Lludd Llaw Ereint, King of Britain

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Llud Nodens Llaw Ereint "Silver-Handed" ap Beli, King of the Britons

Also Known As: "The Silver-Handed", "King of Britons", "Llyr", "The Silver Handed", "Nascients", "Nuadu", "Nudd", "Llud", "Lud", "Nodens", "Silver Handed", "Silver Handed King of Britain", "Llud Nodens Llaw Ereint "Silver-Handed" ap Beli", "King of the Britons"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: BC, King, Siluria, Britian
Death: Died in London, England
Place of Burial: Ludgate, London, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Beli "The Great", King of Britain; Beli "Mawr" Blessed Sovereign Of Britain; Heli of Britain; Dôn verch Mathonwy; <private> Mathonwy and 1 other
Husband of Wife of Lludd Llaw Ereint
Father of Imanuentius King Of The Trinovantes; Mandubratius ap Ludd of Britain; Tasciovanus (Tasciovanus) ap Llud, King of Catuvellauni; Gwryth (Gwrwst), King of Britain and Annia
Brother of Caswallan ap Beli, King of the Catuvellauni; Llefelys ap Beli; Iweriadd . ferch Beli Mawr, Britons; Penarddun ferch Beli Mawr; Arianrhod verch Beli and 6 others
Half brother of NEMED II KING OF BRITAIN and Cas "the Exile" "El exiliado" Cas `the Exile'

Occupation: King of Britons, Lludd of the Silver hand? King of Britain, Ruled 70-c60 BC, brother of Caswallon, 1.st hist. king, King of Britain, (more) http://www.oocities.com/bpstratton/gedcom/d0004/g0000000.html#I1675, King of the Britons
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Lludd Llaw Ereint, King of Britain

Lludd (Lud) King of Britain (legendary)

Ruled 70-c60 BC, brother of Caswallon, 1.st hist. king

Father Beli Mawr King of Britain (semi-legendary)

Mother

Marriage ?

?

Children - - King of Britain (Catuvellauni tribe)

- - Penardun Princess of Britain

Forrás / Source:

http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per03624.htm#0

--------------------

born bef 100bc or 110bc

He ordered the rebuilding of London's walls and towers. The city, hitherto known as Trin ovantum,thus became the city of Lud, i.e. Kaerlud. This was later corrupted to Kaerfundein, from whence came its present name. Lud was eventually buried in London, close to Ludgate that still bears his name. Lud's sons were not considered fit to succeed him, so the crown passed to his younger brother, Cassivelaunus.

Lludd Llaw Ereint the Silver-Handed, God of Health & Healing

Lludd, also known as Nudd, was the Celtic God of Healing and was the son of Beli Mawr. Lludd had a large shrine at Lydney in Gloucestershire, where offerings of bronze diseased limbs were left. Lludd was identified with the protective and regenerative powers. Lludd's companion and symbol was a dog, a deerhound breed with a lick that could cure the diseased. According to legend, Lludd was once the leader of the gods but was wounded in battle and lost his hand. Gorfannon, the divine-smith god, made Lludd a new hand out of silver. For his defeat, Lludd lost his position to his nephew, Lleu Llaw Gyffes.

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Lludd Llaw Eraint

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lludd Llaw Eraint, "Lludd of the Silver Hand", son of Beli Mawr, is a legendary hero from Welsh mythology. As Nudd Llaw Eraint (the earlier form of his name, cognate of the Irish Nuada Airgetlám, derived from the pre-Roman British god Nodens) he is the father of Gwynn ap Nudd. He is probably the source of king Lud from Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain.

In the Mabinogion tale of Lludd and Llefelys, which seems heavily influenced by Geoffrey of Monmouth's work, he is the ruler of Britain while his brother Llefelys ruled Gaul. Lludd calls on Llefelys to rid Britain of three plagues then afflicting the kingdom. According to legend, there was once a temple to Lludd at the site of St Paul's Cathedral, London, near Ludgate, which is named after him.

The plagues of Lludd’s reign

The first plague was that of the Coranians.

The second was that of the white and red dragons. One of the dragons represented the Brythons, while the other represented the Anglo-Saxon invaders of Britain. On the eve of May Day, the two dragons would begin to fight. The White Dragon would strive to overcome the Red Dragon, making the Red cry out a fearful shriek which was heard over every Brythonic hearth. This shriek went through people’s hearts, scaring them so much that the men lost their hue and their strength, women lost their children, young men and the maidens lost their senses, and all the animals and trees and the earth and the waters, were left barren. The plague was finally eradicated by catching the dragons and burying both of them in a rock pit at Dinas Emrys in Snowdonia, north Wales, the securest place in Britain at that time. The dragons were caught by digging out a pit under the exact point where the dragons would fall down exhausted after fighting. This place was at Oxford, which Lludd found to be the exact centre of the island when he measured the island of Britain. The pit had a satin covering over it and a cauldron of mead in it at the bottom. First, the dragons fought by the pit in the form of terrific animals. Then they began to fight in the air over the pit in the form of dragons. Then exhausted with the fighting, they fell down on the pit in the form of pigs and sank into the pit drawing the satin covering under them into the cauldron at the bottom of the pit whereupon they drank the mead and fell asleep. The dragons were then wrapped up in the satin covering and placed in the pit to be buried at Dinas Emrys.

The third plague was the plunder committed by a giant who wore strong, heavy armour and carried a hamper. His nocturnal entrance was heralded by soporific illusions and musical sounds which lulled the members of Lludd’s Court to sleep. Once the court was asleep, he would put all the food and provisions of meat and drink of Lludd’s Court into his commodious hamper and take it away with him. This recurring theft constituted the third plague of Lludd’s reign. Lludd was only able to stop the recurring theft by confronting the intruder. He was able to avoid falling asleep to the soporific illusions and musical sounds by frequently dipping his head in a vessel of cold water by his side. Upon confronting the magician, a fierce encounter ensued in which glittering fire flew out from their arms until Lludd overcame the magician. Thereupon, Lludd granted him mercy and made him his loyal vassal.

Etymology

The name Nudd, cognate with the Irish Nuada and related to the Romano-British Nodens, probably derives from a Celtic stem *noudont- or *noudent-, which J. R. R. Tolkien suggested was related to a Germanic root meaning "acquire, have the use of", earlier "to catch, entrap (as a hunter)". Making the connection with Nuada and Lludd's hand, he detected "an echo of the ancient fame of the magic hand of Nodens the Catcher".[1] Similarly, Julius Pokorny derives the name from a Proto-Indo-European root *neu-d- meaning "acquire, utilise, go fishing".[2]

[

Bibliography

^ J. R. R. Tolkien, "The Name Nodens", Appendix to "Report on the excavation of the prehistoric, Roman and post-Roman site in Lydney Park, Gloucestershire", Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London, 1932

^ Julius Pokorny, Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch 768

Ellis, Peter Berresford, Dictionary of Celtic Mythology(Oxford Paperback Reference), Oxford University Press, (1994): ISBN 0-19-508961-8

MacKillop, James. Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN 0-19-280120-1.

Wood, Juliette, The Celts: Life, Myth, and Art, Thorsons Publishers (2002): ISBN 0-00-764059-5

--------------------

He ordered the rebuilding of London's walls and towers. The city, hitherto known as Trin ovantum,thus became the city of Lud, i.e. Kaerlud. This was later corrupted to Kaerfundein, from whence came its present name. Lud was eventually buried in London, close to Ludgate that still bears his name. Lud's sons were not considered fit to succeed him, so the crown passed to his younger brother, Cassivelaunus.

Lludd Llaw Ereint the Silver-Handed, God of Health & Healing

Lludd, also known as Nudd, was the Celtic God of Healing and was the son of Beli Mawr. Lludd had a large shrine at Lydney in Gloucestershire, where offerings of bronze diseased limbs were left. Lludd was identified with the protective and regenerative powers. Lludd's companion and symbol was a dog, a deerhound breed with a lick that could cure the diseased. According to legend, Lludd was once the leader of the gods but was wounded in battle and lost his hand. Gorfannon, the divine-smith god, made Lludd a new hand out of silver. For his defeat, Lludd lost his position to his nephew, Lleu Llaw Gyffes.

--------------------

Nickname: Silver Haired

Event: was after whom London was renamed (from Trinovantum) Misc

Note: Rebuilt New Troy, or Tinovantum as it was then known, and renamed in KaerLud after himself. This became Lud's Town or London. When he died he was buried by the city wall where Ludgate is named after him. -------------------- Leil's portion of the kingdom corresponds with modern day East Anglia. --------------------

Lludd Llaw Encint (or Llud) (the silver handed), born Britain abt. 80 b.c.. (c) Legendary king of the British mentioned in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History. Lud is listed as the eldest son of Heli (or Beli), and the brother of the historically real Caswallon, which would place Lud's existence at about 60BC. Lud was that rare combination of warrior king and town planner. He rebuilt New Troy, or Trinovantum as it was then known, and renamed it KaerLud after him. This became Lud's Town or London. When he died he was buried by the city wall where Ludgate is named after him. There is a story of Lud in the Welsh tale "Lludd and Llefelys" collected in the Mabinogion, wherein Lud consults his brother Llefelys on how to combat three supernatural plagues that are smiting Britain. He succeeds in defeating the source of the plagues and rules peacefully thereafter. This tale, like that of Merlin's, to which it is closely related, may be about a real British prince who ruled later than Geoffrey's Lud, possible in the first or second centruy AD. He has become remembered in Welsh legend as the Celtic god Llud, also known as Nudd, the Celtic form of Nodens. A temple to Nodens was built at Lydney in Gloucestershire, where there are other places starting with Lyd-, and which may have some relation to a local prince who assumed the name Lud. -------------------- INFO FROM http://www.genealogy4u.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I54340&tree=western2007

Llud, a younger son of the King of Siluria, married Anna, the heir to the ruler of Cornwall. With the help of his brother, King Baran, Prince Llud founded the Kingdom of Camulod.

Llud Llaw Erint "Silver Haired" Ap Beli -------------------- LLUD-LUD-LLAW ap BELI-MAWR

BIRTH: Abt 90 B.C. in Cornwall, England (Britain)

DEATH: Trinovantum, Powys, Wales

BURIAL: Ludgate (Porthlud), Trinavantum, Powys, Wales

FATHER: Beli-Mawr ap MANOGAN

MOTHER: Danu Anna ap MATHONWY (MATHAN) - in Cornwall, England (Britain)

MARRIAGE: Anna, Princess of Cornwall

BIRTH: Abt 88 B.C. in Cornwall, England (Britain)

CHILDREN:

1. Androgeus ap LLUD-LUD-LLAW - Abt 70 B.C. in Montgomeryshire, Powys, Wales

Androgeus was the eldest son of King Lud and the rightful heir to the British throne. Due to his youth, however,

his uncle Cassibelanus ruled as regent until the nobles crowned him king of the Britons.

Androgeus was given the Duchy of Kent and Trinovantum by his uncle following the death of Lud.

He became a trusted advisor to the king and helped in attacks by the Romans under Julius Caesar.

He sought the help of Caesar against invasions and gave him hostages, including his own son Scaeva,

as proof he is willing to aid him in Britain. Caesar and Androgeus invaded and took over London in the night.

Cassibelanus finally pleaded with Androgeus to surrender Britain to Caesar. He submitted and the island became

a dominion of Rome and Caesar wintered there then left for Gaul in the spring.

Androgeus left with Caesar that spring and never returned.

His brother Tenvantius became king following Cassibelanus's death. Androgeus's son, Scaeva, apparently went with his father,

was dead, or not strong enough to claim the throne of Britain.

(Information from Wikipedia.com)

2. Penardim 'Lweriadd' verch LLUD-LUD-LLAW - Abt 64 B.C. in Montgomeryshire, Powys, Wales

3. Tasciovanus Tenantius ap LLUD-LUD-LLAW - Abt 60 B.C. in Montgomeryshire, Powys, Wales

4. Adminius ap LLUD-LUD-LLAW - Abt 62 B.C. in Montgomeryshire, Powys, Wales

5. Mandubratius ap LLUD-LUD-LLAW - Abt 57 B.C. in Montgomeryshire, Powys, Wales

"Lludd of the Silver Hand"

He became king upon his father's death around 73 BCE. During his reign,

he became famous for building and repairing towns throughout the kingdom.

Most important of these was Trinovantum where he built massive towers all

around the city. He built up the homes of the peasantry into lavish buildings

comparable to the greatest homes in the world. He arranged massive feasts

for the people and greatly enjoyed the city of Trinovantum. It is because

of this that it was renamed Caerlud, 'City of Lud' in Welsh. That name

became corrupted into Caerlundein until the Romans called it Londinium which

formed the basis for its current name, London.

He had two sons, Androgeus and Tenvantius, neither of whom succeeded him

directly. Lud died and was buried in Trinovantum near a gateway named

Ludgate (Porthlud in Welsh). He was succeeded by his brother Cassibelanus,

who acted as regent for Androgeus.

SOURCES: Ashley's book of genealogy

"The Mammoth Book of British Kings and Queens by Mike Ashley:

Published by Carroll and Graf Publishers,

INC: ISBN 0-7867-0692-9:Chart 1 on page 67.

(submitted by Ron Custer)

Title: Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet & Cecily de Neville

Author: Ernst-Friedrich Kraentzler

Publication: published by author 1978 -------------------- born bef 100bc or 110bc

He ordered the rebuilding of London's walls and towers. The city, hitherto known as Trin ovantum,thus became the city of Lud, i.e. Kaerlud. This was later corrupted to Kaerfundein, from whence came its present name. Lud was eventually buried in London, close to Ludgate that still bears his name. Lud's sons were not considered fit to succeed him, so the crown passed to his younger brother, Cassivelaunus.

Lludd Llaw Ereint the Silver-Handed, God of Health & Healing

Lludd, also known as Nudd, was the Celtic God of Healing and was the son of Beli Mawr. Lludd had a large shrine at Lydney in Gloucestershire, where offerings of bronze diseased limbs were left. Lludd was identified with the protective and regenerative powers. Lludd's companion and symbol was a dog, a deerhound breed with a lick that could cure the diseased. According to legend, Lludd was once the leader of the gods but was wounded in battle and lost his hand. Gorfannon, the divine-smith god, made Lludd a new hand out of silver. For his defeat, Lludd lost his position to his nephew, Lleu Llaw Gyffes.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

Lludd Llaw Eraint

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lludd Llaw Eraint, "Lludd of the Silver Hand", son of Beli Mawr, is a legendary hero from Welsh mythology. As Nudd Llaw Eraint (the earlier form of his name, cognate of the Irish Nuada Airgetlám, derived from the pre-Roman British god Nodens) he is the father of Gwynn ap Nudd. He is probably the source of king Lud from Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain.

In the Mabinogion tale of Lludd and Llefelys, which seems heavily influenced by Geoffrey of Monmouth's work, he is the ruler of Britain while his brother Llefelys ruled Gaul. Lludd calls on Llefelys to rid Britain of three plagues then afflicting the kingdom. According to legend, there was once a temple to Lludd at the site of St Paul's Cathedral, London, near Ludgate, which is named after him.

The plagues of Lludd’s reign

The first plague was that of the Coranians.

The second was that of the white and red dragons. One of the dragons represented the Brythons, while the other represented the Anglo-Saxon invaders of Britain. On the eve of May Day, the two dragons would begin to fight. The White Dragon would strive to overcome the Red Dragon, making the Red cry out a fearful shriek which was heard over every Brythonic hearth. This shriek went through people’s hearts, scaring them so much that the men lost their hue and their strength, women lost their children, young men and the maidens lost their senses, and all the animals and trees and the earth and the waters, were left barren. The plague was finally eradicated by catching the dragons and burying both of them in a rock pit at Dinas Emrys in Snowdonia, north Wales, the securest place in Britain at that time. The dragons were caught by digging out a pit under the exact point where the dragons would fall down exhausted after fighting. This place was at Oxford, which Lludd found to be the exact centre of the island when he measured the island of Britain. The pit had a satin covering over it and a cauldron of mead in it at the bottom. First, the dragons fought by the pit in the form of terrific animals. Then they began to fight in the air over the pit in the form of dragons. Then exhausted with the fighting, they fell down on the pit in the form of pigs and sank into the pit drawing the satin covering under them into the cauldron at the bottom of the pit whereupon they drank the mead and fell asleep. The dragons were then wrapped up in the satin covering and placed in the pit to be buried at Dinas Emrys.

The third plague was the plunder committed by a giant who wore strong, heavy armour and carried a hamper. His nocturnal entrance was heralded by soporific illusions and musical sounds which lulled the members of Lludd’s Court to sleep. Once the court was asleep, he would put all the food and provisions of meat and drink of Lludd’s Court into his commodious hamper and take it away with him. This recurring theft constituted the third plague of Lludd’s reign. Lludd was only able to stop the recurring theft by confronting the intruder. He was able to avoid falling asleep to the soporific illusions and musical sounds by frequently dipping his head in a vessel of cold water by his side. Upon confronting the magician, a fierce encounter ensued in which glittering fire flew out from their arms until Lludd overcame the magician. Thereupon, Lludd granted him mercy and made him his loyal vassal.

Etymology

The name Nudd, cognate with the Irish Nuada and related to the Romano-British Nodens, probably derives from a Celtic stem *noudont- or *noudent-, which J. R. R. Tolkien suggested was related to a Germanic root meaning "acquire, have the use of", earlier "to catch, entrap (as a hunter)". Making the connection with Nuada and Lludd's hand, he detected "an echo of the ancient fame of the magic hand of Nodens the Catcher".[1] Similarly, Julius Pokorny derives the name from a Proto-Indo-European root *neu-d- meaning "acquire, utilise, go fishing".[2]

[

Bibliography

^ J. R. R. Tolkien, "The Name Nodens", Appendix to "Report on the excavation of the prehistoric, Roman and post-Roman site in Lydney Park, Gloucestershire", Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London, 1932

^ Julius Pokorny, Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch 768

Ellis, Peter Berresford, Dictionary of Celtic Mythology(Oxford Paperback Reference), Oxford University Press, (1994): ISBN 0-19-508961-8

MacKillop, James. Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN 0-19-280120-1.

Wood, Juliette, The Celts: Life, Myth, and Art, Thorsons Publishers (2002): ISBN 0-00-764059-5 -------------------- The mythical "God of Healing" Lludd Llaw Ereint of Britain was High King of Britain in 80 BCE.

Llud, also called Lludd (the Silver-handed") or Lud of the Trinovantes (the most powerful British tribe) supposedly gave his name to London.

Llud was our ancestor through two distinct lines of descent--through his son Tenefan and his son Mandubratius, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

Llud was supposedly the son of Beli Mawr the Cambrian and Don ferch Mathonwy His ancestry is conjectural, legendary, almost certainly fabulous.

Supposedly the mother of Llud was Don ferch Mathonwy, born 105 BCE,

the daughter of Mathonwy, born 135 BCE.

Supposedly, the father of Lllud was Beli Mawr the Cambrian (also known as Heli), born 110 BCE,

whose father was Manogan ab Eneid the Cambrian (also known as Digueillus),

whose father was Eneid the Cambrian (also known as Capoir),

whose father was Cerwyd the Cambrian,

whose father was Crydon the Cambrian,

whose father was Dyfnarth the Cambrian,

whose father was Prydain the Cambrian,

whose father was Aedd Mawr the Cambrian,

whose father was Antonius the Cambrian,

whose father was Seisyll the Briton, who died in 721 BCE,

whose father was Gwrwst the Briton, who died in 735 BCE,

whose father was Rivallo the Briton, who died in 743 BCE,

whose father was Cunedagius the Briton, who died in 772 BCE,

whose father was Henwyn the Briton and whose mother was Rhagaw ferch Llyr the Briton

The father of Rhagaw was the famous King Lear, who died in 810 BCE (see http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p272.htm#i13427),

whose ancestors trace back to the Trojans (as do the ancestors of Henwyn).

The father of Henwyn was supposedly Bleiddud the Briton (also called Cyngen),

whose father was Asser the Briton,

whose father was Cyngen the Briton (also called Bleiddud),

whose father was Dyfnwal Hen the Briton,

whose father was Gorbonian the Briton,

whose father was Camber of the Britons (who gave his name to Cambria), who was also called Cymryw,

whose father was Brutus the Dardanian, who died in 1091 BCE, and whose mother was Ignoge of the Greeks

The father of Brutus the Dardanian was supposedly the mythical Aeneas Silvius of Latium (see http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p279.htm#i13416).

The mother of Ignoge of the Greeks was Pandrasus, King of the Greeks.

The father of Aeneas was Silvius,

whose father was King of Latium Ascanius Iulus, who died in 1137 BCE,

whose father was King of Latium Aeneas of Roman Myth, who died in 1175 BCE (see http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p274.htm#i13402) and whose mother was Creüsa of Troy (daughter of Priam and Hecuba)... you get the picture. It may even be (supposedly) that the parents of Aeneas were King Anchises of Dardania and--are you ready for this?--"the Goddess of Love Aphrodite Pandemos of Greek Myth," which, of course, explains the beauty and passion of all his descendants, including of course YOU.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lud_son_of_Heli for a lot more information.

Also see "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p276.htm#i10325 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Lud was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. He was the eldest son of King Heli and the brother of Cassivelaunus. Once again, as with his father Heli, his actual existence as a real historical figure is questionable.

He became king upon his father's death around 73 BCE. During his reign, he became famous for building and repairing towns throughout the kingdom. Most important of these was Trinovantum where he built massive towers all around the city. He built up the homes of the peasantry into lavish buildings comparable to the greatest homes in the world.

He arranged massive feasts for the people and greatly enjoyed the city of Trinovantum. It is because of this that it was renamed Kaerlud, 'City of Lud' in Welsh. That named became corrupted into Kaerlundein until the Romans called it Londinium which formed the basis for its current name, London.

He had two sons, Androgeus and Tenvantius, neither of whom succeeded him directly. Lud died and was buried in Trinovantum near a gateway named Ludgate (Porthlud in Welsh). He was succeeded by his brother Cassivelaunus, who acted as regent for Androgeus. Lud ordered the rebuilding of London's walls and towers. Up to this point London had been known as Trinovantum but now it became known as Kaerlud, or the City of Lud. This was later corrupted to Kaerlundein or City of Lundein, a small step to City of London

-------------------- defended Britain against Julius Cesear. -------------------- Death: in 18 BC

--------------------

Pedigree Resource File View person in Pedigree mode

name:

Lludd Llaw /Ap Beli/ King of The Britons


gender: male

birth: aproximadamente 0090 BC

            Wales 

death: aproximadamente 0062 BC

marriage: aproximadamente 0071 BC

                   Siluria, Wales 

Parents

father: Beli Mawr (Heli) "the Great" /ap Digueillus/ High King Of Siluria


mother: Danu Anu /Verch Mathonwy/ Prophetess


Marriages (1)

spouse: Mrs Anna // (Ap Beli)


marriage: aproximadamente 0071 BC

                Siluria, Wales 

Hide children (3)

child 1:

Cassivellaunus /Ap Lludd/ King


gender: male

birth: aproximadamente 0070 BC

           Verulamium (Saint Albins),Hertford,England 

death: 0026 BC

child 2:

Imanuentus /Ap Lludd/


gender: male

birth: aproximadamente 0060 BC

                   Trinovantum or Widford (near Chelmsford),Essex, England 

death:

child 3:

Afallach /Ap Lludd/


gender: male

birth: aproximadamente 0045 BC England

death:

Notes (1) after repelling Ceasar's invasion of 55- 54 BC

Citing This Record

"Pedigree Resource File", database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/SPZ8-M2P : accessed 2013-02-25), entry for Lludd Llaw /Ap Beli/ King of The Britons.

Source Information

The Pedigree Resource File is a collection of lineage-linked names submitted by users of FamilySearch. The information displayed in the file includes the notes and sources in the submission. No merges, corrections, or additions are made to the data submitted to the Pedigree Resource File. Users can draw from this database for help with their family history research. Learn more >> --------------------

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Lludd Llaw Ereint, King of Britain's Timeline

-95
-95
A4
-80
-80
BC, King, Siluria, Britian
-50
-50
Age 29
Icenii,,,England
-40
-40
Age 39
Britain
-18
-18
Age 61
London, England
????
????
????
Wales, United Kingdom
????
Ludgate, London, England