Lottie Adaline Lowery / Hayes

public profile

Is your surname Lowery / Hayes?

Research the Lowery / Hayes family

Lottie Adaline Lowery / Hayes's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Lottie Adaline Lowery / Hayes (Deese)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
Death: Died in Lumberton, Robeson, North Carolina, USA
Place of Burial: Lowry Family Cemetery, Pembroke, Robeson, North Carolina, USA
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Silas Deese and Julia Ann "Jewel" Lowery
Wife of Peter Dial
Mother of Burleigh Lowry; Adaline Locklear; Herbert Hubbard Lowry; Ralph H Lowry; Otis Lowery and 4 others
Sister of Luther Deese; Nancy Deese never married; Elizabeth "Lizzie" Deese; John Deese; Maranzie Deese and 3 others

Managed by: Eldon Clark (C)
Last Updated:

About Lottie Adaline Lowery / Hayes

Find a Grave

Birth: May 10, 1851 Robeson County North Carolina, USA

Death: Jun. 25, 1934 Lumberton Robeson County North Carolina, USA


Family links:

Parents:
  • Silas Deese (1823 - 1889)
  • Julia Deese (1832 - 1898)
Spouse:
  • Orlen Strong Hayes (1843 - 1910)
Children:
  • Adaline Lowry Locklear (1872 - 1896)*
  • Herbert H. Lowry (1873 - 1964)*
  • Ralph H. Lowry (1874 - 1938)*
  • Otis Lowery (1876 - 1951)*
  • Callie Lowry Sampson (1877 - 1957)*
  • Dovie Lowry Jones (1879 - 1967)*
  • Orlen Lowry (1881 - 1882)*
  • Silas Strong Lowrey (1885 - 1977)*
  • Burleigh Lowry (1889 - 1963)*

Burial: Lowry Family Cemetery Pembroke Robeson County North Carolina, USA -------------------- Find a Grave

Birth: May 10, 1851 Robeson County North Carolina, USA

Death: Jun. 25, 1934 Lumberton Robeson County North Carolina, USA


Family links:

Parents:
  • Silas Deese (1823 - 1889)
  • Julia Deese (1832 - 1898)
Spouse:
  • Orlen Strong Hayes (1843 - 1910)
Children:
  • Adaline Lowry Locklear (1872 - 1896)*
  • Herbert H. Lowry (1873 - 1964)*
  • Ralph H. Lowry (1874 - 1938)*
  • Otis Lowery (1876 - 1951)*
  • Callie Lowry Sampson (1877 - 1957)*
  • Dovie Lowry Jones (1879 - 1967)*
  • Orlen Lowry (1881 - 1882)*
  • Silas Strong Lowrey (1885 - 1977)*
  • Burleigh Lowry (1889 - 1963)*

Burial: Lowry Family Cemetery Pembroke Robeson County North Carolina, USA -------------------- Lottie Adaline was the eldest child of Silas and Julia "Jewel" Ann Lowery Deese (she was born prior to their marriage).

According to family legend, she was first seen by Col. Orlen Strong Hayes in early 1865 when he was marching with Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's army through Robeson County, North Carolina during their return from the "Burning of Atlanta."

Local Lumbees were friendly to the Union troops and guided Gen. Sherman's troops across the flooded Lumber River and through the county's swamps. Gen. Sherman later described the trip as "the damnedest marching I ever saw."

In an interview conducted by Adolph Dial on May 30, 1969 for the Southeastern Indian Oral History Project, Lottie's cousin, Mabe Sampson (see second note below) recounted a story of "Aunt Lottie" meeting some of the Union soldiers. She was riding a nice filly when some soldiers stopped her, took her horse, and gave her a lame one. She tried to chase after them, but could not keep up. A soldier came back for her, placed her on his horse, and they rode together.

Col. Hayes later returned to North Carolina and settled there as did his younger half-sister, Elizabeth "Lillie" Taylor Hayes Livermore. He and Lottie never married, but at that time in North Carolina it would have been illegal for a white to marry an Indian because of anti-mixed marriage laws. During the 1880 Federal Census, Col. Hayes is listed as household #1 and Lottie and their children as household #2 in the Burnt Swamp section of Robeson county.

Around 1895, Col. Hayes moved to Georgia, and Lottie married Peter Dial. During the 1900 Federal Census, Lottie is listed twice. She is in the household of her husband Peter Dial as Lottie Dial (married about 4 years) along with his children from his first marriage, and she is listed as the head of household with her children (and grandson) with everyone listed as Dials. She also reported having given birth to ten children (nine on census in Peter's household) with eight still living.

On the 1910 Federal Census; however, she is no longer in Peter's household, still listed as married, and everyone's name reverts back to Lowry. On the 1920 Federal Census, she is listed as widowed; however, Peter Dial did not pass away until 1931.

Her eldest child, Adaline, married Dr. Governor Worth Locklear, the first Lumbee physician. After Adeline's death, Lottie raised the only child from that union, Adnell Locklear.

The following was taken from the May 28, 1934 issue of THE ROBESONIAN:

Funeral rites for Mrs. Lottie Lowry, 83, Indian, of the Harper's Ferry section, were conducted from the home Sunday at 11 a.m. by Rev. John Woodell, assited by Rev. J. E. Sawyer, in the presence of a large crowd. Interment was made in the family cemetery. Mrs. Lowry died at 11:15 p.m.

Pallbearers were Messrs. Oakley McMillan, Andrew Brooks, W. H. Oxendine, M. L. Lowry, D. L. Blue, Robert Butler, Russell Hunt.

Surviving are 7 children--Otis of Oklahoma, Silas, Ralph and Burleigh, Mrs. J. W. Caulk of Graceville, Fla., Mesdames Arthur Jones and W. F. Sampson.

  • **NOTE: Her eldest son, Herbert Lowry, was not listed as a surviving child in her THE ROBESONIAN obituary.
    • *NOTE: Rebecca "Beck" Lowery Dial was the maternal grandmother of Mabe Sampson. Julia "Jewel" Ann Lowery Dial was the mother of Lottie Lowry. Beck and Jewel were sisters, so Lottie was the first cousin of Mabe's mother, Sallie Dial Sampson. I assume he referred to her as "Aunt Lottie" because she was an older, female relative.
      • NOTE: Ironically, her former son-in-law, Dr. Governor Worth Locklear, moved to Atlanta, Georgia following Adaline's death in order to legally marry a white woman. Dr. Locklear was found dead in his bed in Pembroke, NC while he was in town visiting relatives (and practicing medicine) for a few weeks during the holidays. It was later decided that an inquest into his death would not be held since it appeared his death was a result of chloroform use (THE ROBESONAN, Dec. 1, 1921).
      • NOTE: I was also born on May 10th and when I was born, my mother's paternal aunts proudly shared with her that I had been born on Grandma Lottie's birthday, so I will always feel a special connection to her.
  • Updated from Find A Grave Memorial via brother John Deese by SmartCopy: Mar 22 2015, 17:00:32 UTC

-------------------- Lottie Adaline was the eldest child of Silas and Julia "Jewel" Ann Lowery Deese (she was born prior to their marriage).

According to family legend, she was first seen by Col. Orlen Strong Hayes in early 1865 when he was marching with Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's army through Robeson County, North Carolina during their return from the "Burning of Atlanta."

Local Lumbees were friendly to the Union troops and guided Gen. Sherman's troops across the flooded Lumber River and through the county's swamps. Gen. Sherman later described the trip as "the damnedest marching I ever saw."

In an interview conducted by Adolph Dial on May 30, 1969 for the Southeastern Indian Oral History Project, Lottie's cousin, Mabe Sampson (see second note below) recounted a story of "Aunt Lottie" meeting some of the Union soldiers. She was riding a nice filly when some soldiers stopped her, took her horse, and gave her a lame one. She tried to chase after them, but could not keep up. A soldier came back for her, placed her on his horse, and they rode together.

Col. Hayes later returned to North Carolina and settled there as did his younger half-sister, Elizabeth "Lillie" Taylor Hayes Livermore. He and Lottie never married, but at that time in North Carolina it would have been illegal for a white to marry an Indian because of anti-mixed marriage laws. During the 1880 Federal Census, Col. Hayes is listed as household #1 and Lottie and their children as household #2 in the Burnt Swamp section of Robeson county.

Around 1895, Col. Hayes moved to Georgia, and Lottie married Peter Dial. During the 1900 Federal Census, Lottie is listed twice. She is in the household of her husband Peter Dial as Lottie Dial (married about 4 years) along with his children from his first marriage, and she is listed as the head of household with her children (and grandson) with everyone listed as Dials. She also reported having given birth to ten children (nine on census in Peter's household) with eight still living.

On the 1910 Federal Census; however, she is no longer in Peter's household, still listed as married, and everyone's name reverts back to Lowry. On the 1920 Federal Census, she is listed as widowed; however, Peter Dial did not pass away until 1931.

Her eldest child, Adaline, married Dr. Governor Worth Locklear, the first Lumbee physician. After Adeline's death, Lottie raised the only child from that union, Adnell Locklear.

The following was taken from the May 28, 1934 issue of THE ROBESONIAN:

Funeral rites for Mrs. Lottie Lowry, 83, Indian, of the Harper's Ferry section, were conducted from the home Sunday at 11 a.m. by Rev. John Woodell, assited by Rev. J. E. Sawyer, in the presence of a large crowd. Interment was made in the family cemetery. Mrs. Lowry died at 11:15 p.m.

Pallbearers were Messrs. Oakley McMillan, Andrew Brooks, W. H. Oxendine, M. L. Lowry, D. L. Blue, Robert Butler, Russell Hunt.

Surviving are 7 children--Otis of Oklahoma, Silas, Ralph and Burleigh, Mrs. J. W. Caulk of Graceville, Fla., Mesdames Arthur Jones and W. F. Sampson.

  • **NOTE: Her eldest son, Herbert Lowry, was not listed as a surviving child in her THE ROBESONIAN obituary.
    • *NOTE: Rebecca "Beck" Lowery Dial was the maternal grandmother of Mabe Sampson. Julia "Jewel" Ann Lowery Dial was the mother of Lottie Lowry. Beck and Jewel were sisters, so Lottie was the first cousin of Mabe's mother, Sallie Dial Sampson. I assume he referred to her as "Aunt Lottie" because she was an older, female relative.
      • NOTE: Ironically, her former son-in-law, Dr. Governor Worth Locklear, moved to Atlanta, Georgia following Adaline's death in order to legally marry a white woman. Dr. Locklear was found dead in his bed in Pembroke, NC while he was in town visiting relatives (and practicing medicine) for a few weeks during the holidays. It was later decided that an inquest into his death would not be held since it appeared his death was a result of chloroform use (THE ROBESONAN, Dec. 1, 1921).
      • NOTE: I was also born on May 10th and when I was born, my mother's paternal aunts proudly shared with her that I had been born on Grandma Lottie's birthday, so I will always feel a special connection to her.
  • Updated from Find A Grave Memorial via son Ralph H. Lowry by SmartCopy: Mar 23 2015, 13:47:02 UTC
view all 13

Lottie Adaline Lowery / Hayes's Timeline

1851
May 10, 1851
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1872
1872
Age 20
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1873
May 17, 1873
Age 22
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1874
September 21, 1874
Age 23
Pembroke, Robeson, North Carolina, USA
1876
May 10, 1876
Age 25
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1877
November 19, 1877
Age 26
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1879
November 24, 1879
Age 28
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1881
January 1881
Age 29
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1885
November 30, 1885
Age 34
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States
1889
July 11, 1889
Age 38
Robeson County, North Carolina, United States