Cináed II mac Maíl Coluim, Rí na h'Alba (932 - 995) MP

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Nicknames: "Cináed mac Maíl Coluim", "An Fionnghalach", "The Fratricide", "King of Scotland", "King Kenneth II of /Scotland/", "o Fraticida", "Kenneth II // K of Scots", "Kenneth /MacDonald/", "/Cinaed/", "Cináed Mac Máel /Coluim/", "Cináed Macmáel /Coluim/", "Cináed mac Maíl C...", "8997"
Birthplace: Iona,,Argyllshire,Scotland
Death: Died in Fettercairne, Kincardineshire, Scotland
Occupation: King of Scotland 971-995, King of Scotland from 971 to 995, King of Alba, King Bet 971 and 995, , Scotland, KING OF SCOTLAND, KENNETH, King of Scotland (Alba) 971-995, konge, Roi d'Ecosse 971 à 995, King of Scotland, King of Scots, Konge av Scotland
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Cináed II mac Maíl Coluim, Rí na h'Alba

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim) anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide" (before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

Children:

1. Dungal, killed 999.

2. *Malcolm.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_of_Scotland

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#_Toc209085740

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious. Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable. It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12]

-------------------------

KENNETH (-maybe murdered Finella's Castle, Fettercairn [995], bur Isle of Iona).

The 10th century Pictish Chronicle Cronica de Origine Antiquorum Pictorum records that "Cinadius filius Maelcolaim" succeeded after the death of Colin, adding that after one year he invaded Saxony and brought back "filium regis Saxonum"[138]. The 11th century Synchronisms of Flann Mainistreach name (in order) "…Cuillen mac Illiulb, Cinaet mac Maelcolaim, Custantin mac Cuilen, Cinaet mac Duib, Maelcolaim mac Cinaeta" as Scottish kings, dated to the 10th and 11th centuries[139]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "…Kinet filius Malcolin xxii annis et ii mensibus…" as king[140]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Kenneth the son of Malcolm and brother of King Duff" succeeded as king in 970 after Culen was killed and reigned for twenty-four years and nine months[141]. He succeeded in 971 as KENNETH II King of Scotland.

The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that King Kenneth II decreed a change to the Scottish royal succession to enable "the nearest survivor in blood to the deceased king to succeed", in opposition to "Constantine the Bald, son of King Culen, and Gryme son of Kenneth son of King Duff"[142]. The same source adds that the king´s opponents persuaded "the daughter of Cruchne, Earl of Angus…Finele" to murder the king in revenge for the death of her son which he had ordered[143]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Cinaed son of Mael Coluim king of Scotland was deceitfully killed" in 995[144]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Kynnath mac Malcolm" reigned for 24 years and 2 months, was killed "a suis hominibus in Fetherkern" through the treachery of "Finuele filie filie Cunthar comitis de Anguss" whose only son had been killed by the king[145]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 includes the same information[146].

m ---. The name of Kenneth's wife is not known. Kenneth II & his wife had one child:

a) MALCOLM ([954]-Glamis Castle, Angus 25 Nov 1034, bur Isle of Iona). The 11th century Synchronisms of Flann Mainistreach name (in order) "…Cuillen mac Illiulb, Cinaet mac Maelcolaim, Custantin mac Cuilen, Cinaet mac Duib, Maelcolaim mac Cinaeta" as Scottish kings, dated to the 10th and 11th centuries[147]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "…Malcolin filius Kinet xxx…" as king[148]. He is named "Malcolmum filium Cyneth regem Scottorum" in the Historia Regem[149]. It is tempting to suggest that either he, or his first cousin with the same name, spent time at the court of Edgar King of England during his youth, as "Malcolm dux" subscribed a charter of King Edgar relating to land in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk dated 970[150], but there is no proof of the co-identity of these persons. He succeeded in 1005 as MALCOLM II King of Scotland. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that Grime was killed by Malcolm, son of King Kenneth II, who succeeded as king[151]. He attacked northern England in 1006. King of Lothian from [1016], becoming effective ruler of the whole of Scotland. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Malcolm submitted to Canute King of England in 1031, along with "two other kings, Mælbeth and Iehmarc"[152]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun defended Cumbria against King Canute, who agreed that it should be ruled by Malcolm´s grandson Duncan[153]. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1034 of "Mael Coluim son of Cinaed, king of Scotland"[154]. The Annals of Tigernach record the death in 1034 of “Mael-Coluímb son of Cinaed king of Scotland”[155]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Malcolm mac Kynnat Rex" reigned for 30 years, died "in Glammes" and was buried "in Yona"[156]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 includes the same information[157]. m ---. The name of Malcolm's wife is not known. King Malcolm III & his wife had [four] children:

i) BETHOC . The "Genealogy of King William the Lyon" dated 1175 names "Betoch filii Malcolmi" as parent of "Malcolmi filii Dunecani"[158]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 names "Cran Abbatis de Dunkelden et Bethok filia Malcolm mac Kynnet" as parents of King Duncan[159]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that King Malcolm II had "an only daughter…Beatrice who married Crynyne Abthane of Dul and Steward of the Isles…in some annals, by a blunder of the writer…abbot of Dul"[160]. Lady of Atholl. m ([1000]) CRINAN "the Thane" Mormaer of Atholl, son of DUNCAN Mormaer of Atholl & his wife --- (-killed in battle 1045). Abthane of Dule. Lay abbot of Dunkeld. Steward of the Western Isles. He was killed fighting King Macbeth.

ii) [DONADA . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 1007. m as his second wife, FINDLAECH MacRory Thane of Angus Mormaer of Moray, son of RUAIDHRI Mormaer of Moray & his wife --- (-1020). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1020 of "Finnlaech son of Ruadrí king of Alba…killed by his own people"[161].] Donada & her husband had one child:

(a) MACBETH ([1005]-killed in battle Lumphanan, Aberdeenshire 15 Aug 1057, bur Isle of Iona). The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "…Macheth filius Findleg xvii…" as king[162]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Machabeus son of Finele" killed King Duncan and succeeded as king in 1040[163]. Mormaer of Moray [1029/32]. He may have been one of the "two other kings, Mælbeth and Iehmarc" recorded by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle has having submitted to Canute King of England in 1031 with King Malcolm II[164]. He succeeded in 1040 as MACBETH King of Scotland. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records that "Donnchal rex Scotiæ" was killed "1040 XIX Kal Sep" by "duce suo Macbethad mac Finnloech" who succeeded as king for 17 years[165]. The Annales Dunelmenses record that "comes Siward" invaded Scotland with a large army in 1046 and briefly expelled "rege Macbeod", the king recovering his realm when Siward withdrew[166]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that he was defeated in battle 27 Jul 1054 by the army of Siward Earl of Northumbria which had invaded Scotland[167]. The Annales Dunelmenses record that "Siwardus" put "Macbeth" to flight in 1054 and installed "Malcolmum rege" in the following year[168]. The Chronicon of Mariano Scotti records that "Macfinlaeg" was killed "1057…in Augusto"[169]. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Mac bethadh son of Findlaech overking of Scotland” was killed by “Malcolm, son of Donnchad” in 1058[170]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Maket mac Fyngal" reigned 17 years, was killed "in Lufanan a Malcolm mac Dunkat" and was buried "in Iona insula"[171]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that Malcolm recaptured his kingdom with the help of "Siward Earl of Northumberland" and killed "Machabeus" 5 Dec 1056[172]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Machabeus" was buried "in the island of Iona"[173]. m (after 1032) as her second husband, GRUOCH, widow of GILLACOMGAIN Mormaer of Moray, daughter of BOITE [Bodhe] of Scotland & his wife --- ([1015]-). "Machbet filius Finlach…et Gruoch filia Bodhe, rex et regina Scottorum" made grants to the church of St Serf, although the document also names "Malcolmus Rex filius Duncani" which casts doubt on its authenticity[174].

iii) [son . Rodulfus Glaber refers to Canute King of England seeking "the friendship of the king of the Scots, receiving his son at the font of baptism"[175]. This passage follows a description of "the Scots whose king was called Malcolm" resisting King Canute's invasion, undated but from the context apparently occurring at the start of Canute's reign. If it is correct that King Malcolm had a son baptised at this time, he would have been considerably younger than the king's daughters, presumably therefore born to a different mother. No corroborative evidence for the existence of this son has been found in other contemporary sources.]

iv) [daughter . Orkneyinga Saga records that “Earl Sigurd” married “the daughter of Malcolm King of Scots”[176]. Snorre records the marriage of "Sigurd the Thick" and "a daughter of the Scottish king Malcolm"[177]. It appears unlikely that Sigurd´s wife could have been King Malcolm´s daughter Donada (as shown in many secondary sources, including the Complete Peerage[178]) if it is correct that Donada´s recorded husband Findlaech was killed in 1020 and also that their son was born in [1005][179]. m SIGURD "Digri" Hlodverson Jarl of Orkney and Caithness, son of HLODVIR [Lodver] Torfinnsson & his wife Audna --- (-killed in battle Clontarf 23 Apr 1014).]

Malcolm I had [one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress]:

3. [KENNETH . The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Constantine the Bald, son of King Culen" succeeded in 994 after King Kenneth II was killed, but that he was "continually harassed by Malcolm [son of King Kenneth] and his illegitimate uncle…Kenneth" and killed in battle "in Laudonia by the banks of the river Almond" after reigning for one and a half years[180]. He is not mentioned in any of the earlier sources so far consulted. His existence should be treated with caution.]

--------------------------

Notes

^ Cináed mac Maíl Coluim is the Mediaeval Gaelic form.

^ Skene, Chronicles, p. 96.

^ Duncan, p. 21.

^ ESSH, p. 512; Duncan, p.25.

^ ESSH, pp. 478–479; SAEC, pp. 75–78.

^ Duncan, pp.24–25.

^ Duncan, pp. 21–22; ESSH, p. 484.

^ See ESSH, pp. 483–484 & 495–502.

^ The name of Cuncar's daughter is given as Fenella, Finele or Sibill in later sources. John of Fordun credits Constantine III (Causantín mac Cuilén) and Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib) with the planning, claiming that Kenneth II planned to change the laws of succession. See ESSH, pp. 512–515.

^ ESSH, p. 516.

^ Annals of the Four Masters, s.a. 998: "Dúngal Cináed's son, was killed by Gille Coemgáin, Cináed's son." It is not clear if the Cináeds (Kenneths) referred to are Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Kenneth II) or his nephew and namesake Cináed mac Duib (Kenneth III). Smyth, pp. 221–222, makes Dúngal following ESSH p. 580.

^ Compare Duncan, p.345 and Lynch (ed), Genealogies, at about p. 680. See also ESSH, p. 580.

References

For primary sources see also External links below.

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

Anderson, Alan Orr, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers. D. Nutt, London, 1908.

Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5

Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8

Lynch, Michael (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. Oxford UP, Oxford, 2002. ISBN 0-19-211696-7

Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80-1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

[edit] External links

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork The Corpus of Electronic Texts includes the Annals of Ulster, Tigernach and the Four Masters, the Chronicon Scotorum, as well as Genealogies, and various Saints' Lives. Most are translated into English, or translations are in progress

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba

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King of Alba. said to have married a princes of Leinster.

Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (170:17).

Kenneth II (Cinaed mac Mael Coluim)

Kenneth became King of Scots in 971, when his predecessor Cuilen was killed by the Strathclyde Britons. There are some indications that Kenneth had a joint kingship with Cuilen's brother Olaf until 977, when Olaf was killed. Kenneth led successful raids against Strathclyde in both 971 and 972. In 973, Kenneth attended a conference of kings at Chester, in England, which was probably organized by Edgar, King of England. There is currently fierce academic debate about what actually went on there, which will hopefully be solved by an article I will publish on the incident in the near future. Kenneth appears to have a quiet, but successful reign, was killed 'by treachery' in 995, and succeeded by Constantine son of Cuilen, a distant cousin. It is possible that Kenneth married an Irish woman from Leinster, as a twelfth - century Scottish poem calls his son Malcolm 'son of a woman of the Leinstermen'.

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Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2]; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious.[3] Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.[4]

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.[5] It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.[6]

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12]

Notes

  1. ^ Cináed mac Maíl Coluim is the Mediaeval Gaelic form.
  2. ^ Skene, Chronicles, p. 96.
  3. ^ Duncan, p. 21.
  4. ^ ESSH, p. 512; Duncan, p.25.
  5. ^ ESSH, pp. 478–479; SAEC, pp. 75–78.
  6. ^ Duncan, pp.24–25.
  7. ^ Duncan, pp. 21–22; ESSH, p. 484.
  8. ^ See ESSH, pp. 483–484 & 495–502.
  9. ^ The name of Cuncar's daughter is given as Fenella, Finele or Sibill in later sources. John of Fordun credits Constantine III (Causantín mac Cuilén) and Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib) with the planning, claiming that Kenneth II planned to change the laws of succession. See ESSH, pp. 512–515.
 10. ^ ESSH, p. 516.
 11. ^ Annals of the Four Masters, s.a. 998: "Dúngal Cináed's son, was killed by Gille Coemgáin, Cináed's son." It is not clear if the Cináeds (Kenneths) referred to are Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Kenneth II) or his nephew and namesake Cináed mac Duib (Kenneth III). Smyth, pp. 221–222, makes Dúngal following ESSH p. 580.
 12. ^ Compare Duncan, p.345 and Lynch (ed), Genealogies, at about p. 680. See also ESSH, p. 580.

References

   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers. D. Nutt, London, 1908.
   * Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5
   * Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8
   * Lynch, Michael (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. Oxford UP, Oxford, 2002. ISBN 0-19-211696-7
   * Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80-1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cin%C3%A1ed_mac_Ma%C3%ADl_Coluim

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Kenneth II of Scotland

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Kenneth II

(Cináed mac Maíl Coluim)

King of Alba


Reign 971–995

Born before 954

Died 995

Place of death Fettercairn ?

Predecessor Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb)

Successor Constantine III (Causantín mac Cuilén)

Offspring Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda)

Boite ?

Dúngal ?

Royal House Alpin

Father Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill)

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim)[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2] (before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious.[3] Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.[4]

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.[5] It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.[6]

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[

--------------------

Cináed II MAC MÁEL COLUIM rí Alban (954-995) 616,808

   * Born: Abt 932, Scotland 808
   * Married: 808
   * Died: 995, Finela's Castle, Fettercairn, Kincardine, Scotland 808
   * Buried: Isle Of Iona, Scotland
  Another name for Cináed was Kenneth II MAC ALPIN.
  Ancestral File Number: 9G83-TS.
  General Notes:
   He succeeded his 3rd cousin, Cuilean, in 971. 12th King of Scots between 971 and 995.
   He raided the North East as far as Stainmore, Teesdale in 971.
   He was defeated by Uhtred, son of the elderly Earl of Bamburgh, after his attack on the North East after claiming the region as part of Scotland and taking advantage of the turmoil caused by the Viking attacks on England in 995. 5278 
  Marriage Information:
   Cináed married Unnamed Princess of Leinster 808. (Unnamed Princess of Leinster was born about 936 in Leinster, Ireland

Spouses/Children:

Unnamed Princess of Leinster

   * Mael-Coluim II MAC CINÁEDA King of the Scots+
   * Dunclina McALPIN+

--------------------

King of Scotland

--------------------

Kenneth II av Skottland

Kenneth II

Konge av Skottland

Navn: Cináed mac Maíl Choluim

Regjeringstid: 971 - 995

Død: 995, Fettercairn i Means

Foreldre: Malcolm II

Ektefelle‍(r): ukjent

Barn: Malcolm

   

Kenneth II av Skottland (Cináed mac Maíl Choluim), sønn av Malcolm I av Skottland, etterfulgte Culen, sønn av Indulf, som hadde blitt slaktet ned av brythonene fra Stathclyde i 971 i Lothian. Kenneth kunne ikke etablere seg som enekonge før han hadde fått Culens bror Amlaíb drept i 977 og da var enekonge av Skottland. Hans hovedområde, slik som dette hadde vært med alle andre skotske konger som utgikk fra ætten til Kenneth MacAlpin lå nord for elven Tay.

Kenneth II begynte sitt regime med å herje i det engelske kongedømmet, men han mistet størstedelen av sin hær ved elven Cornag. Kort tid etter angrep han Eadulf, jarl av den nordlige halvdelen av Northumbria og herjet store deler av dennes område. Kenneth befestet fjordene ved Forth som et forsvar mot britene og invaderte igjen Northumbria og tok jarlens sønn til fange. På omtrent denne tiden ga han også byen Brechin til kirken.

I henhold til engelske kronikører betalte Kenneth II skatt til kong Edgar av England for avståelsen av Lothian, men disse utsagnene er sannsynligvis grunnet i kontroversen om Skottlands posisjon.

Mormaerne eller jarlene til Kenneth II var igjennom hele hans regime opptatt i stridigheter med den norrøne jarlen Sigurd av Orknøyene om rettighetene til området Caithness og andre nordlige områder i Skottland så langt sør som Spey. I disse stridighetene hadde ikke skottene større hell eller framgang.

Ved et tidspunkt i livet giftet Kenneth II seg, men detaljene er uklare. Hans hustru sies å ha vært en prinsesse fra Leinster, i henhold til det irske middelalderdiktet Bercháns profeti, men hennes navn, foreldre og skjebne er ukjent. Ekteskapet ga uansett sønnen Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Malcolm II av Skottland).

I 995 døde Kenneth II ved Fettercairn i Mearns. I henhold til noen kilder ble han snikmyrdet av sine egne undersåtter i et forræderi på grunn av intriger fra Finnguala, datter av Cuncar, mormaer av Angus. Kenneth II ble gravlagt på øya Iona.

[rediger] Referanser

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History, 1922.

Chronicles of the Picts and Scots, ed. W. F. Skene (Edinburgh, 1867)

W. F. Skene, Celtic Scotland (Edinburgh, 1876)

Forgjenger:

Culen  Konge av Skottland

(971–995) Etterfølger:

Konstantin III  

Hentet fra «http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_av_Skottland»

Kategorier: Huset Alpin | Skotske monarker | Dødsfall i 995

--------------------

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

--------------------

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim) anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide" (before 954 – 995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

--------------------

Kenneth II Cinead King of Scotland

born about 0932 Scotland

died 0995 Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland

buried Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland

father:

  • Malcolm I King of Scotland

born about 0897 Scotland

died 0954 Fordoun, Kincardineshire, Scotland

mother:

unknown

siblings:

  • Duff (Dubh) King of Scotland born about 0930 Scotland died 0967 Forres, Morayshire, Scotland

Mogallus Prince of Scotland born about 0934 Scotland

spouse:

unknown

children:

  • Malcolm II (Melkolf) MacKenneth King of Scotland

born about 0970 Scotland

died 25 November 1034 Glamis, Forfarshire, Scotland

buried Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland

  • Dunclina Princess of Scotland born about 0960 Scotland

biographical and/or anecdotal:

  • Kenneth II King of Scotland was killed by his own men.

--------------------

Kenneth II of Scotland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim)[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide" [2] (before 954 – 995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious.[3] Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.[4]

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.[5] It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.[6]

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12]

References

For primary sources see also External links below.

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

Anderson, Alan Orr, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers. D. Nutt, London, 1908.

Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5

Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8

Lynch, Michael (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. Oxford UP, Oxford, 2002. ISBN 0-19-211696-7

Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80-1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

--------------------

Kenneth II succeeded Culen, son of Indulf, who had been slain by the Britons of Strathclyde in 971 in Lothian. He did not established himself as sole king until he killed Culen's brother Amlaíb in 977, after which he ruled all of Scotland. His strength, like that of the other kings of his branch of the house of Kenneth MacAlpin lay chiefly north of the Tay.

Kenneth began his reign by ravaging the British kingdom, but he lost a large part of his force on the river Cornag. Soon afterwards he attacked Eadulf, earl of the northern half of Northumbria, and ravaged the whole of his territory. He fortified the fords of the Forth as a defence against the Britons and again invaded Northumbria, carrying off the earl's son. About this time he gave the city of Brechin to the church.

According to the English chroniclers, Kenneth paid homage to King Edgar for the cession of Lothian, but these statements are probably due to the controversy as to the position of Scotland.

The mormaers, or chiefs, of Kenneth were engaged throughout his reign in a contest with Sigurd the Norwegian, earl of Orkney, for the possession of Caithness and the northern district of Scotland as far south as the Spey. In this struggle the Scots attained no permanent success.

At some point in his life, Kenneth married, but the details are scanty. His wife was said to have been a Princess of Leinster by Berchan's Prophesy. Her name, parentage, and fate are unknown. The marriage produced Malcolm II.

In 995 Kenneth died at Fettercairn in the Mearns. According to some accounts, he was slain treacherously by his own subjects, through the intrigue of Finella, daughter of Cuncar, Earl of Angus. He was buried on the Isle of Iona."

--------------------

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2]; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious.[3] Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.[4]

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.[5] It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.[6]

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12]

[edit] Notes

1.^ Cináed mac Maíl Coluim is the Mediaeval Gaelic form.

2.^ Skene, Chronicles, p. 96.

3.^ Duncan, p. 21.

4.^ ESSH, p. 512; Duncan, p.25.

5.^ ESSH, pp. 478–479; SAEC, pp. 75–78.

6.^ Duncan, pp.24–25.

7.^ Duncan, pp. 21–22; ESSH, p. 484.

8.^ See ESSH, pp. 483–484 & 495–502.

9.^ The name of Cuncar's daughter is given as Fenella, Finele or Sibill in later sources. John of Fordun credits Constantine III (Causantín mac Cuilén) and Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib) with the planning, claiming that Kenneth II planned to change the laws of succession. See ESSH, pp. 512–515.

10.^ ESSH, p. 516.

11.^ Annals of the Four Masters, s.a. 998: "Dúngal Cináed's son, was killed by Gille Coemgáin, Cináed's son." It is not clear if the Cináeds (Kenneths) referred to are Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Kenneth II) or his nephew and namesake Cináed mac Duib (Kenneth III). Smyth, pp. 221–222, makes Dúngal following ESSH p. 580.

12.^ Compare Duncan, p.345 and Lynch (ed), Genealogies, at about p. 680. See also ESSH, p. 580.

[edit] References

For primary sources see also External links below.

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

Anderson, Alan Orr, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers. D. Nutt, London, 1908.

Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5

Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8

Lynch, Michael (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. Oxford UP, Oxford, 2002. ISBN 0-19-211696-7

Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80-1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

[edit] External links

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork The Corpus of Electronic Texts includes the Annals of Ulster, Tigernach and the Four Masters, the Chronicon Scotorum, as well as Genealogies, and various Saints' Lives. Most are translated into English, or translations are in progress

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba

Kenneth II of Scotland

House of Alpin

Born: bef. 954 Died: 995

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Cuilén King of Alba

971–995 Succeeded by

Constantine III

[hide]v • d • ePictish and Scottish Monarchs


Monarchs of the Picts

(traditional) Drest I · Talorc I · Nechtan I · Drest II · Galan · Drest III · Drest IV · Gartnait I · Cailtram · Talorc II · Drest V · Galam Cennalath · Bridei I · Gartnait II · Nechtan II · Cinioch · Gartnait III · Bridei II · Talorc III · Talorgan I · Gartnait IV · Drest VI · Bridei III · Taran · Bridei IV · Nechtan III · Drest VII · Alpín I · Óengus I · Bridei V · Ciniod I · Alpín II · Talorgan II · Drest VIII · Conall · Constantine (I) · Óengus II · Drest IX · Uuen · Uurad · Bridei VI · Ciniod II · Bridei VII · Drest X


Monarchs of the Scots

(traditional) Kenneth I MacAlpin · Donald I · Constantine I (II) · Áed · Giric · Eochaid (doubtful) · Donald II · Constantine II (III) · Malcolm I · Indulf · Dub · Cuilén · Amlaíb · Kenneth II · Constantine III (IV) · Kenneth III · Malcolm II · Duncan I · Macbeth · Lulach · Malcolm III Canmore · Donald III · Duncan II · Donald III · Edgar · Alexander I · David I · Malcolm IV · William I · Alexander II · Alexander III · Margaret (disputed) · First Interregnum · John · Second Interregnum · Robert I · David II · Robert II · Robert III · James I · James II · James III · James IV · James V · Mary I · James VI* · Charles I* · Charles II* · James VII* · Mary II* · William II* · Anne*


  • also monarch of England and Ireland.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_of_Scotland"

Categories: 10th-century births | 995 deaths | Scottish monarchs | Medieval Gaels | House of Alpin | 10th-century Scottish people | 10th-century monarchs in Europe

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cin%C3%A1ed_mac_Ma%C3%ADl_Coluim

--------------------

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious. Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable. It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king. Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin. Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).

--------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_447.htm

He began his reign by ravaging the Britons, probably as an act of vengeance, but his name is also included among a group of northern and western kings said to have made submission to the Anglo-Saxon king Edgar in 973, perhaps at Chester; and the chronicler Roger of Wendover (Flores Historiarum, under the year 975) states that shortly afterward Kenneth received from Edgar all the land called Lothian (i.e., between the Tweed and the Forth rivers). This is the first mention of the River Tweed as the recognized border between England and Scotland. Kenneth was slain, apparently by his own subjects, at Fettercairn in the Mearns.

Kenneth II reigned 971-995; he was murdered by his own men. He is said to have married a princess of Leinster.

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  1. LDS Baptism: 27 Jun 1936
  2. Endowment: 22 Jun 1938 Temple: ARIZO

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  Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland was the son of Malcolm I of Alba, King of Scotland. He died in 995 at Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland, possibly murdered. He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.
    

Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland gained the title of King Kenneth of Alba. He succeeded to the title of King Kenneth II of Scotland in 971.

    He was possbily killed by Finvela, a noblewoman whose son was killed by the king. She is said to have lured Kenneth into her home promising to unmask traiters. In one room, a statue was connected to several hidden crossbows which were set to fire bolts from every side when a golden apple on the statue was lifted. After a great feast, at which wine flowed freely, Finvela took her drunken guest into the fatal room and offered him the golden apple as a gesture of peace. As he lifted the apple, he was struck by a hail of bolts. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

http://thepeerage.com/p10289.htm#i102889

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_of_Scotland

--------------------

Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland

M, #102889, d. 995

Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland|d. 995|p10289.htm#i102889|Malcolm I of Alba, King of Scotland|b. b 900\nd. 954|p10289.htm#i102890||||Donald I. of Alba, King of Scotland|d. 900|p10290.htm#i102891||||||||||

Last Edited=17 Apr 2004

    Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland was the son of Malcolm I of Alba, King of Scotland. He died in 995 at Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland, possibly murdered.1 He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.1
    Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland gained the title of King Kenneth of Alba. He succeeded to the title of King Kenneth II of Scotland in 971.2 
    He was possbily killed by Finvela, a noblewoman whose son was killed by the king. She is said to have lured Kenneth into her home promising to unmask traiters. In one room, a statue was connected to several hidden crossbows which were set to fire bolts from every side when a golden apple on the statue was lifted. After a great feast, at which wine flowed freely, Finvela took her drunken guest into the fatal room and offered him the golden apple as a gesture of peace. As he lifted the apple, he was struck by a hail of bolts. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.3
    

Children of Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland

1.Dungal of Alba d. 999

2.Malcolm II of Alba, King of Scotland+ b. c 954, d. 25 Nov 1034

Citations

1.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 175. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

2.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 174.

3.[S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Kenneth II, -995". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography

source: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10289.htm#i102889

--------------------

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2]; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

Issue

Malcolm II, King of Alba

Boite mac Cináeda?

Dúngal?

Sources:

   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers. D. Nutt, London, 1908.
   * Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5
   * Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8
   * Lynch, Michael (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. Oxford UP, Oxford, 2002. ISBN 0-19-211696-7
   * Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80-1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

--------------------

Död : 995, Fettercairn , Kincardine , Skottland

Begravda : Isle of Iona , Skottland

Allmänna hänvisningar:

Han började sin regering med ödelägger britter, förmodligen som en handling av hämnd , men hans namn finns också bland en grupp av norra och västra kungar sägs ha yttrat till den anglosaxiska kungen Edgar 973, kanske vid Chester , och krönikören Roger av Wendover ( Flores Historiarum under året 975) anges att kort därefter Kenneth från Edgar all mark som kallas Lothian (dvs mellan Tweed och Forth floder) . Detta är det första omnämnandet av floden Tweed som de erkända gränsen mellan England och Skottland. Kenneth dräptes , uppenbarligen av sina egna undersåtar, på Fettercairn i Mearns .

Noterade händelser i hans liv var:

• anslutit sig : King i Förenta pikterna och skottar , 971.

Kenneth gift.

-------------------- Kenneth_II . Died 994/995. !GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of

        Magna Charta Barons; Page; 226; G929.72; C6943ra; Denver Public
        Library; Genealogy

             Children of Kenneth_II  and _____:

           20       i   Malcolm_II , d. 1034

-------------------- Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland was the son of Malcolm I of Alba, King of Scotland. He died in 995 in Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland, possibly murdered.1 He was buried in Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.1

    Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland gained the title of King Kenneth of Alba. He succeeded to the title of King Kenneth II of Scotland in 971.2 
    He was possbily killed by Finvela, a noblewoman whose son was killed by the king. She is said to have lured Kenneth into her home promising to unmask traiters. In one room, a statue was connected to several hidden crossbows which were set to fire bolts from every side when a golden apple on the statue was lifted. After a great feast, at which wine flowed freely, Finvela took her drunken guest into the fatal room and offered him the golden apple as a gesture of peace. As he lifted the apple, he was struck by a hail of bolts. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.3
     

Family Children Dungal of Alba d. 999 Malcolm II of Alba, King of Scotland+ b. c 954, d. 25 Nov 1034


Citations [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 175. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 174. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Kenneth II, -995". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.


-------------------- Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland was the son of Malcolm I of Alba, King of Scotland. He died in 995 at Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland, possibly murdered.1 He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.1

    Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland gained the title of King Kenneth of Alba. He succeeded to the title of King Kenneth II of Scotland in 971.2
    He was possbily killed by Finvela, a noblewoman whose son was killed by the king. She is said to have lured Kenneth into her home promising to unmask traiters. In one room, a statue was connected to several hidden crossbows which were set to fire bolts from every side when a golden apple on the statue was lifted. After a great feast, at which wine flowed freely, Finvela took her drunken guest into the fatal room and offered him the golden apple as a gesture of peace. As he lifted the apple, he was struck by a hail of bolts. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.3
    

Children of Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland

   * Dungal of Alba d. 999
   * Malcolm II of Alba, King of Scotland+ b. c 954, d. 25 Nov 1034

-------------------- Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2]; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious.[3] Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.[4]

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.[5] It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.[6]

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cin%C3%A1ed_mac_Ma%C3%ADl_Coluim --------------------

  1. ID: I176732
  2. Name: King Kenneth [II @<^>v] de Scotland
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: 912 in Fettercairn, Scotland
  5. Death: 995 in Fettercairn, Kincardineshire, Scotland
  6. Burial: Murdered by Lady Finella

Father: King Malcolm [I @<^>v] de Scotland b: 897 in Scotland

Marriage 1 Princess Frigida [@ <^>v] de Mumhan b: 911 in Scotland

   * Married: ABT 958

Children

  1. Has Children King Malcolm [II @<^>v] de Scotland b: 954 in Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
  2. Has Children Anleta (Thora Donada) [@ <^>v] MacKenneth b: 5 OCT 958 in Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
  3. Has Children Princess Dunclina Alpin [@ <>] de Scotland b: ABT 960

-------------------- Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide" before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious. Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh. The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin. Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).

-------------------- a.k.a. Cináed mac Maíl Coluim

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide"[2]; before 954–995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba was compiled in Kenneth's reign, but many of the place names mentioned are entirely corrupt, if not fictitious.[3] Whatever the reality, the Chronicle states that "[h]e immediately plundered [Strathclyde] in part. Kenneth's infantry were slain with very great slaughter in Moin Uacoruar." The Chronicle further states that Kenneth plundered Northumbria three times, first as far as Stainmore, then to Cluiam and lastly to the River Dee by Chester. These raids may belong to around 980, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records attacks on Cheshire.[4]

In 973, the Chronicle of Melrose reports that Kenneth, with Máel Coluim I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), the King of Strathclyde, "Maccus, king of very many islands" (i.e. Magnus Haraldsson (Maccus mac Arailt), King of Mann and the Isles) and other kings, Welsh and Norse, came to Chester to acknowledge the overlordship of the English king Edgar the Peaceable.[5] It may be that Edgar here regulated the frontier between the southern lands of the kingdom of Alba and the northern lands of his English kingdom. Cumbria was English, the western frontier lay on the Solway. In the east, the frontier lay somewhere in later Lothian, south of Edinburgh.[6]

The Annals of Tigernach, in an aside, name three of the Mormaers of Alba in Kenneth's reign in entry in 976: Cellach mac Fíndgaine, Cellach mac Baireda and Donnchad mac Morgaínd. The third of these, if not an error for Domnall mac Morgaínd, is very likely a brother of Domnall, and thus the Mormaer of Moray. The Mormaerdoms or kingdoms ruled by the two Cellachs cannot be identified.

The feud which had persisted since the death of King Indulf (Idulb mac Causantín) between his descendants and Kenneth's family persisted. In 977 the Annals of Ulster report that "Amlaíb mac Iduilb [Amlaíb, son of Indulf], King of Scotland, was killed by Cináed mac Domnaill." The Annals of Tigernach give the correct name of Amlaíb's killer: Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, or Kenneth II. Thus, even if only for a short time, Kenneth had been overthrown by the brother of the previous king.[7]

Adam of Bremen tells that Sweyn Forkbeard found exile in Scotland at this time, but whether this was with Kenneth, or one of the other kings in Scotland, is unknown. Also at this time, Njal's Saga, the Orkneyinga Saga and other sources recount wars between "the Scots" and the Northmen, but these are more probably wars between Sigurd Hlodvisson, Earl of Orkney, and the Mormaers, or Kings, of Moray.[8]

The Chronicle says that Kenneth founded a great monastery at Brechin.

Kenneth was killed in 995, the Annals of Ulster say "by deceit" and the Annals of Tigernach say "by his subjects". Some later sources, such as the Chronicle of Melrose, John of Fordun and Andrew of Wyntoun provide more details, accurately or not. The simplest account is that he was killed by his own men in Fettercairn, through the treachery of Finnguala (also called Fimberhele), daughter of Cuncar, Mormaer of Angus, in revenge for the killing of her only son.[9]

The Prophecy of Berchán adds little to our knowledge, except that it names Kenneth "the kinslayer", and states he died in Strathmore.[10]

Kenneth's son Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda) was later king of Alba. Kenneth may have had a second son, named either Dúngal or Gille Coemgáin.[11] Sources differ as to whether Boite mac Cináeda should be counted a son of Kenneth II or of Kenneth III (Cináed mac Duib).[12]

References

For primary sources see also External links below.

   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers. D. Nutt, London, 1908.
   * Anon., Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney, tr. Hermann Pálsson and Paul Edwards. Penguin, London, 1978. ISBN 0-14-044383-5
   * Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8
   * Lynch, Michael (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. Oxford UP, Oxford, 2002. ISBN 0-19-211696-7
   * Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80-1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

[edit] External links

   * CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork The Corpus of Electronic Texts includes the Annals of Ulster, Tigernach and the Four Masters, the Chronicon Scotorum, as well as Genealogies, and various Saints' Lives. Most are translated into English, or translations are in progress
   * The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_of_Scotland -------------------- Kenneth II (Cináed mac Máel Coluim), son of Malcolm I, king of Scotland, succeeded Culen, son of Indulf, who had been slain by the Britons of Strathclyde in 971 in Lothian. He did not established himself as sole king until he killed Culen's brother Amlaíb in 977, after which he ruled all of Scotland.

Kenneth began his reign by ravaging the British kingdom, but he lost a large part of his force on the river Cornag. Soon afterwards he attacked Eadulf, earl of the northern half of Northumbria, and ravaged the whole of his territory. He fortified the fords of the Forth as a defence against the Britons and again invaded Northumbria, carrying off the earl's son. About this time he gave the city of Brechin to the church.

According to the English chroniclers, Kenneth paid homage to King Edgar for the cession of Lothian, but these statements are probably due to the controversy as to the position of Scotland.

The mormaers, or chiefs, of Kenneth were engaged throughout his reign in a contest with Sigurd the Norwegian, earl of Orkney, for the possession of Caithness and the northern district of Scotland as far south as the Spey. In this struggle the Scots attained no permanent success.

In 995 Kenneth, whose strength like that of the other kings of his branch of the house of Kenneth MacAlpin lay chiefly north of the Tay, was slain treacherously by his own subjects, according to the later chroniclers at Fettercairn in the Mearns through an intrigue of Finvela, daughter of the earl of Angus. He was buried on the Isle of Iona. He, then, became the fifth king of Scotland to be murdered in succession.

References

Chronicles of the Picts and Scots, ed. WF Skene (Edinburgh, 1867)

WF Skene, Celtic Scotland (Edinburgh, 1876)

This entry was originally from the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica. -------------------- According to Berchan's Prophecy, a cryptic Scottish king list posing as verse prophecy, the mother of Malcolm II was a women from Leinster, a statement not supported elsewhere, but which there is no good reason to doubt [ESSH 1: 573-4]. She was presumably a member of one of the local dynasties ruling in Leinster at the time, but no known evidence would tell us to which of these dynasties she belonged (if any).

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#_Toc253996179

Kenneth was maybe murdered Finella's Castle, Fettercairn [995], bur Isle of Iona). The 10th century Pictish Chronicle Cronica de Origine Antiquorum Pictorum records that "Cinadius filius Maelcolaim" succeeded after the death of Colin, adding that after one year he invaded Saxony and brought back "filium regis Saxonum"[141]. The 11th century Synchronisms of Flann Mainistreach name (in order) "…Cuillen mac Illiulb, Cinaet mac Maelcolaim, Custantin mac Cuilen, Cinaet mac Duib, Maelcolaim mac Cinaeta" as Scottish kings, dated to the 10th and 11th centuries[142]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "…Kinet filius Malcolin xxii annis et ii mensibus…" as king[143]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Kenneth the son of Malcolm and brother of King Duff" succeeded as king in 970 after Culen was killed and reigned for twenty-four years and nine months[144]. He succeeded in 971 as KENNETH II King of Scotland. Florence of Worcester records that "subreguli eius octo…Kynath…rex Scottorum, Malcolm rex Cumbrorum, Maccus plurimarum rex insularum et alii quinque Dufnal, Siferth, Huwal, Jacob, Juchil" submitted to King Eadgar at Chester and rowed him on the river Dee, dated to [973] from the context[145]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that King Kenneth II decreed a change to the Scottish royal succession to enable "the nearest survivor in blood to the deceased king to succeed", in opposition to "Constantine the Bald, son of King Culen, and Gryme son of Kenneth son of King Duff"[146]. The same source adds that the king´s opponents persuaded "the daughter of Cruchne, Earl of Angus…Finele" to murder the king in revenge for the death of her son which he had ordered[147]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Cinaed son of Mael Coluim king of Scotland was deceitfully killed" in 995[148]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Kynnath mac Malcolm" reigned for 24 years and 2 months, was killed "a suis hominibus in Fetherkern" through the treachery of "Finuele filie filie Cunthar comitis de Anguss" whose only son had been killed by the king[149]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 includes the same information[150]. m ---. The name of Kenneth's wife is not known. Kenneth II & his wife had one child:

-------------------- Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland was the son of Malcolm I of Alba, King of Scotland.

He died in 995 at Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland, possibly murdered. He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.

Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland gained the title of King Kenneth of Alba. He succeeded to the title of King Kenneth II of Scotland in 971.

He was possbily killed by Finvela, a noblewoman whose son was killed by the king. She is said to have lured Kenneth into her home promising to unmask traiters. In one room, a statue was connected to several hidden crossbows which were set to fire bolts from every side when a golden apple on the statue was lifted. After a great feast, at which wine flowed freely, Finvela took her drunken guest into the fatal room and offered him the golden apple as a gesture of peace. As he lifted the apple, he was struck by a hail of bolts. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography. http://www.thepeerage.com/e114.htm

Children of Kenneth II of Alba, King of Scotland:

   * Dungal of Alba d. 999
   * Malcolm II of Alba, King of Scotland b. c 954, d. 25 Nov 1034

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10289.htm#i102889

-------------------- Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim) anglicised as Kenneth II, and nicknamed An Fionnghalach, "The Fratricide" (before 954 – 995) was King of Scotland (Alba). The son of Malcolm I (Máel Coluim mac Domnaill), he succeeded King Cuilén (Cuilén mac Iduilb) on the latter's death at the hands of Amdarch of Strathclyde in 971. -------------------- Sources:

The book, 'The Oxford History of the British Monarchy'

Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia

The book, 'Scotland Story' -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_II_of_Scotland -------------------- SOURCES:

1) GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; Pages 226, 228;

G929.72;

C6943ra; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

Kenneth II, King of Scots 971-95, was murdered in 994/95 -------------------- Kenneth became King of Scots in 971, when his predecessor Cuilen was killed by the Strathclyde Britons. There are some indications that Kenneth had a joint kingship with Cuilen's brother Olaf until 977, when Olaf was killed. Kenneth led successful raids against Strathclyde in both 971 and 972.

In 973, Kenneth attended a conference of kings at Chester, in England, which was probably organized by Edgar, King of England. Kenneth appears to have had a quiet but successful reign and was killed 'by treachery' in 995, and succeeded by Constantine son of Cuilen, a distant cousin.

It is possible that Kenneth married an Irish woman from Leinster, as a twelfth-century Scottish poem calls his son Malcolm 'son of a woman of the Leinstermen'. -------------------- He was murdered by his own men. He came to his end by "female treachery". He had to put to death the only son of Fenella, wife of the maor mor or viceroy of Kincardineshire. Fenella, though the execution had been a deserved one, did not the less readily determine to revenge her son's death. She invited Kenneth to lodge in her house near Ferrercairn in the Mearns. here he was assassinated. The inhospitable murderess escaped from her castle, down the valley to a place in the parish of Fordun where she was seized and put to death. -------------------- Kenneth II, King of Alba

    Kenneth II, King of Alba was the son of Malcolm I, King of Alba. He died in 995 at Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland, possibly murdered.1 He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.1
    He was also known as Cináed mac Maíl Coluim.2 He succeeded to the title of  King Kenneth II of Alba in 971.3 
    He was possbily killed by Finvela, a noblewoman whose son was killed by the king. She is said to have lured Kenneth into her home promising to unmask traiters. In one room, a statue was connected to several hidden crossbows which were set to fire bolts from every side when a golden apple on the statue was lifted. After a great feast, at which wine flowed freely, Finvela took her drunken guest into the fatal room and offered him the golden apple as a gesture of peace. As he lifted the apple, he was struck by a hail of bolts. He has an extensive biographical entry in the  Dictionary of National Biography.4 

Children of Kenneth II, King of Alba 1.Dungal of Alba d. 999 2.Malcolm II, King of Alba+ b. c 954, d. 25 Nov 1034 Citations 1.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 175. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families. 2.[S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia. 3.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 174. 4.[S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Kenneth II, -995". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.

http://thepeerage.com/p10289.htm#i102889 -------------------- King Of Scotland between 971 and 995

view all 38

Kenneth II, King of Scots's Timeline

932
932
Iona,,Argyllshire,Scotland
948
948
Age 16
Scotland
950
950
Age 18
954
954
Age 22
Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland
958
958
Age 26
The Forgotten Monarchy, , , Scotland
960
960
Age 28
Scotland
971
971
Age 39
King of the Scots
971
- 995
Age 39
Scotland
995
995
Age 63
Fettercairne, Kincardineshire, Scotland

Died at Finella's Castle, Fettercain, Scotland

995
Age 63
Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland