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Lot Smith's Geni Profile

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About Lot Smith

Wikipedia Biographical Summary:

"...Lot Smith (May 15, 1830 – June 21, 1892) was a Mormon pioneer and American frontiersman..."

"...Born in 1830 in Williamstown, Oswego County, New York, he became a close friend of Orrin Porter Rockwell and was known as "The Horseman" for his exceptional skills on horseback as well as for his help in rounding up wild mustangs on Utah's Antelope Island. At sixteen, Smith joined the Mormon Battalion and served on the journey through the southwest to San Diego, where the group was mustered out of service. He then came back across the mountains to the Great Salt Lake, where he became a military leader in the Nauvoo Legion in Utah. Smith practiced the Latter-day Saint doctrine of plural marriage, and had eight wives and 52 children..."

"...The President and US Senate had chosen to remove then-governor Brigham Young from office based on reports from federal officials assigned to Utah who had abandoned their assignments and returned to the east. Young's replacement as governor of Utah territory Alfred Cumming was escorted by a contingent of 2,500 Federal troops led by Gen. Albert Johnston as part of what was called the Utah Expedition. The army's orders were to support the installment of the new governor, using force as necessary as resistance was expected based on the official's reports. Smith was sent on a special mission by Young, who hoped to delay the arrival of the troops in the hope that a diplomatic breakthrough could be reached before the troops reached Salt Lake City..."

"...Smith's efforts delayed the US forces from reaching Utah in 1857, forcing them to winter at Fort Bridger, Wyoming..."

"...Smith was asked to help the development of the Mormon settlement of Tuba City, Arizona. Chief Tuba was a Hopi leader who joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints..."

"...The Navajo husband, angered at finding his sheep dead and family threatened, shot and killed several of Smith's cows. Smith then fired at the Navajo. The brother of the Navajo man returned fire, mortally wounding Lot Smith. Smith managed to return home and, about six hours later, died on June 21, 1892. Smith is buried in a cemetery in Farmington, Utah..."

SOURCE: Wikipedia contributors, 'Lot Smith', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 18 September 2011, 02:19 UTC, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lot_Smith&oldid=451072671> [accessed 6 February 2012]

The following information is from another source, Find A Grave.com:

Son of William Orville Smith and Rhoda Hough

Married Lydia Minerva McBride, 3 Jun 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Jane Walker, 14 Feb 1852, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Julia Ann Smith, 25 Nov 1855, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Laura Louisa Burdick, 3 Jan 1858, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Alice Ann Richards, 30 May 1868, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Alice Mary Baugh, 29 Apr 1872, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Mary Marinda Garn, 13 Jun 1878, St. George, Washington, Utah.

Married Diantha Elizabeth Mortensen, 21 Oct 1880, St. George, Washington, Utah

Lot joined the Latter-day Saint Church at an early age and in manhood became the youngest member of the famous Mormon Battalion on its march to California in the war with Mexico.

He was officer of the Deseret militia; defended settlers at Provo against Indians; major of the Utah militia and in charge at the burning of Johnton's army provision trains on their way to Echo Canyon, Utah.

Lot spent much of his later life serving the Church in Arizona. He was shot by an Indian during an altercation over sheep. Lot's body was buried in a lonely spot and the only marking of the grave was a small plum tree. It lay there for nearly ten years, but through the untiring efforts of some of his comrades, and the assistance of the Church authorities, his remains were exhumed and brought to Farmington, Utah, his old home. Memorial services were held at Farmington on the 8th of April 1902, the casket was draped with the American flag.

The services were largely attended. President Joseph F. Smith, with other Church authorities, and a number of his old comrades of 1857 and 1862 spoke at the services, where eulogies were pronounced by them over the remains of their Captain.

John R. Winder said, "I always admired Lot Smith for his bravery; his men loved and obeyed him for he was kind to them, and always in the lead."

"I have this to say of my Commander," said James Sharp, "there lies a man who knew no fear. With his men he was gentle as a woman and as brave as a lion."

President Smith said he was thankful that the remains of Captain Smith had been brought home where they might rest among his friends. "He was a generous, noble-hearted man," said President Smith, "and history will record the fact that Lot Smith was one of the notable figures of the past." In every instance he discharged his duty to the very best of his ability.

After the services his remains were taken to the Farmington Cemetery, where a very substantial monument marks his last resting place.

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Lot Smith's Timeline

1830
May 15, 1830
Williamstown, Oswego, New York, USA
1851
June 3, 1851
Age 21
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
1852
February 14, 1852
Age 21
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
September 26, 1852
Age 22
Farming, Davis, Utah, USA
1855
September 12, 1855
Age 25
Farmington, Davis, Utah, United States
November 25, 1855
Age 25
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
1857
August 29, 1857
Age 27
Farmington, Davis, Utah, USA
1858
January 3, 1858
Age 27
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
August 15, 1858
Age 28
Farmington, Davis, Utah, United States
1859
September 8, 1859
Age 29
Farmington, Davis, Utah, USA