Julia Gardiner Tyler, First Lady

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Julia Tyler (Gardiner)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Gardiners Island, New York, United States
Death: Died in Sherwood Forest, Charles City Cty., VA
Place of Burial: Hollywood Cemetery Richmond Richmond City Virginia, USA
Immediate Family:

Daughter of David Gardiner and Juliana Mac McLachlan
Wife of John Tyler, 10th President of the USA
Mother of David Gardiner Tyler; John Alexander Alexander Tyler; Julia Gardiner Gardiner Spencer; Lachlan Tyler M.D.; Lyon Gardiner Tyler and 2 others
Sister of David Lyon Gardiner and Alexander Gardiner

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Julia Tyler (Gardiner)

Julia Gardiner Tyler (May 4, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845.

She was born into the prominent Gardiner family on Gardiner's Island in East Hampton, New York. A daughter of David Gardiner, a New York State Senator, Julia was trained from earliest childhood for a life in society; she made her debut at 15.

A European tour with her family gave her new glimpses of social splendors. Late in 1842 the Gardiners went to Washington, D.C., for the winter social season, and Julia became the undisputed darling of the capital. Her beauty and practiced charm attracted the most eminent men in the city, among them President Tyler, a widower since that September.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_Gardiner_Tyler

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First Lady

The 2nd wife and 3rd First Lady of John Tyler, Julia Gardiner Tyler was the First Lady for the last 8 months of her husband's term.

Julia Gardiner Tyler was William Philo Hibbard's 6th Cousin

I grieve my love a belle should be," sighed one of Julia Gardiner's innumerable admirers in 1840; at the age of 20 she was already famous as the "Rose of Long Island."

Daughter of Juliana McLachlan and David Gardiner, descendant of prominent and wealthy New York families, Julia was trained from earliest childhood for a life in society; she made her debut at 15. A European tour with her family gave her new glimpses of social splendors. Late in 1842 the Gardiners went to Washington for the winter social season, and Julia became the undisputed darling of the capital. Her beauty and her practiced charm attracted the most eminent men in the city, among them President Tyler, a widower since September.

Tragedy brought his courtship poignant success the next winter. Julia, her sister Margaret, and her father joined a Presidential excursion on the new steam frigate Princeton; and David Gardiner lost his life in the explosion of a huge naval gun. Tyler comforted Julia in her grief and won her consent to a secret engagement.

The first President to marry in office took his vows in New York on June 26, 1844. The news was then broken to the American people, who greeted it with keen interest, much publicity, and some criticism about the couple's difference in age: 30 years.

As young Mrs. Tyler said herself, she "reigned" as First Lady for the last eight months of her husband's term. Wearing white satin or black lace to obey the conventions of mourning, she presided with vivacity and animation at a series of parties. She enjoyed her position immensely, and filled it with grace. For receptions she revived the formality of the Van Buren administration; she welcomed guests with plumes in her hair, attended by maids of honor dressed in white. She once declared, with truth: "Nothing appears to delight the President more than...to hear people sing my praises."

The Tylers' happiness was unshaken when they retired to their home at Sherwood Forest in Virginia. There Julia bore five of her seven children; and she acted as mistress of the plantation until the Civil War. As such, she defended both states' rights and the institution of slavery. She championed the political views of her husband, who remained for her "the President" until the end of his life.

His death in 1862 came as a severe blow to her. In a poem composed for his sixty-second birthday she had assured him that "what e'er changes time may bring, I'll love thee as thou art!"

Even as a refugee in New York, she devoted herself to volunteer work for the Confederacy. Its defeat found her impoverished. Not until 1958 would federal law provide automatic pensions for Presidential widows; but Congress in 1870 voted a pension for Mary Lincoln, and Julia Tyler used this precedent in seeking help. In December 1880 Congress voted her $1,200 a year -- and after Garfield's assassination it passed bills to grant uniform amounts of $5,000 annually to Mrs. Garfield, Mrs. Lincoln, Mrs. Polk, and Mrs. Tyler. Living out her last years comfortably in Richmond, Julia died there in 1889 and was buried there at her husband's side.

Julia Gardiner Tyler was William Philo Hibbard's 6th Cousin

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Julia GARDINER was born on 4 May 1820 in Gardiners Island, New York. She died on 10 Jul 1889 in Richmond, Richmond County, Virginia. She was buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia.

Spouse: John TYLER (10th President of the USA). John TYLER (10th President of the USA) and Julia GARDINER were married on 26 Jun 1844 in The Church of Ascension, New York, New York County, New York. Children were: Gardiner David TYLER, John Alexander TYLER, Julia Gardiner TYLER, Lachlan TYLER M. D., Lyon Gardiner TYLER, Robert Fitzwalter TYLER, Pearl TYLER.

http://sneakers.pair.com/roots//b80.htm#P6706

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Julia was the 2nd wife of President John Tyler. His first wife Letitia died peacefully in the White House from complications from a paralytic stroke.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_Gardiner_Tyler

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Birth: Jul. 29, 1820 Death: Jul. 10, 1889

Presidential First Lady. She was born Julia Gardiner on Staten Island to very wealthy parents. She was well educated in the social graces at a private finishing school. By fifteen, she was already seeking an advantageous marriage which would provide her with social standing and grace. She was pursued by a string of suitors and found her ideal match when she was introduced to widowed President John Tyler who purposed marriage even though thirty years her senior. They were secretly married in New York at her parents home then belatedly informed the American public. With less then eight months remaining in the Presidential term, Julia became the First Lady. Though Julia did not have long in the White House, she made a real impact. She considered herself royalty. It was Julia who had "Hail to the Chief" played for the President at state functions. She even had a "court" of ladies in waiting. She introduced both the polka and the waltz to White House balls. She and the President loved to dance. A press agent was hired to sound her praises fair and wise. Some made fun of the Tyler's noting the old adage, No Fool, like an old fool" and was often called "Lady Presidentress." Leaving the White House, they retired to Sherwood Forest where Julia became the mistress of the plantation until the Civil War. Here she bore five of her seven children. She supported the Confederacy and in response to ending slavery, praised it as a civilizing influence and noted their slaves lived better than the poor of London. When Virginia seceded , the Tyler's went with it. With John Tyler's death at the start of the civil war at the Exchange Hotel in Richmond, Julia became a widow at 41. Tyler's body lay in state in the Confederate Congress wrapped in a Confederate flag. His funeral was in St. Paul's Episcopal Church and a large procession of 150 carriages including Confederate President Jefferson Davis escorted him to Hollywood Cemetery. Ironically, he was buried next to President James Monroe who was a staunch Federalist. Julia fled to her family at Staten Island New York to wait out the war. Sherwood Forest was captured by Union forces. It was turned over to the slaves who ramsacked the plantation. It was returned to the family after the war but due to the damage, Julia was never able to inhabit the plantation. She spent her last years living in a house in Richmond opposite St. Peter's Roman Catholic Cathedral where she became a member and from where her final funeral service was conducted. She lived to see Sherwood Forest gradually returned to its original condition and often visited the plantation. She died while staying at Richmond's Exchange Hotel at the age of sixty nine a few doors down the hall from where her husband died 27 years before and was interred beside him. (bio by: Donald Greyfield (inactive))


Family links:

Parents:
 David Gardiner (1784 - 1844)
 Juliana MacLachlan Gardiner (1799 - 1864)

Spouse:
 John Tyler (1790 - 1862)*

Children:
 David Gardiner Tyler (1846 - 1927)*
 John Alexander Tyler (1848 - 1883)*
 Julia Gardner Tyler Spencer (1849 - 1871)*
 Lachlan Tyler (1851 - 1902)*
 Lyon Gardiner Tyler (1853 - 1935)*
 Robert Fitzwalter Tyler (1856 - 1927)*
 Pearl Tyler Ellis (1860 - 1947)*

Siblings:
 David Lion Gardiner (1816 - 1892)*
 Alexander Gardiner (1818 - 1851)*
 Julia Gardiner Tyler (1820 - 1889)
 Margaret Gardiner Beeckman (1822 - 1857)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Hollywood Cemetery Richmond Richmond City Virginia, USA


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Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Jan 18, 2001 Find A Grave Memorial# 19598 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=19598

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Julia Gardiner Tyler, First Lady's Timeline

1820
May 4, 1820
Gardiners Island, New York, United States
1844
June 26, 1844
Age 24
New York, NY, USA
1846
July 12, 1846
Age 26
East Hampton, Suffolk, New York, United States
1848
April 7, 1848
Age 27
Charles City, Virginia, United States
1849
December 25, 1849
Age 29
Charles City, Virginia, United States
1851
December 2, 1851
Age 31
Charles City, Virginia, United States
1852
August 24, 1852
Age 32
Charles City, Virginia, United States
1856
March 12, 1856
Age 35
Charles City, Virginia, United States
1860
June 13, 1860
Age 40
Charles City, Virginia, United States
1889
July 10, 1889
Age 69
Sherwood Forest, Charles City Cty., VA