John Cleves Symmes (1742 - 1814)

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Birthplace: Riverhead,Long Island, NY
Death: Died in Cincinnati, OH, USA
Occupation: Judge
Managed by: Bjørn P. Brox
Last Updated:

About John Cleves Symmes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cleves_Symmes

John Cleves Symmes (July 21st, 1742–February 26, 1814[1]) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. He was also the father-in-law of President William Henry Harrison. He was the son of the Rev. Timothy Symmes (1715–1756) and Mary Cleves (died c. 1746) of Suffolk County, New York on Long Island. John was born in Riverhead, New York on July 21, 1742.

Symmes was educated as a lawyer and married Anna Tuthill (1741–1776) at Mattituck, New York on October 30, 1760. They had two children; Maria (born April 23, 1765) and Mary (born August 30, 1767) at Mattituck before moving to New Jersey sometime around 1770. Another daughter Anna Tuthill Symmes was born in 1775 at Flatbrookville, Walpack Township, Sussex County, New Jersey before his wife died in 1776.

Symmes supported the revolution, becoming chairman of the Sussex County, New Jersey Committee of Safety in 1774. Prior to the American Revolution, he served as a schoolteacher. When the Revolutionary war began in earnest, he served as Colonel of the 3rd Regiment of the Sussex County militia from 1777 to 1780. The unit was called into service with the Continental Army on several actions.

Symmes served on the New Jersey Supreme Court in 1777 and 1778. Then, in 1778, Governor William Livingston appointed him to the State Council (now the New Jersey Senate). He was a frequent visitor to the Governor both in Elizabethtown and in Parsippany. In 1779, John married Livingston's daughter, Susannah. Besides being the governor's daughter, she was John Jay's sister-in-law.

Symmes represented New Jersey in the Continental Congress (1785–1786), then, in 1788, moved to the west, settling in what later became North Bend, Ohio. He served as a judge of the Territorial Court from 1788 until Ohio became a state in 1803. He also pursued an active career as a land developer and seller. He died on February 26, 1814 at Cincinnati, Ohio, and is buried at North Bend.

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  • The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883)
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofwil01tutt#page/n71/mode/2up
  • 22. Henry Tuthill was father of Henry 2d, who was father of Henry 3d, whose dau. 'ANNA TUTHILL, m. JOHN CLEVES (s. of Rev. Timothy) SYMMES, b. July 10, 1742. He was an officer in the rev. army, and after one of the judges of the Supreme court of New Jersey. Not long after the war he bought a tract of land some twenty miles in length, on the north side of the Oldo river, including the site of Cincinnati. He removed to Ohio and res. at North Bend, then called Cleves, having been appointed by Washington U. S. Dist. Judge for the North West Ter. He d. at N. B., Feb., 1614. He m. (2) Widow Halsey of N. J.; (3) Susanna, dau. of Hon. Wm. Livingston of N. J. Her sister was wife of John Jay. By 1st m. he had;
  • 1. Anna, who lived with her grandfather Tuthill at Southold, educated at the female academy at E. Hampton; afterwards a pupil of Mrs. Isabella Graham, and res. in her family. In 1764 accompanied her father and step-mother to res. at No. Bend. where she m. Nov. 22, 1795, William Henry Harrison, then a young officer in command of Fort Hamilton; afterwards President of the United States, in which office he d. in the White House at Washington. She d. Feb. 25, 1861, a. 88 yrs. and 7 months. About the year 1853 the compiler while engaged in surveying a route for the Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R., accepted the proffered hospitality of one of the sons of President Harrrison, then living a few miles below North Bend (Hon. Scott Harrison.) Mr. H. referred to his Tuthill relationships, saying his family had always held them in high esteem. Rev. Joseph Tuthill Daryea, D. D., is of this family.
  • -------------------
  • Tuthill family of Tharston, Norfolk County, England and Southold, Suffolk County, New York; also written Totyl, Totehill, Tothill, Tuttle, etc (1898)
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/tuthillfamilyoft00aker#page/13/mode/2up
  • i. Henry, of Acquebogue, b. before Dec., 1715, d. 17 Sept., 1793; m. 16 Mch., 1738, Phoebe Horton (Caleb, Caleb, Caleb, Barnabas), d. 3 Nov., 1793, in her 75th yr. Henry's grand-da., Anna Symmes, m. President Wm. Henry Harrison, and was the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison.
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-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cleves_Symmes

John Cleves Symmes (1742–1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. He was also the father-in-law of President William Henry Harrison. He was the son of the Rev. Timothy Symmes (1715–1756) and Mary Cleves (died c. 1746) of Suffolk County, New York on Long Island. John was born in Riverhead, New York on July 21, 1742.

Symmes was educated as a lawyer and married Anna Tuthill (1741–1776) at Mattituck, New York on October 30, 1760. They had two children; Maria (born April 23, 1765) and Mary (born August 30, 1767) at Mattituck before moving to New Jersey sometime around 1770. Another daughter Anna Tuthill Symmes was born in 1775 near Morristown, before his wife died in 1776.

Symmes supported the revolution, becoming chairman of the Sussex County, New Jersey Committee of Safety in 1774. When the Revolutionary war began in earnest, he served as Colonel of the 3rd Regiment of the Sussex County militia from 1777 to 1780. The unit was called into service with the Continental Army on several actions.

Symmes served on the New Jersey Supreme Court in 1777 and 1778. Then, in 1778, Governor William Livingston appointed him to the state council. He was a frequent visitor to the Governor both in Elizabethtown and in Parsippany. In 1779, John married Livingston's daughter, Susannah. Besides being the governor's daughter, she was John Jay's sister-in-law.

Symmes represented New Jersey in the Continental Congress (1785–1786), then, in 1788, moved to the west, settling in what later became North Bend, Ohio. He served as a judge of the Territorial Court from 1788 until Ohio became a state in 1803. He also pursued an active career as a land developer and seller. He died on February 26, 1814 at Cincinnati, Ohio, and is buried at North Bend.

[edit] Land development

Symmes bought 311,682 acres from the Congress in 1788. President George Washington signed the patent on October 30, 1794 conveying to Symmes 248,250 acres (1,005 km²) plus a surveying township of 23,040 acres (93 km²), in trust, for an academy. This land was known as the Symmes Purchase, and was the cause of considerable controversy in his lifetime and after. The purchase price was $225,000, and was paid in notes issued by the Congress to raise money during the war. There is no doubt that a considerable part of this amount came from Symmes in the first place as he lent most of his own money to the revolution.

There were other investors who served as partners in the transaction. There is also no doubt that some of these notes were purchased from other holders, probably at a discount. This was before the rampant speculation in these notes that happened a few years later, but is still questionable.

There were also disputes about the actual boundaries of the purchase and the quality of surveying and validity of titles. In the last years of his life, he spent a great deal of time in court, defending himself from claims.

Symmes' nephew and namesake John Cleves Symmes, Jr. fought in the War of 1812 and is best known for his Hollow Earth Theory. -------------------- John Cleves Symmes (July 21st, 1742–February 26, 1814 was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. He was also the father-in-law of President William Henry Harrison. He was the son of the Rev. Timothy Symmes (1715–1756) and Mary Cleves (died c. 1746) of Suffolk County, New York on Long Island. John was born in Riverhead, New York on July 21, 1742.

Symmes was educated as a lawyer and married Anna Tuthill (1741–1776) at Mattituck, New York on October 30, 1760. They had two children; Maria (born April 23, 1765) and Mary (born August 30, 1767) at Mattituck before moving to New Jersey sometime around 1770. Another daughter Anna Tuthill Symmes was born in 1775 at Flatbrookville, Walpack Township, Sussex County, New Jersey before his wife died in 1776.

Symmes supported the revolution, becoming chairman of the Sussex County, New Jersey Committee of Safety in 1774. When the Revolutionary war began in earnest, he served as Colonel of the 3rd Regiment of the Sussex County militia from 1777 to 1780. The unit was called into service with the Continental Army on several actions.

Symmes served on the New Jersey Supreme Court in 1777 and 1778. Then, in 1778, Governor William Livingston appointed him to the State Council (now the New Jersey Senate). He was a frequent visitor to the Governor both in Elizabethtown and in Parsippany. In 1779, John married Livingston's daughter, Susannah. Besides being the governor's daughter, she was John Jay's sister-in-law.

Symmes represented New Jersey in the Continental Congress (1785–1786), then, in 1788, moved to the west, settling in what later became North Bend, Ohio. He served as a judge of the Territorial Court from 1788 until Ohio became a state in 1803. He also pursued an active career as a land developer and seller. He died on February 26, 1814 at Cincinnati, Ohio, and is buried at North Bend.

-------------------------------------------------------------- The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883)

Henry Tuthill was father of Henry 2d, who was father of Henry 3d, whose dau. 'ANNA TUTHILL, m. JOHN CLEVES (s. of Rev. Timothy) SYMMES, b. July 10, 1742. He was an officer in the rev. army, and after one of the judges of the Supreme court of New Jersey. Not long after the war he bought a tract of land some twenty miles in length, on the north side of the Oldo river, including the site of Cincinnati. He removed to Ohio and res. at North Bend, then called Cleves, having been appointed by Washington U. S. Dist. Judge for the North West Ter. He d. at N. B., Feb., 1614. He m. (2) Widow Halsey of N. J.; (3) Susanna, dau. of Hon. Wm. Livingston of N. J. Her sister was wife of John Jay. By 1st m. he had; 1. Anna, who lived with her grandfather Tuthill at Southold, educated at the female academy at E. Hampton; afterwards a pupil of Mrs. Isabella Graham, and res. in her family. In 1764 accompanied her father and step-mother to res. at No. Bend. where she m. Nov. 22, 1795, William Henry Harrison, then a young officer in command of Fort Hamilton; afterwards President of the United States, in which office he d. in the White House at Washington. She d. Feb. 25, 1861, a. 88 yrs. and 7 months. About the year 1853 the compiler while engaged in surveying a route for the Cincinnati & St. Louis R. R., accepted the proffered hospitality of one of the sons of President Harrrison, then living a few miles below North Bend (Hon. Scott Harrison.) Mr. H. referred to his Tuthill relationships, saying his family had always held them in high esteem. Rev. Joseph Tuthill Daryea, D. D., is of this family. ------------------- Tuthill family of Tharston, Norfolk County, England and Southold, Suffolk County, New York; also written Totyl, Totehill, Tothill, Tuttle, etc (1898)

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Judge John Cleves Symmes's Timeline

1742
July 21, 1742
Riverhead,Long Island, NY
1760
October 30, 1760
Age 18
Mattituck, NY, USA
1765
April 23, 1765
Age 22
1775
July 25, 1775
Age 33
Walpack, Sussex, New Jersey, United States
1779
1779
Age 36
1814
February 26, 1814
Age 71
Cincinnati, OH, USA
????
????
North Bend, OH, USA