Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce

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Leofwine

Also Known As: "Leofwine", "Ealdorman of the Hwicce", "Leofwine Earl of Mercia"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mercia, England
Death: Died in Chester, Cheshire, England
Immediate Family:

Husband of Ælfwaru
Father of Northman; Leofric III, Earl of Mercia; Eadwine and Godwin

Occupation: ealdorman of the Hwicce, ealdorman in Mercia - a high-ranking royal official, EARL OF MERCIA, Ealdorman of the Hwicce, Duke of Norfolk, Ealdorman of the Hwicce and of Mercia
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce

Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce (c. 950 – 1028), was an ealdorman of the Hwicce people in Mercia. He is mentioned as Wicciarum Prouinciarum dux[1] Ealdorman of Hwicce in 997.

Leofwine may have been related by marriage to the family of Ælfgifu of Northampton.[2] The chronicles mention four children of Leofwine, their order of birth is unknown:

   * Northman, killed in 1017.[3]
   * Eadwine, killed in battle in 1039.[3]
   * Godwine, died some time before 1056.[4]
   * Leofric, Earl of Mercia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leofwine,_Ealdorman_of_the_Hwicce

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Leofwinedied1023A

LEOFWINE, son of [LEOFRIC & his wife ---] (-1023). "Leofwine dux" subscribed charters of King Edward in 976 and 977, and of King Æthelred II dated between 994 and 1015[206], the charter dated 997 specifying that he was "Leofwine Wicciarium-Provinciarum dux"[207]. King Æthelred II granted "Leofwine dux" land in Warwickshire under a charter dated 998[208]. Ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia.

m ---. The name of Leofwine's wife is not known.

Leofwine & his wife had four children:

a) WULFRIC (-killed in battle Ringmere 5 May 1010). Roger of Hoveden names Wulfric as son of Leofwine when recording his death fighting the Danes[209]. Simeon of Durham names "Wlfric the son of Leofwin" among those killed in battle by the Danes "in East Anglia…Ringmere"[210].

b) NORTHMAN (-murdered 1017[211]). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names “Leofricum postea comitem, et Edwinum occisum per Walenses, et Normannum occisum cum Edrico duce Merciorum per Cnutonem regem” as sons of “Leofwinus comes Leicestriæ”[212]. "Northman dux" subscribed a charter of King Æthelred II dated 994[213]. Florence of Worcester records that "Norman son of Leofwin the ealdorman" was killed on the orders of King Canute at the same time as Eadric "Streona"[214]. Ealdorman of Mercia. Simeon of Durham records that "(though guiltless) duke Northman the son of duke Leofwin, the brother of earl Leofric" was among those killed at the same time as Eadric "Streona" in 1017[215]. ”Leofricus comes…et conjux mea Godgyve” donated property to Evesham Monastery by undated charter which names “frater meus Normannus”[216].

c) LEOFRIC (-30 Oct 1057, bur Coventry). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names “Leofricum postea comitem, et Edwinum occisum per Walenses, et Normannum occisum cum Edrico duce Merciorum per Cnutonem regem” as sons of “Leofwinus comes Leicestriæ”[217]. Simeon of Durham records that King Canute appointed "Leofric" as Earl of Mercia after his brother Northman was killed in 1017[218], although this was apparently during the lifetime of their father.

- see below.

d) EADWIN (-killed in battle 1039). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names “Leofricum postea comitem, et Edwinum occisum per Walenses, et Normannum occisum cum Edrico duce Merciorum per Cnutonem regem” as sons of “Leofwinus comes Leicestriæ”[219]. "Edwin the ealdorman's son" is recorded as present in a record of a lawsuit in Herefordshire dated [1016/35][220]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that he was killed by the Welsh[221].

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An ealdorman (from Old English ealdorman, lit. "elder man") is the term used for a high-ranking royal official and prior magistrate of an Anglo-Saxon shire or group of shires from about the ninth century to the time of King Cnut. The term ealdorman was rendered in Latin as dux in early West Saxon charters, and as præfectus (which confusingly, is also the equivalent of gerefa, modern reeve, from which sheriff or shire reeve). In the Life of King Alfred by the Welsh bishop Asser, the Latin equivalent is comes.[1] As the chief magistrate of a shire or group of shires (county) in Anglo-Saxon England, he commanded the army of the shire(s) and districts under his control on behalf of the king.

Appointment

They were appointees of the king and were originally mostly from the ancient and powerful families, but later were often chosen from among the king's comites (plural of comes, lit. "companion") and many, especially in the early Danish period, were new to high office. The office was not hereditary, but there are several examples of tenth-century ealdormen whose sons became ealdormen (if not always of the same district), such as Æthelstan Half-King and Æthelweard the Chronicler.

Earls

Towards the end of the tenth century, the term ealdorman gradually disappeared as it gave way to eorl, probably under the influence of the Danish term jarl, which evolved into modern English earl. The analogous term is sometimes count, from the French comte, derived from the Latin comes. The ealdormen can be thought of as the early English earls, for their ealdormanries (singular ealdormanry, same meaning as earldom) eventually became the great earldoms of Anglo-Danish and Anglo-Norman England.

An ealdormancy was an Anglo-Saxon governing body over several shires, made up of more than one ealdorman.

Aldermen

Although earls may be regarded as the successors of ealdormen, the word ealdorman itself did not disappear and survives in modern times as alderman. This term, however, developed distinct meanings which have little to do with ealdormen.

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Notes

  1. ^ Charter: S 891
  2. ^ Ann Williams, "Leofric" in M. Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0
  3. ^ a b The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  4. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle ed. M. Swanton (1996), p. 294.

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Leofwine (c. 950 – 1028), was an ealdorman in Mercia. He is mentioned as Wicciarum Prouinciarum dux[1] (Ealdorman of Hwicce) in 997.

Leofwine may have been related by marriage to the family of Ælfgifu of Northampton.[2] The chronicles mention four children of Leofwine, their order of birth is unknown:

   * Northman, killed in 1017.[3]
   * Edwin, killed in battle in 1039.[3]
   * Godwin, died some time before 1056.[4]
   * Leofric, Earl of Mercia.

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Charter: S 891
  2. ^ Ann Williams, "Leofric" in M. Lapidge (ed.), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. ISBN 0-631-22492-0
  3. ^ a b The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  4. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle ed. M. Swanton (1996), p. 294.

-------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/i/l/Lisa-A-Wilsonpennington/GENE3-0046.html -------------------- Sir Guy de Warwick de Ardenne -------------------- Lived in Northumberland, England

Leofwine (c. 950 – 1028) was an ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia. He is mentioned as Wicciarum Prouinciarum dux[1] Ealdorman of Hwicce in 997.

The chronicles mention four children of Leofwine, their order of birth is unknown:

   Northman, killed in 1017.[2]
   Eadwine, killed in battle in 1039.[2]
   Godwine, died some time before 1056.[3]
   Leofric, Earl of Mercia.

I found this information online at the Wikipedia site. -------------------- Lived in Northumberland, England

Leofwine (c. 950 – 1028) was an ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia. He is mentioned as Wicciarum Prouinciarum dux[1] Ealdorman of Hwicce in 997.

The chronicles mention four children of Leofwine, their order of birth is unknown:

   Northman, killed in 1017.[2]
   Eadwine, killed in battle in 1039.[2]
   Godwine, died some time before 1056.[3]
   Leofric, Earl of Mercia.

I found this information online at the Wikipedia site.

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Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce's Timeline

950
950
Mercia, England
966
966
Age 16
Mercia, England
967
967
Age 17
Mercia,,,England
968
May 14, 968
Age 18
Mercia, England
977
977
Age 27
Mercia, England, United Kingdom
979
979
Age 29
Balterley, Newcastle under Lyme, Staffordshire, England
1023
1023
Age 73
Chester, Cheshire, England
1028
1028
Age 73
????
Earl of Mercia