Lt. Thomas L. Minor, IV

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Lt. Thomas L. Minor, IV

Nicknames: "Lieutenant Thomas Miner", "Thomas (The Immigrant) Mynor", "(As Baptized in England) Minor", "(Spelled On Arrival in America) Miner"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Chew Magna, Somerset, England
Death: Died in Stonington, New London, Connecticut, United States
Place of Burial: Wequetequock Burial Yard, Stonington, CT, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Clement Miner and Wife of Clement Miner
Husband of Grace Minor and Grace Frances Minor
Father of Capt. John Minor; Clement Miner, III; Thomas Minor, II; Lt. Ephraim Minor; Capt. Joseph Minor, Sr. and 10 others
Brother of Joan Miner; John Miner; Joan Miner; Mary Miner; Elizabeth Tompkins and 2 others
Half brother of Mary or Margaret Minor; Elizabeth Minor; John Minor; Joan Minor; Mary Minor and 3 others

Occupation: Lieutenant and yeoman, CAME TO USA IN 1633, ANCESTOR OF PRES. U.S. GRANT, Married at Rehoboth, :lymouth, Mass. 23 April 1634, Lieutenant
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Lt. Thomas L. Minor, IV

Thomas Miner or Minor (23 April 1608 – 23 October 1690) was a founder of New London and Stonington, Connecticut, USA, and an early New England diarist.

Miner was born in Chew Magna, England, on April 23, 1608. In 1629, he emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, aboard the Lyon's Whelp. He quickly moved to Watertown, and then on to Charlestown, after Typhus Fever broke out in Salem.

In Charlestown, Miner met Grace Palmer, whom he married in 1634. She was the daughter of Walter Palmer. The couple eventually had seven sons and three daughters. In 1636, the Miners moved to Hingham.

After several years in Hingham, the family moved south to the Wequetequock area of present-day Stonington, Connecticut, where Miner and his son Ephraim helped found the Road Church.

In about 1653, Miner bought land west of Stonington, across Quiambaug Cove near present-day Mystic,and built a house for his family. Around this time he began one of the few diaries to survive 17th Century New England. It covers the years 1653 to 1684 and was published in book form in 1899.

Miner was active in public affairs in both New London and Stonington. His sons, and possibly Miner himself, fought in King Philip's War.

Between 1683 and 1684, Miner contracted with an individual in England to investigate his genealogical line and determine how his surname was historically spelled (Miner versus Minor). The response he received is a classic example of fraudulent genealogy. The pedigree and family coat of arms sent back to Miner were proven to be mostly falsified in a 1984 study published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

Miner and his wife died three months apart in 1690 and are buried together in Stonington's Wequetequock Cemetery. The founders monument in Stonington has one side dedicated to him.

Notable descendants include Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Minor, Thomas T. Minor, William Chester Minor, and John D. Rockefeller,

Sources

  • Wheeler, Richard A. "The First Organized Church in New London: An Historical Study". New London County Historical Society. Read before the New London County Historical Society, at its Annual Meeting, November 26, 1877.
  • "Thomas Miner and his Descendants". Note that some accounts have him arriving on the ship Arabella during the Great Migration, arriving in Salem Harbor on June 14, 1630.
  • The Miner Branch of the Hubbards".
  • Biography of Walter Palmer". Walter Palmer Society. http://www.walterpalmer.com/Walter_Palmer_Bio.htm
  • Miner, John A. and Miner, Robert F. "The Curious Pedigree of Lt. Thomas Minor". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. New England Historic Genealogical Society. July 1984, pg 182-185.
  • "The History Of Road Church". www.roadchurch.org.
  • "An Herauldical Essay Upon the Surname of Miner". In possession of the Connecticut Historical Society. Hartford, Connecticut.
  • Ancestors of American Presidents: First Definitive Edition by Gary Boyd Roberts and Julie Helen Otto. 1995.
  • Stonington Historical Society - In Search of the First Settlers
  • Original Stonington settlements c. 1651 - map
  • http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html
=======================

In August of 1652 Thomas Minor built a house for his father-in-law Walter Palmer on the opposite side of Wequetequoc Cove from William Chesebrough, Walter's good friend.

In 1653 Walter, Rebecca and children Elizabeth, Hannah, Elihu, Nahemiah, Moses, Benjamin, Gershom and Rebecca moved from Antient Rehoboth to their new home.

Thomas Minor and his wife (Walter's oldest daughter) Grace with eight children of their own settled nearby in a house (also built by Thomas) in Mistuxet (Quiambaug

--------------------

Thomas Minor had a diary that was published. "The Diary of Thomas Minor"

Immigration: 1630 Came to this country on the ship "Arabella"

THOMAS MINOR OF STONINGTON, CT

(Taken from Thomas Minor Descendants, by John A. Miner)

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak of Typhus, and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown, Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line of Newtown (now Cambridge), and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633/34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later in 1636 the young couple moved once again settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645 Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649 Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett" with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650 Thomas Minor and Jonathan Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot (now New London).

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Manassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white male child born in New London.

In 1652 Thomas moved to Pawcatuck (now Stonington), CT, became a co-founder of the town with three associates; William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law Walter Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four men.

In Stonington Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfild was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October, 1665; October, 1667; October, 1670; October, 1672; May 1677; May and October, 1679; May, 1680; and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Philip's war Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of the ffoure that have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas recieved a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguised public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selectced for the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutentant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife Grace died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.[704546.ged]

1. FAMILY RECORDS AND INFORMATION[3085894.ged]

BIOGRAPHY: THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated aboard the Lyon's Whelp (and not the Arabella as often said) which sailed from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, passed Land End on 13 May, and arrived at Naumkeag Harbor(Salem, Massachusetts) on 29 June 1629.

BIOGRAPHY: He stayed briefly in Salemand Watertown before moving on to Charlestown, Massachusetts where in 1632 he became a founder of the Fir Church. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Charlestown, MA. She was born in 1614, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown and _. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born. In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15.

Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thom Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

BIOGRAPHY: There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August

1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to

Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few (about 17) diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book in 1899.

BIOGRAPHY: He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a document which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat ofarms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, Thomas and his descendants

generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the

Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

BIOGRAPHY: He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODYOF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".

BIOGRAPHY: Source: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

p_miner@alum.wpi.edu

ASource: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

--------------------

THOMAS1 MINOR was born April 23, 1608 in Chew Magna, Somerset County, England.

He married GRACE PALMER April 23, 1634, daughter of WALTER PALMER and ELIZABETH SHORT.

Notes for THOMAS MINOR:

From: THOMAS MINOR DESCENDANTS, by John A. Miner

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing

from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak

of Typhus and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown,

Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line

of Newtown, now Cambridge, and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633/34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later, in 1636, the young couple

moved once again, settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645, Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649, Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett", with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650, Thomas Minor and Jonathan

Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot, now New London, CT.

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Mannassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white child born in New London.

In 1652, Thomas moved to Pawcatuck, now Stonington, CT, and became a founder of the town with three associates: William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter

Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four

men. In Stonington, Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to

Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to

someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug

Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfield was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington, Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October,1665; October, 1677; October, 1670; October, 1672; May, 1677; May and October, 1679;

May, 1680: and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Phillip's War, Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years, he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He

also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary, one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of ffoure tht have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne

Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas received a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguished public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selected for

the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutenant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife, Grace, died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.

Of his ten children, Thomas had descendants, Thomas had desecendants from sons John, Clement, Ephraim, Joseph and Manassah and from his daughter Hannah. His other children, Thomas, Ann, Mary and Samuel all died young without issue. ---------

This is, like many other times, the date of his baptism. His birth would be before this.

--------------------

Buried in Wequetequock Cem, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

Other sources:

http://www.lindapages.com/marshall/minor.txt

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

http://members.cox.net/trm/MinorThomasJr.htm

THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, county of Somerset, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated to Massachusetts, USA perhaps in 1629 on the Lyon's Whelp as Banks 9 states or maybe a couple of years later on the Arabella as many older writings claim, all apparently without any real proof. The first clear reference to Thomas is in Charlestown, Massachusetts where he became a founding member of the church in November 1632. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Massachusetts. She was born about 1612, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born.

In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15 Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

He was among those who began the church at Stonington in June 1674. He was active in the affairs in both New London and Stonington and held many public service positions of trust and honor including deputy to the Connecticut General Court.

He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a essay which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling of the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat of arms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, many his descendants generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August 1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book11 in 1899.

 
 

He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODY OF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".


--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Miner

Thomas Miner or Minor (23 April 1608 – 23 October 1690) was a founder of New London[1] and Stonington, Connecticut, USA, and an early New England diarist.

Early life and marriage

Miner was born in Chew Magna, England, on April 23, 1608. In 1629, he emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, aboard the Lyon's Whelp.[2] He quickly moved to Watertown,[3] and then on to Charlestown, after Typhus Fever broke out in Salem.

In Charlestown, Miner met Grace Palmer, whom he married in 1634. She was the daughter of Walter Palmer.[4] The couple eventually had seven sons and three daughters. In 1636, the Miners moved to Hingham.

Settling Stonington

After several years in Hingham, the family moved south to the Wequetequock area of present-day Stonington, Connecticut, where Miner and his son Ephraim helped found the Road Church.[6]

In about 1653, Miner bought land west of Stonington, across Quiambaug Cove near present-day Mystic,[7] and built a house for his family. Around this time he began one of the few diaries to survive 17th Century New England. It covers the years 1653 to 1684 and was published in book form in 1899.

Miner was active in public affairs in both New London and Stonington. His sons, and possibly Miner himself, fought in King Philip's War.[3]

[edit] Genealogy

Between 1683 and 1684, Miner contracted with an individual in England to investigate his genealogical line and determine how his surname was historically spelled (Miner versus Minor). The response he received is a classic example of fraudulent genealogy.[8] The pedigree and family coat of arms sent back to Miner were proven to be mostly falsified in a 1984 study published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.[5]

[edit] Death

Miner and his wife died three months apart in 1690 and are buried together in Stonington's Wequetequock Cemetery.[2] The founders monument in Stonington has one side dedicated to him.

[edit] Notable descendants

Notable descendants include:

   * Ulysses S. Grant[9]
   * William T. Minor[9]
   * Thomas T. Minor
   * William Chester Minor
   * John D. Rockefeller[9]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Wheeler, Richard A. "The First Organized Church in New London: An Historical Study". New London County Historical Society. Read before the New London County Historical Society, at its Annual Meeting, November 26, 1877. [1]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  2. ^ a b "Thomas Miner and his Descendants". [2]. Accessed 31 July 2007. Note that some accounts have him arriving on the ship Arabella during the Great Migration, arriving in Salem Harbor on June 14, 1630.
  3. ^ a b "The Miner Branch of the Hubbards". [3]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  4. ^ "Biography of Walter Palmer". Walter Palmer Society. http://www.walterpalmer.com/Walter_Palmer_Bio.htm. Accessed 31 July 2007.
  5. ^ a b Miner, John A. and Miner, Robert F. "The Curious Pedigree of Lt. Thomas Minor". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. New England Historic Genealogical Society. July 1984, pg 182-185. See online version at [4]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  6. ^ "The History Of Road Church". www.roadchurch.org. [5]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  7. ^ From Cary Latham
  8. ^ "An Herauldical Essay Upon the Surname of Miner". In possession of the Connecticut Historical Society. Hartford, Connecticut.
  9. ^ a b c Ancestors of American Presidents: First Definitive Edition by Gary Boyd Roberts and Julie Helen Otto. 1995. ISBN 978-0936124193

[edit] External links

   * Stonington Historical Society - In Search of the First Settlers
   * Original Stonington settlements c. 1651 - map

http://cybergata.com/roots/4489.htm

Thomas Minor, II

• Born: Apr 1608, Chew Magna, Somersetshire, England 75,591

• Christened: 23 Apr 1608, Chew Magna, Somersetshire, England 75,591

• Marriage: Grace Palmer on 23 Apr 1634 in Charleston, Massachusetts 75,446,582,591

• Died: 23 Oct 1690, Stonington, New London, Connecticut at age 82 75,582,591

• Buried: Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery, New London, Connecticut,582,591

  Another spelling for Minor can be Miner. 
 Noted events in his life were:

• Immigration. 4,592

From Ter-Centenary Anniversary of the Minor-Miner Family in America, by W.R. Mack, June 1930: "Thomas Minor, then a young man of 22 years, immigrated to this country in the 'Arbella.'" He came as a passenger with Governor Winthrop, Sir Richard Saltonstall and other assistants of the Massachusetts Bay Company. They set sail from England on the 12 Apr 1630, with a fleet of fourteen boats full of about 1500 men, women and children. They arrived on 14 Jun 1630.

The Miner family : Clement of New London, 1638 : Clement of Northfield, 1765, 591 by John A. Miner, page 17:

On 8 Apr 1630, Thomas Minor left Yarmouth, some miles from his ancestral home, on the Arbella. Because this ship carried Governor John Wintrhop. as well as the first Charter of Massachusetts, there is signfigant information about this voyage. On board the Arebellas was some three hundred fifty tons. It was captained by Peter Milbourne and manned by fifty-two seamen. The Arebella first left Yarmouth on 29 Mar 1639, then sailed down the English Channel for eight days, stopping often on it journey. Finally, 8 Apr 1630, the Ambrose, the Jewel, the Talbot and the Flagship, Arebella all set sail for New England.

The journey was extremely hazardous as documented by Governor Winthrop in his journal. It finally found its way into Pequot Harbor, now Salem Massachusetts on 12 Jun 1630.

• Dates & Events: 73

Thomas lived in Salem adn Charlestown Massachusetts. In 1632 he became a founder of the First Church. He moved to Hingham, Massachusetts, then in 1645, he joined John Winthrop Jr. in a the settlement of New Longdon, Conneticut. He sold his home lot in New London, and moved to Stonington, Conneticut.

He started to keep a diary which is one of the few diaries that survive from that time period. His covers the period from 1653 through 1684.

• Grave Stone: 73 ,582

A long stone of rough granite in the burial ground at Wickutequack bears the following inscription:

"Here lyeth the body of Livtenant Thomas Miner, aged eighty-three years. Departed 1690"

• He served in the military. 75

Sergeant, New London Train Band, May 1649

Chief Military Officer, Mystic Train Band, July 1665

Lieutenant in King Philip's War, February and April 1676; Captain, August 1676

• Dates & Events. 505

Thomas Minor was the son of Clement Minor, was born 23 Apr 1608, and came to New England in 1630, and married Grace, daughter of Walter Palmer, 23 Apr 1634. Thomas Minor came with John Winthrop's company, to Pequot, and settle there about 1646-1647. He died at Stonington, 23 Oct 1690 at age 83 years old. Grace, his wife died the same year. He was a leading man in the settlements in the eastern part of the state.

~History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, pg. 642

• Background Information. 582

Thomas Minor married Grace, a daughter of Walter Palmer, and the names of his children were recorded in New London. His boy was named Manasseh, born 28 Apr 1647, who is given the distinction as the first born male at the settlement of New London. He had two daughters who died in infancy. A son Samual, born 4 Mar 1652, and Hannah, born 15 Sep 1655. He also had several son who were born before the other children who were born in New London. They were John, Joseph, Thomas, Clement and Ephraim.

• Background Information. 591

From Ter-Centenary Anniversary of the Minor-Miner Family in America, by W.R. Mack, June 1930:

Thomas took an active and prominent part in the affairs of the new settlement. He was elected as on of the townsmen in 1646. In 1650 he was elected, along with Jonathan Brewster, as deputies to Genral Court at Hartford from Pequot, which became New London, Connecticut. They were the first representatives for New London. Thomas Minor was again elected deputry in 1651, and was appointed to the General Court, as Military Sergeant from New London. Not only was his son, Manassah, the first male child to be born in New London, but his daughter Ann Minor was the first registered death in Pequot. She was born 28 Apr 1649 and died 13 Aug 1652.

Thomas Minor sold his property in New London and moved to Mystic, Connecticut to live on a farm he purchased from Cary Latham. He built a home there, and spent the remained of his days there. He died 23 Oct 1690 at the age of 83 years. His wife, Grace died the same year and they both were buried at Wequetequock, the ancient burial ground of Stonington.

• Background Information. 592

The Miner family : Clement of New London, 1638 : Clement of Northfield, 1765, by John A. Miner, page 17-19:

Shortly after Thomas arrived in Salem, he left in the face of a serious outbreak of Typhus Fever, and moved to Watertown, Massachusetts. He didn't stay there long, since he moved to Charlestown in 1632, where he became the founder of the First Church. His name was 34th on the roll. He was granted, in 1634, four acres of land at the Newtown line and in 1637, he owned a ten-acre lot.

After marrying Grace Palmer at Rehoboth, Massachusetts, he moved in 136, this time to Hingham where he remained until 1645. He joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans who settled New London, connecticut. He lived there for a short period of time, and it appears that Thomas was a close companion of John Winthrop, Junior, from the many references Thomas wrote of him in his own diary.

Some of the dates and events not listed in other sources and from this publication are:

Thomas assisted in the organization of Wiketaquoc Cove, built a house there, and acted twice as Commissioner to deal with the Indians.

Thomas, along with his son Clement, were granted land in 1657, "from Stony Brook easterly 108 pole joining his former grand, thence north one mile and 60 pole, thences east 108 pole to his son's Clement's grant."

At New London, he acted as Deputy in the Connecticut General Court for the sessions of Sep 1650, and May & Sep 1651. He served in Stonington as Deputy in May & Oct, 1665; Oct, 1667; Oct. 1670; Oct 1642; May 1677; May & Oct 1679; May, 1689 and Oct 1689.

In May 1649, he was appointed to serve as a magistrate in the town of New London, and again in Stonighton in Oct 1664 and May 1665. In May 1666, Thomas recived a colonial of 100 acres another 50 acres in 1667 for performing distinguished public service.

Thomas married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer and Ann Elizabeth Carter, on 23 Apr 1634 in Charleston, Massachusetts.75,446,582 (Grace Palmer was born on 9 May 1612 in England,72 died on 31 Oct 1690 in Stonington, Connecticut 72 and was buried in Wequetequock burying ground, Connecticut, Bristish American Colonies 72.)

 Noted events in their marriage were:

• Alt. Marriage Location: Rehoboth, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 72

A good source about Thomas Minor and ancestors:

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

=======================

In August of 1652 Thomas Minor built a house for his father-in-law Walter Palmer on the opposite side of Wequetequoc Cove from William Chesebrough, Walter's good friend.

In 1653 Walter, Rebecca and children Elizabeth, Hannah, Elihu, Nahemiah, Moses, Benjamin, Gershom and Rebecca moved from Antient Rehoboth to their new home.

Thomas Minor and his wife (Walter's oldest daughter) Grace with eight children of their own settled nearby in a house (also built by Thomas) in Mistuxet (Quiambaug

--------------------

Thomas Minor had a diary that was published. "The Diary of Thomas Minor"

Immigration: 1630 Came to this country on the ship "Arabella"

THOMAS MINOR OF STONINGTON, CT

(Taken from Thomas Minor Descendants, by John A. Miner)

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak of Typhus, and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown, Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line of Newtown (now Cambridge), and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633\\\\\\\\34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later in 1636 the young couple moved once again settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645 Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649 Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett" with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650 Thomas Minor and Jonathan Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot (now New London).

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Manassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white male child born in New London.

In 1652 Thomas moved to Pawcatuck (now Stonington), CT, became a co-founder of the town with three associates; William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law Walter Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four men.

In Stonington Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfild was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October, 1665; October, 1667; October, 1670; October, 1672; May 1677; May and October, 1679; May, 1680; and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Philip's war Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of the ffoure that have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas recieved a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguised public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selectced for the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutentant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife Grace died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.[704546.ged]

1. FAMILY RECORDS AND INFORMATION[3085894.ged]

BIOGRAPHY: THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated aboard the Lyon's Whelp (and not the Arabella as often said) which sailed from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, passed Land End on 13 May, and arrived at Naumkeag Harbor(Salem, Massachusetts) on 29 June 1629.

BIOGRAPHY: He stayed briefly in Salemand Watertown before moving on to Charlestown, Massachusetts where in 1632 he became a founder of the Fir Church. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Charlestown, MA. She was born in 1614, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown and _. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born. In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15.

Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thom Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

BIOGRAPHY: There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August

1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to

Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few (about 17) diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book in 1899.

BIOGRAPHY: He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a document which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat ofarms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, Thomas and his descendants

generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the

Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

BIOGRAPHY: He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODYOF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".

BIOGRAPHY: Source: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

p_miner@alum.wpi.edu

ASource: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

--------------------

THOMAS1 MINOR was born April 23, 1608 in Chew Magna, Somerset County, England.

He married GRACE PALMER April 23, 1634, daughter of WALTER PALMER and ELIZABETH SHORT.

Notes for THOMAS MINOR:

From: THOMAS MINOR DESCENDANTS, by John A. Miner

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing

from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak

of Typhus and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown,

Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line

of Newtown, now Cambridge, and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633/34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later, in 1636, the young couple

moved once again, settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645, Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649, Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett", with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650, Thomas Minor and Jonathan

Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot, now New London, CT.

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Mannassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white child born in New London.

In 1652, Thomas moved to Pawcatuck, now Stonington, CT, and became a founder of the town with three associates: William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter

Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four

men. In Stonington, Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to

Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to

someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug

Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfield was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington, Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October,1665; October, 1677; October, 1670; October, 1672; May, 1677; May and October, 1679;

May, 1680: and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Phillip's War, Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years, he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He

also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary, one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of ffoure tht have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne

Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas received a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguished public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selected for

the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutenant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife, Grace, died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.

Of his ten children, Thomas had descendants, Thomas had desecendants from sons John, Clement, Ephraim, Joseph and Manassah and from his daughter Hannah. His other children, Thomas, Ann, Mary and Samuel all died young without issue. ---------

This is, like many other times, the date of his baptism. His birth would be before this.

--------------------

Buried in Wequetequock Cem, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

Other sources:

http://www.lindapages.com/marshall/minor.txt

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

http://members.cox.net/trm/MinorThomasJr.htm

THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, county of Somerset, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated to Massachusetts, USA perhaps in 1629 on the Lyon's Whelp as Banks 9 states or maybe a couple of years later on the Arabella as many older writings claim, all apparently without any real proof. The first clear reference to Thomas is in Charlestown, Massachusetts where he became a founding member of the church in November 1632. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Massachusetts. She was born about 1612, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born.

In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15 Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

He was among those who began the church at Stonington in June 1674. He was active in the affairs in both New London and Stonington and held many public service positions of trust and honor including deputy to the Connecticut General Court.

He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a essay which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling of the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat of arms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, many his descendants generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August 1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book11 in 1899.

 
 

He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODY OF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Miner

Thomas Miner or Minor (23 April 1608 – 23 October 1690) was a founder of New London[1] and Stonington, Connecticut, USA, and an early New England diarist.

Early life and marriage

Miner was born in Chew Magna, England, on April 23, 1608. In 1629, he emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, aboard the Lyon's Whelp.[2] He quickly moved to Watertown,[3] and then on to Charlestown, after Typhus Fever broke out in Salem.

In Charlestown, Miner met Grace Palmer, whom he married in 1634. She was the daughter of Walter Palmer.[4] The couple eventually had seven sons and three daughters. In 1636, the Miners moved to Hingham.

Settling Stonington

After several years in Hingham, the family moved south to the Wequetequock area of present-day Stonington, Connecticut, where Miner and his son Ephraim helped found the Road Church.[6]

In about 1653, Miner bought land west of Stonington, across Quiambaug Cove near present-day Mystic,[7] and built a house for his family. Around this time he began one of the few diaries to survive 17th Century New England. It covers the years 1653 to 1684 and was published in book form in 1899.

Miner was active in public affairs in both New London and Stonington. His sons, and possibly Miner himself, fought in King Philip's War.[3]

[edit] Genealogy

Between 1683 and 1684, Miner contracted with an individual in England to investigate his genealogical line and determine how his surname was historically spelled (Miner versus Minor). The response he received is a classic example of fraudulent genealogy.[8] The pedigree and family coat of arms sent back to Miner were proven to be mostly falsified in a 1984 study published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.[5]

[edit] Death

Miner and his wife died three months apart in 1690 and are buried together in Stonington's Wequetequock Cemetery.[2] The founders monument in Stonington has one side dedicated to him.

[edit] Notable descendants

Notable descendants include:

   * Ulysses S. Grant[9]
   * William T. Minor[9]
   * Thomas T. Minor
   * William Chester Minor
   * John D. Rockefeller[9]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Wheeler, Richard A. "The First Organized Church in New London: An Historical Study". New London County Historical Society. Read before the New London County Historical Society, at its Annual Meeting, November 26, 1877. [1]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  2. ^ a b "Thomas Miner and his Descendants". [2]. Accessed 31 July 2007. Note that some accounts have him arriving on the ship Arabella during the Great Migration, arriving in Salem Harbor on June 14, 1630.
  3. ^ a b "The Miner Branch of the Hubbards". [3]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  4. ^ "Biography of Walter Palmer". Walter Palmer Society. http://www.walterpalmer.com/Walter_Palmer_Bio.htm. Accessed 31 July 2007.
  5. ^ a b Miner, John A. and Miner, Robert F. "The Curious Pedigree of Lt. Thomas Minor". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. New England Historic Genealogical Society. July 1984, pg 182-185. See online version at [4]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  6. ^ "The History Of Road Church". www.roadchurch.org. [5]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  7. ^ From Cary Latham
  8. ^ "An Herauldical Essay Upon the Surname of Miner". In possession of the Connecticut Historical Society. Hartford, Connecticut.
  9. ^ a b c Ancestors of American Presidents: First Definitive Edition by Gary Boyd Roberts and Julie Helen Otto. 1995. ISBN 978-0936124193

[edit] External links

   * Stonington Historical Society - In Search of the First Settlers
   * Original Stonington settlements c. 1651 - map

A good source about Thomas Minor and ancestors:

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

=======================

In August of 1652 Thomas Minor built a house for his father-in-law Walter Palmer on the opposite side of Wequetequoc Cove from William Chesebrough, Walter's good friend.

In 1653 Walter, Rebecca and children Elizabeth, Hannah, Elihu, Nahemiah, Moses, Benjamin, Gershom and Rebecca moved from Antient Rehoboth to their new home.

Thomas Minor and his wife (Walter's oldest daughter) Grace with eight children of their own settled nearby in a house (also built by Thomas) in Mistuxet (Quiambaug

--------------------

Thomas Minor had a diary that was published. "The Diary of Thomas Minor"

Immigration: 1630 Came to this country on the ship "Arabella"

THOMAS MINOR OF STONINGTON, CT

(Taken from Thomas Minor Descendants, by John A. Miner)

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak of Typhus, and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown, Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line of Newtown (now Cambridge), and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633\\\\\\\\34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later in 1636 the young couple moved once again settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645 Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649 Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett" with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650 Thomas Minor and Jonathan Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot (now New London).

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Manassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white male child born in New London.

In 1652 Thomas moved to Pawcatuck (now Stonington), CT, became a co-founder of the town with three associates; William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law Walter Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four men.

In Stonington Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfild was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October, 1665; October, 1667; October, 1670; October, 1672; May 1677; May and October, 1679; May, 1680; and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Philip's war Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of the ffoure that have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas recieved a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguised public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selectced for the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutentant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife Grace died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.[704546.ged]

1. FAMILY RECORDS AND INFORMATION[3085894.ged]

BIOGRAPHY: THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated aboard the Lyon's Whelp (and not the Arabella as often said) which sailed from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, passed Land End on 13 May, and arrived at Naumkeag Harbor(Salem, Massachusetts) on 29 June 1629.

BIOGRAPHY: He stayed briefly in Salemand Watertown before moving on to Charlestown, Massachusetts where in 1632 he became a founder of the Fir Church. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Charlestown, MA. She was born in 1614, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown and _. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born. In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15.

Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thom Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

BIOGRAPHY: There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August

1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to

Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few (about 17) diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book in 1899.

BIOGRAPHY: He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a document which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat ofarms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, Thomas and his descendants

generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the

Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

BIOGRAPHY: He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODYOF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".

BIOGRAPHY: Source: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

p_miner@alum.wpi.edu

ASource: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

--------------------

THOMAS1 MINOR was born April 23, 1608 in Chew Magna, Somerset County, England.

He married GRACE PALMER April 23, 1634, daughter of WALTER PALMER and ELIZABETH SHORT.

Notes for THOMAS MINOR:

From: THOMAS MINOR DESCENDANTS, by John A. Miner

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing

from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak

of Typhus and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown,

Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line

of Newtown, now Cambridge, and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633/34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later, in 1636, the young couple

moved once again, settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645, Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649, Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett", with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650, Thomas Minor and Jonathan

Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot, now New London, CT.

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Mannassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white child born in New London.

In 1652, Thomas moved to Pawcatuck, now Stonington, CT, and became a founder of the town with three associates: William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter

Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four

men. In Stonington, Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to

Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to

someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug

Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfield was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington, Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October,1665; October, 1677; October, 1670; October, 1672; May, 1677; May and October, 1679;

May, 1680: and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Phillip's War, Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years, he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He

also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary, one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of ffoure tht have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne

Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas received a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguished public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selected for

the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutenant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife, Grace, died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.

Of his ten children, Thomas had descendants, Thomas had desecendants from sons John, Clement, Ephraim, Joseph and Manassah and from his daughter Hannah. His other children, Thomas, Ann, Mary and Samuel all died young without issue. ---------

This is, like many other times, the date of his baptism. His birth would be before this.

--------------------

Buried in Wequetequock Cem, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

Other sources:

http://www.lindapages.com/marshall/minor.txt

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

http://members.cox.net/trm/MinorThomasJr.htm

THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, county of Somerset, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated to Massachusetts, USA perhaps in 1629 on the Lyon's Whelp as Banks 9 states or maybe a couple of years later on the Arabella as many older writings claim, all apparently without any real proof. The first clear reference to Thomas is in Charlestown, Massachusetts where he became a founding member of the church in November 1632. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Massachusetts. She was born about 1612, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born.

In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15 Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

He was among those who began the church at Stonington in June 1674. He was active in the affairs in both New London and Stonington and held many public service positions of trust and honor including deputy to the Connecticut General Court.

He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a essay which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling of the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat of arms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, many his descendants generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August 1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book11 in 1899.

 
 

He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODY OF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".


--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Miner

Thomas Miner or Minor (23 April 1608 – 23 October 1690) was a founder of New London[1] and Stonington, Connecticut, USA, and an early New England diarist.

Early life and marriage

Miner was born in Chew Magna, England, on April 23, 1608. In 1629, he emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, aboard the Lyon's Whelp.[2] He quickly moved to Watertown,[3] and then on to Charlestown, after Typhus Fever broke out in Salem.

In Charlestown, Miner met Grace Palmer, whom he married in 1634. She was the daughter of Walter Palmer.[4] The couple eventually had seven sons and three daughters. In 1636, the Miners moved to Hingham.

Settling Stonington

After several years in Hingham, the family moved south to the Wequetequock area of present-day Stonington, Connecticut, where Miner and his son Ephraim helped found the Road Church.[6]

In about 1653, Miner bought land west of Stonington, across Quiambaug Cove near present-day Mystic,[7] and built a house for his family. Around this time he began one of the few diaries to survive 17th Century New England. It covers the years 1653 to 1684 and was published in book form in 1899.

Miner was active in public affairs in both New London and Stonington. His sons, and possibly Miner himself, fought in King Philip's War.[3]

[edit] Genealogy

Between 1683 and 1684, Miner contracted with an individual in England to investigate his genealogical line and determine how his surname was historically spelled (Miner versus Minor). The response he received is a classic example of fraudulent genealogy.[8] The pedigree and family coat of arms sent back to Miner were proven to be mostly falsified in a 1984 study published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.[5]

[edit] Death

Miner and his wife died three months apart in 1690 and are buried together in Stonington's Wequetequock Cemetery.[2] The founders monument in Stonington has one side dedicated to him.

[edit] Notable descendants

Notable descendants include:

   * Ulysses S. Grant[9]
   * William T. Minor[9]
   * Thomas T. Minor
   * William Chester Minor
   * John D. Rockefeller[9]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Wheeler, Richard A. "The First Organized Church in New London: An Historical Study". New London County Historical Society. Read before the New London County Historical Society, at its Annual Meeting, November 26, 1877. [1]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  2. ^ a b "Thomas Miner and his Descendants". [2]. Accessed 31 July 2007. Note that some accounts have him arriving on the ship Arabella during the Great Migration, arriving in Salem Harbor on June 14, 1630.
  3. ^ a b "The Miner Branch of the Hubbards". [3]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  4. ^ "Biography of Walter Palmer". Walter Palmer Society. http://www.walterpalmer.com/Walter_Palmer_Bio.htm. Accessed 31 July 2007.
  5. ^ a b Miner, John A. and Miner, Robert F. "The Curious Pedigree of Lt. Thomas Minor". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. New England Historic Genealogical Society. July 1984, pg 182-185. See online version at [4]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  6. ^ "The History Of Road Church". www.roadchurch.org. [5]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  7. ^ From Cary Latham
  8. ^ "An Herauldical Essay Upon the Surname of Miner". In possession of the Connecticut Historical Society. Hartford, Connecticut.
  9. ^ a b c Ancestors of American Presidents: First Definitive Edition by Gary Boyd Roberts and Julie Helen Otto. 1995. ISBN 978-0936124193

[edit] External links

   * Stonington Historical Society - In Search of the First Settlers
   * Original Stonington settlements c. 1651 - map

http://cybergata.com/roots/4489.htm

Thomas Minor, II

• Born: Apr 1608, Chew Magna, Somersetshire, England 75,591

• Christened: 23 Apr 1608, Chew Magna, Somersetshire, England 75,591

• Marriage: Grace Palmer on 23 Apr 1634 in Charleston, Massachusetts 75,446,582,591

• Died: 23 Oct 1690, Stonington, New London, Connecticut at age 82 75,582,591

• Buried: Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery, New London, Connecticut,582,591

  Another spelling for Minor can be Miner. 
 Noted events in his life were:

• Immigration. 4,592

From Ter-Centenary Anniversary of the Minor-Miner Family in America, by W.R. Mack, June 1930: "Thomas Minor, then a young man of 22 years, immigrated to this country in the 'Arbella.'" He came as a passenger with Governor Winthrop, Sir Richard Saltonstall and other assistants of the Massachusetts Bay Company. They set sail from England on the 12 Apr 1630, with a fleet of fourteen boats full of about 1500 men, women and children. They arrived on 14 Jun 1630.

The Miner family : Clement of New London, 1638 : Clement of Northfield, 1765, 591 by John A. Miner, page 17:

On 8 Apr 1630, Thomas Minor left Yarmouth, some miles from his ancestral home, on the Arbella. Because this ship carried Governor John Wintrhop. as well as the first Charter of Massachusetts, there is signfigant information about this voyage. On board the Arebellas was some three hundred fifty tons. It was captained by Peter Milbourne and manned by fifty-two seamen. The Arebella first left Yarmouth on 29 Mar 1639, then sailed down the English Channel for eight days, stopping often on it journey. Finally, 8 Apr 1630, the Ambrose, the Jewel, the Talbot and the Flagship, Arebella all set sail for New England.

The journey was extremely hazardous as documented by Governor Winthrop in his journal. It finally found its way into Pequot Harbor, now Salem Massachusetts on 12 Jun 1630.

• Dates & Events: 73

Thomas lived in Salem adn Charlestown Massachusetts. In 1632 he became a founder of the First Church. He moved to Hingham, Massachusetts, then in 1645, he joined John Winthrop Jr. in a the settlement of New Longdon, Conneticut. He sold his home lot in New London, and moved to Stonington, Conneticut.

He started to keep a diary which is one of the few diaries that survive from that time period. His covers the period from 1653 through 1684.

• Grave Stone: 73 ,582

A long stone of rough granite in the burial ground at Wickutequack bears the following inscription:

"Here lyeth the body of Livtenant Thomas Miner, aged eighty-three years. Departed 1690"

• He served in the military. 75

Sergeant, New London Train Band, May 1649

Chief Military Officer, Mystic Train Band, July 1665

Lieutenant in King Philip's War, February and April 1676; Captain, August 1676

• Dates & Events. 505

Thomas Minor was the son of Clement Minor, was born 23 Apr 1608, and came to New England in 1630, and married Grace, daughter of Walter Palmer, 23 Apr 1634. Thomas Minor came with John Winthrop's company, to Pequot, and settle there about 1646-1647. He died at Stonington, 23 Oct 1690 at age 83 years old. Grace, his wife died the same year. He was a leading man in the settlements in the eastern part of the state.

~History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, pg. 642

• Background Information. 582

Thomas Minor married Grace, a daughter of Walter Palmer, and the names of his children were recorded in New London. His boy was named Manasseh, born 28 Apr 1647, who is given the distinction as the first born male at the settlement of New London. He had two daughters who died in infancy. A son Samual, born 4 Mar 1652, and Hannah, born 15 Sep 1655. He also had several son who were born before the other children who were born in New London. They were John, Joseph, Thomas, Clement and Ephraim.

• Background Information. 591

From Ter-Centenary Anniversary of the Minor-Miner Family in America, by W.R. Mack, June 1930:

Thomas took an active and prominent part in the affairs of the new settlement. He was elected as on of the townsmen in 1646. In 1650 he was elected, along with Jonathan Brewster, as deputies to Genral Court at Hartford from Pequot, which became New London, Connecticut. They were the first representatives for New London. Thomas Minor was again elected deputry in 1651, and was appointed to the General Court, as Military Sergeant from New London. Not only was his son, Manassah, the first male child to be born in New London, but his daughter Ann Minor was the first registered death in Pequot. She was born 28 Apr 1649 and died 13 Aug 1652.

Thomas Minor sold his property in New London and moved to Mystic, Connecticut to live on a farm he purchased from Cary Latham. He built a home there, and spent the remained of his days there. He died 23 Oct 1690 at the age of 83 years. His wife, Grace died the same year and they both were buried at Wequetequock, the ancient burial ground of Stonington.

• Background Information. 592

The Miner family : Clement of New London, 1638 : Clement of Northfield, 1765, by John A. Miner, page 17-19:

Shortly after Thomas arrived in Salem, he left in the face of a serious outbreak of Typhus Fever, and moved to Watertown, Massachusetts. He didn't stay there long, since he moved to Charlestown in 1632, where he became the founder of the First Church. His name was 34th on the roll. He was granted, in 1634, four acres of land at the Newtown line and in 1637, he owned a ten-acre lot.

After marrying Grace Palmer at Rehoboth, Massachusetts, he moved in 136, this time to Hingham where he remained until 1645. He joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans who settled New London, connecticut. He lived there for a short period of time, and it appears that Thomas was a close companion of John Winthrop, Junior, from the many references Thomas wrote of him in his own diary.

Some of the dates and events not listed in other sources and from this publication are:

Thomas assisted in the organization of Wiketaquoc Cove, built a house there, and acted twice as Commissioner to deal with the Indians.

Thomas, along with his son Clement, were granted land in 1657, "from Stony Brook easterly 108 pole joining his former grand, thence north one mile and 60 pole, thences east 108 pole to his son's Clement's grant."

At New London, he acted as Deputy in the Connecticut General Court for the sessions of Sep 1650, and May & Sep 1651. He served in Stonington as Deputy in May & Oct, 1665; Oct, 1667; Oct. 1670; Oct 1642; May 1677; May & Oct 1679; May, 1689 and Oct 1689.

In May 1649, he was appointed to serve as a magistrate in the town of New London, and again in Stonighton in Oct 1664 and May 1665. In May 1666, Thomas recived a colonial of 100 acres another 50 acres in 1667 for performing distinguished public service.

Thomas married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer and Ann Elizabeth Carter, on 23 Apr 1634 in Charleston, Massachusetts.75,446,582 (Grace Palmer was born on 9 May 1612 in England,72 died on 31 Oct 1690 in Stonington, Connecticut 72 and was buried in Wequetequock burying ground, Connecticut, Bristish American Colonies 72.)

 Noted events in their marriage were:

• Alt. Marriage Location: Rehoboth, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 72

A good source about Thomas Minor and ancestors:

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

=======================

In August of 1652 Thomas Minor built a house for his father-in-law Walter Palmer on the opposite side of Wequetequoc Cove from William Chesebrough, Walter's good friend.

In 1653 Walter, Rebecca and children Elizabeth, Hannah, Elihu, Nahemiah, Moses, Benjamin, Gershom and Rebecca moved from Antient Rehoboth to their new home.

Thomas Minor and his wife (Walter's oldest daughter) Grace with eight children of their own settled nearby in a house (also built by Thomas) in Mistuxet (Quiambaug

--------------------

Thomas Minor had a diary that was published. "The Diary of Thomas Minor"

Immigration: 1630 Came to this country on the ship "Arabella"

THOMAS MINOR OF STONINGTON, CT

(Taken from Thomas Minor Descendants, by John A. Miner)

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak of Typhus, and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown, Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line of Newtown (now Cambridge), and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633\\\\\\\\34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later in 1636 the young couple moved once again settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645 Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649 Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett" with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650 Thomas Minor and Jonathan Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot (now New London).

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Manassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white male child born in New London.

In 1652 Thomas moved to Pawcatuck (now Stonington), CT, became a co-founder of the town with three associates; William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law Walter Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four men.

In Stonington Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfild was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October, 1665; October, 1667; October, 1670; October, 1672; May 1677; May and October, 1679; May, 1680; and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Philip's war Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of the ffoure that have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas recieved a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguised public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selectced for the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutentant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife Grace died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.[704546.ged]

1. FAMILY RECORDS AND INFORMATION[3085894.ged]

BIOGRAPHY: THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated aboard the Lyon's Whelp (and not the Arabella as often said) which sailed from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, passed Land End on 13 May, and arrived at Naumkeag Harbor(Salem, Massachusetts) on 29 June 1629.

BIOGRAPHY: He stayed briefly in Salemand Watertown before moving on to Charlestown, Massachusetts where in 1632 he became a founder of the Fir Church. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Charlestown, MA. She was born in 1614, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown and _. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born. In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15.

Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thom Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

BIOGRAPHY: There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August

1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to

Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few (about 17) diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book in 1899.

BIOGRAPHY: He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a document which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat ofarms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, Thomas and his descendants

generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the

Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

BIOGRAPHY: He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODYOF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".

BIOGRAPHY: Source: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

p_miner@alum.wpi.edu

ASource: English Orgins of the Thomas Miner/Minor family

--------------------

THOMAS1 MINOR was born April 23, 1608 in Chew Magna, Somerset County, England.

He married GRACE PALMER April 23, 1634, daughter of WALTER PALMER and ELIZABETH SHORT.

Notes for THOMAS MINOR:

From: THOMAS MINOR DESCENDANTS, by John A. Miner

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing

from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak

of Typhus and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown,

Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line

of Newtown, now Cambridge, and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633/34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later, in 1636, the young couple

moved once again, settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645, Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649, Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett", with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650, Thomas Minor and Jonathan

Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot, now New London, CT.

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Mannassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white child born in New London.

In 1652, Thomas moved to Pawcatuck, now Stonington, CT, and became a founder of the town with three associates: William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter

Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four

men. In Stonington, Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to

Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to

someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then bought some land situated on Quiambaug

Cove from Cary Latham about 1653. In his diary, Thomas tells of his building his house at Quiambaug. His first published month, November 1653, and the following month, December of the same year, indicate very clearly his life in Stonington. During the following months, one can follow the building of his home: "I had 9 peeces to hew", "I made an end of hewing of timber", "goodman redfield was making our backe for our Chimbloy and wensday the 22nd our backe of our Chimbly was ended goodman Redfild has 22 s and 6 d for doing the stone walle", "I had newly raised my roofe of my house".

In Stonington, Thomas served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court in May and October,1665; October, 1677; October, 1670; October, 1672; May, 1677; May and October, 1679;

May, 1680: and October, 1689. He was appointed Chief Military Officer of the Mystic Trainband in July, 1685. During King Phillip's War, Thomas served as a Lieutenant and was referred to that title in February and in April of 1676. In August, 1676, he was called Captain, although in later years, he usually is mentioned as Lieutenant.

By Colonial appointment in May of 1649, Thomas Minor served as Magistrate or Justice, in the town of New London, and in the town of Stonington in October, 1664, and in May of 1665. He

also held various other positions of trust and honor. In his diary, one can read: "This 24th of Aprill, 1669, I thomas Minor am by my accounts sixtie one yeares ould I was by the towne & this yeare Chosen to be a select man in the Townes Treasurer The Townes Recorder The Brander of horses by the generale Courte Recorded in the head officer of the Traine band by the same Courte one of ffoure tht have the charge of the milischia of the whole Countie and Chossen and sworne

Commissionor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte".

In May, 1666, Thomas received a Colonial grant of 100 acres of land and in October, 1667, 50 acres more; such grants were made to those who had performed distinguished public service. His last two children, Samuel and Hannah, were born 4 March 1652 and 15 Sept 1655, respectively.

Thomas died in Stonington, CT on 23 Oct 1690. He is buried in Wequetequock Cemetery, his grave covered by a "wolfstone", consisting of a large granite slab which it is said he selected for

the purpose from his own field. On one side of the stone an inscription reads: "Here lyeth the body of Lieutenant Thomas Minor, aged 83 years. Departed 1690". His wife, Grace, died 31 December 1690 and is buried beside Thomas, the opposite side of the stone being inscribed for her.

Of his ten children, Thomas had descendants, Thomas had desecendants from sons John, Clement, Ephraim, Joseph and Manassah and from his daughter Hannah. His other children, Thomas, Ann, Mary and Samuel all died young without issue. ---------

This is, like many other times, the date of his baptism. His birth would be before this.

--------------------

Buried in Wequetequock Cem, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

Other sources:

http://www.lindapages.com/marshall/minor.txt

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

http://members.cox.net/trm/MinorThomasJr.htm

THOMAS MINER / MINOR was born in Chew Magna, county of Somerset, England on 23 April 1608, son of Clement Miner. He emigrated to Massachusetts, USA perhaps in 1629 on the Lyon's Whelp as Banks 9 states or maybe a couple of years later on the Arabella as many older writings claim, all apparently without any real proof. The first clear reference to Thomas is in Charlestown, Massachusetts where he became a founding member of the church in November 1632. He married Grace PALMER on 23 April 1634 in Massachusetts. She was born about 1612, the daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Their first child, John, was born in Charlestown, and then in 1636 they moved to Hingham, MA where more children were born.

In 1645, they joined John Winthrop Jr. and company in the settlement of New London, CT. On 15 Oct 1652 Thomas sold his home lot in New London located at the head of Close Cove and settled in Stonington, CT with William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law, Walter Palmer. The Stonington Historical Society has more information on the settling of the town.

He was among those who began the church at Stonington in June 1674. He was active in the affairs in both New London and Stonington and held many public service positions of trust and honor including deputy to the Connecticut General Court.

He is the Thomas Miner who wrote back to England about 1683/4 and received a essay which explores the Miner versus Minor spelling of the name and traces the Miner ancestry back to the 1300s. The information in this document including the coat of arms it presents are believed to be false. After receiving this document, many his descendants generally used the Miner spelling of the name although some retained the Minor spelling especially his son John of Woodbury, CT.

There is a monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August 1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery with one side dedicated to Thomas. In 1653 he bought some land from Cary Latham and moved from the Wequetequock area to the west side of the mouth of Quiambaug Cove near Mystic, CT and began one of the few diaries to survive from this period. This diary covers the period from 1653 through 1684 and was published as a book11 in 1899.

 
 

He died in Stonington, CT on 23 October 1690, and his wife died there on 31 December 1690. Both are buried at Stonington in the Wequetequock Cemetery under a prone, inscribed granite slab which reads "HERE LYES THE BODY OF LIUTENANT THOMAS MINOR AGED 83 -- DEPARTED 1690".


--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Miner

Thomas Miner or Minor (23 April 1608 – 23 October 1690) was a founder of New London[1] and Stonington, Connecticut, USA, and an early New England diarist.

Early life and marriage

Miner was born in Chew Magna, England, on April 23, 1608. In 1629, he emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, aboard the Lyon's Whelp.[2] He quickly moved to Watertown,[3] and then on to Charlestown, after Typhus Fever broke out in Salem.

In Charlestown, Miner met Grace Palmer, whom he married in 1634. She was the daughter of Walter Palmer.[4] The couple eventually had seven sons and three daughters. In 1636, the Miners moved to Hingham.

Settling Stonington

After several years in Hingham, the family moved south to the Wequetequock area of present-day Stonington, Connecticut, where Miner and his son Ephraim helped found the Road Church.[6]

In about 1653, Miner bought land west of Stonington, across Quiambaug Cove near present-day Mystic,[7] and built a house for his family. Around this time he began one of the few diaries to survive 17th Century New England. It covers the years 1653 to 1684 and was published in book form in 1899.

Miner was active in public affairs in both New London and Stonington. His sons, and possibly Miner himself, fought in King Philip's War.[3]

[edit] Genealogy

Between 1683 and 1684, Miner contracted with an individual in England to investigate his genealogical line and determine how his surname was historically spelled (Miner versus Minor). The response he received is a classic example of fraudulent genealogy.[8] The pedigree and family coat of arms sent back to Miner were proven to be mostly falsified in a 1984 study published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.[5]

[edit] Death

Miner and his wife died three months apart in 1690 and are buried together in Stonington's Wequetequock Cemetery.[2] The founders monument in Stonington has one side dedicated to him.

[edit] Notable descendants

Notable descendants include:

   * Ulysses S. Grant[9]
   * William T. Minor[9]
   * Thomas T. Minor
   * William Chester Minor
   * John D. Rockefeller[9]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Wheeler, Richard A. "The First Organized Church in New London: An Historical Study". New London County Historical Society. Read before the New London County Historical Society, at its Annual Meeting, November 26, 1877. [1]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  2. ^ a b "Thomas Miner and his Descendants". [2]. Accessed 31 July 2007. Note that some accounts have him arriving on the ship Arabella during the Great Migration, arriving in Salem Harbor on June 14, 1630.
  3. ^ a b "The Miner Branch of the Hubbards". [3]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  4. ^ "Biography of Walter Palmer". Walter Palmer Society. http://www.walterpalmer.com/Walter_Palmer_Bio.htm. Accessed 31 July 2007.
  5. ^ a b Miner, John A. and Miner, Robert F. "The Curious Pedigree of Lt. Thomas Minor". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. New England Historic Genealogical Society. July 1984, pg 182-185. See online version at [4]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  6. ^ "The History Of Road Church". www.roadchurch.org. [5]. Accessed 14 July 2007.
  7. ^ From Cary Latham
  8. ^ "An Herauldical Essay Upon the Surname of Miner". In possession of the Connecticut Historical Society. Hartford, Connecticut.
  9. ^ a b c Ancestors of American Presidents: First Definitive Edition by Gary Boyd Roberts and Julie Helen Otto. 1995. ISBN 978-0936124193

[edit] External links

   * Stonington Historical Society - In Search of the First Settlers
   * Original Stonington settlements c. 1651 - map

A good source about Thomas Minor and ancestors:

http://alum.wpi.edu/~p_miner/Miner1.html

=======================

In August of 1652 Thomas Minor built a house for his father-in-law Walter Palmer on the opposite side of Wequetequoc Cove from William Chesebrough, Walter's good friend.

In 1653 Walter, Rebecca and children Elizabeth, Hannah, Elihu, Nahemiah, Moses, Benjamin, Gershom and Rebecca moved from Antient Rehoboth to their new home.

Thomas Minor and his wife (Walter's oldest daughter) Grace with eight children of their own settled nearby in a house (also built by Thomas) in Mistuxet (Quiambaug

--------------------

Thomas Minor had a diary that was published. "The Diary of Thomas Minor"

Immigration: 1630 Came to this country on the ship "Arabella"

THOMAS MINOR OF STONINGTON, CT

(Taken from Thomas Minor Descendants, by John A. Miner)

Thomas Minor was born at Chew Magna, Somersett County, England on 23 April 1608, sailing from Gravesend, England on 25 April 1629, and arrived at Salem, MA in the middle of July 1629.

Very shortly after his arrival in Salem (then called Pequot Harbor), there was a serious outbreak of Typhus, and Thomas moved on to Watertown. His stay there was brief also; from Watertown, Thomas moved on to Charlestown where in 1632 he became a founder of the First Church, his name appearing 34th on the roll. Two years later he was granted four acres of land at the line of Newtown (now Cambridge), and by 1637 owned a 10 acre plot.

On 4 March 1633\\\\\\\\34, Thomas was made a freeman, and on 23 April 1634 he married Grace Palmer, daughter of Walter Palmer of Charlestown. Two years later in 1636 the young couple moved once again settling in Hingham, MA where they remained until 1645. Thomas' first child, John, was baptized in 1635 before they moved to Hingham. During their years in Hingham, their sons Clement, Thomas, Ephraim and Joseph were born.

In 1645 Thomas joined John Winthrop Jr.'s colony of Massachusetts Puritans in the settlement of New London, CT. In 1649 Thomas was appointed "Military Sargeant in the towne of Pequett" with power to call forth and train the male inhabitants. In 1650 Thomas Minor and Jonathan Brewster were made the first deputies to the General Court (the Legislature) from Pequot (now New London).

During the years that Thomas lived in New London, his son Manassah and his daughters Ann and Mary were born. Manassah was the first white male child born in New London.

In 1652 Thomas moved to Pawcatuck (now Stonington), CT, became a co-founder of the town with three associates; William Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, and his father-in-law Walter Palmer. On the grounds of Wequetequock Cemetery there is a monument honoring these four men.

In Stonington Thomas built a house on land granted to him, which he later relinquished to Walter Palmer, there having been some confusion during which time the land was also granted to someone else who sold it to Mr. Palmer. Thomas then -------------------- General and President Ulysses S Grant was a lineal descendent of Thomas Miner and wife Grace Palmer Miner. -------------------- Wrote The Diary of Thomas Minor, published in 1899. Digitized copy available here: https://archive.org/details/diarythomasmino00minogoog -------------------- (f/g) Thomas Minor Birth: Apr. 23, 1608 Somerset, England Death: Oct. 23, 1690 Stonington New London County Connecticut, USA

Thomas L. Minor was the husband of Grace Palmer Minor and the son of Clement Minor of Chew Magna, Somersetshire, England.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Grace Palmer Minor (1612 - 1690) 
Children:
 
view all 33

Lt. Thomas L. Minor, IV's Timeline

1608
April 23, 1608
Chew Magna, Somerset, England
April 23, 1608
Chew Magna, Somerset, England
April 23, 1608
Of, Stonington, New London, Conn
April 23, 1608
Of, Stonington, New London, Conn
April 23, 1608
Stonington, New London, Connecticut, United States
April 23, 1608
Of, Stonington, New London, CT
April 23, 1608
Chew Magna, Somerset, England, United Kingdom
April 23, 1608
Of, Stonington, New London, Conn
April 23, 1608
Of, Stonington, New London, Conn
1629
July 1629
Age 21
Salem, Massachusetts in the Lyon's Whelp, John Gibbs, Master