faulkbourne,-- all sparse hamlets strung along the gently undulating road, above the stream, yet each little settlement with its handy inn. Thus was reached Witham, then on the great Roman road between London and the northeast. Thence out of Witham, they followed the course of the Blackwater by Wickham Place, through.

Langford and Heybridge to Maldon. Some fifteen miles in all from Braintree it was, and over a favorite route for bicyclists nowadays. Alternating copses and fields, freshly furrowed for the seed-sowing, marked the way between the snug hamlets and the occasional houses plastered in white or yellow beneath their low-browed roofs of thatch. Some of these houses still exist along the way, and pretty much the same sort of people as of yore still abide in them.

This longest way around, of 100 miles to London, may have been both an easier and a quicker progress than by the forty miles of the shortest highway thereto, by the way of Chelmsford. It should have been less costly a journey than that which necessitated frequent stops at taverns for rest and refreshment. Very well-ordered seems to have been the Loomis's departure. Many a stop was made at gate and door, in those familiar fifteen miles, to give and receive blessings and farewells--the last of earth--repeating what had but just happened in Braintree church and market-place.

Braintree scarce could afford to lose such a citizen as Joseph Loomis; but America needed him more, and he knew it. Just that same need was exactly why he went away. Verily, it was not merely religion, not all prospect of gain, not great dissatisfaction with home,--not any one of these things that chiefly moved him to arise and go to set himself down three thousand miles from the ease of home. Broader than any of these causes was the reason. To help found a new country, with fairer laws and wider liberties, where the ordinary man might be more supreme--that was the Great Idea that possessed him, and many others. As of the non-conformist faction out of the church of England they wanted to dominate the church at home, which power they could not quite attain to there. But deeper than that desire in the breast of Joseph Loomis was the spirit that moved him. He felt himself equal to the task that other men had set. The challenge of their example stirred him. The appeal of Opportunity decided him. It convinced his mind that he was one of "the chosen" for the Great Purpose. And the apparently unlimited possibilities, to him and his, of the natural resources of an unclaimed land, hovered in his imagination. He had all the money that he would require to pleasantly establish his family in America. Let us dismiss, as being insufficient, the idea of "a band of Christians fleeing from persecution" --save with respect to the Mayflower's Pilgrims mostly. To the so-called Puritan settlers, the comforts of religion were vastly more of a necessity and more relished in the New than they had been to them in the Old England. Daily spiritual refreshment kept them to their hard tasks, soothed the longing for a return to the beautiful land they had forsaken, and, in fact, the church was the keystone that held up the arch of the early colonization.

"John Lummys," the father, and tailor, is shown by his will, dated 1619, to have been a tradesman and real-estate holder in comfortable circumstances, and a citizen of esteem in the church and community. His son Joseph advanced the fortune of the family. Contemplating his means and position in England, and his situation in America, it seems entirely fair to say that he was a prosperous man in England, and of the better class of settlers in New England. Long it has been seen that he was independent in Windsor--and particularly so as to the location of his estate there.

Not driven out of England, not forsaking duties or obligations there, not an enthusiast or Puritanical extremist in religion was Joseph Loomis. He came to America on general principles, after long deliberation. As a practical business man of the world his decision so to do, it will be now agreed, was the apotheosis of wisdom. A study of his life in America prys up no indication that he regretted his transplantation, as did many other settlers, with cause.

St. Michael's church. Here for forty years or more Joseph Loomis passed in and out. Here he was baptized between 1585-1592--undoubtedly. Here were proclaimed the banns before his marriage-day,--the wedding having been consummated as per this entry in the parish church of Shalford:--

"Anne Dni 1614

"Joseph Loomys was married unto Marye whight the XXXth Daye of June anno pr dicte."

The Descendants OF Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) IN America Author Elias Loomis Published 1909 Call Number: CS71.L863.

"From our Ancestors come our Names, But from our Virtues our Honors." JOSEPH LOOMIS, son of John and Agnes Loomis, was probably born before 1590, England; married in Messing, Co. Essex, England, June 30, 1614, Mary White, bap. Aug. 24, 1590, (See N. E. H. and G. Register, Vol. 55, pp. 28-29, for copy of Register of Shalford, England, marriages and baptisms), d. Windsor, Aug. 23, 1652.

Mary White was a daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White of Messing, Co. Essex, England, who were married June 24, 1585.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen-draper in Braintree, Essex county, England; sailed from London April 11, 1638, in the ship "Susan and Ellen," and arrived at Boston July 17, 1638, tarrying about 1 year at Dorchester, Mass., it is thought. It is mentioned in the town records of Windsor, Vol. 1, that on the 2nd of Feb., 1640, he had granted him from the plantation 21 acres adjoining Farmington river, on the west side of the Connecticut river, this 21 acres including the site of the first English settlement made in Conn.; (See Records of Abigail Wolcott Ellsworth Chapter, D. A. R.), also several large tracts of land on the east side of the Connecticut, partly from the town and partly by purchase.

He therefore probably came to Windsor in the summer or autumn of 1639, and he is generally supposed to have come in company with Rev. Ephraim Huet, who arrived at Windsor, Aug. 17, 1639. He brought with him five sons, all of whom were freemen, Oct. 7, 1669, and three daughters. His house was situated near the mouth of the Farmington river on "The Island," so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an island by the overflowing of the Connecticut River. He died Nov. 25, 1658, as appears from the following record:

Abstract of the Disposition of the Estate of Joseph Loomis, Windsor, Connecticut Found in Original Records, Vol. 2, page 115-116, and in the printed Digest of Manwaring, Vol. I, page 135. He died Nov. 25, 1658.

Inv't. ?178-10-00. Taken by Henry Clark, John Moore. Ct. Records, p. 115. 2 Dec. 1658. An agreement for a Division of the Estate by the Children of Joseph Loomis, Dec'd and approved by this Court of Magistrates to be an equal Division. To Joseph Loomis, to Nicholas Olmsted, to Josiah Hull, to John Loomis, to Thomas Loomis, to Nathaniel Loomis, to Mary Tudor, to Samuel Loomis.

This agreement of the children of Mr. Joseph Loomis respecting the division of the Estate of ye father deceased, approved by the Court 2 Dec. 1658: We whose names are hereunto subscribd doe by these presents testify that it is our mutual and joynt agreement to attend an equal division of the Estate of Mr. Joseph Loomis, Our father, lately deceased, wch said estate being distributed in the equal prption we doe by these presents engage to set down Satisfied and Contented respecting any future trouble or demands about the foresaid estate now presented by Inventory to ye Court of Magistrates.

Witness our hand, 2nd December, 1658. Joseph Loomis, Josiah Hull, Thomas Loomis, Mary Tudor, Nicholas Olmsted, John Loomis, Nathaniel Loomis, Samuel Loomis.

Abstract of the Disposition of the Estate of Joseph Loomis, Windsor, Connecticut Found in Original Records, Vol. 2, page 115-116, and in the printed Digest of Manwaring, Vol. I, page 135. He died Nov. 25, 1658.

Inv't. ?178-10-00. Taken by Henry Clark, John Moore. Ct. Records, p. 115. 2 Dec. 1658. An agreement for a Division of the Estate by the Children of Joseph Loomis, Dec'd and approved by this Court of Magistrates to be an equal Division. To Joseph Loomis, to Nicholas Olmsted, to Josiah Hull, to John Loomis, to Thomas Loomis, to Nathaniel Loomis, to Mary Tudor, to Samuel Loomis.

This agreement of the children of Mr. Joseph Loomis respecting the division of the Estate of ye father deceased, approved by the Court 2 Dec. 1658: We whose names are hereunto subscribd doe by these presents testify that it is our mutual and joynt agreement to attend an equal division of the Estate of Mr. Joseph Loomis, Our father, lately deceased, wch said estate being distributed in the equal prption we doe by these presents engage to set down Satisfied and Contented respecting any future trouble or demands about the foresaid estate now presented by Inventory to ye Court of Magistrates.

Witness our hand, 2nd December, 1658. Joseph Loomis, Josiah Hull, Thomas Loomis, Mary Tudor, Nicholas Olmsted, John Loomis, Nathaniel Loomis, Samuel Loomis.

[From the Rootsweb Web site of Barbara Young (bnryoung@aol.com)

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes.

He had a store in Braintree, Essex, England., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general.

Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III. They had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White. Joseph Loomis settled at Windsor near the junction of the Farmington river with the Connecticut, on the island.

The island was a high land and so called because it became an island at every great freshet of the river. His house has been in the perpetual possession of the family down to the present time and is probably the oldest one now standing in Connecticut, which is still owned by the descendants of the pioneer builder. It was on this island that Capt. William Holmes and a few other men of the Plymouth colony established a trading house in 1633, which was the first permanent English settleent in Connecticut.

Joseph Loomis was Deputy1 in 1643, 1644 in Ferby. 1640 he had granted him 21 acres on the west side of the Connecticut river; he also had several large tracts on the east side, partly from the town and partly by purchase.

Sources: 1. Title: One Branch of the Booth Family pg. 210 http://www.familytreemaker.com/_glc_/3639/3639_210.hyml

[The following info. came from the Rootsweb Site of Scott Williams (scott_williams@hotmail.com)]

Source #1: Elias Loomis "Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America" Update of 1875 edition published by Elisha S. Loomis, Berea, Ohio,1908. NOTE--Dr. Elias Loomis died before the Supplement was published. But this third (1908) edition contains allnew materials which he had collected, along with all new data collected and obtainable since his death.

From Preface: "While we have retained unbroken Dr. Elias Loomis's historical account of Joseph Loomis, his origin and his name, as set forth under the heading, Historical Data, p. 21, yet we deem it best to add such supplementary facts as havecome to light since 1875, especially as touching the name Loomis. Indeed it is very doubtful if our ancestral name originated in the way Dr. Loomis surmised, as the investigations of Prof. C. A. Hoppin, Jr., hereinafter given, seem to show. ThatJoseph's great-grandfather died at Thaxted, Eng., in the year 1551, is now proved as evidenced by Thaxted church records. But whence came his ancestors, what was the origin of the name, and what is our right to a coat-of-arms? These queries areraised and discussed in Prof. Hoppin's scholarly report to which the reader is referred. Evidently our antecedents are not Royal, but something far better, viz., clean, God-fearing, industrious men of respect and influence--men of character andback-bone."

Proof that Joseph Loomis came from Braintree, England.--Joseph Loomis, one of the first settlers of Windsor, Conn., came from Braintree, Essex County, England, in the year 1638. This fact is established by the following document, being adeposition made July 30, 1639, by one of the passengers in the same ship with Joseph Loomis. The original, of which this is a copy, is in the possession of Mr. J. Hammond Trumbull of Hartford, Conn., President of the CT Historical Society.

The following is a copy of the original draft (unsigned) of the deposition of Joseph Hills of Charlestown, taken 30th July, 1639:(*)

"Joseph Hills of Charlestowne, in New England, Woollen Draper,** aged about 36 yeares, sworne, saith upon his oath that he came to New England undertaker in the ship called the Susan & Ellen of London whereof was master Mr. Edward Payne, in theyeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred thirty and eight, the 14th yeare of the raigne of our Souraigne Lord the King that now is and this dpt knowes that divers goods and chattells, victualls & commodities of Joseph Loomis late of Brayntree inthe County of Essex, Woolen-draper, wch were put in three butts, two hogsheds, one halfe hogshed, one barrel, one tubb & three firkins, transported from Malden in the County of Essex to London in an Ipswch Hye, were shipped in the said ship uponthe eleventh day of Aprill in the yeare abovesayd, and this deponent cleared the said goods wth divers other goods of the said Joseph Loomis and other mens, in the Custome-house at London, as may appeare by the Customers bookes, and this deptsaith that the said goods were transported into New England in the said ship where she arrived on the seaventeenth day of July in the yeare aforesayd."

(*)The N. E. Hst. and Gen. Reg., Vol. VIII, p. 309, contains the Will of Joseph Hills, lawyer, late of Maldon, Mass. He d. Feb. 5, 1687-8.

  • *So designated by Savage, Vol. II, p. 417

Children of Joseph Loomis.--Joseph Loomis had five sons and three daughters, whose marriages are recorded in the town records at Windsor, as also the births of their children, but as the date of the birth of Joseph's children is not recorded, itis difficult to determine the order of seniority.

In the Records of Particular Court for the colony of CT, vol. 2, p. 115, is recorded the agreement of the children of Mr. Joseph Loomis respecting the division of the estate of said deceased, as approved by the court Dec. 2, 1658. This agreementis signed by the children in the following order:

Joseph Loomis. Nicholas Olmsted. Josias Hull. John Loomis. Thomas Loomis. Nathaniel Loomis. Mary Tudor. Samuel Loom

It is believed that the above order indicates the relative ages of the sons. Joseph Loomis, the younger, and John Loomis had land granted to them from the Windsor Plantation in 1643. The other sons acquired no land until several years afterwards. The names of the five sons are repeatedly mentioned on the records at Windsor and Hartford, as jurors, freemen, troopers, etc., and these dates lead to the conclusion that Joseph and John were older than the other three sons.

Unfounded traditions.--In my numerous visits with members of the Loomis family, I have met with a considerable number of traditions respecting the first settlement in this country which are either very inaccurate or entirely erroneous. Onestatement(*) which I have repeatedly seen is the following: "Joseph Loomis (then spelled Lomas), wife and children, left Plymouth, Eng., in the ship Mary and John, March 20, 1634, and landed at or near Boston, Mass., May 30."

This statement is entirely untrue, and contains a jumble of facts and dates derived in part from the history of other settlers in Windsor. On the 20th of March, 1630, a company of 160 persons, including Rev. John Warham, afterwards the firstminister of Windsor, embarked at Plymouth, Eng., in the ship Mary and John, a vessel of 400 tons burden, and landed at Nantasket, near Boston, May 30th. But it is established that Joseph Loomis and his family did not come over until 1638, and thefirst record which can be found of his name in CT is dated Feb. 2, 1640, when he bought a piece of land at Windsor.

The Loomis Family in the Old World: An Original and Exhaustive Inquiry into the Origin of the Name and Ancestry in England of Joseph Loomis the Emigrant to New England in 1638 BY CHARLES A. HOPPIN, JR. FOR "The Loomis Family of America" [Chapterin Elisha's book - AD]

It is already known, of official evidence, that the "Joseph Lummys" ("Lommys"), who resided in the town and parish of Braintree in Essex, England, left that place in the spring of the year of 1638; also, that without any appreciable delaythereafter, he became a passenger of record in a vessel of goodly register, known as the "Susan and Ellen," and that this vessel did depart on the eleventh day in the month of April, of that year, from the port of London, bound for Boston in NewEngland, carrying quite a number of other voyagers with their personal properties.

Joseph Loomis was not one of these unfortunate yet ambitious farmers. His wife was the daughter of a man considered as very well-to-do in that time and region; a man whose testamentary bequests of money alone were upwards of fourteen thousanddollars (present reckoning). Loomis is known to have been a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand-looms in their cottage-homes. He had a store in Braintree stocked therewith and withother goods which a "draper" dealt in. These products, he sold at large, both wholesale and retail, to tailors and consumers in general: Braintree and nearby towns were centres of cloth manufacture.

[From the Rootsweb site of Sue Biedlingmaier (sueb@provide.net.)]

The following information was taken from the website "http://www.loomis.8k.com/".

The Loomis family has been a part of the fabric of American History from this country?s very beginnings. Coming to the shores of the New World landing at Boston Harbor in 1638, just eight years after the founding of Boston, Joseph Loomis brought his family seeking a new life and hoped for prosperity.

From here the family wintered in Dorchester, Massachusetts and in 1639 traveled overland to the Connecticut Valley, where Joseph established his homestead at Windsor, overlooking the great Connecticut River near the mouth of the Farmington River.

Today, the original Joseph Loomis homestead still stands and is part of the Loomis family heritage carried on by The Loomis Chaffee School for boys and girls.

From here, the family continued to be pioneer?s in America?s history, Inventors, Entrepreneurs, mathematics, philosophy, art, business, there is hardly a profession that a Loomis descendant has not put a stamp on.

And the land, forging the Oregon Trail, mining the gold fields of the Yukon, where there are new opportunities, a Loomis is sure to go!

The following was taken from the website www.loomis.org . This is the history of the school, the Loomis Chaffee School, which was named after Joseph's descendants.

The Story of the School

Our roots are deep, running as far back as 1639, when Joseph Loomis and his family first settled at the confluence of the Farmington and Connecticut rivers. Several generations later, the inspiration for our school was born out of family tragedy, when, in the early 1870s, four Loomis brothers and their sister had outlived all their children.

As a memorial to their own offspring, and as a gift to future children, they pooled their considerable estates to found a secondary school. The original 1640 Loomis homestead was chosen as the site where their dream would become reality.

James Chaffee Loomis, Hezekiah Bradley Loomis, Osbert Burr Loomis, John Mason Loomis and Abigail Sarah Loomis Hayden broke new educational ground by planning a school that would offer both vocational and college preparatory courses. (Vocational offerings were discontinued during the later development of the school.)

The founders' enlightened and democratic school would have no religious or political admission criteria. And boys and girls would be given as free an education as the endowment would allow.

As The Loomis Institute, we opened our doors in 1914 to 39 boys and five girls. In 1926, our girls? division broke off to focus more closely on girls? educational issues and became The Chaffee School. Both schools continued to expand. The Loomis Institute built several new facilities in 1967, and the two schools reunited in 1970, forming The Chaffee School. Six years later we began admitting girls as boarders.

Our reunification led to a major revision of our curriculum. The new curriculum combines a demanding basic program with a broad range of electives in art, music, philosophy, religion and other subjects.

We have enjoyed a period of unprecedented growth since the 1970s. We strengthened our endowment to bolster financial aid. We broadened the diversity of our student body. We built dormitories, an enclosed hockey and skating rink, a visual arts center and a new school center.

We invite you to join us as we continue our educational tradition of excellence imagined over a century ago in the hearts and minds of our five founders.

[From the Rootsweb Site of Peter Blood (nowy@erols.com).]

Elisa Loomis (510) speculates that Joseph Loomis, as a wholesale cloth merchant, must have traveled to conduct business, not only to London, but to Spain an Portugal, since Braintree cloth was primary sold in those countries. Partly as a result of contact with foreign countries, Braintree developed a somewhat indepent and liberal thinking. Joseph was probably a regular at the Braintree market, held weekly for 700 years. Elisa Loomis speculates that it was at the marketplace that Joseph not only heard people talking about the opportunities in America, but probably met Mary White, whose father no doubt went to Market there - only four miles from Shalford.

Based upon his assessed taxes in 1629, eight shillings (kind of high), it can be assumed that he was doing very well as a merchant. In 1636, Joseph was paid an 9 shilling tax lived on Essex County residents by the King to cover the cost of building a ship for 8,000 £. This caused an "uproar," when was a fought in parliament by some.

510 Descendants of Joseph Loomis Title: Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America and His Antecedents in the Old Word Author: 510: Elisha Loomis (revised by John Loomis) Publication: Fresno, CA: J. E. Loomis, 1981

[The following Joseph Loomis info. comes from the Rootsweb site of David Copus (alive1now@aol.com)].

Per book, Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America, Joseph Loomis arrived in New England on ship named "Susan & Ellen" of London, whose master was Mr. Edward Payne. Joseph Loomis was a "woolen draper," a man who bought cloth from weavers and sold it in his shop in Braintree. Windsor, CT was founded by Puritans from MA in 1633 in order to block Dutch from New Netherlands from moving into CT valley.

A Descendant, "The Children of Robert White of Messing, Co. Essex, England, Who Settled in Hartford and Windsor," New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 55, p. 23-39, Jan. 1901, reprinted in Gary Boyd Roberts, English Origins of New England Families from the Historical and Genealogical Register, Selected and Introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts, 1984, Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Publishing Co., has the following information on Joseph Loomis:

"In the Loomis Genealogy, pages 9-11, evidence is given proving that Joseph Loomis, of Braintree in England, came to Boston in 1638 and settled in Windsor in 1639. It is believed that this Joseph Loomis is the Joseph Loomis whose marriage, June 30th, 1614, to Mary White, is recorded in the Parish Register of Shalford, and this theory is supported by the bequest in 1617 of Robert White to my 'daughter Maire, the wife of Joseph Loomis of Braintree.'"

Elias Loomis, Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America, revised by Elisha S. Loomis, 1908, Berea, OH, Elisha S. Loomis, pp. 104-106, has the following information about Joseph Loomis:

The Braintree men, through their business abroad, had opportunities to look out upon a world that was wider than their own shire. London was doubtless no strange city to Joseph Loomis. There he must have gone both to sell and to buy. As a wholesale cloth merchant he may have visited the continent,-- even Spain and Portugal, since it was that the Braintree-Bocking cloth was largely sold in those countries. Non-conformity developed with Braintree's commercial growth. Both features seem to have started together. Spiritual liberty was likely founded upon the material independence of the individual. Dissent in Essex dates back to 1375, the days of John Wyclif, the Reformer, whose ideas were favored by John o' Gaunt, the over-lord of our early Loomises in Lancashire. In the following reigns the government tried but failed, even with the measures that were severe, to stamp it out. But it was not until Tyndale's translation of the New Testament reached the people that Braintree residents became dissenters, conspicuously. The church and state soon proscribed the translation, and those who were found to possess a copy of it were punished. In 1527 three men and a woman, all of Braintree and of the name of Beckwith, were dealt with for having a copy of the New Testament in English. Some ecclesiastics sought to "corner" the Bible and maintain "trust methods" in disseminating its contents. The repression did little good, for on January 27, 1550, some sixty persons--(it is related by FredericWest) met in a house in Bocking on a Sunday, where arose a great discussion amongst them. The subject thereof was "whether it was necessary to stand or to kneel, to be bareheaded or covered at prayer." These people soon arrived at a remarkably sensible and clear judgment, viz.(that) "the ceremony was not material, but that the heart before God was required, and nothing else." The wonder now is that everybody else could not then see the truth of that utterance. As for the clergy, they would not see it if they could. Moreover, the church determined that nobody should be suffered to express such a sane belief. And so those Braintree-Bocking people, who could think a little for themselves, were denounced as "dangerous," which, in another way, they certainly were. The Sheriff soon appeared and these people of clear insight were brought before the Council. They confessed that they had assembled "for to talk of the Scriptures;" also that they had not attended communion at the parish church for two years. Five of them were condemned to prison, and seven bound over in a penalty of ?40 each (over $2,000).

The Baptists of Braintree claim the date of that meeting, in the house at Bocking, 1550, as marking the origin of their church. Between 1553 and 1558, when the persecuting statutes against heretics were revived, during the temporary increase of Papal power in England in the reign of Queen Mary, and while the Bishops Latimer, Ridley, Cranmer and others were being burnt, quite a number of citizens in and around Braintree, also were condemned to death at the stake. These were William Piggott, Stephen Knight, Thomas Hawkes, John Laurence, William Hunter, Richard and Thomas Spurge, Catherine Hutt, William Purchas, Cavell and Ambrose. The burning of these martyrs is described in Fox's Book of Martyrs, wherein is also mentioned the putting to death at Canterbury, of one John Lomas of Tenterden in Kent, heretofore referred to.

All that sort of actual and severe persecution quite came to an end with the death of Queen Mary, 1558. England then ceased to be Catholic, and became nominally Protestant. Non-conformity so steadily increased, however, that under Queen Elizabeth Parliament enacted the following:-- (Statutes of the Realm, 23 Eliz. (1581) C. I. Vol. IV, p. 657--"That every person above the age of xvj yeares, which shall not repaire to some Churche Chappell or usual Place of Common Prayer, but forbeare the same contrarye to the tenour of a Statute made in the firste yeare of her Maties Reigne for Uniformite of Common Prayer, and being thereof lawfull convicted, shall forfaite to the Queene's Matie, for every Moneth after the end of this Session of Parliament whiche he or she shall so forbeare, twentie poundes of lawfull English Money; and that over and besides the said Forfeytures, every person so forbearing, by the space of xii Monethes as aforesaid, shall for his or her obstinacie, after certificat thereof in Writinge made into the Courte commonlye called the Kinge's Bench, or by the Ordinarie of the Dioces, a Justice of the Assise and Gaole Deliverye, or a Justice of Peace of the Countie where suche Offendor shall dwell or be, be bounde with two sufficiente Suerties in the somme of two hundreth pound at the leaste to the good Behavior, and so to continue bound, untill suche tyme as the persons so bounde do conforme themselves and come to the churche, accordinge to the true meaninge of the said Statute made in the said firste yeare of the Queene's Maties Raigne."

Absence, from church alone, unaccompanied by any other act, constituted recusancy. Till the Statute of 35 Eliz. (1591) C. I., all non-conformists were considered as recusants; this statute was the first to distinguish the Popish from other recusants. The Protestant recusants continued subject to the statutes before 35 Eliz.

The statute of 35th Eliz. (1591) added imprisonment, and if after 3 months persistence the subject must adjure the realm, and that if he return after banishment or refuse this condition, he should suffer capitally as a felon, without benefit of clergy.

In the third year of Jas. I, 1606, this statute was amended to a fine of ?20 per month, and for not receiving the Sacrament ?20 for the first year, ?40 for the second year and for every default thereafter ?60. Non-conformists were not relieved altogether from these statutes until the Act of Toleration, I Wm. and Mary (1689) 1, c. 18.

The act for imprisonment and death was passed probably before Joseph Loomis was born and before his father settled in Braintree. Hence all the legal proceedings that were taken against those who violated this law have no special application to these Lomases, but Joseph Loomis faced a heavy fine for a withdrawal from the parish church. We do not consider that he did withdraw therefrom, but rather continued therein though as one of the dissatisfied minority. Before the last year of Elizabeth, 1603, some of the Essex clergy had become enlightened, which cost some fifty of them their positions. The liberal or Puritan party in the church continued to gain in members for fifty years after 1603, and many Separatist assemblies had become organized. It is, of course, to be expected that John Lummys was something of a Puritan, though from what is known of him, no hint is had that he was an extremist--a Separatist. His son Joseph undoubtedly, was something of a Puritan sympathizer. Both men probably attended St. Michael's church in Braintree so long as they lived there. There is every reason to believe that they did so. There were small groups of people in Braintree that did not conform at all; but they were not composed of important men like John Hawkins and Joseph Loomis. We cannot conceive the loving friendship of these two men as possible, without religious harmony between them; and Hawkins certainly did not withdraw from the parish church. John and Geoffrey Lommys and their wives must have been buried in the churchyard. The business success of Joseph Loomis is evidence that he lived agreeably with his neighbors. His father-in-law, Robert White, was a communicant of the Shalford or Messing churches until he died. We do not see anything in the Braintree religious conditions as particularly applied to Joseph Loomis, to warrant the belief that he was any such puritanical sort of gentleman as Macaulay so vindictively and unnecessarily described some Puritans were, viz:--

"The dress, the deportment, the language, the studies, the amusements of the rigid sect (the Puritans) were regulated on principles not unlike those of the Pharisees who, proud of their washed hands and broad phylacteries, taunted the Redeemer as a sabbath-breaker and a winebibber. It was a sin to hang garlands on a Maypole, to drink a friend's health, to fly a hawk, to hunt a stag, to play chess, to wear love locks, to put starch into a ruff, to touch the virginals, to read the Fairy Queen. Rules such as these, rules which would have appeared insupportable to the free and joyous spirit of Luther, and contemptible to the serene and philosophical intellect of Zwingle, threw over all life a more than monastic gloom. The learning and eloquence by which the great Reformers had been eminently distinguished for their success, were regarded by the new school of Protestants with suspicion, if not with aversion. Some precisians had scruples about teaching the Latin grammar, because the names of Mars, Bacchus and Apollo occurred in it. The fine arts were all but proscribed. The solemn peal of the organ was superstitions. The light music of Ben Johnson's masques was dissolute. Half the fine paintings in England were idolatrous, and the other half indecent. The extreme Puritan was at once known from other men by his gait, the upturned white of his eyes, the nasal twang with which he spoke, and above all, by his peculiar dialect. He employed, on every occasion, the imagery and style of Scripture.

[From the Web Site Raven Genealogy and Family History. The site address is http://genweb.net/~raven/html/d218.htm#P463.]

Joseph Loomis(7184) was born on 24 Aug 1590.(921) He died on 25 Nov 1658. (921)

One Branch of the Booth Family, p 210: Joseph Loomis came on the Susan and Ellen to Boston, July 17, 1638, and after staying a year in Dorchester, he is supposed to have accompanied Rev. Ephraim Hewitt to Windsor, Aug. 17, 1639. He was b. 1590. d. Nov. 25, 1658, in Windsor. m. Mary White, June 30, 1614, in Shalford. bap. Aug. 24, 1590. d. Aug. 23, 1652.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general. Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White. Joseph Loomis settled at Windsor near the junction of the Farmington river with the Connecticut, on the island.

He was married to Mary White [her father was Robert White] on 30 Jun 1614 in Shalford, Essex, England.(921) Children were: John Loomis, Sarah Loomis.

-------------------- Joseph Loomis was one of the first settlers of Windsor, Connecticut. He was born probably before 1590 at Braintree, in Essex county, England and died in Windsor Connecticut on 25 Nov. 1658.[1]

Parents: John and Agnes Loomis

Married: on 30 June in 1614 to Mary White at Messing, a small village near Braintree, County Essex, England. Mary was baptized on August 24, 1590, at Shalford, England, daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White, of Messing. She died on 23 Aug 1652 at Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut. Children:

Joseph, born in England, about 1615; died at Windsor, June 26, 1687 married 1st, Sarah Hill, Sept. 17, 1646, who died Aug. 23, 1653 ; married 2d, Mary Chauncey, June 28, 1659. On the 3d of July, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation four acres of land, bounded north by the land of Joseph Loomis the elder, and in 1660 by purchase he acquired land on the east side of the Connecticut. In 1686 he conveyed a part of this land to his son Joseph, and a part to his son John. He was freeman in 1654. Sarah, born 1617, who married Capt. Nicholas Olmsted of Hartford in 1640. He died Aug. 31, 1684. Elizabeth, born 1619, married Josiah Hull May 20, 1641. Mr. Hull was deputy to the General Court in 1659, '60 and '62. He then removed to Killingworth, from which place he was deputy 1667-74. He died Nov. lo, 1675 ; his wife was living in 1665. Mary, 1620. married 1st, John Skinner; married 2d, Owen Tudor, Nov. 18, 1651. She d. Aug. 19, 1680. He d. Oct. 30, 1690, Windsor. Deacon John, born in England in 1622 ; admitted to the Windsor church Oct. 11, 1640; married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Scott of Hartford, Feb. 3, 1648-9. On the 3d of May, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation 40 acres of land. He resided in Farmington from 1652 to 1660, when he returned to Windsor, and was deacon of the church. He was deputy to General Court in 1666 and '7, also from 1675 to 1687. He died Sept. 1,1688, and his monument is still preserved in the Windsor burying ground. His wife survived him. His will is preserved in the Probate office at Hartford, and his name is signed John Loomys. The will is dated Aug. 27, 1688, and mentions land on both sides of the Connecticut river. Thomas, born in England, married 1st, Hannah Fox, Nov. 1, 1653, who died April 25, 1662; married 2d, Mary, daughter of Thomas Judd, Jan. 1, 1662-3, who died Aug. 8, 1684. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church April 3, 1666. He owned a farm in East Windsor and died Aug. 28, 1689. Nathaniel, 1626; Lieut. Samuel, born in England, married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Judd, Dec. 27, 1653. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church Nov. 26, 1661. He was a lieutenant, and removed to Westfield, Mass., between 1672 and '75. He sold his dwelling house in Windsor in 1679, and died Oct. 1, 1689. His widow died May 7, 1606. Biography

You can see here that the surname has changed from Lummys to Loomis. Actually, this generation spelled the surname Loomys. It comes down to us as Loomis.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general.

Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White.

Joseph Loomis was married in the church of Saint Michaels, where the family worshipped and where they are buried. This ancient church was founded in 1199, in the first year of the reign of King John. The coat of arms of the Loomis family is carved on one of the ancient Loomis tombs.

He had access to the funds to make the break with the old world to New England, His goods came from Maiden in Essex by way of Ipswich to London, when he started on his journey to America, and he and his family proceeded by land. He sailed with his wife, five sons, and three daughters, from London on 11 April 1638, in the ship “Susan and Ellen” which ship arrived at Boston on July 17th.

After about a year spent in Dorchester, the family moved with the Rev. Ephraim Huet party to Windsor, Connecticut, there arriving August 17, 1639.

By February 1640 Loomis had settled at Windsor, receiving on the 2nd of February, from the Connecticut Plantation, 21 acres adjoining the Farmington River, on the west side (Town Records, Vol. 1). The Massachusetts Bay Colony then had jurisdiction, and he also became owner of several other tracts which he purchased.

Located on a slight elevation above a bend of the Farmington River, the Loomis family homestead dates from 1640, making it one of the oldest houses in Connecticut. Its historical prestige and close ties with the early colonial life of Windsor have made it a symbol of the enduring virtues of those who founded this country.

Joseph Loomis built as his first home a dug-out cabin. His house was erected before 1652 and located on the “Island” near the mouth of the Farmington River, so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an island by the overflowing of the Connecticut River. Cabin and house are both preserved on the grounds of the The Loomis Chaffee School, 4 Batchelder Road, in Windsor, Connecticut.

Weblinks

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89060930807;q1=Loomis;start=1;size=100;page=root;view=image;seq=7;num=i Sources

1906 revision of the "The Loomis Family in America", from the 1875 original by Elias Loomis, L.L.D., by Elisha S. Loomis, Ph.D. Abstract of the Disposition of the Estate of Joseph Loomis, Windsor, Connecticut." Found in original records, Vol. 2 page 115-116, and in the printed Digest of Manwaring, Vol. 1 page 135. Citations

[1] "Joseph Loomis, Son of John and Agnes Loomis, was probably born before 1590, England: married in Messing , Co, Essex, England, June 30, 1614, Mary White, bap. Aug 24, 1590, d. Aug. 23, 1652."..."He died Nov. 25, 1658." Loomis, page 121 of 859 The data appeared on page 121 of 859 pages. It is citation #1 of 12,670. -------------------- JOSEPH LOOMIS was SAMUEL LOOMIS' father. The surname LOOMIS had been changed from LOOMYS. JOSEPH was born August 24, 1590 in Braintree, Essex, England and died Nov. 25, 1658 in Windsor, Hartofd, CT. He was buried in Windsor, Hartford, CT. His occupation was a woolen draper (one who deals in woolen goods) in Braintree, England. He married MARY WHITE at Shalford, a small village near Braintree, England on June 30, 1614. "He had access to the funds to make the break with the old world to New England for he sailed with his wife, 5 sons & 5 daughters from London on April 11, 1638 aboard the ship "Susan & Ellen." The ship arrived at Boston on July 17th. By Feb. 1640, JOSEPH had settled at Windsor, CT receiving on Feb. 2, from the Connecticut Plantation, 21 acres adjoing the Farmington River on the west side of Town (Town Records, Vol. 1). The dug-out cabin JOSEPH LOOMIS built as his first home and the house he erected before 1652 are both preserved on the grounds of the LOOMIS Chaffee School, 4 Batchelder Road, in Windsor, CT. Located on a slight elevation above a bend of the Farmington River, the LOOMIS family homestead dates from 1640, making it one of the oldest houses in Connecticut. Its historical prestige and close ties with the early colonial life of Windsor have made it a symbol of the enduring virtues of those who founded this country. JOSEPH also received several large tracts of land on the east side of the River, partly from the town and partly by purchase. He must, then, have arrived in Windsor in the summer or autumn of 1639. He is generally assumed to have gone to Windsor with the Reverand Ephraim Huet, who arrived on Aug. 17, 1639. JOSEPH"S house is located on the "Island" near the mouth of the Farmington River so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an iland by the overflowing of the Connecticut River." MARY WHITE LOOMIS was born Aug.24, 1590 in Shalford, Messing, Essex, England and died on Aug. 23, 1652 at Windsor, Hartford Co, CT. (Her parents were ROBERT WHITE & BRIDGET of England.) MARY and JOSEPH had 8 children all of whom were born in England: Joseph 1615, Sarah 1617, Elizabeth 1619, Mary 1620, John 1622, Thomas 1624, Nathaniel 1626, and Lt. SAMUEL LOOMIS 1628.

Joseph Loomis - son of John Loomis and Agnes Lingwood, was a woolen-draper. Several sources say he sailed from London, England 11 April 1638 on the Ship "Susan and Ellen", arriving in Boston Mass. 17 July 1638. Other sources claim he probably came to Windsor in the summer or autumn of 1639 in company with Rever and Ephraim Huet , who arrived at Windsor, Aug 17, 1639. Records indicate he stayed about a year in Dorchester, Mass. Town records of Windsor, Conn. show that on 2 Feb 1640, he was granted 21 acres from the Plantation adjoining Farmington River on the west side of the Conn. River. This acreage included the site of the first English settlement made in Conn. Also there were several large tracts of land on the east side of the Conn., partly from the town and partly purchsed. His house was near the mouth of the Farmington River on "The Island." That area was co called because when raining, the Connecticut River overflowed, causing it to temporarily become an island.

In 1614, Joseph married Mary White, daughter of Robert White and Bridgett Allgar- both of Shalford, Essex, England. Joseph and Mary had 8 children, all born in England, and came to America with them. Their 5 sons were freeman--believed to mean those who enjoy political liberty.

Children:

i Joseph Loomis, Jr. was born in 1615 in Messing, Essex, England

ii Sarah Loomis was born in 1617 in Braintree, Essex, England and died in 1667 in Wethersfield, Connecticut. Sarah Married Capt. Nicholas Olmstead on 28 Sep 1640, son of James Olmstead and Joyce Cornish. He was born on 15 Feb 1612 and died on 31 Aug 1684 in Hartford, Connecticut

iii Elizab eth Loomis was born in 1619 in Braintree, Essex, England

iv Mary Loomis was born in 1620 in Braintree, Essex, England

v Deacon John Loomis was born abour 1622 in Braintree, Essex, England and died on 2 Sep 1688 in Windsor Burying Ground

vi Thomas Loomis was born in 1624 in Braintree , Essex, England and died on 28 Aug 1689 in Windsor, Connecticut. Thomas married Mary Judd who was born in 1644 in Windsor, Ct. She died on 8 Aug 1684 in Windsor, CT.

vii Nathaniel Loomis was born in 1626 in Braintree, Essex, England

viii Lt. Samuel Loomis was born in 1628 in Braintree, Essex, England.

_____________________

Lt. Samuel Loomis: On 27 Dec 1653, Samuel married Elizabeth Judd of Farmington, CT. (b. 27 Dec. 1633, daughter of Thomas Judd and Sarah Freeman, both of whom were born in England). Samuel and Elizabeth had 10 children -- 5 boys and 5 girls:

Samuel (1654-1711), Elizabeth (1656-1719), Ruth (1650-1738), Sarah (1663-1678), Joanna (1665-1758), Benjamin (1667-1726), Nehemiah (1670-1740), William (1672-1738), Phill ip (1675-1746) , Mary (1678-1679)

Phillip Loomis: In 1704, Phillip married Hanna Dewey (b. 1669 in Westfield, Hampton, MA, daughter of Israel Dewey and Abigail Drake, both of Windsor, CT.). Together, they had seven children -- 4 girls and 3 boys:

Hannah (1705-1771, Phillip (1707-1751), Joel (1708- 1776), Abigail (1711-1802) Mary (1713- ), Jerusha (1715-1801), Timot hy (1717-1760)

-------------------- BIOGRAPHY: Joseph Loomis was born about 1590, was a woolen-draper in Baintree, co. Essex, England and sailed from London England April 11, 1638, in the ship "Susan and Ellen". He married at Shalfod, co. Essex, (Parish Register of Shalford) June 30 1614, Mary White who was baptized at Shalford (Parish Regisgter of Shalford) Aug. 24, 1590, daughter of Robert White and Bridgett Allgar, his wife, who were married June 24, 1585. Bridgett Allgar was the daughter of William Allgar and was baptized (Parish Register of Shalford) May 11, 1562. Joseph Loomis died at Windsor Conn., Nov. 25, 1658. His wife having already died Aug 23, 1652.

[SOURCE]:(N.E. History and Genealogy Reg., Vol.55,pp.23-31) -------------------- Joseph Loomis was one of the first settlers of Windsor, Connecticut. He was born probably before 1590 at Braintree, in Essex county, England and died in Windsor Connecticut on 25 Nov. 1658.[1]

Parents: John and Agnes Loomis

Married: on 30 June in 1614 to Mary White at Messing, a small village near Braintree, County Essex, England. Mary was baptized on August 24, 1590, at Shalford, England, daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White, of Messing. She died on 23 Aug 1652 at Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut. Children:

Joseph, born in England, about 1615; died at Windsor, June 26, 1687 married 1st, Sarah Hill, Sept. 17, 1646, who died Aug. 23, 1653 ; married 2d, Mary Chauncey, June 28, 1659. On the 3d of July, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation four acres of land, bounded north by the land of Joseph Loomis the elder, and in 1660 by purchase he acquired land on the east side of the Connecticut. In 1686 he conveyed a part of this land to his son Joseph, and a part to his son John. He was freeman in 1654. Sarah, born 1617, who married Capt. Nicholas Olmsted of Hartford in 1640. He died Aug. 31, 1684. Elizabeth, born 1619, married Josiah Hull May 20, 1641. Mr. Hull was deputy to the General Court in 1659, '60 and '62. He then removed to Killingworth, from which place he was deputy 1667-74. He died Nov. lo, 1675 ; his wife was living in 1665. Mary, 1620. married 1st, John Skinner; married 2d, Owen Tudor, Nov. 18, 1651. She d. Aug. 19, 1680. He d. Oct. 30, 1690, Windsor. Deacon John, born in England in 1622 ; admitted to the Windsor church Oct. 11, 1640; married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Scott of Hartford, Feb. 3, 1648-9. On the 3d of May, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation 40 acres of land. He resided in Farmington from 1652 to 1660, when he returned to Windsor, and was deacon of the church. He was deputy to General Court in 1666 and '7, also from 1675 to 1687. He died Sept. 1,1688, and his monument is still preserved in the Windsor burying ground. His wife survived him. His will is preserved in the Probate office at Hartford, and his name is signed John Loomys. The will is dated Aug. 27, 1688, and mentions land on both sides of the Connecticut river. Thomas, born in England, married 1st, Hannah Fox, Nov. 1, 1653, who died April 25, 1662; married 2d, Mary, daughter of Thomas Judd, Jan. 1, 1662-3, who died Aug. 8, 1684. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church April 3, 1666. He owned a farm in East Windsor and died Aug. 28, 1689. Nathaniel, 1626; Lieut. Samuel, born in England, married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Judd, Dec. 27, 1653. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church Nov. 26, 1661. He was a lieutenant, and removed to Westfield, Mass., between 1672 and '75. He sold his dwelling house in Windsor in 1679, and died Oct. 1, 1689. His widow died May 7, 1606. Biography

You can see here that the surname has changed from Lummys to Loomis. Actually, this generation spelled the surname Loomys. It comes down to us as Loomis.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general.

Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White.

Joseph Loomis was married in the church of Saint Michaels, where the family worshipped and where they are buried. This ancient church was founded in 1199, in the first year of the reign of King John. The coat of arms of the Loomis family is carved on one of the ancient Loomis tombs.

He had access to the funds to make the break with the old world to New England, His goods came from Maiden in Essex by way of Ipswich to London, when he started on his journey to America, and he and his family proceeded by land. He sailed with his wife, five sons, and three daughters, from London on 11 April 1638, in the ship “Susan and Ellen” which ship arrived at Boston on July 17th.

After about a year spent in Dorchester, the family moved with the Rev. Ephraim Huet party to Windsor, Connecticut, there arriving August 17, 1639.

By February 1640 Loomis had settled at Windsor, receiving on the 2nd of February, from the Connecticut Plantation, 21 acres adjoining the Farmington River, on the west side (Town Records, Vol. 1). The Massachusetts Bay Colony then had jurisdiction, and he also became owner of several other tracts which he purchased.

Located on a slight elevation above a bend of the Farmington River, the Loomis family homestead dates from 1640, making it one of the oldest houses in Connecticut. Its historical prestige and close ties with the early colonial life of Windsor have made it a symbol of the enduring virtues of those who founded this country.

Joseph Loomis built as his first home a dug-out cabin. His house was erected before 1652 and located on the “Island” near the mouth of the Farmington River, so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an island by the overflowing of the Connecticut River. Cabin and house are both preserved on the grounds of the The Loomis Chaffee School, 4 Batchelder Road, in Windsor, Connecticut.

Weblinks

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89060930807;q1=Loomis;start=1;size=100;page=root;view=image;seq=7;num=i Sources

1906 revision of the "The Loomis Family in America", from the 1875 original by Elias Loomis, L.L.D., by Elisha S. Loomis, Ph.D. Abstract of the Disposition of the Estate of Joseph Loomis, Windsor, Connecticut." Found in original records, Vol. 2 page 115-116, and in the printed Digest of Manwaring, Vol. 1 page 135. Citations

[1] "Joseph Loomis, Son of John and Agnes Loomis, was probably born before 1590, England: married in Messing , Co, Essex, England, June 30, 1614, Mary White, bap. Aug 24, 1590, d. Aug. 23, 1652."..."He died Nov. 25, 1658." Loomis, page 121 of 859 The data appeared on page 121 of 859 pages. It is citation #1 of 12,670. -------------------- Joseph Loomis was one of the first settlers of Windsor, Connecticut. He was born probably before 1590 at Braintree, in Essex county, England and died in Windsor Connecticut on 25 Nov. 1658.[1]

Parents: John and Agnes Loomis

Married: on 30 June in 1614 to Mary White at Messing, a small village near Braintree, County Essex, England. Mary was baptized on August 24, 1590, at Shalford, England, daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White, of Messing. She died on 23 Aug 1652 at Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut. Children:

Joseph, born in England, about 1615; died at Windsor, June 26, 1687 married 1st, Sarah Hill, Sept. 17, 1646, who died Aug. 23, 1653 ; married 2d, Mary Chauncey, June 28, 1659. On the 3d of July, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation four acres of land, bounded north by the land of Joseph Loomis the elder, and in 1660 by purchase he acquired land on the east side of the Connecticut. In 1686 he conveyed a part of this land to his son Joseph, and a part to his son John. He was freeman in 1654. Sarah, born 1617, who married Capt. Nicholas Olmsted of Hartford in 1640. He died Aug. 31, 1684. Elizabeth, born 1619, married Josiah Hull May 20, 1641. Mr. Hull was deputy to the General Court in 1659, '60 and '62. He then removed to Killingworth, from which place he was deputy 1667-74. He died Nov. lo, 1675 ; his wife was living in 1665. Mary, 1620. married 1st, John Skinner; married 2d, Owen Tudor, Nov. 18, 1651. She d. Aug. 19, 1680. He d. Oct. 30, 1690, Windsor. Deacon John, born in England in 1622 ; admitted to the Windsor church Oct. 11, 1640; married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Scott of Hartford, Feb. 3, 1648-9. On the 3d of May, 1643, he had granted him from the Plantation 40 acres of land. He resided in Farmington from 1652 to 1660, when he returned to Windsor, and was deacon of the church. He was deputy to General Court in 1666 and '7, also from 1675 to 1687. He died Sept. 1,1688, and his monument is still preserved in the Windsor burying ground. His wife survived him. His will is preserved in the Probate office at Hartford, and his name is signed John Loomys. The will is dated Aug. 27, 1688, and mentions land on both sides of the Connecticut river. Thomas, born in England, married 1st, Hannah Fox, Nov. 1, 1653, who died April 25, 1662; married 2d, Mary, daughter of Thomas Judd, Jan. 1, 1662-3, who died Aug. 8, 1684. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church April 3, 1666. He owned a farm in East Windsor and died Aug. 28, 1689. Nathaniel, 1626; Lieut. Samuel, born in England, married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Judd, Dec. 27, 1653. He was freeman in 1654, and admitted to the church Nov. 26, 1661. He was a lieutenant, and removed to Westfield, Mass., between 1672 and '75. He sold his dwelling house in Windsor in 1679, and died Oct. 1, 1689. His widow died May 7, 1606. Biography

You can see here that the surname has changed from Lummys to Loomis. Actually, this generation spelled the surname Loomys. It comes down to us as Loomis.

Joseph Loomis was a woolen draper, a merchant engaged in the purchase of cloth from the many weavers who wove on hand looms in their cottage homes. He had a store in Braintree, Essex, Eng., stocked with cloths and other goods which a draper usually dealt in. These products he sold both wholesale and retail to tailors and consumers in general.

Braintree and near-by towns were centers of the cloth manufacture, as many weavers from Flanders had been induced to come to England by Edward III and they had been followed by others in the latter part of the sixteenth century, who had settled in Essex, not far from Braintree, in 1570. Joseph Loomis was in prosperous circumstances and his father-in-law, Robert White, was a man of considerable means for those times. Elder John White was a son of Robert White, and the wives of John Porter and Elder William Goodwin were also daughters of Robert White.

Joseph Loomis was married in the church of Saint Michaels, where the family worshipped and where they are buried. This ancient church was founded in 1199, in the first year of the reign of King John. The coat of arms of the Loomis family is carved on one of the ancient Loomis tombs.

He had access to the funds to make the break with the old world to New England, His goods came from Maiden in Essex by way of Ipswich to London, when he started on his journey to America, and he and his family proceeded by land. He sailed with his wife, five sons, and three daughters, from London on 11 April 1638, in the ship “Susan and Ellen” which ship arrived at Boston on July 17th.

After about a year spent in Dorchester, the family moved with the Rev. Ephraim Huet party to Windsor, Connecticut, there arriving August 17, 1639.

By February 1640 Loomis had settled at Windsor, receiving on the 2nd of February, from the Connecticut Plantation, 21 acres adjoining the Farmington River, on the west side (Town Records, Vol. 1). The Massachusetts Bay Colony then had jurisdiction, and he also became owner of several other tracts which he purchased.

Located on a slight elevation above a bend of the Farmington River, the Loomis family homestead dates from 1640, making it one of the oldest houses in Connecticut. Its historical prestige and close ties with the early colonial life of Windsor have made it a symbol of the enduring virtues of those who founded this country.

Joseph Loomis built as his first home a dug-out cabin. His house was erected before 1652 and located on the “Island” near the mouth of the Farmington River, so called because at every great freshet it became temporarily an island by the overflowing of the Connecticut River. Cabin and house are both preserved on the grounds of the The Loomis Chaffee School, 4 Batchelder Road, in Windsor, Connecticut.

Sites for Loomis Homestead:

Weblinks:

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89060930807;q1=Loomis;start=1;size=100;page=root;view=image;seq=7;num=i Sources

1906 revision of the "The Loomis Family in America", from the 1875 original by Elias Loomis, L.L.D., by Elisha S. Loomis, Ph.D. Abstract of the Disposition of the Estate of Joseph Loomis, Windsor, Connecticut." Found in original records, Vol. 2 page 115-116, and in the printed Digest of Manwaring, Vol. 1 page 135. Citations

[1] "Joseph Loomis, Son of John and Agnes Loomis, was probably born before 1590, England: married in Messing , Co, Essex, England, June 30, 1614, Mary White, bap. Aug 24, 1590, d. Aug. 23, 1652."..."He died Nov. 25, 1658." Loomis, page 121 of 859 The data appeared on page 121 of 859 pages. It is citation #1 of 12,670. --------------------

Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) and Mary White (1590-1652) were born and raised and married and had their children in England. Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) was a woolen and linen draper in Braintree, Essex, England. He was a cloth merchant with a shop. He purchased cloth from many weavers who wove on hand-looms in their homes as well as from all over. He sold cloth all over as well. Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) with his wife and 8 children and much baggage sailed from England on 11 April 1638 aboard the "Susan and Ellen" and arrived at Boston Harbor 17 July 1638 and then spent about a year at Dorchester, MA.

Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) was at Windsor, CT by 17 August 1639 with 5 sons (all of whom were on the 07 October 1669 Freeman list). In 1639 (before or after Joseph Loomis arrived?) the people of Windsor and Hartford and Wethersfield met in convention and agreed to govern themselves according to a written constitution and became a republic that was soon called Connecticut. This is believed to be the first republic in the history of the world created by a written constitution with no religious restrictions to be a democracy in which freedom and equality and individuality were potent factors. Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) was granted 21 acres in Connecticut on the Windsor Plantation on 02 February 1640 at the mouth of the Farmington River near where it meets the Connecticut River. His home was known as "The Island" because when the Connecticut River flooded, the home became an island. Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) is considered to be a founder of Windsor, CT and Windsor, CT believes itself to be the first English settlement in Connecticut. Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) represented Windsor as Deputy to the General Court for 1643 and 1644. He was on the 04 October 1669 Freeman list. Many of his children's marriages and the births of his grandchildren are in the Connecticut Colony records. Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) had no will. His estate inventory was taken on 25 November 1658 and an agreement about dividing the estate was signed by all 8 of the children on 02 December 1658.

Son Joseph Loomis (1615-1687) was born in England and immigrated to New England in 1638 with his parents and his siblings. On May 1643 he was gran

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Joseph Loomis, Sr.'s Timeline

1590
August 24, 1590
Braintree, Essex, England
August 24, 1590
August 24, 1590
Braintree, Essex, England
August 24, 1590
Braintree, Essex, England
August 24, 1590
Braintree, Essex, England
August 24, 1590
Braintree,Essex,England
August 24, 1590
Braintree,Essex,England
August 24, 1590
Braintree,co. Essex,England
August 24, 1590
Braintree,Essex,England
August 24, 1590
Braintree, Essex, England