Loammi Baldwin (1745 - 1807) MP

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Birthplace: Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
Occupation: Baldwin apple/engineer/Revolutionary War
Managed by: Fay Elizabeth Baldwin
Last Updated:

About Loammi Baldwin

  • Daughters of American Revolution Ancestor #: A005316
  • Service: MASSACHUSETTS Rank: COLONEL
  • Birth: 21 Jan 1744 WOBURN MASSACHUSETTS
  • Death: 20 Oct 1807 WOBURN MASSACHUSETTS
  • Notice: TREAT AS NEW ANCESTOR (no application or supplemental application has been verified on this ancestor since the very early days of the society. As such, this means all information on this ancestor and his or her descendants must be documented using current DAR standards)

LOAMMI4, James3, Henry2, Henry1

  • NOTED REVOLUTIONARY WAR OFFICER, at Lexington, Concord and Trenton
  • ENGINEER OF THE MIDDLESEX CANAL
  • DISCOVERER AND PROPAGATOR OF THE BALDWIN APPLE

Loammi Baldwin, son of James Baldwin and Ruth Richardson, was b. at Woburn, Mass. on Jan. 10,1745; died at Woburn Oc.t 20,1807.

Baldwin, MAJ Loammi.

MAJ Loammi Baldwin was the commanding officer of the Woburn militia on 19 April 1775. He established the first successful ambush on the British that day at Bloody Angle. His forces destroyed the British command by injuring 9 out of the 10 officers in the leading companies. Loammi Balwin remained in the militia, eventually being promoted to Colonel in early 1776. He led the 26th Cont'l regiment into battle at Trenton on 26 December 1776, after which he retired due to poor health

Loammi Baldwin was a soldier in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, a civil engineer, and a state legislator from Woburn, Mass. He is credited with propogating and developing, from grafts, the "BALDWIN" apple; a hardy variety of apple. A self-educated cabinetmaker he used to walk from Woburn to Cambridge to hear lectures on mathematics at Harvard. An opponent of British rule, he fought in the American Revolution at Lexington, Trenton and Concord;achieving the rank of colonel. He represented Woburn in the Massachusetts LEGISLATURE (1778-79, 1800-04) and was HIGH SHERIFF of Middlesex County 1781-1794. He was the chief engineer of the MIDDLESEX CANAL that joined Massachusetts' Merrimack and Charles Rivers (1794-1804).

A prolific author, he wrote, in addition to many publications, "An account of a Curious Appearance of the Electrical Fluid" and "Observations on Electricity and an Improved Mode of Constructing Lightning Rods". He wrote a sketch of Count Rumford which was printed in a local publication in 1805 and was the author of a report on the survey of the Boston and Narragansett Bay Canal in 1806. He was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1782, and received from Harvard College the degree of Master of Arts in 1785.

Active politically and socially, he was a favorite of his townsmen and was elected to many positions in addition to that of High Sheriff. He was the first to hold office after the adoption of the state constitution; appointed to many committees, represented Woburn in the general court, and was a candidate for the offices of state senator, lieutenant-governor and presidential elector. In 1780, when the Continental Currency had hyperinflated to the point of being "Not worth a Continental" the Congress stopped authorizing the printing of paper money in its own name - but encouraged the states to issue new currency. When the resolution of Mar. 18,1780 went into effect the decision to use EDEN MILLS paper to reduce counterfeiting, was made and, working with an innovation of Benjamin Franklin, flakes of mica and threads of blue silk were added to the paper mixture. Signors of the money would be three individuals; two who were well recognized citizens, and the third to sign as guarantor. One of the signors chosen to sign the new Massachusetts money was Loammi Baldwin.

But perhaps the greatest and longest lasting accomplishment of his had nothing to do with engineering in the strictest sense. He was one day surveying land at a place called Butters' Row, in Wilmington, when he observed woodpeckers flying to a certain tree and, prompted by curiosity to discover the reason for their attraction, he found ,on the ground below the tree, apples of an excellant flavor and worth cultivating. Next spring he took scions to graft into stocks of his own. Before long others, doing likewise, grafted scions onto their own trees. He often, while attending court or on his trips around the countryside in his capacity as high sheriff, would carry scions of this apple and distribute them to those he encountered, so that soon the produce from his orchards became known, as did those of others who grafted to their own trees, as the "Baldwin" apple.....altho the original tree was blown down in 1815, the success of the grafting process which produced fruit of a consistent quality, was established.

He married 1st with MARY FOWLE, of Woburn, on July. 9,1772. Children were: Cyrus (c1774), Benjamin Franklin (1777), Loammi (1778) James Fowler (1782), and Mary (c1785).

He married 2nd with MARGARY FOWLE on May 26,1791 and they had: Clarissa (c1795), and George Rumford (1798).

LOAMMI BALDWIN

 

Birth: Jan. 10, 1745 Death: Oct. 20, 1807

Canal Engineer, Apple Magnate, Revolutionary War Figure. Born to James Baldwin and Ruth Richardson, Hon. Loammi Baldwin was successively Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Colonel of Gerrish's regment. He was present with the regiment on December 26, 1776, at Trenton, New Jersey with General Washington. He resigned his command about 1777 for ill health and returned to Woburn. He served as High Sheriff of Middlesex County, represented Woburn in the General Court 1778-1805. He received his Masters degree in 1783 from Harvard College and was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was "projector" of the Middlesex Canal. The Baldwin apple was named after him. He married July 9, 1772, Mary Fowle (daughter of James Fowle, Esq and Margaret Fowle). (bio by: Ken - TN (inactive))


Family links:

Children:
 James Fowle Baldwin (1782 - 1862)*
  • Calculated relationship
 

Burial: First Burial Ground Woburn Middlesex County Massachusetts, USA


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Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Jan 01, 2001 Find A Grave Memorial# 1478

http://ntgen.tripod.com/bw/loammi.html

Author: Baldwin, C. C. (Charles Candee), 1834-1895
Subject: Baldwin family
Publisher: Cleveland, O, [Leader printing company]
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT

Pg. 620, 627

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Loammi Baldwin's Timeline

1745
January 10, 1745
Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
1772
July 9, 1772
Age 27
Woburn, Ma, USA
1773
June 22, 1773
Age 28
Woburn, Ma, USA
1777
December 15, 1777
Age 32
Woburn, Ma, USA
1780
May 16, 1780
Age 35
Woburn, Ma, USA
1782
April 29, 1782
Age 37
Woburn, Ma, USA
1785
1785
Age 39
Woburn, Ma, USA
1791
May 26, 1791
Age 46
Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
1792
1792
Age 46
Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
1798
January 26, 1798
Age 53
Woburn, Ma, USA