Lothaire II, roi de Lorraine

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Lothair II King of Lorraine de Lorraine, Re di Itália

Also Known As: "Lothar II", "Lothair II of /Lotharingia/", "Lothar II of /Lorraine/", "Lotharius", "Lothaire II King Of Lorraine", "Lothair of Arles"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Carolingian Empire (Present France)
Death: Died in Piacenza (Plaisance), (Present Provincia di Piacenza), (Present Emilia-Romagna), Italy
Cause of death: Malaria
Place of Burial: Convento de San Antonio, (Near Piacenza/Plaisance), (Present Provincia di Piacenza), (Present Emilie-Romagne), Italy
Immediate Family:

Son of Emperor Lothair I; Lothare I Emporer Holy Roman Empire King of Italy; Ermengarde de Tours and Ermengarde Countess of Tours
Husband of Waldrada; Ermentrude de Wormsgau; Engelberge von Alsace / di Spoleto; Matilde; Waldrada of Wormsgau and 2 others
Father of Gisela Carolingian Princess of Lorraine; Hugues Prince Of Lorraine, Duke Of Alsace; Bertha de Aries; Gisela of Lotharingia, Princess of Lorraine; Ermengarda de Lorraine and 2 others
Brother of Louis II "le Jeune", Emperor of Italy and of the Franks; princess Helletrude (Hiltrude) d´Italy (de Lorraine; Gisèle de Lorraine, abbesse de San Salvatore à Brescia; Ermengarde de Lorraine; Rotrude, daughter of Lothair I and 3 others
Half brother of Charles of Provence

Occupation: King of Lotharingia / Lorraine 855-869, King of Lotharingia, Roi d'Italie (946)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Lothaire II, roi de Lorraine

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Lotharingia (covering first his birth family under his father, Lothaire I, then his wife, and his family with his mistress and children):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#LothaireIEmperorB

LOTHAIRE I 843-855, LOTHAIRE II 855-869


LOTHAIRE, son of Emperor LOUIS I "der Fromme/le Pieux" & his first wife Ermengard (795-Kloster Prüm 29 Sep 855, bur Kloster Prüm).

Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" sons of Emperor Louis I & his wife Ermengard[8].

His father sent him to govern Bavaria in [Aug] 814[9].

He was crowned joint Emperor LOTHAIRE I in Jul 817 at Aachen, ruling jointly with his father. He was sent to Italy in 822, where he established his court at Pavia and was crowned King of Italy by the Archbishop of Milan. The Annales Xantenses record that "Ludewicus imperator" gave "filio suo Lothario regnum Langobardorum" in 822[10]. Einhard's Annales record that the emperor sent "Walahum monachum propinquum suum [imperatoris] fratrem…Adalhardi abbatis" to Italy in 822 with "Hlotharius…filium suum"[11].

He was again crowned Emperor, at Rome 5 Apr 823 by Pope Pascal I. The rivalry with his father and brothers was exacerbated by the unexpected birth of his half-brother Charles in 823. Tension was increased when Emperor Louis invested Charles with Alemannia, Rhetia, Alsace and part of Burgundy at Worms in Aug 829, reducing Lothaire's territory to Italy.

Lothaire and his brothers rebelled in Mar 830, captured their father at Compiègne, and forced him to revert to the constitutional arrangements decided in 817. However, Emperor Louis reasserted his authority at the assemblies of Nijmegen in Oct 830 and Aix-la-Chapelle in Feb 831, and deprived Lothaire of the imperial title and relegated him once more to Italy. A further revolt of the brothers followed.

Emperor Louis was defeated and deposed by his sons at Compiègne 1 Oct 833. He was exiled to the monastery of Saint-Médard de Soissons. Lothaire declared himself sole emperor 30 Jun 833, but was forced to flee to Vienne by his brothers Pepin and Louis, who freed their father.

Emperor Louis was restored 1 Mar 834, crowned once more at Metz 28 Feb 835. Lothaire captured Chalon-sur-Saône, but was arrested by his father's troops near Chouzy. His father pardoned him and sent him back to Italy as king.

Emperor Louis proposed yet another partition in favour of his son Charles at the assembly of Aachen in 837, which was implemented at the assembly of Worms 28 May 839 when he installed his sons Lothaire and Charles jointly, the former taking all land east of the River Meuse, the latter everything to the west, and set aside the claims of his son Louis and the successors of his late son Pepin.

Lothaire succeeded as sole emperor on his father’s death 20 Jun 840. He sought to extend his power base northwards from Italy across the Alps, and deprive his half-brother Charles. The latter allied himself with his half-brother Louis, and together they defeated Lothaire at Fontenoy-en-Puisaye, near Auxerre 25 Jun 841. After retreating to Aachen, Lothaire was forced out to Lyon in Apr 842 by his brothers, who declared him incapable of governing the empire. Preliminary peace proposals signed on an island in the Saône, near Mâcon 15 Jun 842 led to the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, under which the territory of the empire was divided between the three brothers.

Lothaire retained the imperial title and was also installed as LOTHAIRE I King of Lotharingia, a newly created territory covering a wide strip of land from the North Sea coast southwards to Italy, the new country being named after him. He established his seat of government at Aachen, and installed his son Louis as King of Italy. Over the following 10 years, a series of meetings aimed to maintain peace between the three brothers, with varying success.

After a serious illness, Emperor Lothaire abdicated in Sep 855 at Kloster Schüller, near Prüm, and divided his territories between his sons Louis II, Lothaire II and Charles.

The Annales Bertiniani record that Emperor Lothaire entered "monasterium Proneæ in Arduenna", was tonsured, died "IV Kal Oct" and was buried in the monastery[12]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "855 III Kal Oct" of "Lotharius imperator"[13].

m (Thionville, Moselle mid-Oct 821) ERMENGARDE, daughter of HUGUES Comte [de Tours] [Etichonen] & his wife Ava --- (-20 Mar 851, bur Kloster Erstein, near Strasbourg).

Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris refers to the wife of Emperor Lothaire as "filiam Hugi comitis, qui erat de stirpe cuiusdam ducis nomine Etih" and in the following paragraph names her "Irmingarda"[14]. The Annales Xantenses record the marriage in 821 of "Ludewicus imperator…filio suo Lothario" and "Ermingardam filiam Hugonis comitis Turonicorum"[15].

She founded Kloster Erstein in Alsace in 849.

The Annales Xantenses record the death in 851 of "imperatrix…Irmingard, coniunx Lotharii imperatoris"[16]. The Annales Formoselenses record the death in 851 of "Irmingard regina"[17].

Mistress (1): DODA, daughter of --- (-after 9 Jul 855). The Annales Bertiniani records that "Lotharius imperator" took "duas sibi ancillas ex villa regia", of whom Doda gave birth to "filium…Karlomannum"[18].

Emperor Lothaire & his wife had eight children:

  

1. LOUIS "le Jeune" ([825]-near Brescia 12 Aug 875, bur Milan, San Ambrosio).

Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothaire & his wife[19].

He was sent to Italy as king in 844, crowned in Rome in 844 as LOUIS King of Italy by Pope Sergius II. He was crowned joint Emperor LOUIS II, reigning jointly with his father, at Rome in Apr 850 by Pope Leo IV. He was sole emperor in 855 after the death of his father.

2. HILTRUDE ([826]-after [865/66]).

Pope Nicholas I names "Helletrude Berengarii Comitis quondam relicta" in an undated letter which refers to her as "Lothario sorore sua"[20].

m BERENGAR, son of --- (-[865/66]).

3. daughter ([825/30]-).

The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[21]. The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[22]. The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[23].

Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[24]. Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde in secondary sources but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[25].

m (Aquitaine 846) GISELBERT Graf von Maasgau, son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877).

4. BERTA ([830]-after 7 May 852, maybe after [877]).

A letter from Hincmar Archbishop of Reims to "Irmingardi augustæ", included by Flodoard in the Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, names "Bertæ, ipsius imperatricis filiæ" referring to her activities at "Avennaci monasterii", a later passage confirming that she was "abbatissæ Avennaci monasterii"[26]. A poem by Sedulius is addressed to "Berta…proles…Lothari…Ermingardis matris"[27].

Abbess of Avenay before 847.

Maybe Abbess of Faremoutiers 852-after 877.

m ([Worms autumn 841]) ---.

Berta was married, as shown by a second poem by Sedulius addressed to "Berta" which names "Ermingardis Cæsareumque" as her mother and refers to Bertha's "earthly spouse…now in heaven"[28]. It is possible that she was the daughter "Hlotharius…filiæ suæ" whose marriage is referred to at Worms in Autumn 841 in the Annals of Fulda [29]. Berta's husband has not been identified.

5. GISELA ([830]-860).

The necrology of Brixen records that "Domnus Imperator Lotharius tradidit filiam suam domnam Gislam"[30]. Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia 851-860. "Hludwicus…imperator augustus" made grants to San Salvatore in memory of "Gisla soror nostra defuncta" by charter dated 12 Jan [861][31].

---

6. LOTHAIRE ([835]-Piacenza 8 Aug 869, bur Convent of San Antonio near Piacenza).

m ([855], separated 857, repudiated 860) TEUTBERGA, daughter of BOSO "l'Ancien" Comte d’Arles & his wife --- (-Metz before 25 Nov 875, bur Metz, Abbaye de Sainte-Glossinde).

Mistress (1): (from [855]) WALDRADA, daughter of --- (-9 Apr after 868).

King Lothaire II had four illegitimate children by Mistress (1).

(Detailed below)

---

7. ROTRUDE (chr Pavia [835/40]-).

The baptism of Rotrudis daughter of Lothaire is recorded at Pavia in [835/40][74].

[same person as…? ROTRUDE .

"Witbertus…comes" donated property at Ornois to the abbey of Tournus, for the souls of "Lanberti genitoris mei necnon et Rutrudis genetricis meæ", by charter dated 28 Jan 870[75]. Hlawitschka suggests that she was the daughter of Emperor Lothaire I, as her son's charter dated 28 Jan 870 records that the property he donated to the abbey of Tournus had been granted to his father by Emperor Lothaire[76]. However, the copy of the charter reproduced in the Histoire de Tournus, cited above, states that the property had been donated to Wicbert by "senioris mei Hlotharii Regis".

m ([850/51]) LAMBERT Comte et Marquis de Nantes, son of LAMBERT [I] Comte et Marquis de Nantes [Guidonen] & his wife [--- of Italy] (-killed in battle 1 May 852).]

8. CHARLES ([845]-Lyon 25 Jan 863, bur Lyon, Saint-Pierre).

Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothaire & his wife[77]. His father invested him in Sep 855 with Provence, Lyon and Transjuranian Burgundy.

Emperor Lothaire I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

9. CARLOMAN ([853]-).

The Annales Bertiniani name "Karlomannum" as the son of "Lotharius imperator" and his mistress Doda[78].

---

(From above)

6. LOTHAIRE ([835]-Piacenza 8 Aug 869, bur Convent of San Antonio near Piacenza).

Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothaire & his wife[32]. "Lothario rege" is named "filio imperatoris Lotharii" by Folcuin[33].

The Annales Bertiniani record that Emperor Lothaire gave Frisia to his son Lothaire in 855[34].

He succeeded his father in 855 as LOTHAIRE II King of Lotharingia, with Aachen as his capital. He attempted to annul his marriage to marry his mistress of many years, but was opposed by Hincmar Archbishop of Reims, and later Pope Nicholas I who ordered him to return to his wife 15 Aug 865. He was negotiating with Pope Hadrian II for a new decision when he died of malaria[35].

On his death, his lands were divided between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, instead of passing to his brother Emperor Louis despite the latter's objections.

The necrology of Prüm records the death "869 Kal Iul" of "Lotharius rex filius eius [=Lotharius imperator]"[36].

m ([855], separated 857, repudiated 860) TEUTBERGA, daughter of BOSO "l'Ancien" Comte d’Arles & his wife --- (-Metz before 25 Nov 875, bur Metz, Abbaye de Sainte-Glossinde).

The Annales Lobienses name "Tietberga, sorore Hucberti abbatis" as lawful wife of "Lotharius"[37]. The Annales Bertiniani name "Teutbergam" as "materteram suam [=Bosone filio Buvini comitis]"[38].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Thieberga regina legitima uxore [Lotharii]", specifying that she relied on the advice of "Bosonis comitis" at the time of her repudiation, although her relationship to him is not specified[39]. Herimannus names "Tiohtpirga uxore legitima" of King Lothaire II when recording his repudiation of her[40]. She protected the wife of Boso Count in Italy after she deserted her husband. She was repudiated on the grounds of her alleged incest with her brother Hugobert[41]. Her husband kept her prisoner after separating from her.

The Annales Bertiniani record that "uxor Lotharii" fled to "fratrem suum Hucbertum in regno Karli" in 860[42]. She escaped in 860 and sought refuge with Charles II "le Chauve" who gave her the abbey of Avenay in the diocese of Reims. The Annales Bertiniani records that "uxore [Lothario]" gave support to "uxori Bosonis et Balduino qui filiam eius [=Karoli regis] furatus fuerat in uxorem"[43].

Abbess of Sainte Glossinde at Metz 869. "Heccardus comes" names "…Teutbergane uxore Lotharii…" among the beneficiaries under his testamentary disposition dated to [Jan 876][44]. It is not certain that this refers to the separated wife of King Lothar II, but no other "Teutberga/Lothaire" couple has been identified at the time. If this identification is correct, it suggests a family relationship between Teutberga and Ecchard, which has not yet been identified.

Mistress (1): (from [855]) WALDRADA, daughter of --- (-9 Apr after 868).

The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records that the concubine of "Lotharius" was "Waldradam, sororem Guntheri archiepiscopi Coloniensis" and that her brother encouraged Lothaire to leave his legitimate wife for Waldrada, for which he was excommunicated by the Pope[45]. The Annales Novesienses record that “Guntherus episcopus Coloniensis” had “sororem…Vastradam…aliis Waldradam” whom “dux Lotharingiæ Lotharius…superdixit” after her brother approved his divorce from “legitima uxore Tyberga”[46].

According to Baron Ernouf[47], Gunther archbishop of Köln was uncle of Waldrada and Thetgaud archbishop of Trier was her brother, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. The Annales Bertiniani names "Hlotharius Waldradam concubinam" when recording that Lothaire purported to marry her in 862 and crowned her with the support of "Liutfrido avunculo suo et Waltario"[48].

Waldrada was also related to the Etichonen Grafen im Nordgau (ALSACE), as shown by the Vita Sancti Deicoli which names "Waldrada…Heberardo comitis consanguinitatis"[49], but the precise relationship is not known.

Folcuin records King Lothaire's excommunication after repudiating his wife for Waldrada[50]. King Lothaire purported to marry Waldrada in [Aug/Sep] 862 and crowned her as Queen, but this was not recognised by the church[51].

She became a nun at Remiremont.

King Lothaire II had four illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

a) HUGUES ([855/60]-after 895).

Duke of Alsace 867, until after Aug 869.

The Annales Bertiniani record that King Lothaire invested "filioque suo de Waldrada Hugoni" with "ducatum Elisatium" in 867[52]. Herimannus names "Hugonem, Lotharii regis ex Waldrada filium" when recording his rebellion in 879[53].

After his father's death, Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks invaded Alsace and Hugues was obliged to submit to him. The Gesta Francorum records that "Hugo, Hlutharii et Waldrada filius" caused tyranny in France in 879[54].

Pope John VIII excommunicated "Hugonem Lotharii Regis quondam filium non legitimum" in 878[55]. Hugues challenged Louis II "le Bègue" and his son Louis III "le Jeune" in Lotharingia in 879, but was defeated in 880 and swore allegiance at Gondreville in May 881 to Louis "le Jeune" who gave him the abbey of Lobbes.

The Annales Fuldenses record that Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks sent "legatis nepotum suorum" to fight "Hugonem tyrannidem exercentem in Gallia" in 880[56]. Charles III "le Gros" King of the East Franks gave him domains of the Bishopric of Metz in 882, but Hugues rebelled in the same year, was defeated once more and took refuge in Burgundy.

He rebelled again in 885 and sought support from his brother-in-law Gotfrid in Frisia[57]. The Annales Vedastini record that "Hugo…filius Hlotharii regis" was blinded in 885 on the advice of "Heinrico duce"[58]. He was shut in the monastery of Fulda, later transferred to Sankt-Gallen, and finally to the abbey of Prüm[59].

m (883) as her fourth husband, FRIDERADA, widow firstly of ENGUERRAND, secondly of BERNARIUS, and thirdly of WICBERT, daughter of ---.

Regino names "Friderada" as wife of "Engilrammo ex qua filiam quam postmodem Richwinus comes in coniugem accepti", also referring to her subsequent marriages[60]. "Hugo filius Lotharii Regis" had "Wicbertum comitem" murdered and married his wife "Frideradam" in 883[61].

b) GISELA ([860/65]-[21 May/26 Oct] 907).

Regino records the marriage in 882 of "Gisla filia Hlotharii" and "rex Godofridus Nordmannorum"[62]. The Annales Fuldenses record the marriage of "Gotafrid Nordmannus qui superiore anno fuerat baptizatus" and "Hugone Hlutharii filio eiusque sororem" in 883[63].

Abbess at Nivelles and Fosses, after her husband died. "Zendeboldus…rex" gave "proprietatem…in loco…VII Fontes" to "propinqua nostra…Kisla…regis Lotharii filia…abbatisse" by charter dated 30 Jul 896[64]. "Zuendebolchus…rex" gave property to "neptis nostre…Gissele…Nyuialensis abbaciæ" for her abbey by charter dated 26 Jul 897[65].

m (882) GODEFRID, son of HARALD "Klak" & his wife --- (-murdered Jun 885).

He was one of the leaders of the Danes who ravaged large parts of territory between the Rhine and the Somme. He converted to Christianity, and Emperor Charles "le Gros" granted him large parts of Frisia as dux.

c) BERTA ([863]-8 Mar 925, bur Lucca, Santa Maria).

"Hugo comes et marchio" names "patris mei Teutbaldi et matris meæ Berthe…" in a donation by charter dated 924[66]. "Berte" is also named as mother of "Hugo rex" in the latter's donation to Cluny for the souls of his parents dated 8 Mar 934[67].

Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Annales Bertiniani which name "Hugonem Lotharii iunioris filium" and “sororium illius Theutbaldum” in 880[68]. Her origin and second marriage are confirmed by the epitaph of "Comitissæ…Bertha" specifies that she was "uxor Adalberti Ducis Italiæ…regalis generi…filia Lotharii" and records her death in 925[69].

Liudprand provides the proof that Berta, who married Marchese Adalberto, was the widow of Theotbald when he names "Berta matre regis Hugonis", specifying that she was previously married to Adalberto, when recording her death[70]. She was regent of Tuscany after the death of her second husband in 915.

m firstly ([879/80]) THEOTBALD [Thibaut] Comte d’Arles, son of HUBERT d'Arles, Comte de Transjuranie & his wife --- (-[Jun 887]/[895]).

m secondly ([895/98]) ADALBERTO II Marchese of Tuscany, Conte e Duca di Lucca, son of ADALBERT I Marchese of Tuscany & his wife Rothildis of Spoleto (-[10/19] Sep 915, bur Lucca Cathedral).

d) ERMENGARDE (-6 Aug after [895/898], bur Lucca, Santa Giustina).

Her epitaph at Lucca records the death "VIII Id Aug" of "Ermingardis…dicata deo" as daughter of "rex…Lotharius"[71].

Nun at Santa Giustina in Lucca.

Gingins-la-Sarra suggests that Ermengarde was the wife of Berlion [I] Vicomte de Vienne, suggesting that she went to Provence with her sister Berta who married Thibaut Comte d´Arles[72]. He says that the charter dated 25 Dec 923, under which “Ludwicus…imperator augustus” confirmed property “in comitatu Viennensi seu et in Lugdunensi in villa…Tadernaco” to “Ingelbertus…et uxori eius Nonie” (Engelbert being this couple´s son)[73], refers to Engelbert as “propinquus” of the emperor. He says that the term was never used in charters which name Berlion [I] and therefore deduces that the relationship must have been through Engelbert´s mother. However, the text of the charter in question does not appear to apply the word “propinquus” specifically to Engelbert. It is used in the phrase “propinquorum et fidelium suorum”, as part of the introductory words in the charter, while Engelbert is named in the document as “fidelis noster”. There appears to be no other basis for this speculation. If the hypothesis were correct, it would be difficult to explain why Ermengarde would have left Provence (presumably after the death of her supposed husband, dated to [912]) and established herself as a nun at Lucca, while her two sons remained in Provence.

References:

[9] Scholz, B. W. with Rogers, B. (2000) Carolingian Chronicles: Royal Frankish Annals and Nithard's Histories (University of Michigan Press) (“RFA”), 814, p. 97.

[10] Annales Xantenses 822, MGH SS II, p. 224.

[11] Einhardi Annales 822, MGH SS, p. 209.

[12] Annales Bertiniani II 855.

[13] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.

[14] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 28 and 29, MGH SS II, p. 597.

[15] Annales Xantenses 821, MGH SS II, p. 224.

[16] Annales Xantenses 851, MGH SS II, p. 229.

[17] Annales Formoselenses 851, MGH SS V, p. 35.

[18] Annales Bertiniani II 853.

[19] Reginonis Chronicon 851, MGH SS I, p. 568.

[20] Epistola XLII, RHGF VII, p. 438.

[21] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.

[22] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 846, MGH SS I, p. 364.

[23] Annales Mettenses, RCGF 7, p. 186.

[24] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 264.

[25] Rösch, S. (1977) Caroli Magni Progenies (Verlag Degener & Co, Neustadt an der Aisch), p. 89.

[26] Flodoardi Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III 27, MGH SS XIII, pp. 547 and 548.

[27] Sedulii Scotti Carmina II 61, MGH Poetæ latini ævi Carolini III, p. 217.

[28] Sedulii Scotti Carmina II 78, MGH Poetæ latini ævi Carolini III, p. 228, which reads "Terrenum sponsum cælestis nunc capit aula".

[29] Ruodolfi Fuldensis Annales 841, MGH SS I, p. 363.

[30] Muratori, L. A. (1778) Antiquitates Italicæ Medii ævi, Tome XIV, col. 106.

[31] MGH Diplomata, IV, 33, p. 133.

[32] Reginonis Chronicon 851, MGH SS I, p. 568.

[33] Folcuini Gesta Abbatum Lobiensium 13, MGH SS IV, p. 61.

[34] Annales Bertiniani II 855.

[35] Settipani (1993), p. 271.

[36] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.

[37] Annales Lobienses 870, MGH SS XIII, p. 232.

[38] Annales Bertiniani III 869.

[39] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 861, MGH SS XXIII, p. 737.

[40] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 862, MHG SS V, p. 105.

[41] Settipani (1993), p. 271 footnote 549.

[42] Annales Bertiniani II 860.

[43] Annales Bertiniani III 862.

[44] Prou, M. & Vidier, A. (eds.) (1907) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, XXV, p. 59.

[45] Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum II, p. 272.

[46] Annales Novesienses, Veterum Scriptorum IV, col. 537.

[47] Baron Ernouf (1858) Histoire de Waldrade, de Lother II et de leurs descendants (Paris), p. 5.

[48] Annales Bertiniani III 862.

[49] Vita Sancti Deicoli 13, MGH SS XV.2, p. 678.

[50] Folcuini Gesta Abbatum Lobiensium 13, MGH SS IV, p. 61.

[51] Settipani (1993), pp. 271-2.

[52] Annales Bertiniani III 867.

[53] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 879, MHG SS V, p. 108.

[54] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 879, MGH SS I, p. 393.

[55] Conventu Compendiensi V, RCGF 9, p. 304.

[56] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 880, MGH SS I, p. 394.

[57] Reginonis Chronicon 885, MGH SS I, p. 595.

[58] Annales Vedastini 885, MGH SS I, p. 522.

[59] Settipani (1993), p. 273.

[60] Reginonis Chronicon 883, MGH SS I, p. 594.

[61] Chronico Saxonico 883, RHGF IX, p. 36.

[62] Reginonis Chronicon 882, MGH SS I, p. 593.

[63] Annales Fuldenses, Pars Quarta, 883, MGH SS I, p. 398.

[64] MGH Diplomata IV, Zw 11, p. 36.

[65] MGH Diplomata IV, Zw 16, p. 45.

[66] Diplomata Hugonis Comitis Provinciæ et Regis Italiæ I, RHGF IX, p. 689.

[67] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny (Paris), Tome I, 417, p. 403.

[68] Annales Bertiniani III 880.

[69] RHGF IX, p. 105.

[70] Liudprandi Antapodosis III.18, MGH SS III, p. 306.

[71] Epitaphia Lunense I, MGH Poetæ latini IV, p. 1007.

[72] Gingins-la-Sarra, F. de (1853) Les Hugonides (Lausanne), pp. 20-1.

[73] Cluny, Tome I, 237, p. 228.

[74] Settipani (1993), p. 265 footnote 504, citing Agnellus Liber pontificalis ecclesiæ Ravennatis c. 171, MGH SRL, p. 388 (without specifying the volume).

[75] Chifflet, P. F. (1644) Histoire de l´abbaye royale et de la ville de Tournus (Dijon), Preuves, p. 212.

[76] Settipani (1993), p. 265, citing Hlawitschka, E. 'Waren die Kaiser Wido und Lambert Nachkommen Karls des Grossen?', Quellen und Forschungen aus italienischen Archiven und Bibliotheken 49 (1969), pp. 366-86.

[77] Reginonis Chronicon 851, MGH SS I, p. 568.

[78] Annales Bertiniani II 853.

---------------------------

From the French Wikipedia page on Lothaire II de Lotharingie:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothaire_II_de_Lotharingie

Second fils de Lothaire Ier, empereur d'Occident et roi de Francie médiane, et d'Ermengarde de Tours, Hlothar ou Lothaire II (ca 835 - † 869) est un roi des Francs, sur un territoire compris entre l'Escaut et le Rhin et comprenant la plus grande partie de l'Austrasie et de la Frise.

Faute de dénomination pour ce territoire, les chroniqueurs ont appelé ce territoire Lotharii regnum (« royaume de Lothaire »), terme devenu au xe siècle « Lotharingia » et à l'origine de l'allemand « Lothringen » et du français « Lorraine » .

Biographie

Avant de mourir, Lothaire Ier avait, par le traité de Prüm, organisé le partage de son royaume entre ses trois fils : le royaume d'Italie et le titre impérial pour Louis II, la Provence jusqu'à Lyon pour Charles et le reste, c'est-à-dire toute la partie nord de la Francie médiane, de la Frise jusqu'au sud de l'actuel département de la Haute-Marne à Lothaire.

Lothaire Ier meurt le 29 septembre 855 et Lothaire II, reconnu roi par son oncle Louis le Germanique en novembre 855, est sacré roi au début de l'année 856[2],[3].

Pour des raisons politiques, son père lui fait épouser Theutberge, fille de Boson l'Ancien et sœur d'Hucbert un seigneur brigand[4], abbé laïc de Saint-Maurice en Valais, qui domine les zones entre le Jura et les Alpes. Mais celle-ci ne lui donne pas d'enfants, et Lothaire a une maîtresse, Waldrade[5] (sœur de l'archevêque Gunther de Cologne[6],[7]) qu'il souhaite épouser et faire légitimer les enfants. En 860, il répudie sa femme qu'il accuse de relations incestueuses avec son frère, et trouve quelques évêques complaisants pour prononcer l'annulation du mariage. Maintenue prisonnière par son époux, Theutberge réussit à s'enfuir et à se réfugier auprès du roi de Francie occidentale Charles le Chauve. Ce dernier lui donne l'abbaye d'Avenay dépendant du diocèse de Reims[8]. Mais Hincmar, archevêque de Reims avec le second concile de Savonnières refusent d'approuver cette union. Soutenu par Louis le Germanique et Charles le Chauve, les deux oncles du roi, il en réfère au pape Nicolas Ier, qui refuse lui aussi de reconnaître le mariage. Lothaire tente de plaider sa cause auprès du pape qui reste inflexible. Son successeur Adrien II finit même par excommunier Waldrade en 866[9].

En 858, il se réconcilie avec son frère Charles de Provence et signe un traité l'instituant héritier de son frère, au détriment de son autre frère Louis II. À la mort de ce dernier en 863, Lothaire ne réussit qu'à imposer sa suzeraineté que sur les comtés de Lyon, Vienne et Vivarais. La Provence lui échappe au bénéfice de son frère aîné Louis II, empereur d'Occident et roi d'Italie. En février 865, ses oncles se rencontrent à Tusey près de Vaucouleurs et s'accordent sur la partage de ses états, estimant que les fils de Lothaire II ne sont pas légitimes pour lui succéder. Obligé de reprendre Teutberge, il tente une ultime démarche pour fléchir le pape Adrien II qu'il rencontre à l'abbaye du Mont-Cassin, mais contracte une fièvre paludéenne et meurt à Plaisance le 8 août 869[2].

Mariage et enfants [modifier]

En 855, son père lui fait épouser Theutberge († 875), fille de Boson l'Ancien, comte d'Arles. Dès 857, Lothaire II la fait emprisonner, mais ses oncles Louis le Germanique et Charles le Chauve lui permettent de s'évader.

En 862, Lothaire obtient d'évêques complaisants l'annulation de son premier mariage et épouse sa maîtresse Waldrade, issue de l'aristocratie, et probablement parente d'Eberhard, comte alsacien, et de l'abbé Fulrad[2]. Mais ses oncles font appel au pape Nicolas Ier, qui refuse de reconnaître le mariage et excommunie Waldrade en 866. De cette seconde union sont nés :

1. Hugues (ca 855-860 † après 895), duc d'Alsace ;

2. Gisèle (ca 860-865 † 907) mariée en 882 à Godfried († 885), chef viking et dux en Frise ;

3. Berthe (ca 863 † 925), mariée vers 879/88010 à Théobald, comte d'Arles, puis entre 895 et 898 à Adalbert II († 915), marquis de Toscane ;

4. Ermengarde, religieuse à l'abbaye Sainte-Justine de Lucques.

---

In English:

The second son of Lothair I, Emperor of the West and King of Middle Francia, and Ermengarde of Tours, Hlothar or Lothair II (c.835-869) was a King of the Franks within the territory between the Scheldt and the Rhine that included most of Austrasia and Friesland.

Without naming this territory, commentators have called it "Lotharii regnum" ("Kingdom of Lothair"), defined in the 10th century as "Lotharingia" and the origin of the German territorial name "Lothringen" and the French name "Lorraine".

Biography

Before his death, Lothair I had arranged the Treaty of Prüm, where he divided his realm among his three sons: the Kingdom of Italy and the Imperial title went to Ludwig (Louis), Provence and Lyon went to Charles, and the rest, that is to say the entire northern part of Middle Francia from Friesland south to the present departement de Haute-Marne, went to Lothair.

Lothair I died on 29 September 855 and Lothair II as the new King recognized his uncle, Louis the German, in November. He was crowned at the beginning of 856.[2],[3] For political reasons, his father made him marry Theutberge, daughter of Boso the Elder and sister of Hucbert, a brigand lord [4] and lay abbot of St-Maurice in Valais, which dominated the area between the Jura Range and the Alps. But she did not give him children, and Lothair kept a mistress, Waldrade [5] (sister of Gunter, Archbishop of Cologne [6],[7]), with whom he wished to marry and have legitimate children.

In 860, he divorced his wife, accusing her of an incestuous affair with her brother, and some bishops were agreeable to annulling the marriage on these grounds. Having been imprisoned by her husband, Theutberge managed to escape and find refuge with the King of Western Francia, Charles the Bald. He gave her reign of the Abbey of Avenay within the Diocese of Rheims.[8]

But Hincmar, Archbishop of Rheims, refused to approve the divorce and new marriage at the Second Council of Savonnieres. Supported by Louis the German and Charles the Bald, the king's two uncles, the matter is referred to Pope Nicolas I, who also refuses to recognize Lothair's new marriage. Lothair tried to plead his cause, but the Pope remained adamant. His successor, Adrian II, excommunicated Waldrade in 866.[9]

In 858, Lothair reconciled with his brother, Charles de Provence, and signed a treaty establishing him as heir to his throne, at the neglect of his other brother, Louis II. At Charles' death in 863, Lothair managed only to extend his sovereignty to the counties of Lyon, Vienne, and Vivarais. Provence went to Louis II, Emperor of the West and King of Italy.

In February 865, his uncles met at Tusey near Vaucouleurs, and agreed on this division of territories, saying that Lothair II's son was not a legitimate successor. Forced to resume his marriage with Teutberge, he attempted one last time to appeal to Pope Adrian II, who met with him at the Abbey of Monte Cassion, but he contracted malarial fever and died at Piacenza on 8 August 869.[2]

Marriage and children

In 855, his father made him marry Theutberge (d. 875), daughter of Boso the Elder, Comte d'Arles. From 857, Lothair II imprisoned her, but his uncles Louis the German and Charles the Bald allowed her sanctuary upon her escape.

In 862, Lothair received approval from certain bishops for the annulment of his marriage and he married his mistress Waldrade, a woman of noble birth, likely related to Eberhard, Comte d'Alsace and Abbot of Fulrad.[2] But his uncles appealed to Pope Nicolas I, who refused to recognize the marriage and excommunicated Waldrade in 866. From this union were born:

1. Hugues (b. 855-860, d. after 895), Duke of Alsace

2. Gisele (b. c. 860-865, d. 907) married in 882 to Godfried (d. 885), Viking chief and Duke in Friesland

3. Berthe (b. c.863, d. 925) married firstly in 879/880 [10] to Theobald, Comte d'Arles, then secondly in 895-898 to Adalbert II (d. 915), Marquis of Tuscany

4. Ermengarde, a nun at the Abbey of Sainte-Justine de Lucca.

---

Dynastie: Carolingiens

Titre: roi de Lotharingie (855 - 869)

Couronnement: début 856

Prédécesseur: Lothaire Ier

Successeur: Louis le Germanique, et Charles le Chauve

Biographie

Naissance: ca. 835[1]

Décès: 8 août 869

Plaisance

Enfant de Lothaire Ier, empereur des Francs et de Ermengarde

Conjoint Theutberge

Enfants de sa maîtresse:

1. Hugues

2. Gisèle

3. Berthe

4. Ermengearde

Maîtresses: Waldrade

Notes et références

1. ↑ Les Annales Fuldenses le qualifient de parvulus (= enfant) en 841.

2. ↑ Settipani 1993

3. ↑ Riché 1983, p. 173.

4. ↑ Jean Chélini, L'aube du Moyen Âge, naissance de la chrétienté occidentale : la vie religieuse des laïcs dans l'Europe carolingienne (750-900), 1991, p. 158

5. ↑ Généalogie de Waldrade sur le site FMG

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HOLLAND.htm#WaldradaMLotharII

6. ↑ Waldradam, sororem Guntheri archiepiscopi Coloniensi, dans Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus Archiepiscopum Coloniensium 94-1230, Fontes rerum Germanicarum tome II, p. 272

7. ↑ Annales Novesienses (annales de Nuitz) Veterum Scriptorum IV, col. 537 : Guntherus episcopus Coloniensi...sorore...Vastradam...aliis Waldradam

8. ↑ Université de Strasbourg, Revue du Moyen Âge latin 1984, p. 184

9. ↑ Riché 1983, p. 177 et 184.

10. ↑ Généalogie de Berthe sur le site FMG http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIA.htm#BertaM1ThibautArlesM2AdalbertIITuscany

Bibliographie

Pierre Riché, Les Carolingiens, une famille qui fit l'Europe, Hachette, coll. « Pluriel », Paris, 1983 (réimpr. 1997), 490 p. (ISBN 2-01-278851-3)

Christian Settipani, La Préhistoire des Capétiens (Nouvelle histoire généalogique de l'auguste maison de France, vol. 1), éd. Patrick van Kerrebrouck, 1993 (ISBN 2-9501509-3-4), p. 270-4

Jean-Charles Volkmann, Bien connaître les généalogies des rois de France, Éditions Gisserot, 1999 (ISBN 2-877472086)

Michel Mourre, Le Petit Mourre. Dictionnaire d'Histoire universelle, Éditions Bordas, avril 2007 (ISBN 978-2-04-732194-2)

---------------------------

From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Lothar II (Forrás / Source):

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10321.htm#i103207

Lothar II, King of Lothuringia

M, #103207, b. circa 826, d. 8 August 869

Last Edited=26 Nov 2006

Lothar II, King of Lothuringia was born circa 826. He was the son of Lothair I, Holy Roman Emperor and Irmengard, Comtesse de Tours.

He married Waldrada I (?). He died on 8 August 869.

Lothar II, King of Lothuringia gained the title of King Lothar II of Lothuringia in 835.

Children of Lothar II, King of Lothuringia and Waldrada I (?)

-1. Buwin (Beuves), Count of Ardem+

-2. Gisela, Princesse de Lorraine+ d. 908 (1)

Citations

1. [S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family."

(Ben M. Angel notes: Secondary source, at best.)

--------------------

Unattributed information on Lothair II:

Lothair II (835 – August 8, 869), was the second son of Emperor Lothair I and Ermengarde of Tours. He was married to Teutberga, daughter of Boso the Elder

Illegitimate children

   * Hugh (c.855-895), Duke of Alsace
   * Gisela (865-908), married Godfrey, Duke of Frisia
   * Bertha (c.863-925), married Theobald of Arles, brother of Theutberga, and then Adalbert II of Tuscany
   * Ermengard

Sources:

  1. Hincmar, "Opusculum de divortio Lotharii regis et Tetbergae reginae," in Cursus completus patrologiae, tome cxxv., edited by J. P. Migne (Paris, 1857-1879)
  2. M. Sdralek, Hinkmars von Rheims Kanonistisches Gutachten uber die Ehescheidung des Königs Lothar II (Freiburg, 1881)
  3. E. Dummler, Geschichte des ostfränkischen Reiches (Leipzig, 1887-1888)
  4. E. Muhlbacher, Die Regenten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881)

--------------------

Unattributed information on Lothaire II:

  1. Name: Lothaire II LORRAINE
  2. Given Name: Lothaire II
  3. Surname: Lorraine
  4. Sex: M
  5. Birth: Abt 830 in Alsace, Lorraine, France
  6. Death: 7 Aug 869 in Plaisance, Italy

Father: Lothaire I HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE b: 795 in Altdorf, Bavaria, Germany

Mother: Ermengarde De TOURS b: Abt 805 in Tours, Indre Et Loire, Touraine Centre, France

Marriage 1 Valdrade Valtrude LORRAINE b: Abt 850 in Lorraine, France

Married: 15 Oct 862

Children

1. Bertha Princess Of LORRAINE b: 863 in Lorraine, France

2. Gisela LORRAINE b: Abt 869 in Lorraine, France

--------------------

Ben M. Angel public service announcement: He was not associated with the Holy Roman Empire. The entity that became the Holy Roman Empire did not exist until 2 February 962. Please review:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_roman_empire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_I_the_Great

And remember, friends do not let friends become "Holy Roman Empire (HRE) monkeys"

--------------------

From the English Wikipedia page on Lothair II of Lotharingia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothair_II_of_Lotharingia

Lothair II (835 – August 8, 869) was the second son of Emperor Lothair I and Ermengarde of Tours. He was married to Teutberga, daughter of Boso the Elder. He is the namesake of the Lothair Crystal, which he probably commissioned, and of the Cross of Lothair, which was made over a century after his death but incorporates a rock crystal bearing his name and image from his seal.

Upon his father's death in 855, he received as his kingdom a territory west of the Rhine stretching from the North Sea to the Jura mountains. It became known as Regnum Lotharii and early in the 10th century as Lotharingia or Lorraine (a designation subsequently applied only to the duchy of Lorraine). His elder brother Louis II received northern Italy and the title of Emperor, and his younger brother Charles received the western parts of his father's domains, Burgundy and the Provence.

On the death of his brother Charles in 863, Lothair added some lands south of the Jura to this realm, but except for a few feeble expeditions against the Norman pirates he seems to have done little for its government or its defense.

Lothair's reign was chiefly occupied by his efforts to obtain a divorce from his wife Teutberga, a sister of Hucbert, abbot of St Maurice (d. 864) and daughter of the Bosonid Boso the Elder, and his relations with his uncles Charles the Bald and Louis the German were influenced by his desire to obtain their support for this endeavor. Although quarrels and reconciliations between the three kings followed each other in quick succession, in general it may be said that Louis favoured the divorce, and Charles opposed it, while neither lost sight of the fact that Lothair had no sons to inherit his lands.

Lothair, whose desire for the divorce was prompted by his affection for his mistress, Waldrada, put away Theutberga, but Hucbert took up arms on her behalf, and after she had submitted successfully to the ordeal of water, Lothair was compelled to restore her in 858. Still pursuing his purpose, he won the support of his brother, Emperor Louis II, by a cession of lands and obtained the consent of the local clergy to the divorce and to his marriage with Waldrada, which took place in 862.

A synod of Frankish bishops met at Metz in 863 and confirmed this decision, but Teutberga fled to the court of Charles the Bald, and Pope Nicholas I voided the decision of the synod. An attack on Rome by the emperor was without result, and in 865 Lothair, threatened with excommunication and convinced that Louis and Charles at their recent meeting had discussed the partition of his kingdom, again took back his wife. Teutberga, however, either from inclination or compulsion, now expressed her desire for a divorce, and Lothair went to Italy to obtain the assent of the new pope, Adrian II. Placing a favourable interpretation upon the words of the pope, he had set out on the return journey, when he was seized with fever and died at Piacenza on the August 8, 869. He left, by Waldrada, a son Hugh who was declared illegitimate, and his kingdom was divided between his uncles Charles the Bald and Louis the German by the Treaty of Meerssen.

Illegitimate children

1. Hugh (c.855-895), Duke of Alsace

2. Gisela (865-908), married Godfrey, Duke of Frisia

3. Bertha (c.863-925), married Theobald of Arles, brother of Theutberga, and then Adalbert II of Tuscany

4. Ermengard

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Lothair II of Lotharingia

Hincmar, "Opusculum de divortio Lotharii regis et Tetbergae reginae," in Cursus completus patrologiae, tome cxxv., edited by J. P. Migne (Paris, 1857–79)

M. Sdralek, Hinkmars von Rheims Kanonistisches Gutachten uber die Ehescheidung des Königs Lothar II (Freiburg, 1881)

E. Dummler, Geschichte des ostfränkischen Reiches (Leipzig, 1887–88)

E. Muhlbacher, Die Regenten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881)

Lothair II of Lotharingia, Carolingian Dynasty

Born: 835

Died: 8 August 869 - Piacenza

Regnal titles

King of Lotharingia, 23 September 855 – 8 August 869

Preceded by Emperor Lothar I as King of Middle Francia

Succession: Kingdom divided between Louis the German and Charles the Bald

Heir: Hugh, Duke of Alsace

Consort Teutberga

Consort Waldrada

Offspring

Hugh, Duke of Alsace,

Gisela of Frisia,

Bertha

Royal House: Carolingian Dynasty

Father Emperor Lothair I

Mother Ermengarde of Tours

--------------------

Unattributed biographical information on Lothaire II:

Lothaire II claimed the northern portion of his father's lands, which came to be known as Lotharingia. Lothaire II died in 869 without a legitimate heir. He had a bastard son Hugh and a daughter Bertha. His son was barred from legitimate succession since the pope did not recognize Lothaire's second marriage, which produced Hugh. Hugh became a contestant for control of his father's territory, against Louis the German and Charles the Bald who wanted to divide it between themselves. Later, Hugh allied himself with the Viking Godorid, who settled in Frisia, against Charles the Fat. Hugh was captured by Henry of Babenberg on behalf of Charles the Fat and blinded.

--------------------

Unattributed Norwegian information on Lothar:

Familj med Waldrade (830 - 868)

Vigsel: före 855 1)

Barn:

Gisela av Lothringen (- 872)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Noteringar

Vid delningen av faderns rike fick han den norra tredjedelen, som efter hans död delades mellan farbröderna i Frankrike och Tyskland. Det kallades efter honom Lotharingen, senare Lothringen, på franska Lorraine. Kejsar Lothar II hette som tysk kung Lothar III.

Källa: Bra Böcker

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Källor

1)  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England 

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothair_II_of_Lotharingia -------------------- Occupation: King of Lorraine -------------------- Because of the struggle with the divorce from his first wife, which was

continually reversed and then confirmed again he died without legal heirs -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothair_II_of_Lotharingia -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothair_II

Lothair II of Lotharingia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Lothair II

King of Lotharingia

Lothair II of Lotharingia.jpg

Seal of Lothair II

Reign 855-869

Born 835

Died 8 August 869 (0869-08-09)

Place of death Piacenza

Predecessor Emperor Lothair I as King of Middle Francia

Heir Hugh, Duke of Alsace

Successor Lands divided between Louis the German and Charles the Bald

Consort Teutberga

Consort Waldrada

Offspring Hugh, Duke of Alsace, Gisela of Frisia, Bertha

Royal House Carolingian Dynasty

Father Emperor Lothair I

Mother Ermengarde of Tours

Lothair II (835 – August 8, 869), was the second son of Emperor Lothair I and Ermengarde of Tours. He was married to Teutberga, daughter of Boso the Elder

Upon his father's death in 855, he received as his kingdom a territory west of the Rhine stretching from the North Sea to the Jura mountains. It became known as Regnum Lotharii and early in the 10th century as Lotharingia or Lorraine (a designation subsequently applied only to the duchy of Lorraine). His elder brother Louis II received northern Italy and the title of Emperor, and his younger brother Charles received the western parts of his father's domains, Burgundy and the Provence.

On the death of his brother Charles in 863, Lothair added some lands south of the Jura to this realm, but except for a few feeble expeditions against the Norman pirates he seems to have done little for its government or its defense.

Lothair's reign was chiefly occupied by his efforts to obtain a divorce from his wife Theutberga, a sister of Hucbert, abbot of St Maurice (d. 864) and daughter of the Bosonid Boso the Elder, and his relations with his uncles Charles the Bald and Louis the German were influenced by his desire to obtain their support for this endeavor. Although quarrels and reconciliations between the three kings followed each other in quick succession, in general it may be said that Louis favoured the divorce, and Charles opposed it, while neither lost sight of the fact that Lothair had no sons to inherit his lands. Lothair, whose desire for the divorce was prompted by his affection for his mistress, Waldrada, put away Theutberga, but Hucbert took up arms on her behalf, and after she had submitted successfully to the ordeal of water, Lothair was compelled to restore her in 858. Still pursuing his purpose, he won the support of his brother, Emperor Louis II, by a cession of lands and obtained the consent of the local clergy to the divorce and to his marriage with Waldrada, which took place in 862.

A synod of Frankish bishops met at Metz in 863 and confirmed this decision, but Teutberga fled to the court of Charles the Bald, and Pope Nicholas I voided the decision of the synod. An attack on Rome by the emperor was without result, and in 865 Lothair, threatened with excommunication and convinced that Louis and Charles at their recent meeting had discussed the partition of his kingdom, again took back his wife. Teutberga, however, either from inclination or compulsion, now expressed her desire for a divorce, and Lothair went to Italy to obtain the assent of the new pope, Adrian II. Placing a favourable interpretation upon the words of the pope, he had set out on the return journey, when he was seized with fever and died at Piacenza on the August 8, 869. He left, by Waldrada, a son Hugh who was declared illegitimate, and his kingdom was divided between his uncles Charles the Bald and Louis the German by the Treaty of Meerssen.

[edit] Illegitimate children

   * Hugh (c.855-895), Duke of Alsace
   * Gisela (865-908), married Godfrey, Duke of Frisia
   * Bertha (c.863-925), married Theobald of Arles, brother of Theutberga, and then Adalbert II of Tuscany
   * Ermengard

[edit] Ancestry

[show]

v • d • e

Ancestors of Lothair II of Lotharingia



















16. Pepin the Short








8. Charlemagne












17. Bertrada of Laon








4. Louis the Pious















18. Gerold of Vintzgau








9. Hildegarde












19. Emma of Alamannia








2. Lothair I


















20. Rodbert








10. Ingerman of Hesbaye












5. Ermengarde of Hesbaye















11. Hedwig of Bavaria












1. Lothair II





















24. Adalrich, Duke of Alsace








12. Count Haicho












25. Berswinda








6. Hugh of Tours















13. Ganna ?












3. Ermengarde of Tours


















7. Ava














[edit] References

Search Wikimedia Commons Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Lothair II of Lotharingia

   * Hincmar, "Opusculum de divortio Lotharii regis et Tetbergae reginae," in Cursus completus patrologiae, tome cxxv., edited by J. P. Migne (Paris, 1857-1879)
   * M. Sdralek, Hinkmars von Rheims Kanonistisches Gutachten uber die Ehescheidung des Königs Lothar II (Freiburg, 1881)
   * E. Dummler, Geschichte des ostfränkischen Reiches (Leipzig, 1887-1888)
   * E. Muhlbacher, Die Regenten des Kaiserreichs unter den Karolingern (Innsbruck, 1881)
   * This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Lothair II of Lotharingia

Carolingian Dynasty

Born: 835 Died: 8 August 869

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Emperor Lothar I

as King of Middle Francia King of Lotharingia

23 September 855 – 8 August 869 Kingdom divided

between Louis the German

and Charles the Bald

This page was last modified on 24 April 2010 at 23:10 -------------------- LOTHAIRE I 843-855, LOTHAIRE II 855-869

LOTHAIRE, son of Emperor LOUIS I "der Fromme/le Pieux" & his first wife Ermengard (795-Kloster Prüm 29 Sep 855, bur Kloster Prüm).

Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" sons of Emperor Louis I & his wife Ermengard[8].

His father sent him to govern Bavaria in [Aug] 814[9].

He was crowned joint Emperor LOTHAIRE I in Jul 817 at Aachen, ruling jointly with his father. He was sent to Italy in 822, where he established his court at Pavia and was crowned King of Italy by the Archbishop of Milan. The Annales Xantenses record that "Ludewicus imperator" gave "filio suo Lothario regnum Langobardorum" in 822[10]. Einhard's Annales record that the emperor sent "Walahum monachum propinquum suum [imperatoris] fratrem…Adalhardi abbatis" to Italy in 822 with "Hlotharius…filium suum"[11].

He was again crowned Emperor, at Rome 5 Apr 823 by Pope Pascal I. The rivalry with his father and brothers was exacerbated by the unexpected birth of his half-brother Charles in 823. Tension was increased when Emperor Louis invested Charles with Alemannia, Rhetia, Alsace and part of Burgundy at Worms in Aug 829, reducing Lothaire's territory to Italy.

Lothaire and his brothers rebelled in Mar 830, captured their father at Compiègne, and forced him to revert to the constitutional arrangements decided in 817. However, Emperor Louis reasserted his authority at the assemblies of Nijmegen in Oct 830 and Aix-la-Chapelle in Feb 831, and deprived Lothaire of the imperial title and relegated him once more to Italy. A further revolt of the brothers followed.

Emperor Louis was defeated and deposed by his sons at Compiègne 1 Oct 833. He was exiled to the monastery of Saint-Médard de Soissons. Lothaire declared himself sole emperor 30 Jun 833, but was forced to flee to Vienne by his brothers Pepin and Louis, who freed their father.

Emperor Louis was restored 1 Mar 834, crowned once more at Metz 28 Feb 835. Lothaire captured Chalon-sur-Saône, but was arrested by his father's troops near Chouzy. His father pardoned him and sent him back to Italy as king.

Emperor Louis proposed yet another partition in favour of his son Charles at the assembly of Aachen in 837, which was implemented at the assembly of Worms 28 May 839 when he installed his sons Lothaire and Charles jointly, the former taking all land east of the River Meuse, the latter everything to the west, and set aside the claims of his son Louis and the successors of his late son Pepin.

Lothaire succeeded as sole emperor on his father’s death 20 Jun 840. He sought to extend his power base northwards from Italy across the Alps, and deprive his half-brother Charles. The latter allied himself with his half-brother Louis, and together they defeated Lothaire at Fontenoy-en-Puisaye, near Auxerre 25 Jun 841. After retreating to Aachen, Lothaire was forced out to Lyon in Apr 842 by his brothers, who declared him incapable of governing the empire. Preliminary peace proposals signed on an island in the Saône, near Mâcon 15 Jun 842 led to the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, under which the territory of the empire was divided between the three brothers.

Lothaire retained the imperial title and was also installed as LOTHAIRE I King of Lotharingia, a newly created territory covering a wide strip of land from the North Sea coast southwards to Italy, the new country being named after him. He established his seat of government at Aachen, and installed his son Louis as King of Italy. Over the following 10 years, a series of meetings aimed to maintain peace between the three brothers, with varying success.

After a serious illness, Emperor Lothaire abdicated in Sep 855 at Kloster Schüller, near Prüm, and divided his territories between his sons Louis II, Lothaire II and Charles.

The Annales Bertiniani record that Emperor Lothaire entered "monasterium Proneæ in Arduenna", was tonsured, died "IV Kal Oct" and was buried in the monastery[12]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "855 III Kal Oct" of "Lotharius imperator"[13].

m (Thionville, Moselle mid-Oct 821) ERMENGARDE, daughter of HUGUES Comte [de Tours] [Etichonen] & his wife Ava --- (-20 Mar 851, bur Kloster Erstein, near Strasbourg).

Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris refers to the wife of Emperor Lothaire as "filiam Hugi comitis, qui erat de stirpe cuiusdam ducis nomine Etih" and in the following paragraph names her "Irmingarda"[14]. The Annales Xantenses record the marriage in 821 of "Ludewicus imperator…filio suo Lothario" and "Ermingardam filiam Hugonis comitis Turonicorum"[15].

She founded Kloster Erstein in Alsace in 849.

The Annales Xantenses record the death in 851 of "imperatrix…Irmingard, coniunx Lotharii imperatoris"[16]. The Annales Formoselenses record the death in 851 of "Irmingard regina"[17].

Mistress (1): DODA, daughter of --- (-after 9 Jul 855). The Annales Bertiniani records that "Lotharius imperator" took "duas sibi ancillas ex villa regia", of whom Doda gave birth to "filium…Karlomannum"[18].

Emperor Lothaire & his wife had eight children:

1. LOUIS "le Jeune" ([825]-near Brescia 12 Aug 875, bur Milan, San Ambrosio).

Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothaire & his wife[19].

He was sent to Italy as king in 844, crowned in Rome in 844 as LOUIS King of Italy by Pope Sergius II. He was crowned joint Emperor LOUIS II, reigning jointly with his father, at Rome in Apr 850 by Pope Leo IV. He was sole emperor in 855 after the death of his father.

2. HILTRUDE ([826]-after [865/66]).

Pope Nicholas I names "Helletrude Berengarii Comitis quondam relicta" in an undated letter which refers to her as "Lothario sorore sua"[20].

m BERENGAR, son of --- (-[865/66]).

3. daughter ([825/30]-).

The Gesta Francorum records that "Gisalbertus, vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and took her to Aquitaine where they were married[21]. The Annales Fuldenses also record that "Gisalbertus vassallus Karoli" abducted "filiam Hlotharii imperatoris" and married her in Aquitaine in 846[22]. The Annales Mettenses also date this event in 846[23].

Settipani states that the emperor recognised the marriage in 849[24]. Rösch says that this daughter is often named Ermengarde in secondary sources but that there is no contemporary proof that this is correct[25].

m (Aquitaine 846) GISELBERT Graf von Maasgau, son of --- (-after 14 Jun 877).

4. BERTA ([830]-after 7 May 852, maybe after [877]).

A letter from Hincmar Archbishop of Reims to "Irmingardi augustæ", included by Flodoard in the Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, names "Bertæ, ipsius imperatricis filiæ" referring to her activities at "Avennaci monasterii", a later passage confirming that she was "abbatissæ Avennaci monasterii"[26]. A poem by Sedulius is addressed to "Berta…proles…Lothari…Ermingardis matris"[27].

Abbess of Avenay before 847.

Maybe Abbess of Faremoutiers 852-after 877.

m ([Worms autumn 841]) ---.

Berta was married, as shown by a second poem by Sedulius addressed to "Berta" which names "Ermingardis Cæsareumque" as her mother and refers to Bertha's "earthly spouse…now in heaven"[28]. It is possible that she was the daughter "Hlotharius…filiæ suæ" whose marriage is referred to at Worms in Autumn 841 in the Annals of Fulda [29]. Berta's husband has not been identified.

5. GISELA ([830]-860).

The necrology of Brixen records that "Domnus Imperator Lotharius tradidit filiam suam domnam Gislam"[30]. Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia 851-860. "Hludwicus…imperator augustus" made grants to San Salvatore in memory of "Gisla soror nostra defuncta" by charter dated 12 Jan [861][31].

---

6. LOTHAIRE ([835]-Piacenza 8 Aug 869, bur Convent of San Antonio near Piacenza).

m ([855], separated 857, repudiated 860) TEUTBERGA, daughter of BOSO "l'Ancien" Comte d’Arles & his wife --- (-Metz before 25 Nov 875, bur Metz, Abbaye de Sainte-Glossinde).

Mistress (1): (from [855]) WALDRADA, daughter of --- (-9 Apr after 868).

King Lothaire II had four illegitimate children by Mistress (1).

(Detailed below)

---

7. ROTRUDE (chr Pavia [835/40]-).

The baptism of Rotrudis daughter of Lothaire is recorded at Pavia in [835/40][74].

[same person as…? ROTRUDE .

"Witbertus…comes" donated property at Ornois to the abbey of Tournus, for the souls of "Lanberti genitoris mei necnon et Rutrudis genetricis meæ", by charter dated 28 Jan 870[75]. Hlawitschka suggests that she was the daughter of Emperor Lothaire I, as her son's charter dated 28 Jan 870 records that the property he donated to the abbey of Tournus had been granted to his father by Emperor Lothaire[76]. However, the copy of the charter reproduced in the Histoire de Tournus, cited above, states that the property had been donated to Wicbert by "senioris mei Hlotharii Regis".

m ([850/51]) LAMBERT Comte et Marquis de Nantes, son of LAMBERT [I] Comte et Marquis de Nantes [Guidonen] & his wife [--- of Italy] (-killed in battle 1 May 852).]

8. CHARLES ([845]-Lyon 25 Jan 863, bur Lyon, Saint-Pierre).

Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothaire & his wife[77]. His father invested him in Sep 855 with Provence, Lyon and Transjuranian Burgundy.

Emperor Lothaire I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):

9. CARLOMAN ([853]-).

The Annales Bertiniani name "Karlomannum" as the son of "Lotharius imperator" and his mistress Doda[78].

---

(From above)

6. LOTHAIRE ([835]-Piacenza 8 Aug 869, bur Convent of San Antonio near Piacenza).

Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothaire & his wife[32]. "Lothario rege" is named "filio imperatoris Lotharii" by Folcuin[33].

The Annales Bertiniani record that Emperor Lothaire gave Frisia to his son Lothaire in 855[34].

He succeeded his father in 855 as LOTHAIRE II King of Lotharingia, with Aachen as his capital. He attempted to annul his marriage to marry his mistress of many years, but was opposed by Hincmar Archbishop of Reims, and later Pope Nicholas I who ordered him to return to his wife 15 Aug 865. He was negotiating with Pope Hadrian II for a new decision when he died of malaria[35].

On his death, his lands were divided between Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks and Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks, instead of passing to his brother Emperor Louis despite the latter's objections.

The necrology of Prüm records the death "869 Kal Iul" of "Lotharius rex filius eius [=Lotharius imperator]"[36].

m ([855], separated 857, repudiated 860) TEUTBERGA, daughter of BOSO "l'Ancien" Comte d’Arles & his wife --- (-Metz before 25 Nov 875, bur Metz, Abbaye de Sainte-Glossinde).

The Annales Lobienses name "Tietberga, sorore Hucberti abbatis" as lawful wife of "Lotharius"[37]. The Annales Bertiniani name "Teutbergam" as "materteram suam [=Bosone filio Buvini comitis]"[38].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Thieberga regina legitima uxore [Lotharii]", specifying that she relied on the advice of "Bosonis comitis" at the time of her repudiation, although her relationship to him is not specified[39]. Herimannus names "Tiohtpirga uxore legitima" of King Lothaire II when recording his repudiation of her[40]. She protected the wife of Boso Count in Italy after she deserted her husband. She was repudiated on the grounds of her alleged incest with her brother Hugobert[41]. Her husband kept her prisoner after separating from her.

The Annales Bertiniani record that "uxor Lotharii" fled to "fratrem suum Hucbertum in regno Karli" in 860[42]. She escaped in 860 and sought refuge with Charles II "le Chauve" who gave her the abbey of Avenay in the diocese of Reims. The Annales Bertiniani records that "uxore [Lothario]" gave support to "uxori Bosonis et Balduino qui filiam eius [=Karoli regis] furatus fuerat in uxorem"[43].

Abbess of Sainte Glossinde at Metz 869. "Heccardus comes" names "…Teutbergane uxore Lotharii…" among the beneficiaries under his testamentary disposition dated to [Jan 876][44]. It is not certain that this refers to the separated wife of King Lothar II, but no other "Teutberga/Lothaire" couple has been identified at the time. If this identification is correct, it suggests a family relationship between Teutberga and Ecchard, which has not yet been identified.

Mistress (1): (from [855]) WALDRADA, daughter of --- (-9 Apr after 868).

The Cæsarii Heisterbacensis Catalogus of archbishops of Köln records that the concubine of "Lotharius" was "Waldradam, sororem Guntheri archiepiscopi Coloniensis" and that her brother encouraged Lothaire to leave his legitimate wife for Waldrada, for which he was excommunicated by the Pope[45]. The Annales Novesienses record that “Guntherus episcopus Coloniensis” had “sororem…Vastradam…aliis Waldradam” whom “dux Lotharingiæ Lotharius…superdixit” after her brother approved his divorce from “legitima uxore Tyberga”[46].

According to Baron Ernouf[47], Gunther archbishop of Köln was uncle of Waldrada and Thetgaud archbishop of Trier was her brother, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. The Annales Bertiniani names "Hlotharius Waldradam concubinam" when recording that Lothaire purported to marry her in 862 and crowned her with the support of "Liutfrido avunculo suo et Waltario"[48].

Waldrada was also related to the Etichonen Grafen im Nordgau (ALSACE), as shown by the Vita Sancti Deicoli which names "Waldrada…Heberardo comitis consanguinitatis"[49], but the precise relationship is not known.

Folcuin records King Lothaire's excommunication after repudiating his wife for Waldrada[50]. King Lothaire purported to marry Waldrada in [Aug/Sep] 862 and crowned her as Queen, but this was not recognised by the church[51].

She became a nun at Remiremont.

King Lothaire II had four illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

a) HUGUES ([855/60]-after 895).

Duke of Alsace 867, until after Aug 869.

The Annales Bertiniani record that King Lothaire invested "filioque suo de Waldrada Hugoni" with "ducatum Elisatium" in 867[52]. Herimannus names "Hugonem, Lotharii regis ex Waldrada filium" when recording his rebellion in 879[53].

After his father's death, Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks invaded Alsace and Hugues was obliged to submit to him. The Gesta Francorum records that "Hugo, Hlutharii et Waldrada filius" caused tyranny in France in 879[54].

Pope John VIII excommunicated "Hugonem Lotharii Regis quondam filium non legitimum" in 878[55]. Hugues challenged Louis II "le Bègue" and his son Louis III "le Jeune" in Lotharingia in 879, but was defeated in 880 and swore allegiance at Gondreville in May 881 to Louis "le Jeune" who gave him the abbey of Lobbes.

The Annales Fuldenses record that Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks sent "legatis nepotum suorum" to fight "Hugonem tyrannidem exercentem in Gallia" in 880[56]. Charles III "le Gros" King of the East Franks gave him domains of the Bishopric of Metz in 882, but Hugues rebelled in the same year, was defeated once more and took refuge in Burgundy.

He rebelled again in 885 and sought support from his brother-in-law Gotfrid in Frisia[57]. The Annales Vedastini record that "Hugo…filius Hlotharii regis" was blinded in 885 on the advice of "Heinrico duce"[58]. He was shut in the monastery of Fulda, later transferred to Sankt-Gallen, and finally to the abbey of Prüm[59].

m (883) as her fourth husband, FRIDERADA, widow firstly of ENGUERRAND, secondly of BERNARIUS, and thirdly of WICBERT, daughter of ---.

Regino names "Friderada" as wife of "Engilrammo ex qua filiam quam postmodem Richwinus comes in coniugem accepti", also referring to her subsequent marriages[60]. "Hugo filius Lotharii Regis" had "Wicbertum comitem" murdered and married his wife "Frideradam" in 883[61].

b) GISELA ([860/65]-[21 May/26 Oct] 907).

Regino records the marriage in 882 of "Gisla filia Hlotharii" and "rex Godofridus Nordmannorum"[62]. The Annales Fuldenses record the marriage of "Gotafrid Nordmannus qui superiore anno fuerat baptizatus" and "Hugone Hlutharii filio eiusque sororem" in 883[63].

Abbess at Nivelles and Fosses, after her husband died. "Zendeboldus…rex" gave "proprietatem…in loco…VII Fontes" to "propinqua nostra…Kisla…regis Lotharii filia…abbatisse" by charter dated 30 Jul 896[64]. "Zuendebolchus…rex" gave property to "neptis nostre…Gissele…Nyuialensis abbaciæ" for her abbey by charter dated 26 Jul 897[65].

m (882) GODEFRID, son of HARALD "Klak" & his wife --- (-murdered Jun 885).

He was one of the leaders of the Danes who ravaged large parts of territory between the Rhine and the Somme. He converted to Christianity, and Emperor Charles "le Gros" granted him large parts of Frisia as dux.

c) BERTA ([863]-8 Mar 925, bur Lucca, Santa Maria).

"Hugo comes et marchio" names "patris mei Teutbaldi et matris meæ Berthe…" in a donation by charter dated 924[66]. "Berte" is also named as mother of "Hugo rex" in the latter's donation to Cluny for the souls of his parents dated 8 Mar 934[67].

Her parentage and first marriage are confirmed by the Annales Bertiniani which name "Hugonem Lotharii iunioris filium" and “sororium illius Theutbaldum” in 880[68]. Her origin and second marriage are confirmed by the epitaph of "Comitissæ…Bertha" specifies that she was "uxor Adalberti Ducis Italiæ…regalis generi…filia Lotharii" and records her death in 925[69].

Liudprand provides the proof that Berta, who married Marchese Adalberto, was the widow of Theotbald when he names "Berta matre regis Hugonis", specifying that she was previously married to Adalberto, when recording her death[70]. She was regent of Tuscany after the death of her second husband in 915.

m firstly ([879/80]) THEOTBALD [Thibaut] Comte d’Arles, son of HUBERT d'Arles, Comte de Transjuranie & his wife --- (-[Jun 887]/[895]).

m secondly ([895/98]) ADALBERTO II Marchese of Tuscany, Conte e Duca di Lucca, son of ADALBERT I Marchese of Tuscany & his wife Rothildis of Spoleto (-[10/19] Sep 915, bur Lucca Cathedral).

d) ERMENGARDE (-6 Aug after [895/898], bur Lucca, Santa Giustina).

Her epitaph at Lucca records the death "VIII Id Aug" of "Ermingardis…dicata deo" as daughter of "rex…Lotharius"[71].

Nun at Santa Giustina in Lucca.

Gingins-la-Sarra suggests that Ermengarde was the wife of Berlion [I] Vicomte de Vienne, suggesting that she went to Provence with her sister Berta who married Thibaut Comte d´Arles[72]. He says that the charter dated 25 Dec 923, under which “Ludwicus…imperator augustus” confirmed property “in comitatu Viennensi seu et in Lugdunensi in villa…Tadernaco” to “Ingelbertus…et uxori eius Nonie” (Engelbert being this couple´s son)[73], refers to Engelbert as “propinquus” of the emperor. He says that the term was never used in charters which name Berlion [I] and therefore deduces that the relationship must have been through Engelbert´s mother. However, the text of the charter in question does not appear to apply the word “propinquus” specifically to Engelbert. It is used in the phrase “propinquorum et fidelium suorum”, as part of the introductory words in the charter, while Engelbert is named in the document as “fidelis noster”. There appears to be no other basis for this speculation. If the hypothesis were correct, it would be difficult to explain why Ermengarde would have left Provence (presumably after the death of her supposed husband, dated to [912]) and established herself as a nun at Lucca, while her two sons remained in Provence. -------------------- Lothaire II King Of Lorraine the second son of Emperor Lothair I and Ermengarde of Tours

was the king of Lotharingia from 855 until his death

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothaire_II


-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lothair_II_of_Italy

Lothair II of Italy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lothair II (926/928–22 November 950), often Lothair of Arles, was the King of Italy from 948 to his death.[1] He was of the noble Frankish lineage of the Bosonids, descended from Boso of Provence. His father and predecessor was Hugh of Provence and his mother was a German named Alda (or Hilda).

Although he held the title of rex Italiae, he never succeeded in exercising power there. He was betrothed in 931 and married, 12 December 937, to the fifteen-year-old Adelaide,[2] the spirited and intelligent daughter of Rudolf II of Burgundy and Bertha of Swabia.

Their marriage was part of a political settlement designed to conclude a peace between her father and his.[3] The couple had a daughter, Emma, born as early as 948, who was married in 966 to the Carolingian Lothair of France.

Lothair's power in Italy was nominal. From the time of the successful uprising of the nobles in 945, when Hugh was forced into exile, Berengar of Ivrea kept all real power and patronage in his hands. Lothair died at Turin, perhaps poisoned by Berengar, who attempted to cement his usurped political power in Lombardy by forcing Lothair's widow to marry his son Adalbert. Instead she entreated the protection of Otto I of Germany, whom she married.

Lothair figures briefly in the vita of Adelaide written by Hroswitha of Gandersheim.

[edit]Note

^ He was co-king with his father from 931.

^ Odilo of Cluny gives her age at her marriage as "in her sixteenth year."

^ In 933, Hugh of Arles had given up his kingdom (Provence) to his inveterate enemy Rudolf II, who merged the two kingdoms into a new Kingdom of Arles, but died in 937.

[edit]References

Pierre Riché. Les Carolingiens, une famille qui fit l'Europe. Paris: 1983. ISBN 2010097378 (in French)

Jean-Charles Volkmann. Bien Connaître les généalogies des rois de France. ISBN 2-87747-208-6 (in French)

"Lothar II." Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved April 25, 2007, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://www.search.eb.com/eb/article-9049021.

"Lothar koenig von Italien" Genealogical references (in German).

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Lothaire II, roi de Lorraine's Timeline

835
835
Carolingian Empire (Present France)
855
855
Age 20
Lorraine
855
Age 20
france
855
- 869
Age 20
Lorraine, France
862
December 25, 862
Age 27
Alsace-Lorraine,,,France
862
Age 27
863
863
Age 28
Lorraine, France
865
865
Age 30
Of, Friesland, Germany
869
August 8, 869
Age 34
Piacenza (Plaisance), (Present Provincia di Piacenza), (Present Emilia-Romagna), Italy
August 869
Age 34
(Near Piacenza/Plaisance), (Present Provincia di Piacenza), (Present Emilie-Romagne), Italy