Leonidas King of Sparta

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Λεωνίδας

Birthdate:
Death: Died
Immediate Family:

Son of Anaxandridas II King of Sparta and First Wife
Husband of Gorgo Queen of Sparta
Father of Pleistarchus King of Sparta
Brother of Dorieus and Cleombrotus Regent of Sparta
Half brother of Cleomenes I King of Sparta

Managed by: Jason Scott Wills
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About Leonidas King of Sparta

Leonidas was a 5th century B.C. Spartan military king who bravely led a small force of Greeks -- mostly Spartan (the famous 300), but also Thespians and Thebans -- against the much larger Persian army of Xerxes, at the pass of Thermopylae, in 480 B.C. during the Persian Wars. According to Herodotus, Leonidas had been warned by the Delphic oracle that either Sparta would be destroyed or their king would lose his life. Leonidas chose the second alternative.

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Leonidas King of Sparta's Timeline

-540
-540
- -480

לאונידס הראשון
Disambig RTL.svg המונח "לאונידס" מפנה לכאן. לערך העוסק בכדורגלן ברזילאי, ראו לאונידס (כדורגלן).

פסל מודרני של לאונידס הראשון, מלך ספרטה
לאונידס הראשון (בערך 521 לפנה"ס - 11 באוגוסט 480 לפנה"ס) היה מלך ספרטה שנודע בשל גבורתו בקרב תרמופילאי.

לאונידס היה אחד מבניו של אנכסנדרידס השני, מלך ספרטה שעל פי המיתולוגיה נחשב לצאצאו של הרקולס. ב-489 לפנה"ס או ב-488 לפנה"ס ירש את כתר ספרטה מאחיו קלאומנס הראשון, שאת בתו גורגו נשא לאישה.

קרב תרמופילאי[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
Postscript-viewer-shaded.png ערך מורחב – קרב תרמופילאי
כאשר נודע בספרטה על פלישת קסרקסס מלך פרס ליוון, אנשיה נועצו באורקל מדלפי וקיבלו תשובה שבה נאמר בין היתר: "ייפול בחלקם של אנשי לאקוניה להתאבל על מות מלכם - צאצאו של הרקולס הגדול."

באוגוסט 480 יצא לאונידס בלווית 300 מאנשי חיל משמרו למצר היבשתי תרמופילאי שבמרכז יוון - המעבר היחיד שדרכו ניתן היה להגיע מצפון יוון לדרומה. הוא פיקד על כוח של הליגה ההלנית שמנה 7,000 איש ושהוטל עליו לעצור את התקדמותו של הצבא הפרסי, שהגיע מכיוון צפון יוון ומנה מאות אלפי חיילים. וזאת במטרה לאפשר לצי היווני להתארגן בארטמיסיון.

במשך היומיים הראשונים לאונידס ואנשיו הצליחו להדוף את התקפות הפרסים בקרב שבו נהרגו כ-20,000 מחיילי צבא קסרקסס, ובהם שניים מאחיו. אך ביום השלישי בוגד יווני בשם אפיאלטס הוביל את המצביא הפרסי הידרנס בשביל אנופאיאה. זו הייתה דרך בהרים שעקפה את מצר תרמופילאי ואיפשרה לפרסים לאגף ולהביס את הצבא היווני.

במצב דברים זה החליט לאונידס לשלוח בחזרה את כל החיילים היוונים, בעוד הוא ו-300 אנשיו נשארו ללחום בפרסים עד מוות, כדי לעכב את התקדמותם ולאפשר ליוונים להתארגן נגדם.

כוח קטן זה, שהוקף מכל צדדיו בחיילי האויב, נלחם עד האיש האחרון. ההיסטוריון היווני הרודוטוס כתב כי קסרכסס פקד לערוף את ראשו של לאונידס ולצלוב את גופתו. קברו של לאונידס נמצא כיום בעיר ספרטה שבמחוז פלופונסוס ביוון.

בתרמופילאי הוקמה אנדרטה בצורת אריה (שנהרס במשך הדורות) ושעליו כתוב, כפי שמוזכר כבר על ידי הרודוטוס :"עובר אורח, לך ואמור לספרטנים כי כאן שוכבים אנו, המצייתים לחוקיהם."

ראו גם[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
צבא ספרטה
300 (סרט)
קישורים חיצוניים[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
ויקישיתוף מדיה וקבצים בנושא לאונידס הראשון בוויקישיתוף
P La Liberte.png ערך זה הוא קצרמר בנושא היסטוריה. אתם מוזמנים לתרום לוויקיפדיה ולהרחיב אותו.
קטגוריות: קצרמר היסטוריהמלכי ספרטהיוון העתיקה: היסטוריה צבאית

Leonidas I
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Leonidas (disambiguation).

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2008)
Leonidas I
King of Sparta
Leonidas I of Sparta.jpg
Reign 489–480 BC
Predecessor Cleomenes I
Successor Pleistarchus
Born c. 540 BC
Sparta
Died 480 BC (aged around 60)
Thermopylae
Consort Gorgo
Issue Pleistarchus
Greek Λεωνίδας
House Agiad
Father Anaxandridas II
Mother Unknown
Religion Greek Polytheism
Leonidas I (/liːˈɒn.ɨ.dəs/ lee-on-i-dəs or /liː.əˈnaɪ.dəs/; Doric: Λεωνίδας [leɔːnídas], Leōnidas; Ionic Greek: Λεωνίδης, Leōnidēs; died 480 BC),[1] was a Greek warrior king of the Greek city-state of Sparta. He led the Spartan forces during the Second Persian War and is remembered for his death at the Battle of Thermopylae. Leonidas was the third son of Anaxandridas II of Sparta,[2] and thus belonged to the Agiad dynasty, who claimed descent from the hero Heracles.

Contents [hide]
1 Life
2 Battle of Thermopylae
3 Legacy
3.1 Antiquity
3.2 Thermopylae monument
3.3 Modern
3.4 Literature
3.5 Film
4 Notes
5 References
6 External links
Life[edit]
According to Herodotus, Leonidas' mother was not only his father's wife but also his niece and had been barren for so long that the ephors, the five annually elected administrators of the Spartan constitution, tried to prevail upon King Anaxandridas to set her aside and take another wife. Anaxandridas refused, claiming his wife was blameless, whereupon the ephors agreed to allow him to take a second wife without setting aside his first. This second wife, a descendent of Chilon of Sparta (one of the Seven Sages of Greece), promptly bore a son, Cleomenes. However, one year after Cleomenes' birth, Anaxandridas' first wife also gave birth to a son, Dorieus. Leonidas was the second son of Anaxandridas' first wife, and either the elder brother or twin of Cleombrotus.[3] Because Leonidas was not heir to the throne, he was not exempt from attending the agoge, the public school education which the sons of all Spartans had to complete in order to qualify for citizenship.[4] Leonidas was thus one of the few Spartan kings to have ever undergone the notoriously harsh training of Spartan youth.

Anaxandridas died in 520 BC,[5] and Cleomenes succeeded to the throne sometime between then and 516 BC.[6] Dorieus was so outraged that the Spartans had preferred his half-brother over himself that he found it impossible to remain in Sparta. He made one unsuccessful attempt to set up a colony in Africa and, when this failed, sought his fortune in Sicily, where after initial successes he was killed.[7] Leonidas' relationship with his bitterly antagonistic elder brothers is unknown, but he married Cleomenes' daughter, Gorgo, sometime before coming to the throne in 490 BC.[8]

Leonidas I as depicted at the top of the monument to Felice Cavallotti in Milan, created by Ernesto Bazzaro in 1906.
Leonidas was clearly heir to the Agiad throne and a full citizen (homoios) at the time of the Battle of Sepeia against Argos (c. 494 BC). Likewise, he was a full citizen when the Persians sought submission from Sparta and met with vehement rejection in or around 492/491 BC. His elder brother the king had already been deposed on grounds of purported insanity, and had fled into exile when Athens sought assistance against the First Persian invasion of Greece, that ended at Marathon (490 BC).

Plutarch has recorded the following: "When someone said to him: 'Except for being king you are not at all superior to us,' Leonidas son of Anaxandridas and brother of Cleomenes replied: 'But were I not better than you, I should not be king.'"[9] As the product of the agoge, Leonidas is unlikely to have been referring to his royal blood alone but rather suggesting that he had, like his brother Dorieus, proven superior capability in the competitive environment of Spartan training and society, and that he believed this made him qualified to rule.

Leonidas was chosen to lead the combined Greek forces determined to resist the Second Persian invasion of Greece in 481 BC. This was not simply a tribute to Sparta's military prowess: The probability that the coalition wanted Leonidas personally for his capability as a military leader is underlined by the fact that just two years after his death, the coalition preferred Athenian leadership to the leadership of either Leotychidas or Leonidas' successor (as regent for his still under-aged son) Pausanias. The rejection of Leotychidas and Pausanias was not a reflection on Spartan arms. Sparta's military reputation had never stood in higher regard, nor was Sparta less powerful in 478 BC than it had been in 481 BC.

This selection of Leonidas to lead the defense of Greece against Xerxes' invasion led to Leonidas' death in the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC.

Battle of Thermopylae[edit]
Main article: Battle of Thermopylae

Leonidas at Thermopylae (1814) by Jacques-Louis David, who chose the subject in the aftermath of the French Revolution as a model of "civic duty and self-sacrifice", but also as a contemplation of loss and death, with Leonidas quietly poised and heroically nude[10]
Upon receiving a request from the confederated Greek forces to aid in defending Greece against the Persian invasion, Sparta consulted the Oracle at Delphi. The Oracle is said to have made the following prophecy in hexameter verse:

For you, inhabitants of wide-wayed Sparta,
Either your great and glorious city must be wasted by Persian men,
Or if not that, then the bound of Lacedaemon must mourn a dead king, from Heracles' line.
The might of bulls or lions will not restrain him with opposing strength; for he has the might of Zeus.
I declare that he will not be restrained until he utterly tears apart one of these.[11]

In August 480 BC, Leonidas went out to meet Xerxes' army at Thermopylae with a small force of 300 men, where he was joined by forces from other Greek city-states, who put themselves under his command to form an army of 14,000 strong. There are various theories on why Leonidas was accompanied by such a small force of hoplites. According to Herodotus, "the Spartans sent the men with Leonidas on ahead so that the rest of the allies would see them and march with no fear of defeat, instead of medizing like the others if they learned that the Spartans were delaying. After completing their festival Carneia, they left their garrison at Sparta and marched in full force towards Thermopylae. The rest of the allies planned to do likewise, for the Olympiad coincided with these events. They accordingly sent their advance guard, not expecting the war at Thermopylae to be decided so quickly."[12] Many modern commentators are unsatisfied with this explanation and point to the fact that the Olympic Games were in progress or impute internal dissent and intrigue.

Whatever the reason Sparta's own contribution was just 300 Spartiates (accompanied by their attendants and probably perioikoi auxiliaries), the total force assembled for the defense of the pass of Thermopylae came to something between four and seven thousand Greeks. They faced a Persian army who had invaded from the north of Greece under Xerxes I. Herodotus stated that this army consisted of over two million men; modern scholars consider this to be an exaggeration and give estimates ranging from 70,000 to 300,000.[13]

Xerxes waited four days to attack, hoping the Greeks would disperse. Finally, on the fifth day the Persians attacked. Leonidas and the Greeks repulsed the Persians' frontal attacks for the fifth and sixth days, killing roughly 20,000 of the enemy troops. The Persian elite Special Forces unit known to the Greeks as "the Immortals" was held back, and two of Xerxes' brothers (Abrocomes and Hyperanthes) died in battle.[14] On the seventh day (August 11), a Malian Greek traitor named Ephialtes led the Persian general Hydarnes by a mountain track to the rear of the Greeks.[15] At that point Leonidas sent away all Greek troops and remained in the pass with his 300 Spartans, 900 Helots, and 700 Thespians who refused to leave. The Thespians stayed entirely of their own will, declaring that they would not abandon Leonidas and his followers. Their leader was Demophilus, son of Diadromes, and as Herodotus writes: "Hence they lived with the Spartans and died with them."

One theory provided by Herodotus is that Leonidas sent away the remainder of his men because he cared about their safety. The King would have thought it wise to preserve those Greek troops for future battles against the Persians, but he knew that the Spartans could never abandon their post on the battlefield. The soldiers who stayed behind were to protect their escape against the Persian cavalry. Herodotus himself believed that Leonidas gave the order because he perceived the allies to be out of heart and unwilling to encounter the danger to which his own mind was made up. He therefore chose to dismiss all troops except the Thespians and Helots and save the glory for the Spartans.[11]

Of the small Greek force, attacked from both sides, all were killed except for the Thebans, who surrendered. Leonidas was killed, but the Spartans retrieved his body and protected it. Herodotus says that Xerxes' orders were to have Leonidas' head cut off and put on a stake and his body crucified. This was considered sacrilegious.[16]

Legacy[edit]
Antiquity[edit]
A hero cult of Leonidas survived at Sparta until the Antonine era (1st century AD).[17]

Thermopylae monument[edit]

Statue of the Leonidas at the monument of Thermopylae.
A monument to Leonidas was erected at Thermopylae in 1955. It features a bronze statue of Leonidas. A sign, under the statue, reads simply: "ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ" ("Come and take"), which the Spartans said when the Persians asked them to put down their weapons at the start of the Battle of Thermopylae.

Another statue, also with the inscription ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ, was erected at Sparta in 1968.

Modern[edit]
In the US Army, the 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, with a detachment of 300 men, known as Task Force 300 and led by then LtCol Andrew Poppas of Greek ancestry, was chosen to bolster the defenses of Baqubah in the Diyala River Valley, Iraq and led a series of battles named after Greek City-States.[18]

A fiberglass replica of the Leonidas statue stands at the traffic circle marking the east end of Artillery Road in Fort Polk's "maneuver box", the site of US Army Joint Readiness Training Center rotations. JRTC's motto is "Forging the Warrior Spirit", The statue stands south of a former artillery observation bunker known as "the war memorial" where painted logos of various units that have passed through the rotation there. These include two separate Army brigade combat teams (3rd of the 10th Mountain Division and the 4th Brigade (Airborne) of the 25th Infantry Division) that call themselves "Spartans".

Literature[edit]
Leonidas was the name of an Epic poem written by Richard Glover, which originally appeared in 1737. It went on to appear in four other editions, being expanded from 9 books to 12.

He is a central figure in Steven Pressfield's novel Gates of Fire.

He appears as the protagonist of Frank Miller's 1998 comic book series 300, as it presents a fictionalized version of Leonidas and the Battle of Thermopylae, so does the 2007 feature film adapted from it.

Helena P. Schrader has produced a three-part biographical novel on Leonidas. Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge, Wheatmark, Tucson, 2010 ISBN 978-1-60494-474-7 Leonidas of Sparta: A Peerless Peer, Wheatmark, Tucson, 2011, ISBN 978-1-60494-602-4 and "Leonidas of Sparta: A Heroic King" (scheduled for publication 2012).

Film[edit]
Further information: Battle of Thermopylae in popular culture and Sparta in popular culture
In cinema, Leonidas has been portrayed by:

Richard Egan in the 1962 epic The 300 Spartans.
Gerard Butler in the 2006 film 300, inspired by the graphic novel of the same name by Frank Miller and Lynn Varley. Tyler Neitzel portrayed Leonidas as a young man. Voice actors for foreign dubs include Tilo Schmitz (German) and Jōji Nakata (Japanese).
Scott Burn in the 2007 spoof United 300.
Sean Maguire in the 2008 spoof Meet the Spartans.
Notes[edit]
Jump up ^ Robert Chambers, Book of Days
Jump up ^ Morris, 25
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 5.39–41; Jones, p. 48.
Jump up ^ For more information on the agoge see: Nigel M. Kennell, The Gymnasium of Virtue, Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1995.
Jump up ^ Morris, 35
Jump up ^ W. G. Forrest, A History of Sparta 950–192 B.C., New York, W.W. Norton & Company, 1968, p. 85.
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 5.42–48
Jump up ^ Paul Cartledge, The Spartans: The World of the Warrior-Heroes of Ancient Greece, New York, Vintage Books, 2002, p. 126.
Jump up ^ Plutarch on Sparta, Sayings of Spartans, Leonidas son of Anaxandridas, #1
Jump up ^ Jack Johnson, "David and Literature," in Jacques-Louis David: New Perspectives (Rosemont, 2006), pp. 85–86 et passim.
^ Jump up to: a b Herodotus, 7.220
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 7:206
Jump up ^ De Souza, Philip (2003). The Greek and Persian Wars 499–386 BC. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. p. 41.
Jump up ^ Herodotus; George Rawlinson, editor (1885). The History of Herodotus. New York: D. Appleman and Company. pp. bk. 7.
Jump up ^ Herodotus; Henry Cary, editor (1904). The Histories of Herodotus. New York: D. Appleton and Company. p. 438.
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 7.238
Jump up ^ Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics, Part 12 By James Hastings Page 655 ISBN 0-567-09489-8
Jump up ^ http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/Repository/SelectedSpeeches/Caldwell5-7...
References[edit]
Herodotus, Herodotus, with an English translation by A. D. Godley. Cambridge. Harvard University Press. 1920.
Jones, A. H. M. Sparta, New York, Barnes and Nobles, 1967
Morris, Ian Macgregor, Leonidas: Hero of Thermopylae, New York, The Rosen Publishing Group, 2004.
Attribution.
Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Leonidas". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
External links[edit]
Portal icon Ancient Greece portal
Portal icon Biography portal
Wikiquote has quotations related to: Leonidas I
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Leonidas I.
Leonidas and the 300 Spartans with explanatory animations, videos and rare images from Sparta's Archaeological Museum
Sparta Reconsidered provides a comprehensive look at Sparta including an essay on Leonidas.[1]
The website Sparta-Leonidas-Gorgo is specifically dedicated to Leonidas and his wife Gorgo.[2]
Preceded by
Cleomenes I Agiad King of Sparta
489–480 BC Succeeded by
Pleistarchus
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Categories: 480 BC5th-century BC Greek people5th-century BC rulersBattle of ThermopylaeGreek historical hero cultPeople of the Greco-Persian WarsRulers of SpartaGreek peopleGreek culture480s BC deaths

-521
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לאונידס הראשון
Disambig RTL.svg המונח "לאונידס" מפנה לכאן. לערך העוסק בכדורגלן ברזילאי, ראו לאונידס (כדורגלן).

פסל מודרני של לאונידס הראשון, מלך ספרטה
לאונידס הראשון (בערך 521 לפנה"ס - 11 באוגוסט 480 לפנה"ס) היה מלך ספרטה שנודע בשל גבורתו בקרב תרמופילאי.

לאונידס היה אחד מבניו של אנכסנדרידס השני, מלך ספרטה שעל פי המיתולוגיה נחשב לצאצאו של הרקולס. ב-489 לפנה"ס או ב-488 לפנה"ס ירש את כתר ספרטה מאחיו קלאומנס הראשון, שאת בתו גורגו נשא לאישה.

קרב תרמופילאי[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
Postscript-viewer-shaded.png ערך מורחב – קרב תרמופילאי
כאשר נודע בספרטה על פלישת קסרקסס מלך פרס ליוון, אנשיה נועצו באורקל מדלפי וקיבלו תשובה שבה נאמר בין היתר: "ייפול בחלקם של אנשי לאקוניה להתאבל על מות מלכם - צאצאו של הרקולס הגדול."

באוגוסט 480 יצא לאונידס בלווית 300 מאנשי חיל משמרו למצר היבשתי תרמופילאי שבמרכז יוון - המעבר היחיד שדרכו ניתן היה להגיע מצפון יוון לדרומה. הוא פיקד על כוח של הליגה ההלנית שמנה 7,000 איש ושהוטל עליו לעצור את התקדמותו של הצבא הפרסי, שהגיע מכיוון צפון יוון ומנה מאות אלפי חיילים. וזאת במטרה לאפשר לצי היווני להתארגן בארטמיסיון.

במשך היומיים הראשונים לאונידס ואנשיו הצליחו להדוף את התקפות הפרסים בקרב שבו נהרגו כ-20,000 מחיילי צבא קסרקסס, ובהם שניים מאחיו. אך ביום השלישי בוגד יווני בשם אפיאלטס הוביל את המצביא הפרסי הידרנס בשביל אנופאיאה. זו הייתה דרך בהרים שעקפה את מצר תרמופילאי ואיפשרה לפרסים לאגף ולהביס את הצבא היווני.

במצב דברים זה החליט לאונידס לשלוח בחזרה את כל החיילים היוונים, בעוד הוא ו-300 אנשיו נשארו ללחום בפרסים עד מוות, כדי לעכב את התקדמותם ולאפשר ליוונים להתארגן נגדם.

כוח קטן זה, שהוקף מכל צדדיו בחיילי האויב, נלחם עד האיש האחרון. ההיסטוריון היווני הרודוטוס כתב כי קסרכסס פקד לערוף את ראשו של לאונידס ולצלוב את גופתו. קברו של לאונידס נמצא כיום בעיר ספרטה שבמחוז פלופונסוס ביוון.

בתרמופילאי הוקמה אנדרטה בצורת אריה (שנהרס במשך הדורות) ושעליו כתוב, כפי שמוזכר כבר על ידי הרודוטוס :"עובר אורח, לך ואמור לספרטנים כי כאן שוכבים אנו, המצייתים לחוקיהם."

ראו גם[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
צבא ספרטה
300 (סרט)
קישורים חיצוניים[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
ויקישיתוף מדיה וקבצים בנושא לאונידס הראשון בוויקישיתוף
P La Liberte.png ערך זה הוא קצרמר בנושא היסטוריה. אתם מוזמנים לתרום לוויקיפדיה ולהרחיב אותו.
קטגוריות: קצרמר היסטוריהמלכי ספרטהיוון העתיקה: היסטוריה צבאית

Leonidas I
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Leonidas (disambiguation).

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Leonidas I
King of Sparta
Leonidas I of Sparta.jpg
Reign 489–480 BC
Predecessor Cleomenes I
Successor Pleistarchus
Born c. 540 BC
Sparta
Died 480 BC (aged around 60)
Thermopylae
Consort Gorgo
Issue Pleistarchus
Greek Λεωνίδας
House Agiad
Father Anaxandridas II
Mother Unknown
Religion Greek Polytheism
Leonidas I (/liːˈɒn.ɨ.dəs/ lee-on-i-dəs or /liː.əˈnaɪ.dəs/; Doric: Λεωνίδας [leɔːnídas], Leōnidas; Ionic Greek: Λεωνίδης, Leōnidēs; died 480 BC),[1] was a Greek warrior king of the Greek city-state of Sparta. He led the Spartan forces during the Second Persian War and is remembered for his death at the Battle of Thermopylae. Leonidas was the third son of Anaxandridas II of Sparta,[2] and thus belonged to the Agiad dynasty, who claimed descent from the hero Heracles.

Contents [hide]
1 Life
2 Battle of Thermopylae
3 Legacy
3.1 Antiquity
3.2 Thermopylae monument
3.3 Modern
3.4 Literature
3.5 Film
4 Notes
5 References
6 External links
Life[edit]
According to Herodotus, Leonidas' mother was not only his father's wife but also his niece and had been barren for so long that the ephors, the five annually elected administrators of the Spartan constitution, tried to prevail upon King Anaxandridas to set her aside and take another wife. Anaxandridas refused, claiming his wife was blameless, whereupon the ephors agreed to allow him to take a second wife without setting aside his first. This second wife, a descendent of Chilon of Sparta (one of the Seven Sages of Greece), promptly bore a son, Cleomenes. However, one year after Cleomenes' birth, Anaxandridas' first wife also gave birth to a son, Dorieus. Leonidas was the second son of Anaxandridas' first wife, and either the elder brother or twin of Cleombrotus.[3] Because Leonidas was not heir to the throne, he was not exempt from attending the agoge, the public school education which the sons of all Spartans had to complete in order to qualify for citizenship.[4] Leonidas was thus one of the few Spartan kings to have ever undergone the notoriously harsh training of Spartan youth.

Anaxandridas died in 520 BC,[5] and Cleomenes succeeded to the throne sometime between then and 516 BC.[6] Dorieus was so outraged that the Spartans had preferred his half-brother over himself that he found it impossible to remain in Sparta. He made one unsuccessful attempt to set up a colony in Africa and, when this failed, sought his fortune in Sicily, where after initial successes he was killed.[7] Leonidas' relationship with his bitterly antagonistic elder brothers is unknown, but he married Cleomenes' daughter, Gorgo, sometime before coming to the throne in 490 BC.[8]

Leonidas I as depicted at the top of the monument to Felice Cavallotti in Milan, created by Ernesto Bazzaro in 1906.
Leonidas was clearly heir to the Agiad throne and a full citizen (homoios) at the time of the Battle of Sepeia against Argos (c. 494 BC). Likewise, he was a full citizen when the Persians sought submission from Sparta and met with vehement rejection in or around 492/491 BC. His elder brother the king had already been deposed on grounds of purported insanity, and had fled into exile when Athens sought assistance against the First Persian invasion of Greece, that ended at Marathon (490 BC).

Plutarch has recorded the following: "When someone said to him: 'Except for being king you are not at all superior to us,' Leonidas son of Anaxandridas and brother of Cleomenes replied: 'But were I not better than you, I should not be king.'"[9] As the product of the agoge, Leonidas is unlikely to have been referring to his royal blood alone but rather suggesting that he had, like his brother Dorieus, proven superior capability in the competitive environment of Spartan training and society, and that he believed this made him qualified to rule.

Leonidas was chosen to lead the combined Greek forces determined to resist the Second Persian invasion of Greece in 481 BC. This was not simply a tribute to Sparta's military prowess: The probability that the coalition wanted Leonidas personally for his capability as a military leader is underlined by the fact that just two years after his death, the coalition preferred Athenian leadership to the leadership of either Leotychidas or Leonidas' successor (as regent for his still under-aged son) Pausanias. The rejection of Leotychidas and Pausanias was not a reflection on Spartan arms. Sparta's military reputation had never stood in higher regard, nor was Sparta less powerful in 478 BC than it had been in 481 BC.

This selection of Leonidas to lead the defense of Greece against Xerxes' invasion led to Leonidas' death in the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC.

Battle of Thermopylae[edit]
Main article: Battle of Thermopylae

Leonidas at Thermopylae (1814) by Jacques-Louis David, who chose the subject in the aftermath of the French Revolution as a model of "civic duty and self-sacrifice", but also as a contemplation of loss and death, with Leonidas quietly poised and heroically nude[10]
Upon receiving a request from the confederated Greek forces to aid in defending Greece against the Persian invasion, Sparta consulted the Oracle at Delphi. The Oracle is said to have made the following prophecy in hexameter verse:

For you, inhabitants of wide-wayed Sparta,
Either your great and glorious city must be wasted by Persian men,
Or if not that, then the bound of Lacedaemon must mourn a dead king, from Heracles' line.
The might of bulls or lions will not restrain him with opposing strength; for he has the might of Zeus.
I declare that he will not be restrained until he utterly tears apart one of these.[11]

In August 480 BC, Leonidas went out to meet Xerxes' army at Thermopylae with a small force of 300 men, where he was joined by forces from other Greek city-states, who put themselves under his command to form an army of 14,000 strong. There are various theories on why Leonidas was accompanied by such a small force of hoplites. According to Herodotus, "the Spartans sent the men with Leonidas on ahead so that the rest of the allies would see them and march with no fear of defeat, instead of medizing like the others if they learned that the Spartans were delaying. After completing their festival Carneia, they left their garrison at Sparta and marched in full force towards Thermopylae. The rest of the allies planned to do likewise, for the Olympiad coincided with these events. They accordingly sent their advance guard, not expecting the war at Thermopylae to be decided so quickly."[12] Many modern commentators are unsatisfied with this explanation and point to the fact that the Olympic Games were in progress or impute internal dissent and intrigue.

Whatever the reason Sparta's own contribution was just 300 Spartiates (accompanied by their attendants and probably perioikoi auxiliaries), the total force assembled for the defense of the pass of Thermopylae came to something between four and seven thousand Greeks. They faced a Persian army who had invaded from the north of Greece under Xerxes I. Herodotus stated that this army consisted of over two million men; modern scholars consider this to be an exaggeration and give estimates ranging from 70,000 to 300,000.[13]

Xerxes waited four days to attack, hoping the Greeks would disperse. Finally, on the fifth day the Persians attacked. Leonidas and the Greeks repulsed the Persians' frontal attacks for the fifth and sixth days, killing roughly 20,000 of the enemy troops. The Persian elite Special Forces unit known to the Greeks as "the Immortals" was held back, and two of Xerxes' brothers (Abrocomes and Hyperanthes) died in battle.[14] On the seventh day (August 11), a Malian Greek traitor named Ephialtes led the Persian general Hydarnes by a mountain track to the rear of the Greeks.[15] At that point Leonidas sent away all Greek troops and remained in the pass with his 300 Spartans, 900 Helots, and 700 Thespians who refused to leave. The Thespians stayed entirely of their own will, declaring that they would not abandon Leonidas and his followers. Their leader was Demophilus, son of Diadromes, and as Herodotus writes: "Hence they lived with the Spartans and died with them."

One theory provided by Herodotus is that Leonidas sent away the remainder of his men because he cared about their safety. The King would have thought it wise to preserve those Greek troops for future battles against the Persians, but he knew that the Spartans could never abandon their post on the battlefield. The soldiers who stayed behind were to protect their escape against the Persian cavalry. Herodotus himself believed that Leonidas gave the order because he perceived the allies to be out of heart and unwilling to encounter the danger to which his own mind was made up. He therefore chose to dismiss all troops except the Thespians and Helots and save the glory for the Spartans.[11]

Of the small Greek force, attacked from both sides, all were killed except for the Thebans, who surrendered. Leonidas was killed, but the Spartans retrieved his body and protected it. Herodotus says that Xerxes' orders were to have Leonidas' head cut off and put on a stake and his body crucified. This was considered sacrilegious.[16]

Legacy[edit]
Antiquity[edit]
A hero cult of Leonidas survived at Sparta until the Antonine era (1st century AD).[17]

Thermopylae monument[edit]

Statue of the Leonidas at the monument of Thermopylae.
A monument to Leonidas was erected at Thermopylae in 1955. It features a bronze statue of Leonidas. A sign, under the statue, reads simply: "ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ" ("Come and take"), which the Spartans said when the Persians asked them to put down their weapons at the start of the Battle of Thermopylae.

Another statue, also with the inscription ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ, was erected at Sparta in 1968.

Modern[edit]
In the US Army, the 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, with a detachment of 300 men, known as Task Force 300 and led by then LtCol Andrew Poppas of Greek ancestry, was chosen to bolster the defenses of Baqubah in the Diyala River Valley, Iraq and led a series of battles named after Greek City-States.[18]

A fiberglass replica of the Leonidas statue stands at the traffic circle marking the east end of Artillery Road in Fort Polk's "maneuver box", the site of US Army Joint Readiness Training Center rotations. JRTC's motto is "Forging the Warrior Spirit", The statue stands south of a former artillery observation bunker known as "the war memorial" where painted logos of various units that have passed through the rotation there. These include two separate Army brigade combat teams (3rd of the 10th Mountain Division and the 4th Brigade (Airborne) of the 25th Infantry Division) that call themselves "Spartans".

Literature[edit]
Leonidas was the name of an Epic poem written by Richard Glover, which originally appeared in 1737. It went on to appear in four other editions, being expanded from 9 books to 12.

He is a central figure in Steven Pressfield's novel Gates of Fire.

He appears as the protagonist of Frank Miller's 1998 comic book series 300, as it presents a fictionalized version of Leonidas and the Battle of Thermopylae, so does the 2007 feature film adapted from it.

Helena P. Schrader has produced a three-part biographical novel on Leonidas. Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge, Wheatmark, Tucson, 2010 ISBN 978-1-60494-474-7 Leonidas of Sparta: A Peerless Peer, Wheatmark, Tucson, 2011, ISBN 978-1-60494-602-4 and "Leonidas of Sparta: A Heroic King" (scheduled for publication 2012).

Film[edit]
Further information: Battle of Thermopylae in popular culture and Sparta in popular culture
In cinema, Leonidas has been portrayed by:

Richard Egan in the 1962 epic The 300 Spartans.
Gerard Butler in the 2006 film 300, inspired by the graphic novel of the same name by Frank Miller and Lynn Varley. Tyler Neitzel portrayed Leonidas as a young man. Voice actors for foreign dubs include Tilo Schmitz (German) and Jōji Nakata (Japanese).
Scott Burn in the 2007 spoof United 300.
Sean Maguire in the 2008 spoof Meet the Spartans.
Notes[edit]
Jump up ^ Robert Chambers, Book of Days
Jump up ^ Morris, 25
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 5.39–41; Jones, p. 48.
Jump up ^ For more information on the agoge see: Nigel M. Kennell, The Gymnasium of Virtue, Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1995.
Jump up ^ Morris, 35
Jump up ^ W. G. Forrest, A History of Sparta 950–192 B.C., New York, W.W. Norton & Company, 1968, p. 85.
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 5.42–48
Jump up ^ Paul Cartledge, The Spartans: The World of the Warrior-Heroes of Ancient Greece, New York, Vintage Books, 2002, p. 126.
Jump up ^ Plutarch on Sparta, Sayings of Spartans, Leonidas son of Anaxandridas, #1
Jump up ^ Jack Johnson, "David and Literature," in Jacques-Louis David: New Perspectives (Rosemont, 2006), pp. 85–86 et passim.
^ Jump up to: a b Herodotus, 7.220
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 7:206
Jump up ^ De Souza, Philip (2003). The Greek and Persian Wars 499–386 BC. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. p. 41.
Jump up ^ Herodotus; George Rawlinson, editor (1885). The History of Herodotus. New York: D. Appleman and Company. pp. bk. 7.
Jump up ^ Herodotus; Henry Cary, editor (1904). The Histories of Herodotus. New York: D. Appleton and Company. p. 438.
Jump up ^ Herodotus, 7.238
Jump up ^ Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics, Part 12 By James Hastings Page 655 ISBN 0-567-09489-8
Jump up ^ http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/Repository/SelectedSpeeches/Caldwell5-7...
References[edit]
Herodotus, Herodotus, with an English translation by A. D. Godley. Cambridge. Harvard University Press. 1920.
Jones, A. H. M. Sparta, New York, Barnes and Nobles, 1967
Morris, Ian Macgregor, Leonidas: Hero of Thermopylae, New York, The Rosen Publishing Group, 2004.
Attribution.
Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Leonidas". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
External links[edit]
Portal icon Ancient Greece portal
Portal icon Biography portal
Wikiquote has quotations related to: Leonidas I
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Leonidas I.
Leonidas and the 300 Spartans with explanatory animations, videos and rare images from Sparta's Archaeological Museum
Sparta Reconsidered provides a comprehensive look at Sparta including an essay on Leonidas.[1]
The website Sparta-Leonidas-Gorgo is specifically dedicated to Leonidas and his wife Gorgo.[2]
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Cleomenes I Agiad King of Sparta
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Categories: 480 BC5th-century BC Greek people5th-century BC rulersBattle of ThermopylaeGreek historical hero cultPeople of the Greco-Persian WarsRulers of SpartaGreek peopleGreek culture480s BC deaths

-490
-490
- August 11, -480

לאונידס הראשון מלך ספרטה

Leonidas I Of Sparta

-480
August 7, -480
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