Robert Glenn Johnson, Jr. MP

‹ Back to Johnson surname

1

Matches

0 0 1
Adds sibling(s).

View Robert Glenn Johnson, Jr.'s complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Robert Glenn Johnson, Jr.
  • Request to view Robert Glenn Johnson, Jr.'s family tree

Share

Nicknames: "Junior"
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg, North Carolina, USA
Birthdate: (82)
Birthplace: Wilkes, North Carolina, USA
Managed by: Eldon Clark (C)
Last Updated:
view all

Immediate Family

About Robert Glenn Johnson, Jr.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert Glenn Johnson, Jr. (born June 28, 1931), better known as Junior Johnson, is one of the early superstars of NASCAR in the 1950s and 1960s. He won 50 NASCAR races in his career before retiring in 1966. In the 1970s and 1980s, he became a NASCAR racing team owner; he sponsored such NASCAR champions as Cale Yarborough and Darrell Waltrip. He now produces a line of fried pork skins and country ham. He is credited with discovering drafting. He is nicknamed "The Last American Hero" and his autobiography is of the same name.

Johnson was born in Wilkes County, North Carolina, the fourth of seven children of Lora Belle Money and Robert Glenn Johnson, Sr. His father, a lifelong bootlegger, spent nearly twenty of his sixty-three years in prison, as their house was frequently raided by revenue agents. Junior spent one year in prison in Ohio for having an illegal still, although he was never caught in his many years of transporting bootleg liquor at high speed.

In 1955, Johnson began his career as a NASCAR driver. In his first full season, he won five races and finished sixth in the 1955 NASCAR Grand National points standings.

In 1958 he won six races. In 1959, he won five more NASCAR Grand National races (including a win from the pole position at the 1959 Hickory 250); by this time he was regarded as one of the best short-track racers in the sport.

His first win at a "superspeedway" came at the Daytona 500 in 1960. Johnson and his crew chief Ray Fox were practicing for the race, trying to figure out how to increase their speed, which was 22 miles per hour (35 km/h) slower than the top cars in the race. During a test run a faster car passed Johnson. He noticed that when he moved behind the faster car his own speed increased due to the faster car's slipstream. Johnson was then able to stay close behind the faster car until the final lap of the test run, when he used the "slipstream" effect to slingshot past the other car. By using this technique Johnson went on to win the 1960 Daytona 500, despite the fact that his car was slower than others in the field. Johnson's technique was quickly adopted by other drivers, and his practice of "drafting" has become a common tactic in NASCAR races.

In 1963 he had a two-lap lead in the World 600 at Charlotte before a spectator threw a bottle onto the track and caused Junior to crash; he suffered only minor injuries.

He retired in 1966. In his career, he claimed 50 victories as a driver, and 11 of these wins were at major speedway races. He retired as the winningest driver never to have a championship.

view all

Junior Johnson's Timeline

1931
June 28, 1931
Wilkes, North Carolina, USA
1992
1992
Age 60
1994
1994
Age 62
????