Juana de Danmartín, reina consorte de Castilla

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Jeanne de Dammartin, reine consort de Castille

Also Known As: "Joan", "Jeanne", "Joanna", "Jeanne of /Dammartin-Aumale/", "Jeanne /De Dammartin/", "Johanna de Dammartin /Cts of Ponthieu/", "Joanna /De Dammartin/", "Joan of Dammartin", "Joan of Damartin", ": Jeanne de Dammartin", "Joan Countess of Ponthieu"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Abbeville, Picardy, France
Place of Burial: Valloires Abbey, Argoules, Picardy, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Simon II de Dammartin, comte d'Aumale and Marie de Ponthieu, comtesse de Ponthieu
Wife of Ferdinand 111 Castile; Fernando III el Santo, rey de Castilla and Jean III de Nesle, seigneur de Falvy
Mother of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of England; Simón, infante de Castilla y León; Juan, infante de Castilla y León; Jeanne de Falvy de Nesle; Philippa Clermont and 1 other
Sister of Agathe de Dammartin, Dame de Ponthieu; Marie de Dammartin; Philippa de Dammartin and Renier de Dammartin

Occupation: Queen of Castile, Countess of Ponthieu, Queen of Castille and Leon, Queen consort of Castile and Leon., Countess of Ponthieau and Queen Consort of Castile and Leon, Comtesse, d'Aumale, de Dammartin, de Ponthieu, Reine, de Castille, of Castile and Leon
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Juana de Danmartín, reina consorte de Castilla

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeanne_of_Dammartin

Jeanne of Dammartin or Joan of Dammartin (b. 1229 – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), Countess of Ponthieu (1237-1279) and Montreuil.

She was daughter of Simon de Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1251-1276) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (1221-1251). In 1237 she married in Burgos with King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1198/1199-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–1269), Count of Aumale

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–1269)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

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aka Joana, Joanna. Alternate birthdate 1208. Alternate deathplace Abbeville, France.

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Question as to whether she was married to anyone apart from Fernando III or Jean (see below)

From http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN%20FRANCE.htm

JEANNE de Dammartin ([1220]-Abbeville 16 Mar 1279, bur monastery of Valoires).  The De Rebus Hispaniæ of Rodericus Ximenes names "Mariam…mater Joannæ Reginæ Castellæ et Legionis" as the daughter of "Comitis de Pontivo" and his wife "Adelodis" daughter of "Ludovico Regi Francorum" (and his wife "Elisabeth", an error for Constanza)[704].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to, but does not name, the four daughters of "comes de Pontivo Symon" (in order) as the wives of "rex Castelle de Hispanie Fernandus…maiorem filius vicecomitis de Castro Araudi…comitis de Augo…comes de Roceio"[705].  The contract of marriage between "Ferrandi…regis Castelle et Toleti, Legionis et Galicie" and "donna Johanna…socero nostro…comite Pontivi" is noted in a charter dated Jan 1238 (New Style) issued by Louis IX King of France, which also refers to the king of Castile's letter dated 31 Oct 1237[706].  She succeeded her father as Ctss d‘Aumâle in 1239.  She succeeded her mother in 1251 as Ctss de Ponthieu.  She returned to France as a widow in 1253[707].  The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.  The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death in 1279 of "regina Hispanie, domina Pontivi, mater Alienoræ reginæ Angliæ"[708].  m firstly (Burgos 1237 before 20 Nov) as his second wife, don FERNANDO III "el Santo" King of Castile, son of don ALFONSO IX King of León & his second wife Infanta doña Berenguela de Castilla (Monte de Valparaíso [30 Jul/5 Aug] 1201-Seville 30 May 1252, bur Seville, Cathedral Santa María).  m secondly ([May 1260/9 Feb 1261]) JEAN de Nesle Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle, son of --- (-2 Feb 1292). 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
















Ferdinand II of León








Alfonso IX of León












Urraca of Portugal








Ferdinand III of Castile















Alfonso VIII of Castile








Berengaria of Castile












Eleanor (Leonora) of England








Eleanor of Castile


















Alberic II de Dammartin








Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu












Mahaut de Clermont








Jeanne, Countess of Ponthieu















William IV of Ponthieu








Marie, Countess of Ponthieu












Alys, Countess of the Vexin





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Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c.1220[1] – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251-1279) and Montreuil (1251-1279). She was the mother of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of King Edward I of England.

Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clémence de Bar.[2] Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile.

In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find her son another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested the young Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands. In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Jeanne married in Burgos, King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1201-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

  1. Ferdinand (1239–ca 1265)
  2. Eleanor, married Edward I of England
  3. Louis (1243–ca 1275)
  4. Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo
  5. John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

References

  1. ^ Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, page 192
  2. ^ Comte de Clermont de Clermont
  3. ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Castile

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan,_Countess_of_Ponthieu

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Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c.1220[1] – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) was Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251-1279) and Aumale (1237-1279). Her daughter, the English queen Eleanor of Castile, was her successor in Ponthieu. Her son and co-ruler in Aumale, Ferdinand, predeceased her, so she was succeeded by his son John.

Contents [hide]

1 Family

2 Henry III of England

3 Marriages and children

4 Source

5 References

[edit]Family

Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clémence de Bar.[2] Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile.

[edit]Henry III of England

After secret negotiations were undertaken in 1234, it was agreed that Joan would marry King Henry III of England. This marriage would have been politically unacceptable to the French, however, since Joan stood to inherit not only her mother's county of Ponthieu but also the county of Aumale that was vested in her father's family. Ponthieu bordered on the duchy of Normandy, and Aumale lay within Normandy itself. The French king Philip Augustus had seized Normandy from King John of England as recently as 1205, and Philip's heirs could not risk the English monarchy recovering any land in that area, since it might allow the Plantagenets to re-establish control in Normandy. As it happened, Joan's father Simon had become involved in a conspiracy of northern French noblemen against Philip Augustus and to win pardon from Philip's son Louis VIII, Simon—who had only daughters—was compelled to promise that he would marry off neither of his two eldest daughters without the permission of the king of France. In 1235, the queen-regent of France, Blanche of Castile, invoked that promise on behalf of her son, King Louis IX of France, and threatened to deprive Simon of all his lands if Joan married Henry III. Henry therefore abandoned the project for his marriage to Joan and in January 1236 married Eleanor of Provence, the sister of Louis IX's wife.

[edit]Marriages and children

In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find her son another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested the young Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands. In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Joan married in Burgos, King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1201-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–ca 1265)

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–ca 1275)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

Upon her mother's death in 1251, Joan succeeded to the titles of Countess of Ponthieu and Countess of Montreuil which she held in her own right.

After Ferdinand III died in 1252, Joan did not enjoy a cordial relationship with his heir, her stepson Alfonso X of Castile, with whom she quarreled over some of the lands and income she should have received as dowager queen of Castile. Sometime in 1253, she became the ally and supporter of another of her stepsons, Henry of Castile, who also felt Alfonso had not allowed him all the wealth their father had meant him to have. Joan unwisely attended secret meetings with Henry and his supporters, and it was rumored that she and Henry were lovers. This further strained her relations with Alfonso and in 1254, shortly before her daughter Eleanor was to marry Edward of England, Joan and her eldest son Ferdinand left Castile and returned to her native Ponthieu.

Sometime between May 1260 and 9 February 1261, Joan took a second husband, Jean de Nesle, Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle (died 2 February 1292).[3] This marriage is sometimes said to have produced a daughter, Béatrice, but she was in fact a child of Jean de Nesle's first marriage. In 1263, Joan was recognized as countess of Aumale after the death of a childless Dammartin cousin. But her son Ferdinand died around 1265, leaving a young son known as John of Ponthieu.

During her marriage to Jean de Nesle, Joan ran up considerable debts and also appears to have allowed her rights as countess in Ponthieu to weaken. The death of her son Ferdinand made her next son, Louis, her heir in Ponthieu but around 1275 he, too, died, leaving two children. But according to inheritance customs in Picardy, where Ponthieu lay, Joan's young grandson John of Ponthieu could not succeed her there; her heir in Ponthieu automatically became her adult daughter Eleanor, who was married to Edward I of England. [citation needed] It does not appear that Joan was displeased at the prospect of having Ponthieu pass under English domination; from 1274 to 1278, in fact, she had her granddaughter Joan of Acre (the daughter of Edward I and Eleanor) with her in Ponthieu, and appears to have treated the girl so indulgently that when she was returned to England her parents found that she was thoroughly spoiled.

That same indulgent nature appears to have made Joan inattentive to her duties as countess. When she died in March 1279, her daughter and son-in-law were thus confronted with Joan's vast debts, and to prevent the king of France from involving himself in the county's affairs, they had to pay the debts quickly by taking out loans from citizens in Ponthieu and from wealthy abbeys in France. They also had to deal with a lengthy legal struggle with Eleanor's nephew, John of Ponthieu, to whom Joan bequeathed a great deal of land in Ponthieu as well as important legal rights connected with those estates. The dispute was resolved when John of Ponthieu was recognized as Joan's successor in Aumale according to the inheritance customs that prevailed in Normandy, while Edward and Eleanor retained Ponthieu and John gave up all his claims there. By using English wealth, Edward and Eleanor restored stability to the administration and the finances of Ponthieu, and added considerably to the comital estate by purchasing large amounts of land there.

[edit]Source

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Jeanne of Dammartin or Joan of Dammartin (b. 1216 – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), Countess of Ponthieu (1237-1279) and Montreuil. She was the mother of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of King Edward I of England.

She was daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1251-1276) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (1221-1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clemence de Bar.[1] Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin. In 1237 she married in Burgos King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1198/1199-1252). She was his second wife, his first consort Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, the mother of his heir, Alfonso, having died in 1235.

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–1269), Count of Aumale

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–1269)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

In 1253, Jeanne returned to France. Sometime between May 1260 and 9 February 1261, she married secondly, Jean de Nesle, Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle (died 2 February 1292).[2]

--------------------

Jeanne of Dammartin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jeanne of Dammartin or Joan of Dammartin (b. 1216 – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), Countess of Ponthieu (1237-1279) and Montreuil.

She was daughter of Simon de Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1251-1276) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (1221-1251). In 1237 she married in Burgos with King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1198/1199-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–1269), Count of Aumale

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–1269)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

--------------------

Jeanne of Dammartin or Joan of Dammartin (b.1216 – d. Abbeville, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252–1252), Countess of Ponthieu (1237–1279) and Montreuil.

She was daughter of Simon de Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1251–1276) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (1221–1251). In 1237 she married in Burgos with King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1198/1199–1252).

--------------------

Jeanne of Dammartin or Joan of Dammartin (b. 1216 – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), Countess of Ponthieu (1237-1279) and Montreuil.

She was daughter of Simon de Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1251-1276) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (1221-1251). In 1237 she married in Burgos King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1198/1199-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–1269), Count of Aumale

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–1269)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

--------------------

Jeanne of Dammartin or Joan of Dammartin (b. 1216 – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), Countess of Ponthieu (1237-1279) and Montreuil.

She was daughter of Simon de Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1251-1276) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (1221-1251). In 1237 she married in Burgos King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1198/1199-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–1269), Count of Aumale

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–1269)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

--------------------

Queen Consrot of Castile, Queen Consort of Leon, Countess of Ponthieu and Countess of Montreuil

--------------------

Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c.1220[1] – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) was Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251-1279) and Montreuil (1251-1279). She was the mother of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of King Edward I of England.

Contents [hide]

1 Family

2 Henry III of England

3 Marriages and children

4 Source

5 References


[edit] Family

Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clémence de Bar.[2] Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile.

[edit] Henry III of England

After secret negotiations were undertaken in 1234, it was agreed that Joan would marry King Henry III of England. This marriage would have been politically unacceptable to the French, however, since Joan stood to inherit not only her mother's county of Ponthieu but also the county of Aumale that was vested in her father's family. Ponthieu bordered on the duchy of Normandy, and Aumale lay within Normandy itself. The French king Philip Augustus had seized Normandy from King John of England as recently as 1205, and Philip's heirs could not risk the English monarchy recovering any land in that area, since it might allow the Plantagenets to re-establish control in Normandy. As it happened, Joan's father Simon had become involved in a conspiracy of northern French noblemen against Philip Augustus and to win pardon from Philip's son Louis VIII, Simon—who had only daughters—was compelled to promise that he would marry neither of his two eldest daughters without the permission of the king of France. In 1235, the queen-regent of France, Blanche of Castile, invoked that promise on behalf of her son, King Louis IX of France, and threatened to deprive Simon of all his lands if Joan married Henry III. Henry therefore abandoned the project for his marriage to Joan and in January 1236 married Eleanor of Provence, the sister of Louis IX's wife.

[edit] Marriages and children

In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find her son another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested the young Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands. In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Joan married in Burgos, King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1201-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–ca 1265)

Eleanor, married Edward I of England

Louis (1243–ca 1275)

Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo

John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

Upon her mother's death in 1251, Joan succeeded to the titles of Countess of Ponthieu and Countess of Montreuil which she held in her own right.

After Ferdinand III died in 1252, Joan did not enjoy a cordial relationship with his heir, her stepson Alfonso X of Castile, with whom she quarreled over some of the lands and income she should have received as dowager queen of Castile. Sometime in 1253, she became the ally and supporter of another of her stepsons, Henry of Castile, who also felt Alfonso had not allowed him all the wealth their father had meant him to have. Joan unwisely attended secret meetings with Henry and his supporters, and it was rumored that she and Henry were lovers. This further strained her relations with Alfonso and in 1254, shortly before her daughter Eleanor was to marry Edward of England, Jeanne and her eldest son Ferdinand left Castile and returned to her native Ponthieu.

Sometime between May 1260 and 9 February 1261, Joan took a second husband, Jean de Nesle, Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle (died 2 February 1292).[3] This marriage is sometimes said to have produced a daughter, Béatrice, but she was in fact a child of Jean de Nesle's first marriage. In 1263, Joan was recognized as countess of Aumale after the death of a childless Dammartin cousin. But her son Ferdinand died around 1265, leaving a young son known as John de Ponthieu.

During her marriage to Jean de Nesle, Joan ran up considerable debts and also appears to have allowed her rights as countess in Ponthieu to weaken. The death of her son Ferdinand made her next son, Louis, her heir in Ponthieu but around 1275 he, too, died, leaving two children. But according to inheritance customs in Picardy, where Ponthieu lay, Joan's young grandson John de Ponthieu could not succeed her there; her heir in Ponthieu automatically became her adult daughter Eleanor, who was married to Edward I of England.[citation needed] It does not appear that Joan was displeased at the prospect of having Ponthieu pass under English domination; from 1274 to 1278, in fact, she had her granddaughter Joan of Acre (the daughter of Edward I and Eleanor) with her in Ponthieu, and appears to have treated the girl so indulgently that when she was returned to England her parents found that she was thoroughly spoiled.

That same indulgent nature appears to have made Joan inattentive to her duties as countess. When she died in March 1279, her daughter and son-in-law were thus confronted with Joan's vast debts, and to prevent the king of France from involving himself in the county's affairs, they had to pay the debts quickly by taking out loans from citizens in Ponthieu and from wealthy abbeys in France. They also had to deal with a lengthy legal struggle with Eleanor's nephew, John of Ponthieu, to whom Joan bequeathed a great deal of land in Ponthieu as well as important legal rights connected with those estates. The dispute was resolved when John of Ponthieu was recognized as Joan's successor in Aumale according to the inheritance customs that prevailed in Normandy, while Edward and Eleanor retained Ponthieu and John gave up all his claims there. By using English wealth, Edward and Eleanor restored stability to the administration and the finances of Ponthieu, and added considerably to the comital estate by purchasing large amounts of land there.

[edit] Source

Genealogy.Euweb.cz

de Clermont

Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, page 192

John Carmi Parsons, Eleanor of Castile: Queen and Society in Thirteenth-Century England (New York, 1993)

[edit] References

^ Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, page 192

^ Comte de Clermont de Clermont

^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Castile

-------------------- Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c.1220 – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251-1279) and Montreuil (1251-1279). She was the mother of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of King Edward I of England.

Family

Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clémence de Bar. Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile.

Henry III of England

After secret negotiations were undertaken in 1234, it was agreed that Joan would marry King Henry III of England. This marriage would have been politically unacceptable to the French, however, since Joan stood to inherit not only her mother's county of Ponthieu but also the county of Aumale that was vested in her father's family. Ponthieu bordered on the duchy of Normandy, and Aumale lay within Normandy itself. The French king Philip Augustus had seized Normandy from King John of England as recently as 1205, and Philip's heirs could not risk the English monarchy recovering any land in that area, since it might allow the Plantagenets to re-establish control in Normandy. As it happened, Joan's father Simon had become involved in a conspiracy of northern French noblemen against Philip Augustus and to win pardon from Philip's son Louis VIII, Simon—who had only daughters—was compelled to promise that he would marry neither of his two eldest daughters without the permission of the king of France. In 1235, the queen-regent of France, Blanche of Castile, invoked that promise on behalf of her son, King Louis IX of France, and threatened to deprive Simon of all his lands if Joan married Henry III. Henry therefore abandoned the project for his marriage to Joan and in January 1236 married Eleanor of Provence, the sister of Louis IX's wife.

Marriages and children

In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find her son another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested the young Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands. In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Jeanne married in Burgos, King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1201-1252).

They had four sons and one daughter:

  1. Ferdinand (1239–ca 1265)
  2. Eleanor, married Edward I of England
  3. Louis (1243–ca 1275)
  4. Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo
  5. John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

Upon her mother's death in 1251, Joan succeeded to the titles of Countess of Ponthieu and Countess of Montreuil which she held in her own right.

After Ferdinand III died in 1252, Joan did not enjoy a cordial relationship with his heir, her stepson Alfonso X of Castile, with whom she quarreled over some of the lands and income she should have received as dowager queen of Castile. Sometime in 1253, she became the ally and supporter of another of her stepsons, Henry of Castile, who also felt Alfonso had not allowed him all the wealth their father had meant him to have. Joan unwisely attended secret meetings with Henry and his supporters, and it was rumored that she and Henry were lovers. This further strained her relations with Alfonso and in 1254, shortly before her daughter Eleanor was to marry Edward of England, Jeanne and her eldest son Ferdinand left Castile and returned to her native Ponthieu.

Sometime between May 1260 and 9 February 1261, Joan took a second husband, Jean de Nesle, Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle (died 2 February 1292). This marriage is sometimes said to have produced a daughter, Béatrice, but she was in fact a child of Jean de Nesle's first marriage. In 1263, Joan was recognized as countess of Aumale after the death of a childless Dammartin cousin. But her son Ferdinand died around 1265, leaving a young son known as John de Ponthieu.

During her marriage to Jean de Nesle, Joan ran up considerable debts and also appears to have allowed her rights as countess in Ponthieu to weaken. The death of her son Ferdinand made her next son, Louis, her heir in Ponthieu but around 1275 he, too, died, leaving two children. But according to inheritance customs in Picardy, where Ponthieu lay, Joan's young grandson John de Ponthieu could not succeed her there; her heir in Ponthieu automatically became her adult daughter Eleanor, who was married to the king of England.[citation needed] It does not appear that Joan was displeased at the prospect of having Ponthieu pass under English domination; from 1274 to 1278, in fact, she had her granddaughter Joan of England with her in Ponthieu, and appears to have treated the girl so indulgently that when she was returned to England her parents found that she was thoroughly spoiled.

That same indulgent nature appears to have made Joan inattentive to her duties as countess. When she died in March 1279, her daughter and son-in-law were thus confronted with Joan's vast debts, and to prevent the king of France from involving himself in the county's affairs, they had to pay the debts quickly by taking out loans from citizens in Ponthieu and from wealthy abbeys in France. They also had to deal with a lengthy legal struggle with Eleanor's nephew, John of Ponthieu, to whom Joan bequeathed a great deal of land in Ponthieu as well as important legal rights connected with those estates. The dispute was resolved when John of Ponthieu was recognized as Joan's successor in Aumale according to the inheritance customs that prevailed in Normandy, while Edward and Eleanor retained Ponthieu and John gave up all his claims there. By using English wealth, Edward and Eleanor restored stability to the administration and the finances of Ponthieu, and added considerably to the comital estate by purchasing large amounts of land there. -------------------- Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c.1220[1] – d. Abbeville, March 16, 1279) was Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251-1279) and Aumale (1237-1279). Her daughter, the English queen Eleanor of Castile, was her successor in Ponthieu. Her son and co-ruler in Aumale, Ferdinand, predeceased her, so she was succeeded by her grandson John.


Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clémence de Bar.[2] Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile.

After secret negotiations were undertaken in 1234, it was agreed that Joan would marry King Henry III of England. This marriage would have been politically unacceptable to the French, however, since Joan stood to inherit not only her mother's county of Ponthieu but also the county of Aumale that was vested in her father's family. Ponthieu bordered on the duchy of Normandy, and Aumale lay within Normandy itself. The French king Philip Augustus had seized Normandy from King John of England as recently as 1205, and Philip's heirs could not risk the English monarchy recovering any land in that area, since it might allow the Plantagenets to re-establish control in Normandy. As it happened, Joan's father Simon had become involved in a conspiracy of northern French noblemen against Philip Augustus and to win pardon from Philip's son Louis VIII, Simon—who had only daughters—was compelled to promise that he would marry off neither of his two eldest daughters without the permission of the king of France. In 1235, the queen-regent of France, Blanche of Castile, invoked that promise on behalf of her son, King Louis IX of France, and threatened to deprive Simon of all his lands if Joan married Henry III. Henry therefore abandoned the project for his marriage to Joan and in January 1236 married Eleanor of Provence, the sister of Louis IX's wife.

In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find her son another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested the young Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands.[3] In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Joan married in Burgos, King Ferdinand III of Castile and Leon (1201-1252). Since Ferdinand already had seven sons from his first marriage to Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, there was little chance of Ponthieu being absorbed by Castile.

They had four sons and one daughter:

Ferdinand (1239–ca 1265) m. (after 1256) Laure de Montfort, Lady of Espernon (d before 08.1270), and had issue: Eleanor, married Edward I of England and had issue Louis (1243–ca 1275)m. Juana de Manzanedo, Lady of Gaton, and had issue Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba

She accompanied Ferdinand to Andalucia and lived with him in the army camp as he besieged Seville in 1248[4].

Upon her mother's death in 1251, Joan succeeded to the titles of Countess of Ponthieu and Countess of Montreuil which she held in her own right.

After Ferdinand III died in 1252, Joan did not enjoy a cordial relationship with his heir, her stepson Alfonso X of Castile, with whom she quarreled over some of the lands and income she should have received as dowager queen of Castile. Sometime in 1253, she became the ally and supporter of another of her stepsons, Henry of Castile, who also felt Alfonso had not allowed him all the wealth their father had meant him to have. Joan unwisely attended secret meetings with Henry and his supporters, and it was rumored that she and Henry were lovers. This further strained her relations with Alfonso and in 1254, shortly before her daughter Eleanor was to marry Edward of England, Joan and her eldest son Ferdinand left Castile and returned to her native Ponthieu.

Sometime between May 1260 and 9 February 1261, Joan took a second husband, Jean de Nesle, Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle (died 2 February 1292).[5] This marriage is sometimes said to have produced a daughter, Béatrice, but she was in fact a child of Jean de Nesle's first marriage. In 1263, Joan was recognized as countess of Aumale after the death of a childless Dammartin cousin. But her son Ferdinand died around 1265, leaving a young son known as John of Ponthieu.

During her marriage to Jean de Nesle, Joan ran up considerable debts and also appears to have allowed her rights as countess in Ponthieu to weaken. The death of her son Ferdinand made her next son, Louis, her heir in Ponthieu but around 1275 he, too, died, leaving two children. But according to inheritance customs in Picardy, where Ponthieu lay, Joan's young grandson John of Ponthieu could not succeed her there; her heir in Ponthieu automatically became her adult daughter Eleanor, who was married to Edward I of England.[citation needed] It does not appear that Joan was displeased at the prospect of having Ponthieu pass under English domination; from 1274 to 1278, in fact, she had her granddaughter Joan of Acre (the daughter of Edward I and Eleanor) with her in Ponthieu, and appears to have treated the girl so indulgently that when she was returned to England her parents found that she was thoroughly spoiled.

That same indulgent nature appears to have made Joan inattentive to her duties as countess. When she died in March 1279, her daughter and son-in-law were thus confronted with Joan's vast debts, and to prevent the king of France from involving himself in the county's affairs, they had to pay the debts quickly by taking out loans from citizens in Ponthieu and from wealthy abbeys in France. They also had to deal with a lengthy legal struggle with Eleanor's nephew, John of Ponthieu, to whom Joan bequeathed a great deal of land in Ponthieu as well as important legal rights connected with those estates. The dispute was resolved when John of Ponthieu was recognized as Joan's successor in Aumale according to the inheritance customs that prevailed in Normandy, while Edward and Eleanor retained Ponthieu and John gave up all his claims there. By using English wealth, Edward and Eleanor restored stability to the administration and the finances of Ponthieu, and added considerably to the comital estate by purchasing large amounts of land there.

Source:

Genealogy.Euweb.cz de Clermont Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, page 192 John Carmi Parsons, Eleanor of Castile: Queen and Society in Thirteenth-Century England (New York, 1993)

References:

Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, page 192 ^ Comte de Clermont de Clermont ^ Carmi Parsons, John (1995). Eleanor of Castile, Queen and Society in Thirteenth-Century England. p. 8. ^ Carmi Parsons, John (1995). p. 9. ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Castile ^ Michel Bur, "De quelques champenois dans l'entourage francais des rois d'Angleterre aux XIe et XIIe siecles", in Family Trees and the Roots of Politics, K.S.B.Keats-Rohan, ed. (1997), pp. 333-48

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The County of Aumale, later elevated to a duchy, was a medieval fief in Normandy. It was disputed between England and France during parts of the Hundred Years' War.

The title was later re-created in 1547 for Francis, then styled Count of Aumale by courtesy. On his accession as Duke of Guise, he ceded it to his brother Claude, Duke of Aumale. It was later used as a title by Henri d'Orleans, the youngest son of Louis-Philippe, King of the French and Duc d'Orleans.

The present titleholder is a grandson of the late HRH Henri, Comte de Paris, Orleans heir, and his wife, HRH Isabelle d'Orleans-Braganza of Brazil. Prince Foulques Foulques d'Orleans, son of Jacques duc d'Orleans Jacques Jean Jaroslav Marie d'Orléans, Duc d'Orléans and the duchess, née Gersende de Ponteves Sabran, added it to his title of Comte d'Eu.

Lords of Aumale: Guerinfroi, lord before 996–? Guerinfroi Aymard (son) ?–1048 Bertha of Aumale (daughter) 1048–1052 Hugh of Ponthieu (count Hugh II of Ponthieu) 1048–1052 (married to Bertha) Enguerrand I of Aumale (married Adelaide of Normandy, who retained the lordship after her husband's death) Adelaide of Normandy 1053–1087 with Lambert of Boulogne count of Lens 1053–1054 (married to Adelaide) [edit] Counts of Aumale Coat of Arms of the Counts of Aumale.Odo of Troyes 1069–1115 (married to Adelaide) Stephen of Aumale before 1070–1127 William le Gros 1127–1179 Hawise of Aumale 1179–1194 with William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex 1180–1189 (married to Hawise) William de Fortibus 1189–1194 (married to Hawise) Baldwin of Bethune 1195–1196 (married to Hawise) confiscated; to French royal domain. However, the English kings continued to recognise the title, see Earl of Albemarle [edit] Counts of Aumale (House of Dammartin) Coat of Arms of the Lords of Dammartin.Renaud I of Dammartin 1224–1227 Mahaut of Dammartin 1227–1234 with Philip Hurepel 1227–1234 (married to Mahaut) Simon of Dammartin 1234–1239 Joan of Dammartin 1239–1278 with [edit] Counts of Aumale (House of Castile) Ferdinand I 1239–1252 (married to Jeanne) Ferdinand II of Castile-Aumale 1252–1260 (son of Joan and Ferdinand I) John I 1260–1302 (son of Ferdinand II) John II 1302–1343 Blanche of Ponthieu 1343–1387 with [edit] Counts of Aumale (House of Harcourt)John III 1343–1356 (husband of Blanche) John IV 1356–1389 (son of John III and Blanche) John V 1389–1452 Marie of Harcourt 1452–1476 with

Counts of Aumale (House of Lorraine-Vaudémont)

Guise.Antoine, count of Vaudémont 1452–1458 (married to Marie) John VI 1458–1473 (son of Antoine and Marie René 1473–1508 (nephew of John) Claude I 1508–1547 [edit] Dukes of Aumale

Dukes of Aumale of the Lorraine family:

Francis 1547–1550 Claude II 1550–1573 Charles 1573–1631 Anne 1631–1638 (countess of Maulévrier) Henry of Savoy, Duke of Nemours 1631–1632 (married to Anne) Louis of Savoy 1638–1641 (also Duke of Nemours) Charles Amadeus of Savoy 1641–1652 (also Duke of Nemours) to royal domain Marie Jeanne of Savoy Louis Charles de Bourbon (1701–1773) sold to the crown, but payment not made, so returned to the heir Louis Jean Marie of Bourbon (1776–1793) Henri d'Orléans (1822–1897)

Aumale in the English peerage: Through the end of the Hundred Years' War, the kings of England at various times ruled Aumale, through their claims to be dukes of Normandy and later, kings of France. The title of Count or Duke of Aumale was granted several times during this period.

Earls of Aumale (1095): In 1196, Philip II of France captured the castle of Aumale, and granted the title of "Count of Aumale" to Renaud de Dammartin. However, despite Philip's conquest of Aumale (and, subsequently, the remainder of Normandy), the kings of England continued to claim the Duchy of Normandy, and to recognize the old line of Counts or Earls of Aumale. These were:

see above for Counts before 1196 Hawise of Aumale, 2nd Countess of Aumale (d. 1214), married, bef. 1196: Baldwin de Bethune (d. 1212), Count of Aumale jure uxoris William de Forz, 3rd Earl of Albemarle (d. 1242), son of the 2nd Countess by her second husband William de Forz William de Forz, 4th Earl of Albemarle (d. 1260), son of the 3rd Earl Thomas de Forz, 5th Earl of Albemarle (d. 1269), son of the 4th Earl Aveline de Forz, Countess of Albemarle (d. 1274), daughter of the 4th Earl Aveline married Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster in 1269, but died without issue in 1274. A claim upon the inheritance by John de Eston (de Ashton) was settled in 1278 with the surrender of the title to the Crown.

[edit] Dukes of Aumale, first Creation (1385)also: Duke of Gloucester (1385–1397), Earl of Essex (1376–1397), Earl of Buckingham (1377) Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester (d. 1397), fifth son of Edward III, was created Duke of Aumale by writ of summons on 3 September 1385, but was also made Duke of Gloucester very soon after, and seems never to have used the former title. It was almost certainly forfeit upon his murder while awaiting trial for treason. [edit] Dukes of Aumale, second Creation (1397)also: Duke of York (1385), Earl of Cambridge (1362–1414), Earl of Rutland (1390–1402), Earl of Cork (c. 1396) Edward of Norwich, 1st Earl of Rutland (d. 1415), first son of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York (himself fourth son of Edward III), was created Duke of Aumale shortly after Woodstock's murder, but was deprived of the title by Henry IV Bolingbroke in 1399. [edit] Earls of Aumale (1412)also: Duke of Clarence (1412) Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence (1387–1421), second son of Henry IV Bolingbroke, was created Earl of Aumale along with his dukedom of Clarence, and carried both titles until his death without issue. [edit] Counts of Aumale (1422)also: Earl of Warwick (1088) Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick (1382–1439), military commander under Henry V in France, was created Earl of Aumale for life only. In further creations in the English peerage after the Hundred Years' War, Aumale was spelled Albemarle. For these, see Duke of Albemarle and Earl of Albemarle.

-------------------- Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c.1220 – d. Abbeville,France March 16, 1279) was Queen consort of Castile and León (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251–1279) and Aumale (1237–1279). Her daughter, the English queen Eleanor of Castile, was her successor in Ponthieu. Her son and co-ruler in Aumale, Ferdinand II, Count of Aumale, predeceased her, so she was succeeded by her grandson John I, Count of Aumale, deceased at the Battle of Courtrai, 11 July 1302. Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clémence de Bar. Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile. After secret negotiations were undertaken in 1234, it was agreed that Joan would marry King Henry III of England. This marriage would have been politically unacceptable to the French, however, since Joan stood to inherit not only her mother's county of Ponthieu but also the county of Aumale that was vested in her father's family. Ponthieu bordered on the duchy of Normandy, and Aumale lay within Normandy itself. The French king Philip Augustus had seized Normandy from King John of England as recently as 1205, and Philip's heirs could not risk the English monarchy recovering any land in that area, since it might allow the Plantagenets to re-establish control in Normandy. As it happened, Joan's father Simon had become involved in a conspiracy of northern French noblemen against Philip Augustus and to win pardon from Philip's son Louis VIII, Simon—who had only daughters—was compelled to promise that he would marry off neither of his two eldest daughters without the permission of the king of France. In 1235, the queen-regent of France, Blanche of Castile, invoked that promise on behalf of her son, King Louis IX of France, and threatened to deprive Simon of all his lands if Joan married Henry III. Henry therefore abandoned the project for his marriage to Joan and in January 1236 married instead Eleanor of Provence, the sister of Louis IX's wife. Queen of Castile: In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find Ferdinand another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands. In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Joan and Ferdinand were married in Burgos, Spain. Since Ferdinand already had seven sons from his first marriage to Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, there was little chance of Ponthieu being absorbed by Castile. They had four sons and one daughter: 1.Ferdinand II, Count of Aumale (1239–ca 1265) m. (after 1256) Laure de Montfort, Lady of Espernon (d before 08.1270), and had issue: 2.Eleanor of Castile, Countess of Ponthieu, who married king Edward I of England and had issue 3.Louis (1243–ca 1275), who married Juana de Manzanedo, Lady of Gaton, and had issue 4.Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo 5.John (1245), died young and buried at the cathedral in Córdoba She accompanied Ferdinand to Andalucia and lived with him in the army camp as he besieged Seville in 1248. Upon her mother's death in 1251, Joan succeeded as Countess of Ponthieu and Montreuil, which she held in her own right. After Ferdinand III died in 1252, Joan did not enjoy a cordial relationship with his heir, her stepson Alfonso X of Castile, with whom she quarreled over the lands and income she should have received as dowager queen of Castile. Sometime in 1253, she became the ally and supporter of another of her stepsons, Fadrique of Castile, who also felt Alfonso had not allowed him all the wealth their father had meant him to have. Joan unwisely attended secret meetings with Henry and his supporters, and it was rumored that she and Fadrique were lovers. This further strained her relations with Alfonso and in 1254, shortly before her daughter Eleanor was to marry Edward of England, Joan and her eldest son Ferdinand left Castile and returned to her native Ponthieu. Rule in Ponthieu and Aumale: Sometime between May 1260 and 9 February 1261, Joan took a second husband, Jean de Nesle, Seigneur de Falvy et de La Hérelle (died 2 February 1292). This marriage is sometimes said to have produced a daughter, Béatrice, but she was in fact a child of Jean de Nesle's first marriage. In 1263, Joan was recognized as countess of Aumale after the death of a childless Dammartin cousin. But her son Ferdinand died around 1265, leaving a young son known as John of Ponthieu. During her marriage to Jean de Nesle, Joan ran up considerable debts and also appears to have allowed her rights as countess in Ponthieu to weaken. The death of her son Ferdinand in 1265 made her next son, Louis, her heir in Ponthieu but around 1275 he, too, died, leaving two children. But according to inheritance customs in Picardy, where Ponthieu lay, Joan's young grandson John of Ponthieu could not succeed her there; her heir in Ponthieu automatically became her adult daughter Eleanor, who was married to Edward I of England.[6] It does not appear that Joan was displeased at the prospect of having Ponthieu pass under English domination; from 1274 to 1278, in fact, she had her granddaughter Joan of Acre (the daughter of Edward I and Eleanor) with her in Ponthieu, and appears to have treated the girl so indulgently that when she was returned to England her parents found that she was thoroughly spoiled. That same indulgent nature appears to have made Joan inattentive to her duties as countess. When she died in March 1279, her daughter and son-in-law were thus confronted with Joan's vast debts, and to prevent the king of France from involving himself in the county's affairs, they had to pay the debts quickly by taking out loans from citizens in Ponthieu and from wealthy abbeys in France. They also had to deal with a lengthy legal struggle with Eleanor's nephew, John of Ponthieu, to whom Joan bequeathed a great deal of land in Ponthieu as well as important legal rights connected with those estates. The dispute was resolved when John of Ponthieu was recognized as Joan's successor in Aumale according to the inheritance customs that prevailed in Normandy, while Edward and Eleanor retained Ponthieu and John gave up all his claims there. By using English wealth, Edward and Eleanor restored stability to the administration and the finances of Ponthieu, and added considerably to the comital estate by purchasing large amounts of land there.

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Juana de Danmartín, reina consorte de Castilla's Timeline

1220
1220
1237
October 1237
Age 17
1240
1240
Age 20
Burgos, Castille and Leon, Spain
1244
1244
Age 24
1246
1246
Age 26
1252
1252
Age 32
France
1252
Age 32
Nesle, Somme, Picardie, France
1260
1260
Age 40
1279
March 16, 1279
Age 59
Abbeville, Picardy, France
1992
August 24, 1992
Age 59