Lochlann (Roland) mac Uchtred, Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland

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Lochlann (Roland) mac Uchtred, Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland

Also Known As: "Roland", "Lochlann", "Rolond", "Lachlan", "Lochlan McDonald", "Roland of Galloway", "Roland Lord Of /Galloway/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland
Death: Died in Northamptonshire, England
Place of Burial: Northampton Abbey, Northamptonshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Uchtred mac Fergus, Lord of Galloway; Gunnild of Dunbar and Gunnilda of Dunbar
Husband of <private> de Morville; Helen de Morville; <private> de Morville and Elena de Morville
Father of <private> Fitz Roland; Lord Alan of Galloway Fitz Roland; <private> Fitz Roland; Alan, Lord of Galloway; Ada of Galloway and 2 others
Brother of Margaret Verch Caradog; Eva FitzUchtred of Galloway, Heiress Of Gartley; Miss Galloway; Daughter of Uchtred, Lord of Galloway; Fergus II MacUchtred MacDonald of Galloway and 2 others

Occupation: Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland, Lord, constable of Scotland
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Lochlann (Roland) mac Uchtred, Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland

Roland or Lochlan of Galloway, sometimes using the surname MacDonald (clan name).

ROLAND Lord of Galloway, son of UHTRED Lord of Galloway & his wife Gunnhild of Dunbar (-1200). William of Newburgh names "fratri nefarie interempto filius Rollandus"[513]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records that "Ochtred´s son Rotholand" fought against "Gilpatrick and Henry Kennedy" in 1185 after the death of his uncle[514]. Lord of Galloway. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1200 of "Roland son of Uchtrach king of the Foreign-Irish”[515].

m HELEN de Moreville, daughter of RICHARD de Moreville, Constable of Scotland[516] & his wife Avise de Lancaster (-11 Jun 1217[517]). The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records that "Rotholand lord of Galloway" married "William de Morville…[his] sister" who was her brother´s heir[518].

Lord Roland & his wife had three children:

1. ALAN of Galloway (-1234, bur Dundraynan[519]). He succeeded his father in 1200 as Lord of Galloway. The Annals of Dunstable record that “dominus Galwinæ” died in 1235[520]. The Liber Pluscardensis records the death in [1234] of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway…qui…fuit constabilarius Scociæ" and his burial "apud Dundranan"[521]. On his death Galway was divided between his daughters, but the people of Galway invited Alexander II King of Scotland to become their sole lord but he refused. The king finally defeated the insurgents after Jul 1235[522]. m firstly HELEN de Lisle, daughter of --- ([1174]-). According to Matthew of Paris, the wife of Alan of Galloway "iam defunctus" was the (unnamed) daughter of "Hugonem de Lasey"[523]. m secondly (1209) MARGARET of Huntingdon, daughter of DAVID of Scotland Earl of Huntingdon & his wife Maud of Chester ([1194]-1233). The Chronicle of Melrose records the marriage in 1209 of "Alan FitzRoland" and "the daughter of earl David, the brother of the king of Scotland"[524]. The Annales Londonienses name "Margaretam, Isabellam, Matildam, et Aldam" as the four daughters of "comiti David", recording the marriage of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[525].

Lord Alan & his first wife had two children:

a) WALTER (-[1231/34]). The Liber Pluscardensis records that King Alexander II installed "Walterum filium Alani de Galuway" as "primus…Senescallus in Scocia" in 1231[526]. The chronology suggests that Walter must have been Alan´s son by his first marriage. Walter must have predeceased his father as no further mention of him is found.

b) HELEN of Galloway (-after 21 Nov 1245, bur Brackley). The Annales Londonienses name "Eleyn countesse de Wynton" as eldest of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei", naming "Margarete countesse de Ferreres et Eleyne la Zusche et la countesse de Bougham" as her three daughters[527]. The Liber Pluscardensis records that the eldest daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" married "Rogerus de Quinci comes Wintoniæ"[528]. m as his first wife, ROGER de Quincy Earl of Winchester, son of SAHER de Quincy Earl of Winchester & Margaret of Leicester (-25 Apr 1264, maybe bur Brackley). Named son-in-law of Alan of Galloway by Matthew of Paris, who does not name his wife[529] but says in a later passage that she was "primogenita soror"[530]. He succeeded his father-in-law in 1234 as hereditary Constable of Scotland, de iure uxoris.

Lord Alan & his second wife had two children:

c) DEVORGUILLA of Galloway ([1218]-28 Jan 1290, bur Sweetheart Abbey, Kirkland). The Annales Londonienses name "Devorgoille de Baillol" as second of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[531]. According to the Chronicle of Melrose[532], Devorguilla was second daughter of Alan of Galloway, when recording her marriage in 1233 to "John de Baylol". The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage in 1233 of the second daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" and "Johannes de Balliolo"[533]. m (1233) Sir JOHN de Balliol of Barnard Castle, co Durham, son of HUGH Balliol [Bailleul] of Barnard Castle & his wife Cecilia de Fontaines (-before 24 Oct 1268 or 1269). Named son-in-law of Alan of Galloway by Matthew of Paris, who does not name his wife[534].

d) CHRISTIAN of Galloway (-shortly before 29 Jul 1246). The Annales Londonienses name "countesse de Albermarle" as third of the three daughters of "la primere fille Davi" and "Aleyn de Gavei"[535]. The Liber Pluscardensis records that the third daughter of "Alanus de Galway filius Rotholandi de Galway" married "comes Albemarliæ"[536]. Matthew of Paris records the death in 1246 of "comitissa quoque Albemarliæ filia Alani de Galeweia sororque comitisse Wintoniæ"[537]. m (before Apr 1236) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Forz, son of GUILLAUME de Forz Comte d'Aumâle & his wife Aveline de Montfichet (-Amiens 23 May 1260). "W filio comitis de Aubemarliæ" is named son-in-law of Alan of Galloway by Matthew of Paris, who does not name his wife[538]. He succeeded his father in 1241 as Lord of Holderness, titular Comte d'Aumâle. No issue.

Lord Alan had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

e) THOMAS . Illegitimate son of Alan of Galloway according to Matthew of Paris[539]. On the death of his father, he led the rebellion of the people of Galloway and fled to Ireland after they were defeated by Alexander II King of Scotland[540]. [541]m (1226[542]) --- of Man, daughter of RAGNVALD King of Man & his wife ---. The Chronicon Manniæ et Insularum records that King Ragnvald married his daughter to Alan of Galloway´s son[543].

2. THOMAS of Galloway (-1231, bur Abbey of Cupre[544]). Brother of Alan of Galloway according to Matthew of Paris, when he describes his (unnamed) son's rebellion[545]. Earl of Atholl de iure uxoris. The Liber Pluscardensis records the death in 1231 of "Alani de Galuway frater…comes Atholiæ" and his burial "in Cupro"[546]. m (before Jan 1210) as her first husband, ISABEL Ctss of Atholl, daughter of HENRY 3rd Earl of Atholl & his wife Margaret --- . She married secondly Alan de Lundin. Thomas & his wife had one child:

a) PATRICK of Galloway (-murdered Haddington 1242). He is named as son of Thomas of Galloway by Matthew of Paris[547]. He succeeded his father in 1231 as 5th Earl of Atholl. After defeating Walter Bisset in a tournament, he was burnt to death by the latter in his own residence[548]. He was succeeded in Atholl by his maternal aunt.

Thomas had one possibly illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

b) ALAN (-after Jan 1252). "Alan son of Thomas Earl of Atholl" was granted a pardon for killing some men in Ireland[549].

3. DEVORGUILLA of Galloway . Mentioned 1233 and 1241. m NICHOLAS [II] Stuteville of Brincklow, son of NICHOLAS [I] Stuteville of Liddel & his wife --- (-Priory of St Andrew [8 Sep/18 Oct] 1233). Nicholas & his wife had two children:

a) JOAN de Stuteville (-before 6 Apr 1276). m firstly (before 29 May 1229) HUGH Wake, son of BALDWIN Wake & his wife Isabel Briwere (-on crusade before 18 Dec 1241). m secondly HUGH Bigod Chief Justiciar of England, son of HUGH Bigod Earl of Norfolk & his wife Maud Marshal of Pembroke (-before 7 May 1266).

b) MARGARET de Stuteville (-before 13 Nov 1235). m WILLIAM de Mastac .

4. daughter . The Liber Pluscardensis records the marriage in 1233 of "Alanus de Galwidia…sororem suam" and "Waltero de Biseth"[550]. m (1233[551]) WALTER Bisset, son of ---. He was outlawed with his nephew John Bisset whom he had incited to murder Patrick of Galloway Earl of Atholl, his wife's nephew[552]. Walter Bisset incited Henry III King of England to march north intending to invade Scotland in 1244, but a treaty of peace was concluded 24 Aug 1244[553].

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#UchtredGallowaydied1174

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Lochlann or Lachlan, (died December 12, 1200), also known by his French name Roland, was the son and successor of Uchtred, Lord of Galloway as the "Lord" or "sub-king" of eastern Galloway.

After the death of his uncle Gille Brigte in 1185, Lochlann went about to seize the land of Gille Brigte's heirs. In this aim he had to defeat the men who would defy his authority in the name of Gille Brigte's heir. He seems to have done so, defeating the resistors, who were led by men called Gille Pátraic and Henric Cennédig. Yet resistance continued under a warrior called Gille Coluim of Galloway.

Lochlann's aims moreover encouraged the wrath of a more important political figure that any of the above. King Henry II of England was outraged. A few years before Gille Brigte's death, Henry had taken his son and successor Donnchad as a hostage. Hence Henry was the patron and protector of the man Lochlann was trying to disinherit. When King William of Scotland was ordered to visit Henry in southern England, William was told that Lochlann must be stopped. However, William and Lochlann were friends, and so in the end Henry himself brought an army to Carlisle, and threatened to invade unless Lochlann would submit to his judgment. Lochlann did so. As it transpired, Lochlann kept most of Galloway, and Donnchad was given the new "Mormaerdom" of Carrick in compensation.

More than any previous Lord of Galloway, he was the loyal man and vassal of the King of Scotland. After all, he owed his lands to the positive influence of King William. Whereas Lochlann's grandfather, Fergus had called himself King of Galloway, Lochlann's favorite title was "Constable of the King of Scots".

Lochlann had led William's armies north into Moireabh against the pretender Domnall mac Uilleim, who claimed the Scottish throne as a grandson of King Donnchad II of Scotland. Lochlann defeated him in 1187 at the Battle of Mam Garvia, a mysterious location probably near Dingwall.

Lochlann, unlike his uncle Gille Brigte, welcomed French and English colonization into his eastern lands. In this, he was following his overlord, King William I of Scotland. Of all the Lords of Galloway, Lochlann is the least mentioned in the Gaelic annals, suggesting that he had lost touch somewhat with his background in the world of greater Irish Sea Gaeldom.

In 1200, he was in the company of King William in England, who was giving homage to the new king, John. Lochlann used the opportunity to make legal proceeding in Northampton regarding the property claims of his wife, Helena, daughter and heiress of Richard de Morville. It was here that he met his death and was buried.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lochlann,_Lord_of_Galloway

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Lochlann or Lachlan, (d. December 12, 1200), also known by his French name Roland, was the son and successor of Uchtred, Lord of Galloway as the "Lord" or "sub-king" of eastern Galloway.

After the death of his uncle Gille Brigte in 1185, Lochlann went about to seize the land of Gille Brigte's heirs. In this aim he had to defeat the men who would defy his authority in the name of Gille Brigte's heir. He seems to have done so, defeating the resistors, who were led by men called Gille Pátraic and Henric Cennédig. Yet resistance continued under a warrior called Gille Coluim of Galloway.

Lochlann's aims moreover encouraged the wrath of a more important political figure that any of the above. King Henry II of England was outraged. A few years before Gille Brigte's death, Henry had taken his son and successor Donnchad as a hostage. Hence Henry was the patron and protector of the man Lochlann was trying to disinherit. When King William of Scotland was ordered to visit Henry in southern England, William was told that Lochlann must be stopped. However, William and Lochlann were friends, and so in the end Henry himself brought an army to Carlisle, and threatened to invade unless Lochlann would submit to his judgment. Lochlann did so. As it transpired, Lochlann kept most of Galloway, and Donnchad was given the new "Mormaerdom" of Carrick in compensation.

More than any previous Lord of Galloway, he was the loyal man and vassal of the King of Scotland. After all, he owed his lands to the positive influence of King William. Whereas Lochlann's grandfather, Fergus had called himself King of Galloway, Lochlann's favorite title was "Constable of the King of Scots".

Lochlann had led William's armies north into Moireabh against the pretender Domnall mac Uilleim, who claimed the Scottish throne as a grandson of King Donnchad II of Scotland. Lochlann defeated him in 1187 at the Battle of Mam Garvia, a mysterious location probably near Dingwall.

Lochlann, unlike his uncle Gille Brigte, welcomed French and English colonization into his eastern lands. In this, he was following his overlord, King William I of Scotland. Of all the Lords of Galloway, Lochlann is the least mentioned in the Gaelic annals, suggesting that he had lost touch somewhat with his background in the world of greater Irish Sea Gaeldom.

In 1200, he was in the company of King William in England, who was giving homage to the new king, John. Lochlann used the opportunity to make legal proceeding in Northampton regarding the property claims of his wife, Helena, daughter and heiress of Richard de Morville. It was here that he met his death and was buried. -------------------- Roland fitz Uhtred, Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland, was Lord of Galloway between 1174 and 1200.

He married Helen de Morville, daughter of Richard de Moreville, Constable of Scotland and Avice de Lancaster, circa 1183 at Kirkoswald, Cumberland, England.

Roland was Constable of Scotland between 1189 and 1200.

He died on 19 December 1200 at Northamptonshire, England, at the age of 36 years.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p381.htm#i6974 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

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Lochlann (Roland) mac Uchtred, Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland's Timeline

1152
1152
Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland
1152
Scotland, United Kingdom
1182
1182
Age 30
1186
1186
Age 34
Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland
1189
1189
Age 37
Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland
1190
1190
Age 38
Wigtown, Gallowayshire, Scotland
1195
1195
Age 43
Perth, Perthshire, , Scotland
1196
1196
Age 44
Scotland