Lt. Andrew Newcomb

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Andrew Newcomb

Also Known As: "Lieutenant Andrew Newcomb"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County, Province of Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Biological son of Andrew Newcomb and Grace Ricks
Husband of Sarah Graves and Anna Newcomb
Father of Simeon Newcomb; Andrew Newcomb, Jr.; Thomas Newcomb; Sarah Eldredge; Mary Lombard and 9 others
Brother of Susannah Blague
Half brother of Grace Butler

Occupation: Lieutenant, Lt.
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Lt. Andrew Newcomb

Added by E. C. Nickerson about my Great grandfather: Mr. Newcomb's first purchase of land on Martha's Vineyard was made 13 Feb. 1677, of John Daggett, for £25, 10 acresland, "according to the bounds thereat as it was layed out, unto John Freeman, Blacksmith, and to him granted by the said town; as likewise half a Commonage in the said townshippe; for him, the said Andrew Newcomb, to have and to hold the aforesaid land and premisses, with the now dwelling house thereone standing and being, with all and singular the outhouseing banres shoppes hovells fence and fencing stuff on the said land and premisses being." This land situated on the south side of the village, together with a house-lot, he sold Israel Dagget for £40, 3 Feb 1702. May 13, 1686, he bought of Jacob Washaman and Notickquanum (also written Wonnottoohquanam) alias Elizabeth, his wife, Sachem, and Queen of Nunpauquee, for £5, a pice of land called Job's Neck, 22 Jan. 1701-2, to his son, Simon, one of the witnesses to the deed being Peeter Newcomb.

He sold for £22 land at Sanchacantaket, bought of Misam alias Wabamuch; and in 1700 he sold the land, later occupied as a famous camp-meeting ground on Martha's Vineyard. (Vol. 3, p. 320)

In June 1703 he, with others, gave Samuel Holman, the tanner, a lot of land "to encourage him in his business." Mar. 10, 1709-10, Thomas Harlock sold lands bought of "Mr. Andrew Newcomb late deceased." He owned the land in Edgartown upon which the Court House was afterwards built.

Mrs. Newcomb's name is in the earliest preserved list of church members, 13 July 1717; also in the list of 24 Jan 1730-1. She received in 1680, by will of her father dated 4 Feb. 1679-80, £50; also, a three-eights interest in his real estate, which was increased by rights of her sister bought by Mr. Newcomb in 1686. Of the Indian lands of Capt. Bayes Mr. and Mrs. Newcomb owned, in 1688, three and a half shares at Sanchacantaket, near the camp-meeting ground, ten acres at Pompineches neck, and one half-share on the Island of Chappaquiddick. ./ECN/ children: Simeon, Andrew, SIMON (3), Thomas, Sarah, Mary (or Mercy), Peter

m.2 Anna Bayes in 1676

children: Anna, Elizabeth, Joseph, Emmaline, Tabitha, Hannah, Zerviah, Mary

and other different information:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/o/g/i/Robert-R-Ogilvie/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1509.html

Andrew Newcomb (b. 1640, d. 20 August 1706)

Andrew Newcomb (son of ANDREW (1) Newcomb and Grace Ricks) was born 1640 in Edgartown, Dukes County, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, and died 20 August 1706 in Edgartown, Dukes County, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. He married Anna Bayes [2nd wife ; 1st wife: Sarah]

Children of Andrew Newcomb and Anna Bayes are??

SIMON (3) Newcomb, b. 1662, Edgars Town, Dukes County, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, d. 20 January 1744/45, Lebanon, New London, Connecticut.

   [NOTE: I had different b. date for Simon (1665) with info that he was born in York Co., Maine. Anna Bayes was Andrew's second wife. All other records I have indicate that Sarah was Simon's mother.]

Isle of Shoals (off the coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire and Kittery, Maine)

He was engaged in the fisheries at the Isle Sholes. Andrew, son of the immigrant Capt. Andrew Newcomb, lived in Kittery, Maine for some time. He was known to be living near the Isle of Shoals in 1666. The earliest record of his purchase of land in this county is dated 20 Apr 1669, in which it appears that Andrew Newcomb of Kittery, York County, Maine, fisherman, bought a house in Kittery and six acres of land. He sold the house and land 7 Jul 1674 to John Cutt of Portsmouth. The place is believed to be still standing in Kittery, situated about half a mile north of the city of Portsmouth. Andrew Newcomb was constable in 1671 at the Isle of Shoals.

He moved about 1675 and settled in Edgartown, MA, where he was a proprietor and at various times received share in the division of lands in the town. Andrew arrived in Edgartown with six children from his first wife, Sarah, and married Anna Bayes shortly after arriving. On 13 Feb 1676 he bought ten acrs of land from John Daggett, and a half share of commonage formerly granted to John Freeman. The death of his father in law in 1680 made him an heir to the Bayes lot on Main Street, where he made his home.

In 1688 Lt. Andrew was indicted for taking the life of his son, Andrew, but the jury found no bill, and decreed that Andrew's death was accidental.

He served several times as juror, as constable in 1681, assessor in 1685, selectman and overseer in 1693. He was chosen Lieutenant 13 Apr 1691 and placed in command of the fortification. He owned the land on which the courthouse now stands in the village of Edgartown.

(From Steve Condarcure's New England Genealogy)

http://www.kutchenfamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I274&tree=tree1


◦Andrew Newcomb moved from Appledore, Isle of Shoals to Edgartown, Dukes Cty., Martha's Vineyard, Mass. in 1675. He was a constable of Edgartown in 1681, made Lieutenant and commander of fortifications in 1691, and Townsman and Overseer in 1693. Lieut. Andrew Newcomb married 2nd Anna Bayes about 1676 on Martha's Vineyard. She had Anna, Elizabeth, Joseph, Emblem, Tabitha, Hannah, Zervia and Mary


Military Service ◦Lt. in the Colonial Militia

Lt. Andrew Newcomb Born in Boston, Massachusetts, about 1640 Married Sarah Young, 1661 [Sarah Young’s ancestry traces back to Charlemagne] Died in Martha’s Vineyard, August 2, 1706(8)

Lt Andrew Newcomb was residing at the Isles of Shoals as early as July 1666 as at this date he attended a meeting at the Isles of Shoals, near Portsmouth, New Hampshire, of several merchants and men engaged in the fisheries, for the purpose of fixing the price of fish.

In a case brought by Richard Endell of the Isles of Shoals against Jonathan Wade of Ipswich in March 1672, for fish and oil delivered to Wade for several years, the case turned on the price of fish in 1666; and to this Mr. Newcomb made affidavit, which is now on file among the court papers at Salem, Mass. This affidavit, written by Mr. Hathorne, reads as follows:

Andrew Newckum aged thirtey tow yeares or theare aboutt Swaren and Saith that in the year 1666 the prise off ffish wass Sett and mad at the Illes off Showles marchanabell fish--thirtey tow Railles per quntel this deponent then Receued Seuerall poundes in marcha fish att the prise Corrantt aboue Rightin and this deponent Knew no other prise Corrantt Butt that aboue Rightin and fforder Saith nott Taken upon oath 27 : 1 mo [16]72 Wm Hathorne Assist.

By the foregoing, it is shown that Mr. Newcomb was born about 1640.

Jenness, in his history of The Isles of Shoals, says:

“Kittery is the least quantity of land of any town in the county. To the town of Kittery was attached the north half of the Isles of Shoals; was then and has ever since been attached. This portion of Kittery was 'the N 1/2 Of 'the Isles of Shoales. This N:/2 consisted of two islands, Hog Island and Smutty Nose (alias Church) called Georges -part or northerly part of the group. These isles contained the better land but Star Island, on account of their convenience for the fisheries, was very early lined with fishing stages and studded with fish houses--taken up before 1660. Majority of people lived upon the northerly islands. “While the Church, Court House and principal Ordinary still remained on Smutty Nose, about 1629 the southerly half of the Shoals was reclaimed from Mass., and annexed to N. H., the new Province, and a large part of the inhabitants of the northerly half removed across the harbor to Star Island. No less than 40 families crossed over from Hog Island at the time. Courts ceased to be held on Smutty Nose after 1684.”

Women were excluded from the islands from 1635 to about 1647, at which time the court refused a petition to exclude the wife of John Renolds from the Isles. In 1650 this law was practically annulled. The Isles were called "Appledore" in 1661; they are situated in the ocean about nine miles south-east of Portsmouth.

In “Directory of the Ancestral Heads of New England Families (1620-1700)”, Andrew was listed as shipmaster and mariner and married in Boston (1664).

The name of his first wife, Sarah (whom he married about 1661) has been found but once upon record.

The earliest record found of Andrew's purchase of land in this country is upon deeds at Alfred, York Co., Maine, Vol. 2, page 162, date 20 Apr. 1669, from which it appears that Daniel Moore of Portsmouth, blacksmith, for £58 sold Andrew Newcomb of Kittery, York Co., Me., fisherman, a dwelling-house in Kittery, near Thomas Spinnep's and formerly in the tenure and occupation of James Emberry (Emery), also. 6 acres of land adjoining the house at Emberry's (Emery's) Point. The house and land, as above:

“…next to the land of Spinney's of Kittery side," were sold 7 July 1674 to John Cutt of Portsmouth; and he sold the same 8 Jan. 1674-5 to Samuel Fernald, who bequeathed them, 1698, to his son, Nathaniel; and Nathaniel, again, in 1743, to his Son, Nathaniel. This place in Kittery, York Co., Me., is on the southeast side of the mouth of Spinney Creek, and bounded westerly by the Piscataqua River, about half a mile from the city of Portsmouth and owned and occuyied by Miss Sally Carter in 1874. He also appears to have owned other land at Kittery, record of purchase not found.York Deeds at Alfred, York Co., Me., 3/123-4 – "William Hearle and wife Beaton of Portsmouth, for valuable sum of money and goods, sell John Fernald of Kittery, Shoemaker, all that parcel of land which was formerly in possession of Adrew Newcomb, lying in Kittery near unto and butting upon ye Broad Cove commonly called Spinny's Cove, containing 20 acres, being 40 rods broad butting upon said Core and having the land of Christian Ramix (Remich) on the South side. and the land of John Saward on ye North side,and so runs 80 rods east into the woods; which said land was sold by William Hilton unto the said Andrew Newcomb.” Deed acknowledged 1 Feb. 1680 and recorded 26 Apr. 1683.

Andrew Newcome, held the office of constable and was living at the Shoals or in Kittery in 1671, as shown by the following from York Court Records, Book E, page 51:

Septembr : 8 : 1671 Marke Roe complaynd of by Andrew Nucum Constable of ye Yles of Shoales for threatening to break his bones and tearing of his shyrt, & other uncivill behayors towards him, in the execution of his office, upon his serueing of an Attachment: from the ... for the breach of his bonds And further the Constable complayns of seuerall Oaths sworn by the sd Roe in comeing ouer, who upon examination the sd Marke Roe confesed before mee yt hee was provoaked to sware seurall oaths Edw Rishworth Asst

Probate at Exeter, first file, Edward Carter's estate owed Andrew Newcomb 12 shillings 16 May 1672.

Among the court papers (filed in covers at office of deeds) at Exeter, N. H., is an original bond given by Mr. Newcomb, in which he agrees to appear at next county court at Dover, the last Tuesday in June 1673, to answer complaint of Francis Small for withholding the:

“Hull of a ffishing shallop of sd Smalls receiued of Thomas Trickle by virtue of sd Small's order," The case came to trial 26 June 1673, at which time Lydia Green testified that she heard Small agree with "Andrew Newcombe of the Ile of Shoales that he would carry on one quarter part of A fishing voyage at ye Ile of Shoales in the Shollop that the said Andrew Newcombe recd of Mr Thomas Tricky pr order of sd Small and this was sometime about Nouember or December last past.”

The case was withdrawn, there being no cause for action.

At the time of Andrew’s residence upon the Shoals they were places of resort, and the Church, Court House and principal Ordinary being located upon Smutty Nose or Church Island, together with the fishing industry, in which Mr. Newcomb was engaged, caused the islands to be preferred for residences until later, when the mainland became more thickly settled.

From deeds at Exeter, N. W., Vol. 3, p. 80, it appears that:

“Andrew Newcombe, of Hogg Island (so called from its rude resemblance toa hoff's back) on ye Ile of Sholes," fisherman, for £52 in merchantable fish, sold Henry Platts, of same place, with consent of his wife, Sarah, house on Hog Island (not described) 19 July 1673, in the 25th. year of Charles the Second, deed recorded 21 July 1673.”

From the foregoing it would seem that Mr. Newcomb had previously lived upon Hog Island and after the purchase of his house in Kittery he removed his family to the mainland.

“Att a County Court houlden at Wells for the County of Yorke July 7, 1674, the Worshipfl Major Tho. Clarke, Praesident, Major Bryan Pendleton, Mr. Geo. Munjoy, Edw- ReCor. Assotiates. Mr John Cutt is plantiffe in an action of debt Contra Andrew Newcom Defendt. In ye action Capt. Davess is taken off and Capt. Charles Frost is put in his place. The Jury finds for ye Plantiffe 16:00:0 one halfe in marchtble fish & ye other halfe in refuge fish, according to bill: 5" Damage & costs of Court 25 & 6d.”

Andrew Newcomb removed from Kittery and Isles of Shoals in the year 1674 or early in 1675. From the foregoing it will be seen that after the decision of the Court at Wells (7 July 1674) he turned over to John Cutt his house and land in Kittery and, his wife having died previously, he took his seven young and motherless children to a more favorable locality, for it is possible that the Indians had become troublesome in that locality, as King Philip's war broke out in June 1675. This also may have influenced him in his removal.

He settled at Edgartown, on the Island of Martha's Vineyard, the same year, where he became a proprietor and at various times received shares in the divisions of lands in that town.

Mr. Newcomb's first purchase of land on Martha's Vineyard was made 13 Feb. 1677 of John Daggett, for £25, 10 acres land:

“according to the bounds thereat as it was layed out, unto John Freeman, Blacksmith, and to him granted by the said town; as likewise half a Commonage in the said townshippe; for him, the said Andrew Newcomb, to have and to hold the aforesaid land and p'misses, with the now dwelling house thereon standing and being, with all and singular the outhouseing barnes shoppes hovells fence and fencing stuff on the said land and p'mises being.”

This land situated on the south side of the village, together with a house-lot, he sold Israel Daggett for £40, 3 Feb. 1702.

May 13, 1686, he bought of Jacob Washaman and Notickquanum (also written Wonnottoohquanam) alias Elizabeth, his wife, Sachem, and Queen of Nunpauque, for £5, a piece of land called Job's Neck, alias Sapotem or Sapotamane, running into a pond on south side of the township, bounded southerly by pond, easterly and westerly by coves of water to Mill Path (also written Milne Path). He sold this land, Job's Neck, 22 Jan. 1701-2, to his son, Simon, one of the witnesses to the deed being Peeter Newcomb.

He sold for £22 land at Sanchacantaket, bought of Misam alias Wabamuck; and in 1700 he sold the land, later occupied as a famous camp-meeting ground on Martha's Vineyard. (Vol. 3, p. 320.)

That Mr. Newcomb was one of the prominent citizens of Martha's Vineyard is shown by the fact that he was juror at quarter court at Eastham 25 Sept. 1677 and 28 Dec. 1680; foreman of grand jury Sept. 1681, June 1700, June 1703 and 7 March 1704; constable in 1681; was chosen 25 Nov. 1685 with two others, “to make ye governors rate of three half penny upon ye pound”; tithing-man 10 May 1693; select-man 1693-4; and overseer 16 Mar. 1693-4. His name appears many times upon record as witness to deeds, etc.

He was always called “Mr” a title then conferring more honor and distinction and commanded higher respect than that of “Honorable” of the present day. He was a prosperous man, and thus (as mentioned previously), was not included in his father's will.

In 1860, Mrs. Newcomb received by will of her father dated 4 Feb. 1679-80, £50; also, a three-eighths interest in his real estate, which was increased by rights of her sister bought by Mr. Newcomb in 1686. Of the Indian lands of Capt. Bayes Mr. and Mrs. Newcomb owned, in 1688, three and a half shares at Sanchacantaket, near the camp-meeting ground ten acres at Pompineches Neck, and one half-share on the Island of Chappauiddick.

There are reasons for believing that he was a merchant several and perhaps many years. On the 18th. Feb. 1683 he paid Nathaniel Fryer £3: 11s. in feathers. (Land Records, Edgartown, Dukes Co., Mass., Vol. I, p. 219):

“Received this 18th of February 1683 from Mr. Andrew Newcomb of Edgartown upon Martin Vineyard the sum of three pounds, eleven shillings in feathers for account of my father Nathaniel Fryer in full of all debts dues and demands from the beginning of the world to this day. Received pr me Joshua Frier. “Joshua Frier acknowledged the above written receipt this 18th day of Feb., 1683-4. Before me, Matt Mayhew, Justice of Peace.”

In the Court Records (Edgartown):

“Special Corte held this 16th December 1684, Mr. Andrew Nurcom complayneth agaynst Amos an Enden for Inbaseling or purloyning away Sider & Rum. They joyne ishew before the Court to his the sayed Nucom great treble to the damag to ye vallew of seven pounds & twelve shillings. “In ye case betwene Mr. Andrew Nurcorn plantife Amos Endian defendant we find ye defendant gilty of one cask of Rum containing 12 gallons, and one pound & twelve shillings damage with costs of Corte.”

From Records at Albany, N. Y.-N. Y. Col. Mss. 34: part 2, p. 35-3ce:

“Insula Martha Vineyard. I under written doe confess and acknowledge to owe and to be Indepted unto Richard Sarson his heirs &c ye summe of thirty eight pounds ffive Shillings and three pence money to be paid unto ye aforesaid Richard Sarson his heirs &c, upon ye Bottome of ye Shipp Betty now in the Harbour of ye above Island being for wages paid to the men of ye Shipp Betty as witness my hand this 13th ffebry 1684-5 Rob: Right Witness Andrew Nucombe Thomas Harlock The abovesaid Capt Robert Right acknowledged the abovewritten to be his act & Deed the day & year abovesaid Matt Mayhew Chiefe Magistrate.”

Again in court records:

“Insula Marthas Vineyard. I underwritten doe obleidge myself my heires &c to pay or cause to be paid unto Andrew Newcombe Junior three pounds Money to his heirs &e upon Demand, being soe much due for three Months wages on ye Shipp Betty of Carolina, Capt Robt Right commandr: as witness my hand this 13th ffebry 1684-5 Robt Right Testes

Stepen Hussey Andrew Neucombe Senior.” Court Records (Edgartown) p. 7I.

At Court Sept 30, 1690:

“September 24, 1690, Andrew Newcomb haueing legally purchased a neck of land caueled Job's neck of ye Sachem thereof, ye Sachem haueing given legall conuayance to sd Andrew Newcomb being ye trew and proper oner of ye sayd neck, one Jobe an Indian hauing noe just nor lawfuli caues therefore hath trespassed on ye sayd neck by tilling, improfing, moing, and to his own use converted the benefitt of sayd land thereby not only berefing sayd Andrew Newcomb of such benefitt which he ought and might lawfully make of ye same but deffaming his just title thereunto whereby ye sayd Newcomb hath ben lett and hindred from a dew Improfement thereof and his title to the same questioned to his great dammage and lose of which he doubteth not to make this Court sencible and humbly prayeth relefe in his sd caus and shall eaver pray yo" humble Supplyant (not signed) "In ye case pending betwene Andrew Newcomb plaintife and Jobe the Indian defendant, the verditt of ye Jury is We find for ye plaintife Six pence dameg and Cost of Court”

According to Martha's Vineyard records, Andrew bought of Indian Job 24 Sept. 1690 a tract of land called “at Saprataine” or in the deed called “Sopotaminy”.

In Court Records (of Edgartown) p. 95:

“Court of common pleas holden at Edgartown, Oct. 3, 1693. Andrew Newcomb complaineth against Jacob Washaman and notick quanum alis Elizabeth queon Sachem his wife in an action of trespas on the case for Refusing to give to sd Andrew Newcomb posesion of certain land in Edgartown containing one neck of land caled Sapotomane. “The humble petytion and declaration of Andrew Newcomb to their Majesties honoured Court seting Octobr 3d. 93 humbly sheweth that whereas the sd Andrew Newcomb procured a deed of sale of Jacob Washaman & Elizabeth his wife of the neck of land called Sapautamane whereby sd Jacob was legally... end

“In the case depending between Andrew Newcomb plaintife and Jacob Washaman an indian defendant, the Jury find for the defendant and cost of Court.”

“Court of Quarter Sessions, holden at Edgartown, Oct 2d 1696 by their Majesties' Justices for Martha's Vineyard. “Dick alias Soo-ah-chame, an Indian, being legally convicted of lifting the door of Andrew Newcombs' dwelling house at Edgartown off from the hinges and entering into the house, being late in the night, thereby disturbing and frighting the people of the house, is adjudged to pay the summe of three pounds to said Newcombe and to stand committed until payed.

“’October 4’ 27th 1684 voted that Mr. Newcomb Joseph Norton and Thomas Butler are chosen to make up ye accounts of ye men that hav, done any Seruice for ye Town or Layed out any money for ye town and to make a Rate and to sett all things to Rights and to make all Rates for this year.

“Maj. Wait Winthrop in a letter to Gov. Phips, no date but received 21 Oct.1693 mentions "Mr. Newcomb"; and in a letter Simon Athern to the Governor and Council Oct. 1692 says: "being sensable of much troble on marthas vineyard for want of dew settlement of the affairs of that Iland And Considering the present state of persons and things there I humbly shew that if Mr. Andrew Newcomb be made Cheefe Justice And Mr. Joseph Norton & Mr. James Alien Justices there who are reputed welthy and having such influence in the people there, will be most Reddy way to settle your government there.”

In April 13 1691, Andrew was chosen Lieut. of Militia, and commander put in charge of fortifications (1691).

“University of the State of New York, etc. New York State Library Albany, N. Y. May 15, 1896. “This is to certify that the following is a correct copy and of the whole thereof of page 230 of Vol. 37 of the series of manuscript volumes entitled ‘New York Colonial Manuscripts’ in the custody of the University of the State of New York in the State Library. (Signed) George Rogers Howell, Archivist. “Marthas Vineyard:

Seal of Matthew Mayhew, Chief Magistrate University of Richard Sarson the State of Thomas Dagget Justices of peace New York Thomas Mayhew

           Matthew Mayhew, Clerk & Register
           Thomas Havlock. Sheriff for the county
           Benjamin Smith, kings Attorney

“Andrew Newcomb, Commander of the fortifications: who had such number of men as occasionally were ordered by the chief Magistrates.

“All debts to the king, customs, excise, wrekes &c. were the care of the collector, and the ordinarie let at 10 Ib. per annum, viz. custome & excise.

‘A Nantucket commanded As chief Magistrate Capt: John Gardener James Coffin

“Justices of peace William Gayer William Worth

“Capt. John Gardener, Collector, and his charge was all dues for the king. Ye chief Magistrate in the County, present, had a casting voice in (a word illegible) Dedimus potes tatem to Matthew Maphew to Administer the Oath to all the Magistrates and officers Civil & military in Dukes County. Dated 20th. Augt. 1691. Ret 20 March following.

“Judges, John Gardener, James Coffin & Richd Sars (on) (two last letters missing in the original), Common Pleas. G. R. Hatch.”

In June 1703 Andrew (with others) gave Samuel Holman, the tanner, a lot of land “to encourage him in his business.”

Andrew appears to have died without making a will, and no inventory or settlement of his estate has been found upon record.

By his first wife he had seven children, all of whom appear to have been born in the vicinity of Kittery, Maine. By his second wife there were eight children, all of whom were married and had families, and although no record of their births has been preserved yet their relationship as brother and sisters, also that they were children of Andrew and Anna Newcomb, has been authenticated by a plea for partition of land and brought 1 Oct. 1731, in which all, or nearly all of the children and heirs are named.

On Mar. 10, 1709-10, Thomas Harlock sold lands bought of “Mr. Andrew Newcomb, late deceased.” He owned the land in Edgartown upon which the Court House was afterwards built. Mrs. Newcomb's name is in the earliest preserved list of church members, 13 July 1717; also in the list of 24 Jan. 1730-1.

In 1710, Mrs. Newcomb sold 5 acres of land near the court house in Edgartown, formerly from her father, and in 1716 she, “widow, Relict of Andrew Newcomb, late of Edgartown,” sold her stepson, Simon Newcomb, for £20, land in Edgartown.

In 1728, she sold her daughter Mary “all my household goods, to enter upon at my decease”. bciverson1 bciverson1 originally shared this 16 Jul 2008 story

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Lt. Andrew Newcomb's Timeline

1640
1640
Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
1662
1662
Age 22
Kittery, York County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1664
1664
Age 24
1668
1668
Age 28
Kittery, York County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1669
1669
Age 29
Kittery, Maine
1670
1670
Age 30
Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County, Province of New York
1672
1672
Age 32
Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes County, Province of New York
1674
1674
Age 34
Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Province of New York