Judith, Queen of Wessex, Countess of Flanders

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Judith de France, Princesse, Gravin van Vlaanderen

Also Known As: "Judith Princess of the /Franks/", "Judith de France", "Princess Of the West Franks", "Judith of Flanders", "Judith /de FRANCE/", "Judith /Princess of France/", "Gravin van Vlaanderen", "(Judith CAROLINGIENNE)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Orléans, Loiret, Centre, France
Death: Died in Auxerre, Burgundy, France
Place of Burial: France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Charles II "the Bald", Western Emperor and Ermentrude d'Orléans, reine des Francs
Wife of Aethelwulf, King of Wessex; Boudewijn I "Iron-Arm", count of Flanders and Aethelbald, King of Wessex
Mother of Boudewijn II "the Bald", count of Flanders; Karel van Vlaanderen; Guinidilda De Flanders; Raoul, comte de Cambrai and William III "Le Clito" De Flandres, Count of Flanders
Sister of Rothilde of the Franks; Louis II "le bègue", roi des Francs; Charles "the Child", King of Aquitaine; Lotar; Carloman Carolingiens, Prince of France and 10 others
Half sister of King Louis II "The Stammerer"; Gisela,; Charles; Rothilde of the Franks; Drogo and 3 others

Occupation: Twice Queen of Wessex, Countess of Flanders, married Abt 0859 Flandres, Austrasia, Queen of Brittany, Princess
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Judith, Queen of Wessex, Countess of Flanders

Judith of the Franks

Judith de France (v. 843-870), reine de Wessex puis comtesse de Flandre

Elle est la fille de Charles le Chauve et Ermentrude d'Orléans.

Elle épouse successivement :

   * Æthelwulf (795 † 858), roi de Wessex le 1er octobre 856 à Verberie.
   * Æthelbald (829 † 860), roi de Wessex en 858, fils du précédent. De cette deuxième union elle eut un fils :
         1 Archibald le Jeune
   * Baudouin Bras de fer (837 - 879), comte de Flandre. Bien qu'elle eût été enlevée de son plein gré par Baudouin Bras de fer, elle fut, à la demande du roi de France, excommuniée avec son ravisseur par un concile d'évêques. Intercédant tous les deux auprès du pape Nicolas Ier, celui-ci donna son accord à leur mariage qui eut lieu à Auxerre le 13 décembre, 862[1] ou 863[2] selon les sources. Ils eurent 2 enfants :
         1 Baudouin dit le Chauve (862 -† 918 Gand).
         2 Raoul (865 -† 900)

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_de_France

http://vls.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith,_%C3%AAeste_Gravinne_van_Vloandern

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Flanders

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#JudithM1AethelwulfM2AethelbaldM3Baudouin

Emperor Charles II & his first wife Ermentrudis had nine children:

1. JUDITH ([844]-after 870). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that she married "Balduinus comes"[235].

The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head[236]. Her first husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice in the kingdom of Wessex[237]. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[238].

Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself"[239].

The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[240]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[241].

m firstly (Verberie-sur-Oise, near Senlis 1 Oct 856) as his [second/third] wife, ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, son of ECGBERT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/800]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester).

m secondly (858) ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne).

m thirdly (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders, son of ODACRE [Audacer/Odoscer] Graf van Harlebeek & his wife --- ([837/840]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer).

Æthelwulf m [thirdly] ([Verberie-sur-Oise] 1 Oct 856) as her first husband, JUDITH of the Franks, daughter of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrude [d’Orléans] ([844]-after 870).

The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head[1494].

She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf[1495]. Her husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice according to Asser, who also says that the subservient position previously given to the queen was adopted in Wessex after the reign of King Beorhtric because of the unpopular influence of his queen Eadburh of Mercia[1496].

Queen Judith married secondly ([858/59]) her stepson, Æthelbald King of Wessex. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[1497].

She eloped with her future third husband, Baudouin I Count of Flanders, around Christmas 861 and married him at Auxerre end-863. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[1498]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[1499].

Æthelbald m ([858/59], separated) as her second husband, his stepmother, JUDITH of the Franks, widow of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks & his first wife Ermentrude [d’Orléans] ([844]-after 870).

Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself"[1513].

The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[1514].

Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith[1515]. Roger of Wendover records the marriage and adds that Æthelbald repudiated his wife in penitence for the marriage[1516]. "Iudith regis filius [sic]" subscribed a charter of King Æthelbald dated 860[1517].

This presumably refers to Judith, Æthelbald's wife. Although it is not impossible that Queen Judith had a daughter by her first husband, her own date of birth indicates that it is unlikely that such a child could have been born before [858], in which case the daughter would probably not have been considered old enough to have subscribed a charter in 860. The "regis filius [=filia]" reference is nevertheless surprising (why not "regina"?), although one explanation is that it refers to her as daughter of the Frankish king rather than her relationship to the Wessex royal family. Another simpler explanation is that it was simply a copyist's error.

The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[1518].

Judith eloped with her future third husband, Baudouin I Count of Flanders, around Christmas 861 and married him at Auxerre end-863. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[1519].

Baudouin m (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) as her third husband, JUDITH, widow firstly of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex and secondly of ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, daughter of CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks [Carolingian] & his first wife Ermentrude [d'Orléans] ([844]-after [870]). She is named as wife of Baudouin in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which also names her parents and her three sons[44]. She and her father are named by Roger of Hoveden when he records her marriage to King Æthelwulf[45].

Asser records that "Iuthittam, Karoli Francorum regis filiam" married "Æthelbald filius eius [=Æthelwulfo rege]" after the death of her first husband, commenting that it was "cum magna ab omnibus audientibus infamia"[46]. Roger of Hoveden also records this second marriage of Judith[47]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[48]. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that Judith married "Balduinus comes"[49]. The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[50].

The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage in 862 of "Balduinus, Odacri filius" and "Iudith, Caroli regis filiam"[51]. The preceding information is pulled together by the Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ which names "Iudith vidua Adelbaldi regis Anglorum, filia Karoli Calvi regis Francorum" as the wife of "Balduinum Ferreum"[52].

No information has been found in the primary sources so far consulted which throws light on the possible date of death of Judith, although it is unlikely that she died before about 870 at the earliest assuming that she was the mother of all the children referred to below.

Count Baudouin I & his wife had [five] children:

1. CHARLES ([864/65]-young). "Karolus brevis vite" is named as first of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[53]. It is assumed that Charles died young as no other reference to him has been found.

2. BAUDOUIN ([865/67]-[10 Sep] 918, bur St Bertin, transferred 929 to Gent, St Pieter). He is named as second of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[54]. He succeeded his father in 879 as BAUDOUIN II "le Chauve"[55] Count of Flanders. From his succession, he came under great pressure from Viking raids, and took refuge in the marshes of Saint-Omer in 883[56].

Baudouin II expanded his territories by occupying the pagi of Mempisc, Courtrai and the Ijzer, seizing control of the counties of Ternois and Boulonnais after 892, and the Tournaisis (except for the town of Tournai)[57]. Although Count Baudouin at first supported the election of Eudes as king of France in 888, the latter opposed the count's becoming lay-abbot of St Bertin (in 892, in succession to abbot Rudolf[58]) and pursued the count to Bruges, although the king was unable to capture the town.

The Annales Vedastini record the death "Non Ian 892" of "Rodulfus abba", that "castellani Egfridum comitem" was sent to announce the news to the king, and that in his absence "Balduinum a Flandris…per consilium Evreberti qui nimis fuerat versutissimus" seized the abbacy against the wishes of the king who had promised it to Egfrid[59]. The Annales Vedastini record that "Balduinus" captured Artois in 892[60]. Count Baudouin supported the coronation of Charles III "le Simple" as king of the West Franks in 895, but afterwards changed sides and supported Zwentibold Duke of Lotharingia.

The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold in 895[61]. Baudouin II invaded Péronne in 899[62] and attacked Vermandois, Artois and Boulogne, but was driven out of Vermandois by 900, although he reconquered it and killed Héribert II Comte de Vermandois in revenge for the death of his brother Raoul[63]. Count Baudouin also controlled the abbeys of St Vaast and St Bertin.

The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 918 of "Balduvinus comes", specifying that he was buried at "Blandinio"[64]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[65]. His territories were divided between his two sons on his death[66].

m ([893/99]) ÆLFTHRYTH of Wessex, daughter of ALFRED King of Wessex & his wife Ealhswith of the Gainas ([877]-7 Jun 929, bur Gent, St Pieter). "Elfthtritham" is named by Roger of Hoveden, third in his list of King Alfred's daughters by Queen Ealhswith[67]. She is called "Æthelswitha" by Asser[68]. "Elftrudis" is named as wife of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin without giving her origin[69]. The Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ names "filia Edgeri regis Anglorum, nomine Elferudem" as the wife of "Balduinus Calvus"[70], although "Edgeri" is clearly an error for "Alfredi". This marriage represented the start of a long-lasting alliance between England and Flanders, founded on their common interest in preventing Viking settlements along the coast. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[71]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 929 of "filia regis Elftrudis comitissa"[72]. The Memorial of "Elstrudis…Balduini…domini" records her death "VII Iunii"[73]. An undated charter, dated to [962], recording the last wishes of "marchysi Arnulfi", notes that "pater meus et mater mea" were buried in the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Gand[74]. Count Baudouin II & his wife had [five] children:

a) ARNOUL de Flandres (after [893/99]-murdered 27 Mar 964, bur Gent, St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus"[75]. He succeeded his father in 918 as ARNOUL I "le Grand" Count of Flanders and Artois.

b) ADALOLF [Æthelwulf] de Flandres (after [893/99]-13 Nov 933, bur Gent St Pieter). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Arnulfum, fratrem eius Adelulfum" as the two sons of "Balduinus"[76]. "Adalolphus" is named son of Count Baudouin II in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin, which specifies that he succeeded his father in 918 as Comte de Boulogne-sur-Mer, de Thérouanne, and lay-Abbot of St Bertin[77]. "Elstrudis comitissa…cum filiis suis Arnulfo et Adelolfo" donated "hereditatem suam Liefsham…in terra Anglorum in Cantia" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "senioris sui Baldwini", by charter dated 11 Sep 918[78]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 933 of "Adalulfus comes", specifying that he was buried "in monasterio sancti Petri"[79].

c) EALSWID de Flandres. "Ealhswid" is named as daughter of Count Baudouin and his wife Ælfthryth in the Chronicle of Æthelweard[80].

d) ERMENTRUDE de Flandres. "Earmentruth" is named as daughter of Count Baudouin and his wife Ælfthryth in the Chronicle of Æthelweard[81].

e) [---. No information has been found concerning this possible fifth child of Count Baudouin II. If "avunculus" is used in its strict sense in the source cited below, the child was a daughter. However, it is possible that "avunculus" was used informally as the counterpart of "nepos", the latter being much less precise and possibly indicating a more remote blood relationship. If Abbot Hildebrand's mother was the sister of Count Arnoul, it is possible that she was the same person as either Ealswid or Ermentrude who are named above. No information has been found about the father of Hildebrand. m ---.] One child:

i) [HILDEBRAND (-after 961). Arnulf Count of Flanders was "avunculus Hildebrandi abbas" according to the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[82]. The Chronica Monasterii Sancti Bertini also records "Hildebrandus…avunculo suo comite Arnulfo"[83]. Abbé de Saint-Bertin et de Saint-Vaast. The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin names "Hildebrando nepos suus [Widdonem abbas]", specifying that he succeeded Guido as abbot[84]. No other information has been found to enable a more precise relationship to be identified either between Count Arnoul and Abbot Hildebrand or between Abbot Hildebrand and Abbot Guido.]

3. RAOUL ([867/70]-murdered 17 Jun 896). "Rodolphus Cameracensis comes" is named as third of the three sons of Baudouin and his wife Judith in the list of counts of Flanders recorded in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[85]. The Annales Blandinienses records "Rodulfus comes et abba factus est" in 882[86]. The date when he was installed as Comte de Cambrai is not known. However, his brother Baudouin II Count of Flanders supported the election of Eudes as king of France in 888, and it is suggested that Raoul's appointment must have taken place around that time. Baudouin quarrelled with King Eudes over the succession to the lay abbacy of Saint-Bertin in 892, so it is unlikely that the king would have favoured members of the count's family with a comital appointment after this episode. Raoul supported his brother's attack on the county of Vermandois and captured Arras, Saint-Quentin and Péronne after 5 Jan 892, but was captured by Héribert I Comte de Vermandois and killed[87]. The Annales Vedastini name "Balduinus…comes et Rodulfus frater eius necnon et Ragnerus" when recording that they joined Zwentibold of Lotharingia in 895[88]. The History of Waulsort monastery records that "Cameracensis comes Rodulfus…regalis consanguinitatis" invaded the territory of "quatuor Heriberti filios" with the consent of "rege Francorum…avunculo suo" but was expelled[89], but this source confuses Raoul, son of Baudouin I, with Comte Raoul [II] de Gouy (see the document NORTHERN FRANCE). The Annales Vedastini record that "Rodulfus comes" disrupted the peace in 896 and took the property of "Heribertus et Erkingerus", that "Odo rex" besieged "castrum sancti Quintini et Peronam" and expelled Raoul's supporters, and that Héribert killed Raoul[90]. The Annales Blandinienses record that "Rodulfus comes" was killed "IV Kal Iul 896"[91]. [m ---. The name of the possible wife of Comte Raoul is not known.] Raoul & his wife had [one possible child]:

a) [--- de Cambrai . According to Europäische Stammtafeln[92], Isaac was married to a daughter of Raoul. The primary source on which this is based has not been identified. It is possible that it is purely speculative designed to explain the transmission of the county of Cambrai between the two individuals. m ISAAC Comte de Cambrai, son of --- (-[946/30 Apr 948]).]

4. [daughter . m ---.] [One possible child]:

a) [GAUTHIER . The History of Waulsort monastery names "Walterus…Rodulfi sororis filius" recording that he attempted to avenge the death of his maternal uncle[93]. No other reference to this person has been found and, because the History of Waulsort monastery is such a confused source, his existence should be treated with caution.]

Incorrectly assigned daughter:

5. [GUNHILD [Guinidilde] (-before 19 Feb 904). Wifredo "el Velloso" and his wife Winidilda donated property to Ripoll monastery by charter dated 27 Jun 875 which names "fratre meo…Seniofredo"[94]. According to Weir[95], the wife of Guifré I Conde de Barcelona was Gunhild, daughter of Baudouin I Count of Flanders. It is assumed that this is based on the Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium which records that Charles II "le Chauve" King of the Franks gave an unnamed daughter of the (unnamed) count of Flanders in marriage to "Pilosi" at the same time as granting him the county of Barcelona[96], although this source is unreliable in some points of detail concerning the family of the counts of Barcelona. Considering that the early counts of Flanders were in 877 still in the process of consolidating their position in their newly founded county, it is not clear what contact they would have had with a count whose territory was so distant from their own sphere of activity, or the advantages they would have seen in such a dynastic marriage. The only known point in common between the two counts appears to have been that King Charles II "le Chauve" was suzerain of both. Gunhild is not shown among the children of Count Baudouin in Rösch[97]. This supposed Flemish origin is incorrect: Guinidilde´s true parentage is confirmed by charters dated 875, 877 and 878 under which "Winidildes commitissa" donated property "de comparatione de cuondam patrem meum…Seniofredo" to San Juan de Ripoll monastery[98].

A charter of her daughter Emma dated 19 Feb 904 specifies that her mother was dead[99]. m (before 27 Jun 875) GUIFRE "el Velloso/el Pilós/the Hairy" Conde de Barcelona, son of SUNIFREDO de Carcassonne, Count in the March of Spain & his wife Ermentrude (-killed in battle near Santa María del Puch [21 Aug 897/31 Dec 898], probably 11 Aug 898, bur Santa María de Ripoll monastery).]

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http://historyandwomen.blogspot.com/2008/10/judith-of-france-844-870.html:

Judith of France, 844-870

In a time when women had little power, even to make decisions that intimately affected their own lives, the story of Judith of France stands out as that of a young woman who finally took control of her own destiny.

A great-granddaughter of Charlemagne, Judith was born in 844 to Charles the Bald, King of the Franks. In October 856, when she was 12 years old, Judith was married to Aethelwulf, the 60-year-old king of England. Aethelwulf was a deeply religious man who was returning from a pilgrimage to Rome with his youngest son, Alfred (later the English king Alfred the Great). In a break with Saxon tradition, Aethelwulf named Judith as queen. According to tradition, the Saxons had once had an "obstinate and malevolent" queen who caused the nobles to swear they would never allow a king to rule over them if he attempted to place a queen on the throne beside him.

Scholars speculate the marriage between Judith and Aethelwulf was made for strictly diplomatic purposes; Aethwulf's oldest son, Aethelbald, however, seems to have thought there was a possibility of an heir from his father's second marriage. Before Aethelwulf and Judith could arrive in England, Aethelbald had usurped the throne. In an effort to avoid civil war, Aethelwulf divided his kingdom, giving the west to Aethelbald and keeping the east for himself.

Judith was left a very young widow when Aethelwulf died in 858. What happened next in her life is something of a mystery. Instead of returning to her father in France, Judith married her stepson, Aethelbald - the man who had attempted to usurp the throne -- in 860, when she was 16. The move was highly unpopular with the Saxon nobles and the church. Asser, the biographer of Alfred the Great, described the situation as being "against God's prohibition and Christian dignity . . . incurring great disgrace from all who heard of it." No doubt realizing he couldn't hold his political power if he remained married to Judith, Aethelbald agreed to an annulment on the grounds of consanguinity. Ironically, he died before the year was out.

Judith finally returned to France, but not to home. For reasons unknown, her father put her in a monastery under the supervision of the bishop of Sens. It's not too hard, actually, to guess why Charles would sequester his daughter; around Christmas 861, Judith eloped with Baldwin Iron Arm, who may have earned his nickname defending Charles' kingdom against Vikings. Judith and Baldwin were probably married before they left the monastery to flee north to escape Charles' wrath. They managed to elude Charles until October 862, when they went for refuge to Lothair II, Judith's cousin.

Unable to capture Judith and Baldwin, Charles resorted to damning their eternal souls - he ordered his bishops to excommunicate the pair. Refusing to simply accept the king's order, Judith and Baldwin traveled to Rome for an audience with Pope Nicholas I. The pope agreed their marriage was valid and Charles was forced to accept Baldwin as his son-in-law. Judith and Baldwin were officially married in December 863.

The couple settled down in Flanders. Some people speculate that Charles gave Baldwin land that was vulnerable to Viking attacks in hopes his new son-in-law would be killed. However, Baldwin defended his property successfully and became one of Charles' most loyal supporters. Judith bore three sons for Baldwin: Charles, who died young; Baldwin II (866); and Raoul (869). Unfortunately, Judith had only a short time to enjoy life with the husband she obviously chose for herself; she died in 870 at the age of 26.

Portrait is Cover art from Margaret Leighton's book Judith of France

from wikipedia.org:

Judith of Flanders

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Judith of Flanders (or Judith of France) (October 844 – 870) was the first daughter of the Frankish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Bald and his wife Ermentrude of Orléans. Through her marriage to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice a Queen, and through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became the first Countess of Flanders. She was ancestress of the later Counts of Flanders, and was the step-mother and later the step-sister of King Alfred the Great.

Queen of Wessex

When Judith was about 12 years old, her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Ethelwulf had been on pilgrimage to Rome, and had stopped at the Court of Judith's father, Charles the Bald on his journey back to Wessex. Soon after the two returned to England, Ethelwulf's eldest surviving son, Ethelbald, had devised a conspiracy with the Ealdorman of Somerset and the Bishop of Sherborne to oppose Æthelwulf's resumption of the kingship. In response to this crisis, Æthelwulf yielded western Wessex to his son while he himself retained central and eastern Wessex. Æthelwulf's restoration included a special concession on behalf of Saxon queens: the West Saxons previously did not allow the queen to sit next to the king. In fact they were not referred to as a queen, but merely the "wife of the king." This restriction was lifted for Queen Judith, probably because she was a high ranking European princess.

When Ethelwulf died on the 13th of January 858, he was succeeded by his son, Ethelbald. In the same year Ethelbald earned the censure of the Church by marrying Judith, his widowed teenage step-mother. The relationship was deemed incestuous and in direct contravention of church law. The marriage was eventually annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity, the same year that Ethelbald died.

Through her marriages to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice Queen of Wessex and was both the step-mother and later step-sister of Alfred the Great. Interestingly, Judith's son by her third marriage, Baldwin II of Flanders would go on to marry Alfred's daughter, Ælfthryth (also known as Elfrida). By her third marriage, Judith was also the ancestress of another Queen of England, Matilda of Flanders, the consort of England's first Norman King, William the Conqueror. Thus Judith is not only an ancestress of the Counts of Flanders, but through Matilda, she is also direct ancestress of the Monarchs of England, including Queen Elizabeth II.

Elopement with Baldwin of Flanders

Following the death of her second husband, Judith sold her properties in Wessex and returned to France. According to the Chronicle of St. Bertin, her father sent her to the Monestery at Senlis, where she would remain "under his protection and royal episcopal guardianship, with all the honour due to a queen, until such time as, if she could not remain chaste, she might marry in the way the apostle said, that is suitably and legally."[1] Presumably, Charles may have intended to arrange another marriage for his daughter. However, around Christmas 861, Judith eloped with Baldwin, later Count of Flanders. The two were likely married at the monastery of Senlis at this time. The record of the incident in the Annals depict Judith not as the passive victim of bride theft but as an active agent, eloping at the instigation of Baldwin and apparently with her brother Louis the Stammerer's consent.[2]

Unsurprisingly, Judith's father was furious and ordered his bishops to excommunicate the couple. They later fled to the court of Judith's cousin Lothair II of Lotharingia for protection, before going to Pope Nicholas I to plead their case. The Pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre in 863.

Baldwin was given the land directly south of the Scheldt, ie: the Country of Flanders (albeit an area of smaller size than the county which existed in the High Middle Ages) to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became a faithful supporter of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and would come to be one of the most powerful principality's of France. Judith herself died in 870, when she was approximately only 26 years of age.

Marriages and Children

Judith was first married to King Ethelwulf of Wessex, then to his heir, Ethelbald of Wessex. Her first two marriages produced no issue.

By her third huband, Baldwin I of Flanders, Judith's children included:

   * Charles (born after 863, died young) - ostensibly named for Judith's father, Charles the Bald
   * Baldwin II - (c. 864/866 - 918). Succeeded his father as Count of Flanders. Married Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great
   * Raoul (Rodulf) - (c. 869 - 896). Became Count of Cambrai around 888, and was killed by Herbert I of Vermandois in 896

--------------------

Entre los 13 y 17 años estuvo casada con dos reyes de Wessex. Despues de morir el ultimo de ellos, fue raptada (con su consentimiento) por Baudouin "Brazo de Hierro". Su padre (Carlos Calvo, Rey de Francia) hizo excomulgar a ambos, quienes intercedieron con el Papa que los perdono. En esa epoca los noruegos asolaban el litoral frances y el rey necesitaba buenos guerreros que lo protegieran. A raiz de ello y del perdon papal, nombro (964) a su nuevo yerno "Marchio de Flandriae", titulo que este logro cambiar por el de Comte de Flandre, siendo asi Baudouin I, Comte de Flandre. Su hija Gunidilda nacio poco antes del casamiento y figura poco.

--------------------

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_van_West-Francië

Judith van West-Francië (oktober 844[1] - 870), ook wel Judith Martel genoemd, was een Frankische prinses, gehuwd met twee opeenvolgende koningen van Wessex en uiteindelijk met de eerste Graaf van Vlaanderen.

Judith is de dochter van keizer Karel de Kale (823-877) en diens eerste echtgenote Ermentrudis van Orléans (830-869). Ze was dus een achterkleinkind van Karel de Grote. Ze is ook de zus van Lodewijk de Stamelaar (846-879).

--------------------

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_van_West-Francië

Judith van West-Francië (oktober 844[1] - 870), ook wel Judith Martel genoemd, was een Frankische prinses, gehuwd met twee opeenvolgende koningen van Wessex en uiteindelijk met de eerste Graaf van Vlaanderen.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Flanders

--------------------

Judith of Flanders (or Judith of France) (October 844 – 870) was the first daughter of the Frankish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Bald and his wife Ermentrude of Orléans. Through her marriage to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice a Queen, and through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became the first Countess of Flanders. She was ancestress of the later Counts of Flanders, and was the stepmother and later the sister-in-law of King Alfred the Great.

When Judith was about 12 years old, her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Ethelwulf had been on pilgrimage to Rome, and had stopped at the Court of Judith's father, Charles the Bald on his journey back to Wessex. Soon after the two returned to England, Ethelwulf's eldest surviving son, Ethelbald, had devised a conspiracy with the Ealdorman of Somerset and the Bishop of Sherborne to oppose Æthelwulf's resumption of the kingship. In response to this crisis, Æthelwulf yielded western Wessex to his son while he himself retained central and eastern Wessex. Æthelwulf's restoration included a special concession on behalf of Saxon queens: the West Saxons previously did not allow the queen to sit next to the king. In fact they were not referred to as a queen, but merely the "wife of the king." This restriction was lifted for Queen Judith, probably because she was a high ranking European princess.

When Ethelwulf died on the 13th of January 858, he was succeeded by his son, Ethelbald. In the same year Ethelbald earned the censure of the Church by marrying Judith, his widowed teenage stepmother. The relationship was deemed incestuous and in direct contravention of church law. The marriage was eventually annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity, the same year that Ethelbald died.

Through her marriages to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice Queen of Wessex and was both the stepmother and later sister-in-law of Alfred the Great. Interestingly, Judith's son by her third marriage, Baldwin II of Flanders would go on to marry Alfred's daughter, Ælfthryth (also known as Elfrida). By her third marriage, Judith was also the ancestress of another Queen of England, Matilda of Flanders, the consort of England's first Norman King, William the Conqueror. Thus Judith is not only an ancestress of the Counts of Flanders, but through Matilda, she is also direct ancestress of the Monarchs of England, including Queen Elizabeth II.

Following the death of her second husband, Judith sold her properties in Wessex and returned to France. According to the Chronicle of St. Bertin, her father sent her to the Monastery at Senlis, where she would remain "under his protection and royal episcopal guardianship, with all the honour due to a queen, until such time as, if she could not remain chaste, she might marry in the way the apostle said, that is suitably and legally."[1] Presumably, Charles may have intended to arrange another marriage for his daughter. However, around Christmas 861, Judith eloped with Baldwin, later Count of Flanders. The two were likely married at the monastery of Senlis at this time. The record of the incident in the Annals depict Judith not as the passive victim of bride theft but as an active agent, eloping at the instigation of Baldwin and apparently with her brother Louis the Stammerer's consent.[2]

Unsurprisingly, Judith's father was furious and ordered his bishops to excommunicate the couple. They later fled to the court of Judith's cousin Lothair II of Lotharingia for protection, before going to Pope Nicholas I to plead their case. The Pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre in 863.

Baldwin was given the land directly south of the Scheldt, ie: the Country of Flanders (albeit an area of smaller size than the county which existed in the High Middle Ages) to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became a faithful supporter of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and would come to be one of the most powerful principality's of France. Judith herself died in 870, when she was approximately only 26 years of age.

Judith was first married to King Ethelwulf of Wessex, then to his heir, Ethelbald of Wessex. Her first two marriages produced no issue.

By her third huband, Baldwin I of Flanders, Judith's children included:

Charles (born after 863, died young) - ostensibly named for Judith's father, Charles the Bald

Baldwin II - (c. 864/866 - 918). Succeeded his father as Count of Flanders. Married Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great

Raoul (Rodulf) - (c. 869 - 896). Became Count of Cambrai around 888, and was killed by Herbert I of Vermandois in 896

Judith is a significant character in The Marsh King, a juvenile historical novel by C. Walter Hodges, which gives her a fictional son by her marriage to Ethelbald.

Judith is also depicted in 'Judith of France' and the sequel, "Journey for a Princess" both by Margaret C. Leighton.

--------------------

Judith, Princesse de France

F, #102612, b. between 843 and 844

Last Edited=25 Feb 2008

    Judith, Princesse de France was born between 843 and 844. (1)  She was the daughter of Charles I, Roi de France and Ermentrude d'Orléans. (1) She married, firstly, Æðelwulf, King of Wessex, son of Ecgbeorht, King of Wessex and Redburga (?), on 1 October 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. (1) She married, secondly, Æthelbald, King of Wessex, son of Æðelwulf, King of Wessex and Osburga (?), in 858. (2) She married, thirdly, Baldwin I, Comte de Flandre circa 863 at Auxerre, France. (1)
    As a result of her marriage, Judith, Princesse de France was styled as Queen Judith of Wessex on 1 October 856. (1) Her marriage to Æthelbald, King of Wessex was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity. (1)

Children of Judith, Princesse de France and Baldwin I, Comte de Flandre

-1. Baldwin II, Comte de Flandre+ b. c 863, d. 10 Sep 918 (1)

-2. Charles de Flandre b. c 863, d. c 864 (1)

-3. Rudolf de Flandre, Comte de Flandre b. a 863 (1)

-4. Gunhilda de Flandre+ b. a 863 (1)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10262.htm#i102612

--------------------

Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she was first a queen, then later through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became Countess of Flanders.

Judith was born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Soon after, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. Following Ethelwulf's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother Judith. However, the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity.

Judith eloped with Baldwin in January 862. They were likely married at the monastery of Senlis before they eloped. The couple was in hiding from Judith's father, King Charles the Bald, until October after which they went to her uncle Lothair II for protection. From there they fled to Pope Nicholas I. The pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre.

Baldwin was accepted as son-in-law and was given the land directly south of the Scheldt to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became one of the most faithful supporters of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and was for a long time the most powerful principality of France.

Judith and Baldwin had a son, Baldwin II, Count of Flanders, born in 864. Judith died in 870.

--------------------

Judith of Flanders (or Judith of France) (October 844 – 870) was the first daughter of the Frankish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Bald and his wife Ermentrude of Orléans. Through her marriage to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice a Queen, and through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became the first Countess of Flanders. She was a great-grandaughter of Charlemagne, and through her descendant Matilda of Flanders, she is also a direct ancestor of Queen Elizabeth II. By virtue of her first two marriages, she was the step-mother and later the step-sister of King Alfred the Great.

Queen of Wessex

When Judith was about 12 years old, her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Ethelwulf had been on pilgrimage to Rome, and had stopped at the Court of Judith's father, Charles the Bald on his journey back to Wessex. Soon after the two returned to England, Ethelwulf's eldest surviving son, Ethelbald, had devised a conspiracy with the Ealdorman of Somerset and the Bishop of Sherborne to oppose Æthelwulf's resumption of the kingship. In response to this crisis, Æthelwulf yielded western Wessex to his son while he himself retained central and eastern Wessex. Æthelwulf's restoration included a special concession on behalf of Saxon queens: the West Saxons previously did not allow the queen to sit next to the king. In fact they were not referred to as a queen, but merely the "wife of the king." This restriction was lifted for Queen Judith, probably because she was a high ranking European princess.

When Ethelwulf died on the 13th of January 858, he was succeeded by his son, Ethelbald. In the same year Ethelbald earned the censure of the Church by marrying Judith, his widowed teenage step-mother. The relationship was deemed incestuous and in direct contravention of church law. The marriage was eventually annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity, the same year that Ethelbald died.

Through her marriages to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice Queen of Wessex and was both the step-mother and later step-sister of Alfred the Great. Interestingly, Judith's son by her third marriage, Baldwin II of Flanders would go on to marry Alfred's daughter, Ælfthryth (also known as Elfrida). By her third marriage, Judith was also the ancestress of another Queen of England, Matilda of Flanders, the consort of England's first Norman King, William the Conqueror. Thus Judith is not only an ancestress of the Counts of Flanders, but through Matilda, she is also direct ancestress of the Monarchs of England, including Queen Elizabeth II.

[edit] Elopement with Baldwin of Flanders

Following the death of her second husband, Judith sold her properties in Wessex and returned to France. According to the Chronicle of St. Bertin, her father sent her to the Monestery at Senlis, where she would remain "under his protection and royal episcopal guardianship, with all the honour due to a queen, until such time as, if she could not remain chaste, she might marry in the way the apostle said, that is suitably and legally."[1] Presumably, Charles may have intended to arrange another marriage for his daughter. However, around Christmas 861, Judith eloped with Baldwin, later Count of Flanders. The two were likely married at the monastery of Senlis at this time. The record of the incident in the Annals depict Judith not as the passive victim of bride theft but as an active agent, eloping at the instigation of Baldwin and apparently with her brother Louis the Stammerer's consent.[2]

Unsurprisingly, Judith's father was furious and ordered his bishops to excommunicate the couple. They later fled to the court of Judith's cousin Lothair II of Lotharingia for protection, before going to Pope Nicholas I to plead their case. The Pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre in 863.

Baldwin was given the land directly south of the Scheldt, ie: the Country of Flanders (albeit an area of smaller size than the county which existed in the High Middle Ages) to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became a faithful supporter of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and would come to be one of the most powerful principality's of France. Judith herself died in 870, when she was approximately only 26 years of age.

[edit] Marriages and Children

Judith was first married to King Ethelwulf of Wessex, then to his heir, Ethelbald of Wessex. Her first two marriages produced no issue.

By her third huband, Baldwin I of Flanders, Judith's children included:

   * Charles (born after 863, died young) - ostensibly named for Judith's father, Charles the Bald
   * Baldwin II - (c. 864/866 - 918). Succeeded his father as Count of Flanders. Married Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great
   * Raoul (Rodulf) - (c. 869 - 896). Became Count of Cambrai around 888, and was killed by Herbert I of Vermandois in 896

--------------------

Daughter of Charles The Bald

--------------------

Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she was first a queen, then later through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became Countess of Flanders.

Judith was born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Soon after, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. Following Ethelwulf's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother Judith. However, the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Flanders

--------------------

Judith of Flanders (or Judith of France) (October 844 – 870) was the first daughter of the Frankish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Bald and his wife Ermentrude of Orléans. Through her marriage to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice a Queen, and through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became the first Countess of Flanders. She was ancestress of the later Counts of Flanders, and was the stepmother and later the sister-in-law of King Alfred the Great.

Queen of Wessex

When Judith was about 12 years old, her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Ethelwulf had been on pilgrimage to Rome, and had stopped at the Court of Judith's father, Charles the Bald on his journey back to Wessex. Soon after the two returned to England, Ethelwulf's eldest surviving son, Ethelbald, had devised a conspiracy with the Ealdorman of Somerset and the Bishop of Sherborne to oppose Æthelwulf's resumption of the kingship. In response to this crisis, Æthelwulf yielded western Wessex to his son while he himself retained central and eastern Wessex. Æthelwulf's restoration included a special concession on behalf of Saxon queens: the West Saxons previously did not allow the queen to sit next to the king. In fact they were not referred to as a queen, but merely the "wife of the king." This restriction was lifted for Queen Judith, probably because she was a high ranking European princess.

When Ethelwulf died on the 13th of January 858, he was succeeded by his son, Ethelbald. In the same year Ethelbald earned the censure of the Church by marrying Judith, his widowed teenage stepmother. The relationship was deemed incestuous and in direct contravention of church law. The marriage was eventually annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity, the same year that Ethelbald died.

Through her marriages to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice Queen of Wessex and was both the stepmother and later sister-in-law of Alfred the Great. Interestingly, Judith's son by her third marriage, Baldwin II of Flanders would go on to marry Alfred's daughter, Ælfthryth (also known as Elfrida). By her third marriage, Judith was also the ancestress of another Queen of England, Matilda of Flanders, the consort of England's first Norman King, William the Conqueror. Thus Judith is not only an ancestress of the Counts of Flanders, but through Matilda, she is also direct ancestress of the Monarchs of England, including Queen Elizabeth II.

Elopement with Baldwin of Flanders

Following the death of her second husband, Judith sold her properties in Wessex and returned to France. According to the Chronicle of St. Bertin, her father sent her to the Monastery at Senlis, where she would remain "under his protection and royal episcopal guardianship, with all the honour due to a queen, until such time as, if she could not remain chaste, she might marry in the way the apostle said, that is suitably and legally."[1] Presumably, Charles may have intended to arrange another marriage for his daughter. However, around Christmas 861, Judith eloped with Baldwin, later Count of Flanders. The two were likely married at the monastery of Senlis at this time. The record of the incident in the Annals depict Judith not as the passive victim of bride theft but as an active agent, eloping at the instigation of Baldwin and apparently with her brother Louis the Stammerer's consent.[2]

Unsurprisingly, Judith's father was furious and ordered his bishops to excommunicate the couple. They later fled to the court of Judith's cousin Lothair II of Lotharingia for protection, before going to Pope Nicholas I to plead their case. The Pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre in 863.

Baldwin was given the land directly south of the Scheldt, ie: the Country of Flanders (albeit an area of smaller size than the county which existed in the High Middle Ages) to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became a faithful supporter of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and would come to be one of the most powerful principality's of France. Judith herself died in 870, when she was approximately only 26 years of age.

Marriages and Children

Judith was first married to King Ethelwulf of Wessex, then to his heir, Ethelbald of Wessex. Her first two marriages produced no issue.

By her third huband, Baldwin I of Flanders, Judith's children included:

Charles (born after 863, died young) - ostensibly named for Judith's father, Charles the Bald

Baldwin II - (c. 864/866 - 918). Succeeded his father as Count of Flanders. Married Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great

Raoul (Rodulf) - (c. 869 - 896). Became Count of Cambrai around 888, and was killed by Herbert I of Vermandois in 896

--------------------

  1. D: I3689
  2. Name: Judith of the West Franks
  3. Surname: of the West Franks
  4. Given Name: Judith
  5. Sex: F
  6. Birth: 0844 in France
  7. Death: 0870
  8. _UID: E8D8545648109D46BA6A572FBCC59DB21F9C
  9. Note:
   Princess of France, Queen of Wessex, Queen of England, Countess of Flanders.
   Title "Queen" was not usual for wives of Kings of Wessex.
   First Carolingian Princess to be married to a foreign ruler.
   Charles the Bald gave her to be wed for English help vs. the Vikings.
   JUDITH (WEST FRANKS) Princess of the West Franks was born in 844. Shedied after 870. Aged 12 when married to Aethelwulf; aged 16 when marriedto her son-in-law Aethelbald
   William George Searle, *Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings and Nobles*, Cambridge, 1899, p 343

1 2

  1. Change Date: 15 May 2009 at 01:00:00

Father: Charles II "the Bald"King of West Franks b: 13 Jun 0823 in Frankfurt, Hessen-Nassau

Mother: Ermentrude De Orléans b: 0825 in Orléans, Loiret, France

Marriage 1 Aethelwulf King of Kent & Wessex b: 0806 in Wessex, England

   * Married: 1 Oct 0856
   * Note:
         "Judith, Charles the Bald's daughter, was crowned and anointed on the
         occasion of her marriage to king Aethelwulf of Wessex in 856. Aethelwulf
         conferred on Judith the title of queen, which according to Prudentius of
         Troyes was 'not customary to him or to his people.' Judith's anointingmay
         have been intended in part as a form of protection. She was after allthe
         first Carolingian princess to be married to a foreign ruler, and she wasat
         twelve years of age marrying an elderly man with a clutch of sons olderthan
         herself. The marriage itself has been associated with Charles the Bald's
         need for English assistance against the Vikings."
         --- Rosamond McKitterick, *The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians751-987*, London & NY (Longman) 1983, p 194-195

Marriage 2 Ethelbald King of Wessex b: ABT 0834

   * Married: 0858/0860
   * Note:
         1 _MEND Divorce
         1 _FA1
         2 DATE 858
         1 _FA2
         2 PLAC Judith was the widow of Ethelbald's father. Church disallowedmarriage.

Marriage 3 Baudouin I Bras der Fer Count de Flanders b: 0837 in Fflandrys, Nord, France

   * Married: 0862 in Fflandrys, Nord, France 3

Children

  1. Has Children Baudouin II the Bald Count de Flanders b: 0863 in Fflandrys, Nord, France
  2. Has Children Widnille De Flanders b: 0865 in Fflandrys, Nord, France
  3. Has No Children Rudolf Raoul de Flanders Count de Cambray b: 0865/0867 in Fflandrys, Nord, France

Sources:

  1. Title: L'Art de vérifier les dates depuis l'année 1770 jusqu'à nos jours
     Author: Agricole Joseph François Xavier Pierre Esprit Simon Paul Antoine Fortia d'Urban, David Bailie Warden, Maurists
     Publication: Paris, 1844
  2. Title: Stemmata Illustria
     Publication: 1825
  3. Title: Stemmata Illustria
     Publication: 1825
     Text: m 862, no place 

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=aet-t&id=I3689

--------------------

Judith of Flanders

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she was first a queen, then later through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became Countess of Flanders.

Judith was born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Soon after, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. Following Ethelwulf's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother. However, the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity.

[edit]Elopement

Judith eloped with Baldwin in January 862. They were likely married at the monastery of Senlis before they eloped. The couple was in hiding from Judith's father, King Charles the Bald, until October after which they went to her uncle Lothair II for protection. From there they fled to Pope Nicholas I. The pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre.

Baldwin was accepted as son-in-law and was given the land directly south of the Scheldt to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became one of the most faithful supporters of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and was for a long time the most powerful principality of France.

[edit]Succession

Judith and Baldwin had a son, Baldwin II, Count of Flanders, born in 864. Judith died in 870.

[edit]Judith in fiction

Judith is a significant character in The Marsh King, a juvenile historical novel by C. Walter Hodges, which gives her a fictional son by her marriage to Ethelbald.

Judith is also depicted in 'Judith of France' and the sequel, "Journey for a Princess" both by Margaret C. Leighton.

--------------------

Reference: http://www.gedcoms4u.com/individual.php?pid=I18080&ged=a_smith_pedigree.ged

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f002/f53/a0025332.htm

Judith of Flanders

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article does not cite any references or sources. (April 2007)

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unverifiable material may be challenged and removed.

Carolingian Dynasty

(West Frankish Branch)


Louis the Pious

Children

  Lothair I, Holy Roman Emperor 
  Pepin I of Aquitaine 
  Louis the German 
  Charles the Bald 

Charles the Bald

Children

  Judith 
  Louis the Stammerer 
  Charles the Child 
  Carloman 

Louis II of France

Children

  Louis III 
  Carloman II 
  Charles the Simple 

Louis III

Carloman II

Charles III

Children

  Louis IV 

Louis IV

Children

  Lothair 
  Charles, Duke of Lower
  Lorraine 

Lothair

Children

  Louis V 
  Arnulf 

Louis V


Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald and therefore she was a princess. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she first became queen, and later through her third marriage to Baldwin she became countess of Flanders.

Judith was probably born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France.

Soon after this, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. After his father's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother, but the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity.

She eloped with Baldwin I, Count of Flanders, in January 862. They were probably married at the monastery of Senlis before they eloped. The couple went into hiding until October from Judith's father King Charles the Bald, when they went to her uncle Lothair II for protection. From there they fled to Pope Nicholas I for protection. The pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the legal binding of the sacred marriage and welcome the young couple in his circles - which ultimately he did. The couple then went back to France and then officially married at Auxerre. Baldwin was accepted as son-in-law and was given the land directly south of the Scheldt to fight Viking attacks. Although among historians it is still disputed whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well, hunted the Vikings down, and expanded both his army and his territory quickly. He became one of the most strong, secure and faithful supporters of King Charles. The March of Baldwin became to be known as the County Flanders and was for a long time the most powerful principality of France.

They had a son, Baldwin II, Count of Flanders, born in 864.

Judith died in 870.

[edit] Judith in fiction

Judith is a significant character in The Marsh King, a juvenile historical novel by C. Walter Hodges, which gives her a fictional son by her marriage to Ethelbald.

Judith is also depicted in 'Judith of France' and the sequel, "Journey for a Princess" both by Margaret C. Leighton

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Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she was first a queen, then later through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became Countess of Flanders.

Judith was born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Soon after, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. Following Ethelwulf's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother. However, the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity.

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Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she was first a queen, then later through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became Countess of Flanders.

Judith was born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Soon after, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. Following Ethelwulf's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother. However, the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity.

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Judith of Flanders (844 – 870) was a daughter of the Frankish king Charles the Bald. Through her marriage to two kings of Wessex she was first a queen, then later through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became Countess of Flanders.

Judith was born in October of 844, the daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, and Ermentrude.

Her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Soon after, Ethelwulf's son Ethelbald forced his father to abdicate. Following Ethelwulf's death on January 13, 858, Ethelbald married his widowed stepmother. However, the marriage was annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity.

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Judith av Flandern (844-870) var datter av den frankiske kongen Karl den skallede. Gjennom sitt ekteskap med to konger av Wessex var hun første en dronning, og senere gjennom sitt tredje ekteskap med Baldwin, ble hun grevinne av Flandern.

Judith ble født i oktober 844, datter av Karl den skallede, frankernes konge, og Ermentrude.

Faren ga henne i ekteskapet til Ethelwulf, konge av Wessex 1. oktober, 856 i Verberie sur Oise, Frankrike. Like etter, tvang Ethelwulf sønn Ethelbald sin far til å abdisere. Etter Ethelwulf død 13. januar 858, giftet Ethelbald hans enke stemor. Imidlertid ble ekteskapet annullert i 860 på grunn av blodsslektskap.

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Died after 870.

BIOGRAPHY: General Notes:

Princess of WEST FRANKS, Queen of WESSEX.

BOOKS

Barber Grandparents: 125 Kings, 143 Generations, Ted Butler Bernard and Gertrude Barber Bernard, 1978, McKinney TX, p78: "302Z Baldwin I, Count of Flanders, (S of 291, F of 314); married Princess Judith of France."

Kings and Queens of Great Britain, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute, 1990: "Aethewulf, Son of Ecgbert King of West Saxons, King of Wessex 839- Deposed 856, Died 858, Mar =1 Osburga Daughter of Oslac the Chief Butler, =2 Judith Daughter of Charles II The Bald King of France =ii Aethelbald...Aethelbald King of Wessex 856-860, Mar (2) Judith his stepmother =iii Baldwin I Count of Flanders."

The Formation of England 550-1042, HPR Finberg, 1974, Paladin, p123: "...Ethelwulf reached Rome by June 855, and stayed there for twelve months. He was now a widower. On the way home he married Judith, daughter of Charles the Bald, king of the West Franks..."

ANCESTRAL FILE

Ancestral File Ver 4.11 9G61-WN Born 844 Mar Abt ?839< 859.

MARRIAGE: Marriage Information:

Judith married King Ethelwulf WESSEX, son of King Egbert WEST SAXONY and Queen Redburch Wessex WEST SAXONY, on 1 Oct 856 in , , England. (King Ethelwulf WESSEX was born about 801-806 in , Wessex, England, died on 13 Jan 857-858 in , , England and was buried in Stamridge.)

MARRIAGE: Marriage Information:

Judith also married King Ethelbald WESSEX, son of King Ethelwulf WESSEX and Queen Osburgh WESSEX. (King Ethelbald WESSEX was born about 840 in Wantage, Wessex, Berkshire, England and died about 860.)

MARRIAGE: Marriage Information:

Judith also married Count Baldwin FLANDERS, I, son of Odacre and Mrs Odacre, about 859-860 in , Flanders, Belgium. (Count Baldwin FLANDERS, I was born about 837-840 in , Flanders, Belgium and died about 879.)

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Tochter des Königs (Kaisers) KARLS II. DES KAHLEN, Witwe der angelsächsischen Könige Aethelwulf I. (+ 858) und Aethelbald (+ 860)

vgl. England I

http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/balduine_grafen_von_flandern/balduin_1_eisenarm_graf_879/ennen.html

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Flanders -------------------- Judith of Flanders (or Judith of France) (October 844 – 870) was the first daughter of the Frankish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Bald and his wife Ermentrude of Orléans. Through her marriage to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice a Queen, and through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became the first Countess of Flanders. She was ancestress of the later Counts of Flanders, and was the stepmother and later the sister-in-law of King Alfred the Great.

Queen of Wessex

When Judith was about 12 years old, her father gave her in marriage to Ethelwulf, King of Wessex on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France. Ethelwulf had been on pilgrimage to Rome, and had stopped at the Court of Judith's father, Charles the Bald on his journey back to Wessex. Soon after the two returned to England, Ethelwulf's eldest surviving son, Ethelbald, had devised a conspiracy with the Ealdorman of Somerset and the Bishop of Sherborne to oppose Æthelwulf's resumption of the kingship. In response to this crisis, Æthelwulf yielded western Wessex to his son while he himself retained central and eastern Wessex. Æthelwulf's restoration included a special concession on behalf of Saxon queens: the West Saxons previously did not allow the queen to sit next to the king. In fact they were not referred to as a queen, but merely the "wife of the king." This restriction was lifted for Queen Judith, probably because she was a high ranking European princess.

When Ethelwulf died on the 13th of January 858, he was succeeded by his son, Ethelbald. In the same year Ethelbald earned the censure of the Church by marrying Judith, his widowed teenage stepmother. The relationship was deemed incestuous and in direct contravention of church law. The marriage was eventually annulled in 860 on the grounds of consanguinity, the same year that Ethelbald died.

Through her marriages to two Kings of Wessex, Judith was twice Queen of Wessex and was both the stepmother and later sister-in-law of Alfred the Great. Interestingly, Judith's son by her third marriage, Baldwin II of Flanders would go on to marry Alfred's daughter, Ælfthryth (also known as Elfrida). By her third marriage, Judith was also the ancestress of another Queen of England, Matilda of Flanders, the consort of England's first Norman King, William the Conqueror. Thus Judith is not only an ancestress of the Counts of Flanders, but through Matilda, she is also direct ancestress of the Monarchs of England and later Great Britain and the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth Realms.

Elopement with Baldwin of Flanders

Following the death of her second husband, Judith sold her properties in Wessex and returned to France. According to the Chronicle of St. Bertin, her father sent her to the Monastery at Senlis, where she would remain "under his protection and royal episcopal guardianship, with all the honour due to a queen, until such time as, if she could not remain chaste, she might marry in the way the apostle said, that is suitably and legally."[1] Presumably, Charles may have intended to arrange another marriage for his daughter. However, around Christmas 861, Judith eloped with Baldwin, later Count of Flanders. The two were likely married at the monastery of Senlis at this time. The record of the incident in the Annals depict Judith not as the passive victim of bride theft but as an active agent, eloping at the instigation of Baldwin and apparently with her brother Louis the Stammerer's consent.[2]

Unsurprisingly, Judith's father was furious and ordered his bishops to excommunicate the couple. They later fled to the court of Judith's cousin Lothair II of Lotharingia for protection, before going to Pope Nicholas I to plead their case. The Pope took diplomatic action and asked Judith's father to accept the union as legally binding and welcome the young couple into his circle - which ultimately he did. The couple then returned to France and were officially married at Auxerre in 863.

Baldwin was given the land directly south of the Scheldt, ie: the Country of Flanders (albeit an area of smaller size than the county which existed in the High Middle Ages) to ward off Viking attacks. Although it is disputed among historians as to whether King Charles did this in the hope that Baldwin would be killed in the ensuing battles with the Vikings, Baldwin managed the situation remarkably well. Baldwin succeeded in quelling the Viking threat, expanded both his army and his territory quickly, and became a faithful supporter of King Charles. The March of Baldwin came to be known as the County of Flanders and would come to be one of the most powerful principalities of France. Judith herself died in 870, when she was approximately 26 years old.

Marriages and Children

Judith was first married to King Ethelwulf of Wessex, then to his heir, Ethelbald of Wessex. Her first two marriages produced no issue.

By her third husband, Baldwin I of Flanders, Judith's children included:

   * Charles (born after 863, died young) - ostensibly named for Judith's father, Charles the Bald
   * Baldwin II - (c. 864/866 - 918). Succeeded his father as Count of Flanders. Married Ælfthryth, daughter of Alfred the Great
   * Raoul (Rodulf) - (c. 869 - 896). Became Count of Cambrai around 888, and was killed by Herbert I of Vermandois in 896

-------------------- Judith, g.862 m. Balduin I, död 879, greve av Flandern.

Judith var gift 1. gang 01.10.856 med kong Ethelwurf av England som døde i 858. 2. gang i 858 med hans sønn, Etherbald, død i 860. 3. gang i 862 med Balduin Bras-de-Fer av Flandern. 1.

Vedi padre,Charles II the Bald * 16/3 823, † 6/10 877.(.......Carlo Magno).

-------------------- Queen of Brittany Princess Judith of France -------------------- Judith of Flanders (or Judith of France) (c. 843 – c. 870)[1] was the eldest daughter of the Frankish King and Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Bald and his wife Ermentrude of Orléans. Through her marriages to two Kings of Wessex, Æthelwulf and Æthelbald, she was twice a queen. Her first two marriages were childless, but through her third marriage to Baldwin, she became the first Countess of Flanders and an ancestress of later Counts of Flanders. One of her sons by Baldwin married Ælfthryth, a daughter of Æthelbald's brother, Alfred the Great. She was also an ancestress of Matilda of Flanders, the consort of William the Conqueror, and thus of later monarchs of England.

-------------------- Leo: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: Page 12.

Leo: Burke's Guide to the Royal Family, London, 1973 , Reference: 189. -------------------- http://www.our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p253.htm#i7601

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Judith, Queen of Wessex, Countess of Flanders's Timeline

844
October 844
Orléans, Loiret, Centre, France
856
October 1, 856
Age 12
Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
860
860
Age 15
862
December 13, 862
Age 18
Flanders, Nord, France
863
863
Age 18
Vlaanderen (Flanders)
863
Age 18
Vlaanderen (Flanders)
865
865
Age 20
Flanders, France
865
Age 20
Flanders, Nord, France
870
April 870
Age 25
Auxerre, Burgundy, France
870
Age 25
France