Leonard Berryman (Bereman) (c.1660 - 1704)

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Death: Died
Managed by: Hatte Blejer
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Immediate Family

About Leonard Berryman (Bereman)

Leonard Berryman (son of Thomas Berryman and Jane Tietie) was born circa 1660, and died after March 25, 1704. He married Abigail ---- circa 1690 in Salem Co., New Jersey.

Was a resident of Staten Island. Was an early settler of Cumberland County, New Jersey.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/a/g/Charles-Hagen/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0201.html states the following:

Leonard bought land on Staten Island from Jacob Garrison in 1688. He was a "husbandman" on Staten Island during 1688 to 1691. This might either mean a farmer or quite possibly a herder. Sometime after 1691, Leonard moved from Staten Island to Cohansey Creek in Cumberland Co., New Jersey. Without any evidence, this was quite possibly the result of an inheritance from his father or mother or a product of his marriage. Purchase is also quite possible.

Leonard was unusual for founders of the Cohansey colony because most of the population there came along a route starting in the 1630s that began in Boston, moved first to the Hamptons of Long Island, then to Fairfield, Connecticut, and finally to Cohansey. LB's Staten Island origin and an absence of New England records of Berryman families add to the questions of the Berryman origins (suggestions of a "Samuel Bereman" killed in King Philip's War on 26 March 1667 can be shown to involve a Samuel Bourman of Barnstable, probably unrelated to the Berrymans).

Leonard can be positively identified in the Cohansey (New Jersey) area only between 1691 [when he bought property there -- JTS] and 1704 when he was involved in the will of another man. It cannot be assumed that he died right away for records in the Cohansey area were not good and the Berryman family seems to have lost its literacy there. LB's son Thomas did not rise to prominence until the late 1710s which might imply it wasn't until around then that he (Thomas) became the head of household or it might mean nothing at all.

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