Llŷr Llediath, King of the Silures

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Llŷr "Llediath" (Half-Speech) ap Caswallon, King of the Silures

Nicknames: "Lleddiarth", "Llediath", "Leddiath", "Lediath", "Lediarth", "Leddiarth", "Llediarth", "Llyr", "Lear", "Leir", "Lir", "Llŷr", "/Lear/", ""Llediath" (Half-Speech) King of Silurius", "Llŷr Llediath", "King of the Silures", "Llyr of Siluria", "King Lear", "Llyr "Lleddiarth" ap Bladud meaning..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Trevan, Llanilid, Glamorganshire, Wales
Death: Died in Britain
Immediate Family:

Son of Baran 1st King of Siluria ap Ceri
Husband of Penarddun ferch Beli Mawr and Iweriadd . ferch Beli Mawr, Britons
Father of Brân "Fendigaid" (the Blessed) ap Llyr Lleddiarth, Saint, Brenin o Silures; Manwydan . ap Llyr Lediaith; Cymbeline Pendragon King of Britons and Branwen verch LLyr

Occupation: King of the Britons, King of Britain 0020 BC - 0010, d.800bc, King of Britain, about 800 B. C., (Llediatha) ('King Constans'), (King Coel)
Managed by: Erin Spiceland
Last Updated:

About Llŷr "Llediath" (Half-Speech) ap Caswallon, King of the Silures

Probably not son of Caswallon, who was his wife's brother.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leir_of_Britain

is there one or 2 King Lears?

is this same King Lear?

King Lear had 3 doughters and no sons?

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SOME SOURCES SAY LEAR'S FATHER WAS BERAN OR BARAN AP CERI OF (L) BRITAIN.

OTHER POSSIBLE PARENTS ARE SHOWN BELOW BUT THIS INDIVIDUAL IS NOT SHOWN AS A CHILD ON THE FOLLOWING POSSIBLE PARENTS' FAMILY PAGES, TO DO SO WOULD BE CONSIDERED ERRORS BY GENI, EVEN THOUGH THESE LAST POSSIBLE PARENTS MAY BE THE CORRECT ONES,

OTHER SOURCES SAY HIS FATHER WAS CASWALLON (NOTES) (L) DE BRITAIN.

SOME SOURCES SAY LEAR WAS THE FATHER OF BELI OR HELI (SEE NOTE) MAWR KING (L) BRITAIN BUT HE IS NOT SHOWN SO HERE BECAUSE SHOWING MORE THAN ONE SET OF PARENTS WOULD BE CONSIDERED ERRORS BY GENI.

OTHER SOURCES SAY LEAR WAS THE FATHER OF BRAN "THE BLESSED" (NOTES) (L) FENDIGAITH BUT HE IS NOT SHOWN SO HERE BECAUSE SHOWING MORE THAN ONE SET OF PARENTS- TO DO SO WOULD BE CONSIDERED ERRORS BY GENI.

LEAR WAS EDUCATED BY AUSUSTUS CAESAR.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ll%C5%B7r

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Llyr (Lear) Prince of Britain (Roman)

Father Caswallon King of Britain (Catuvellauni tribe)

Mother

Marriage - Penardun Princess of Britain

Children - - Bran "the Blessed" King of Britain (Roman)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per08832.htm#0

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From http://www.mathematical.com/baranllyr20.html

He was educated in Rome by Augustus Caesar. Among the "wise sayings" recorded by the Bards we find this attributed to Llyr: "No folly but ends in misery." -------------------- Llŷr is a figure in Welsh mythology, the father of Brân, Brânwen and Manawydan by Penarddun. The Welsh Triads mention he was imprisoned by Euroswydd; the Second Branch of the Mabinogi names Euroswydd as the father of Penarddun's younger two sons, Nisien and Efnisien. Llŷr corresponds to Lir in Irish mythology, and, like the latter, he is identified as a god of the sea. Leir of Britain, a mythical British king most famous as the subject of William Shakespeare's King Lear, may be derived from Llŷr. -------------------- Lir alias Llyr Llediarth

Celtic God of the Sea

Lir (or Llyr) was God of the Sea, like his son, Manawydan (Manannan). He was represented in medieval Royal pedigrees as Llyr Marini (of the Sea), though completely misplaced in time. Whilst, mythologically, he was Llyr Llediarth (Half-Speech), possibly indicating a foreign origin. He was married to Lweriadd, daughter of Belenos , the Sun-God and his other children included Bran the Blessed and Branwen.

According to the Welsh, he was chief of the gods; but the Irish tell how, when the Tuatha De Danann were driven underground by the sons of Mil, Lir was rejected as chief in favour of Bof. As a measure of reconciliation, the latter offered him the choice of his daughters in marriage (perhaps Lweriadd had died). Lir chose Eve, by whom he had three children; and, when she died, he married her sister, Eva. Unfortunately, Eva became jealous of Lir’s offspring and she lured them to a lake where they were turned into swans! The children were thus forced to spend three hundred years each at three different locations until Christianity overran the land. When finally freed, they were so old that they died soon afterward.

http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/bios/lir.html -------------------- Reference: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rwfurtaw&id=I9630&ti=5538 -------------------- Leir is a legendary prehistoric king of the Britons, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. His story is told in much-modified and romanticized form in William Shakespeare's King Lear. In this drama, some names are identical to those of this legends (e.g. Goneril, Regan, Cordelia), and the happenings are very similar. It is thought that his legend began in the form of the sea-god Llyr and later received a historical setting. It is thus also related to the Irish tale of the Children of Lir.

In Geoffrey's Historia Regum Britanniae, Leir followed his father, King Bladud, to the kingship of Britain and had the longest reign of all the kings at sixty years. He built the city of Kaerleir (Leicester) along the banks of the River Soar.

Unlike his predecessors, he produced no male heir to the throne but had three daughters: Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, whom he favoured most. As he neared his death, he planned to divide the kingdom among his three daughters and their husbands. Goneril and Regan flattered their father and were married off to the Duke of Albany and Duke of Cornwall respectively, each being promised half of the kingdom to inherit. Cordelia, however, refused to flatter her father, feeling that he should not need special assurances of her love, and was given no land to rule. Aganippus, the king of the Franks, courted Cordelia and married her, although Leir refused her a dowry. Some time later, Leir became old, and the two dukes who had married his older daughters rebelled and seized the whole of the kingdom. Maglaurus, the Duke of Albany, maintained Leir in his old age, protecting him with 140 knights. However, Goneril disapproved of such extravagance and after two years decreased Leir's bodyguard to only thirty. He fled to Cornwall, where Regan decreased his guard to only five knights. He fled back to Albany and pleaded with Goneril, but he was given only one knight for protection.

Fearing his two older daughters, he fled to Gaul and his youngest child. Nearing insanity, he was nursed back to health by Cordelia, after which he was held in high honour in Gaul by the leaders, who vowed to restore him to his former glory. Leir, Cordelia, and Aganippus invaded Britain at the head of a large army and overthrew the dukes and their wives. Leir reclaimed the throne of Britain and reigned for three more years until his death. He was succeeded by Cordelia, who buried him in an underground chamber beneath the River Soar near Leicester. It was dedicated to the Roman god Janus and every year people celebrated his feast-day near Leir's tomb. -------------------- Leir is a legendary prehistoric king of the Britons, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. His story is told in much-modified and romanticized form in William Shakespeare's King Lear. In this drama, some names are identical to those of this legends (e.g. Goneril, Regan, Cordelia), and the happenings are very similar. It is thought that his legend began in the form of the sea-god Llyr and later received a historical setting. It is thus also related to the Irish tale of the Children of Lir.

In Geoffrey's Historia Regum Britanniae, Leir followed his father, King Bladud, to the kingship of Britain and had the longest reign of all the kings at sixty years. He built the city of Kaerleir (Leicester) along the banks of the River Soar.

Unlike his predecessors, he produced no male heir to the throne but had three daughters: Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, whom he favoured most. As he neared his death, he planned to divide the kingdom among his three daughters and their husbands. Goneril and Regan flattered their father and were married off to the Duke of Albany and Duke of Cornwall respectively, each being promised half of the kingdom to inherit. Cordelia, however, refused to flatter her father, feeling that he should not need special assurances of her love, and was given no land to rule. Aganippus, the king of the Franks, courted Cordelia and married her, although Leir refused her a dowry. Some time later, Leir became old, and the two dukes who had married his older daughters rebelled and seized the whole of the kingdom. Maglaurus, the Duke of Albany, maintained Leir in his old age, protecting him with 140 knights. However, Goneril disapproved of such extravagance and after two years decreased Leir's bodyguard to only thirty. He fled to Cornwall, where Regan decreased his guard to only five knights. He fled back to Albany and pleaded with Goneril, but he was given only one knight for protection.

Fearing his two older daughters, he fled to Gaul and his youngest child. Nearing insanity, he was nursed back to health by Cordelia, after which he was held in high honour in Gaul by the leaders, who vowed to restore him to his former glory. Leir, Cordelia, and Aganippus invaded Britain at the head of a large army and overthrew the dukes and their wives. Leir reclaimed the throne of Britain and reigned for three more years until his death. He was succeeded by Cordelia, who buried him in an underground chamber beneath the River Soar near Leicester. It was dedicated to the Roman god Janus and every year people celebrated his feast-day near Leir's tomb. -------------------- Leir is a legendary prehistoric king of the Britons, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. His story is told in much-modified and romanticized form in William Shakespeare's King Lear. In this drama, some names are identical to those of this legends (e.g. Goneril, Regan, Cordelia), and the happenings are very similar. It is thought that his legend began in the form of the sea-god Llyr and later received a historical setting. It is thus also related to the Irish tale of the Children of Lir.

In Geoffrey's Historia Regum Britanniae, Leir followed his father, King Bladud, to the kingship of Britain and had the longest reign of all the kings at sixty years. He built the city of Kaerleir (Leicester) along the banks of the River Soar.

Unlike his predecessors, he produced no male heir to the throne but had three daughters: Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, whom he favoured most. As he neared his death, he planned to divide the kingdom among his three daughters and their husbands. Goneril and Regan flattered their father and were married off to the Duke of Albany and Duke of Cornwall respectively, each being promised half of the kingdom to inherit. Cordelia, however, refused to flatter her father, feeling that he should not need special assurances of her love, and was given no land to rule. Aganippus, the king of the Franks, courted Cordelia and married her, although Leir refused her a dowry. Some time later, Leir became old, and the two dukes who had married his older daughters rebelled and seized the whole of the kingdom. Maglaurus, the Duke of Albany, maintained Leir in his old age, protecting him with 140 knights. However, Goneril disapproved of such extravagance and after two years decreased Leir's bodyguard to only thirty. He fled to Cornwall, where Regan decreased his guard to only five knights. He fled back to Albany and pleaded with Goneril, but he was given only one knight for protection.

Fearing his two older daughters, he fled to Gaul and his youngest child. Nearing insanity, he was nursed back to health by Cordelia, after which he was held in high honour in Gaul by the leaders, who vowed to restore him to his former glory. Leir, Cordelia, and Aganippus invaded Britain at the head of a large army and overthrew the dukes and their wives. Leir reclaimed the throne of Britain and reigned for three more years until his death. He was succeeded by Cordelia, who buried him in an underground chamber beneath the River Soar near Leicester. It was dedicated to the Roman god Janus and every year people celebrated his feast-day near Leir's tomb.

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http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=arciek&id=I01487

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