Lt. William Clarke, of Northampton

Is your surname Clark?

Research the Clark family

Lt. William Clarke, of Northampton's Geni Profile

Records for William Clark

9,820,135 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

William Clark (Clarke), I

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dorsetshire, England
Death: Died in Northampton, Hampshire, MA, USA
Place of Burial: Bridge Street Cemetery, Northhampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Clarke and Rose Clarke (Kerrich)
Husband of Sarah Clarke and Sarah Clark
Father of Sarah Clark; Jonathan Clark; Nathaniel Clark; Experience Clark; Increase Clark and 5 others
Brother of Margaret Clarke; Carew Clarke; Thomas Clarke, VI; Mary Peckham; Margaret Wyeth and 4 others
Half brother of Anne Clarke

Occupation: Lieutentant, Military ( Lt. )
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William Clark (Clarke), I

William Clarke arrived in New England: The Mary & John left Southampton or London, England abt Mar 24/26, 1634 with her Master, Robert Sayres, arriving in New England.

Clarke, William

Source: http://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/maryjohn2.htm ________________________________

http://minerdescent.wordpress.com/2010/07/09/lt-william-clark/

Its believed Lt. William Clarke was born in England around 1608 from his listed age when he died. He was a "Puritan" that moved to New England to practice his religion with minimum interference from the established English Anglican church and the often hostile Royal authorities. He was apparently reasonably well educated for the period knowing how to read, write and do arithmetic. He is often called Lt. William Clarke to distinguish him from the 7 other William Clarkes in New England in this time period. Despite several "attempts" to tie William's birth to Dorchester England no unambiguous documented evidence has come to light to verify this. William Clarke is such a common name its difficult to tie a particular William Clarke to our William Clarke. The original settlers of Dorchester Mass. came from around Dorsetshire England but their is NO documented evidence that he was among this 1630 group. Most Puritans came from the East Anglica counties of England--Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgshire, Kent etc. Reconstituted ship lists of the "Mary and John" 1630 passengers that settled Dorchester Mass. in 1630 do NOT include a William Clarke. Most of the original Dorchester Mass. settlers picked up and moved their families and herds to what they named Windwor CT on the Connecticut River in about 1634 (some of the first settlers there) leaving their homes and property in Dorchester MA for sale--"cheap". Their are about 8 different William Clarkes in New England in this period--see "Genealogical Dictionary of New England" by James Savage (available on-line). William (used 6.6% of the time) was a very popular male first name and about 90% of the male population of this period used less than 20 different first names. Clark is also a very common last name making finding "good unambiguous" records extremely difficult. It is not difficult finding Williams and Sarahs; they are all over the records.

William married Sarah ---------- [last name unknown] around 1636 in Dorchester, Mass. There are Dorchester Mass. town records of him and his wife from this period including many of his children's births and the many offices he held in Dorchester Mass.. He moved to Northampton, Mass in 1659. There he was granted and bought about 110 acres of land, served as a deacon in the Northampton church, acted as county judge, officiated at marriages, settled boundary disputes, represented Northampton in the General Court in its sessions in Boston, built and owned part of a grist mill and lumber mill and led and helped train the town's militia. In his spare time he supported his church and neighbors, planted and harvested crops, helped start a lead mining company, built houses and mills, fortified a town, fought Indians, run an tavern that sold beer and ale and raised a family. After his helpmate Sarah ----- died in 1675 after almost 40 years of marriage, at the age of 68 he married the widow of Thomas Cooper (1616-1675), Sarah Slye Cooper (1620-1688), on 15 Nov 1676 in Northampton, Mass. William didn't even have to learn a new name for his new wife. Sarah [Cooper] Clarke died 8 May 1688 in Northampton, Mass. William died 19 Jul 1690 in Northampton, Mass and is buried in the Bridge Street Cemetery in Northampton, Mass.. alongside his wives and some of his children

The Sarah, that married William, has a unlisted last name in any known records and many people have "added" her to several different families--unfortunately, Sarah is such a common English first name of this period about 18% [!!] of females are named Sarah--only Mary which is the first name of 27% and Elizabeth which is the first name of 19% are used more often. A Sarah Strong was born 1613 in Chardstock, Dorsetshire, England but whether she ever immigrated or who she married is unknown. Her parents were Thomas STRONG and Joanna BAGGE. Thomas was the brother of Richard Strong who was their daughter-in-law Hannah’s father. That possibly makes Sarah’s grandfather, George STRONG (1556 – 1636) a possible double ancestor, or not. There is no known evidence that William Clarke married the Sarah Strong mentioned here--despite several people listing it as "truth", indeed one of the many Sarah Strongs related to the Strong family that is known to have emigrated to America is recorded as marrying someone else. William's son, John Clarke, married Mary Strong daughter of John Strong and Abigail Ford in the next generation again casting serious doubts on Sarah's last name being Strong.

The most likely versions of the arrival of William Clarke in the New England is recorded on one of the few ship passenger lists preserved from this era for the "Mary and John".: (See: Http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ladd/shiplist.htm)

A William Clarke is listed as leaving England on the ship ‘Mary and John’, which sailed from London on March 24, 1633, arriving in New England in June of that year. This is likely him; but because of the many William Clarkes running around New England then it may not be him. The family "tradition" of William arriving on the "Mary and John" may well be true just not the first voyage of 1630.

The first Sarah------- married to William in Dorchester MA about 1636 died on 6 Sept. 1675 in Northampton Mass and is buried at the Bridge Street Cemetery in Northampton Mass..

Children of William and Sarah -------- Clarke:

1. Sarah Clarke b. 21 Apr 1638 Dorchester, Suffolk County, Mass. d. 21 Jun 1638 Dorchester MA

2. Jonathan Clarke b. 1 Aug 1639 Dorchester d.1 Oct 1639 Dorchester MA

3. Nathaniel Clarke b. 27 Jan 1642 Dorchester; d. 30 Mar 1669 Northampton, Mass

       Md.: Mary Meekins b. 8 May 1663 Hatfield, Mass. 
    

4. Experience Clarke b. 30 Mar 1643 Dorchester MA d. young Dorchester MA

5. Increase Clarke b. 1 Mar 1646 Dorchester MA d. 24 Apr 1662 Northampton MA

6. Rebecca Clarke b.1 Mar 1648/49 Dorchester MA Md: Israel Rust 9 Dec 1669 of Hingham MA

       Rebecca  d. 8 Feb 1733 Northampton MA

7. Dec. John Clarke b. 1 May 1651 Dorchester Mass. d. 3 Sept 1704 Northampton MA

      Married [1] Rebecca Cooper (daughter of Sarah Slye Cooper) b. 15 May 1657; d. 8 May 1678
      Married [2] Mary Strong b. 26 Mar 1654 Northampton MA  d. 8 Dec 1738 Northampton MA

8. Samuel Clarke 16 Oct 1653 Dorchester Md. Elizabeth Edwards 1 Mar 1682 Northampton MA

      d. 5 Aug 1729 Northampton MA

9. Capt. William Clarke b. 3 Jul 1656 Dorchester MA d. 9 May 1725 Lebanon, CT

      Md: [1] Hannah Stronge b. 30 May 1659; Md: 15 Jul 1680; d. 31 Jan 1693/1694 Northampton MA
      Md: [2} Mary Smith b. 14 Mar 1662 Milford CT; d. 23 Apr 1748 Lebanon CT

10. Sarah Clarke b. 19 Mar 1659 Dorchester Md: Capt, John Parsons 23 Dec 1675 Northampton d. 15 Apr 1728 Northampton MA

[First names were often reused in this era--hence the two Sarahs. Records taken form "Lt William Clarke of Northampton Mass. through six generations"; Nyman, Edith (Clark) available on Film 7-102-2377 Salt Lake City Family Genealogy Library, SLC, UT]

Julian Dates

Dates before 1752 are Julian dates which by the then were 10-11 days ahead of the Gregorian calendar we use now. The English did NOT like the Pope who stated using the "correct" Gregorian calender that kept correct solar time so they continued to use the old Julian calendar till 1752. The Julian calendar was "almost correct its just that in 1500 years of use it had got a little out of whack with incorrect leap year corrections etc..

The Julian year stated on March 25th (near the spring equinox). January and February were the 11th and 12th months of the year. Dates from January to March are labeled Old Style (O.S.) and/or double dated (ex. Jan 1671/72) March is treated as the first month of the new year.

It is NOT recommended that dates be converted to "today's" dates as this can lead to much confusion with the records.

The Colonial first Name Problem

Some first names in this period are used over and over and over. By analyzing the names listed in James Savage's "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England before 1692" name frequency can be found. Similar results are gotten by other people examining name frequencies in England. Savages works, available in text format online, show about 63,000 male New England names 1620-1692 which were "counted" by combining all his volumes and using "search" editing software to count names found: John 26.8% Thomas 12.3% Samuel 7.8% William 6.6% Joseph 5.5% James 3.4% Richard 3.1% Benjamin 2.9% Nathaniel 2.8% Daniel 2.3% Charles 2.1% Robert 2.1% Edward 1.9% Henry 1.7% George 1.7% Stephen 1.2% Peter 1.1% David 1.0%

Women's first names found from 33,000 women's names. Mary 27.7% Elizabeth 18.4% Sarah 18.0% Anne 6.6% Rebecca 4.7% Martha 3.8% Susanna 3.4% Joan 2.4% Margaret 2.2% Jane 1.6% Dorothy 1.4% Alice 1.1% Judith 1.0%

The other name problem is the names of towns that are often named after English towns and often their names are repeated in adjacent states towns. Its very important to list where the town you are talking about is located.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

William Clarke's Life

The first documented record of Lt. William Clarke is found in Dorchester Church Records which shows that William Clarke and wife, Sarah, were confirmed as members of that church on August 23, 1636. In Dorchester he is sometimes called Sergeant Clarke apparently his rank in the Dorchester Militia. The births of their 10 children were all recorded in Dorchester MA. Town records of Dorchester show that William obtained about 8 acres of land at Squantum Neck from William Hill before February 23, 1638, because he sold an acre and a quarter on that date. He was elected Selectman (equivalent to today's town councilman) in Dorchester in 1645, 1647 and 1650. He was a ‘Rater’ (tax assessor) in 1651, 52, 55 and 57. In 1652-1653 he was one of four men appointed to lay out land for Augustine Clement and was elected " He was given the job of "fence viewer" in 1653, 56 and 58 to make sure everyone kept their fences in good condition. Escaping livestock could ruin crops. In his sojourn in Dorchester he apparently was a valued member of the community given many responsible jobs.

In May of 1653, Clarke was one of 24 petitioners to the MA General Court who desired to move to and settle "Nonotuck" (Northampton) Mass. a prospective town on the Connecticut River about 100 miles inland from Boston. They needed permission to purchase the land from the Indians. All except Clarke were from the original Dorchester Mass. settlers living then in or around Windsor CT. On October 3, 1653, the first meeting of the proprietors (prospective settlers) of Northampton was held at either Springfield Mass. or Hartford CT, and William Clarke attended and signed as a proprietor. However, he didn't move there immediately because in 1654 he was chosen as a “Boundsman” in Dorchester to lay out a way to the burial grounds and to determine the bounds (boundary) between Dorchester and Braintree Mass. In 1655, between Dorchester and Dedham; and in 1658 between Dorchester and Braintree and Dorchester and Roxbury. Also in 1658, he was on a committee to lay out land for Gamaleel Beaman, and in 1659, to lay out meadow lots and to survey land for a school. The committee later appointed John Capen to replace Clarke, who had moved to Northampton in 1659.

In 1659 Northampton was a frontier outpost of less than 200 inhabitants surrounded by Indians with two horse paths along the Connecticut River connecting it to Springfield MA and Hadley MA. In 1659 William and his family and a few others moved over 100 miles of wilderness to Northampton. The presumed route was the horse path that connected to Windsor CT then up the path near the Connecticut River on to Springfield and Northampton Mass. Reportedly, his wife rode on horseback with two baskets or panniers slung across the horse, carrying a boy in each basket (William Jr. 3 & Samuel 5) and the Infant Sarah on her lap, her husband, fifty years old, preceding on foot. This is method of travel is recorded as common in that era before roads. Presumably, their heavier goods would have gone by ship around Cape Cod and as far up the Connecticut River as they could make it (Windsor CT?). In Northampton, he was granted by the town councilmen who allocated land 12 acres on the West side of what is now Elm Street, bordering on the Mill River, and comprising today the northern half of what is today the campus of Smith College. In all he was granted and/or bought over 100 acres in the Northampton area. He bought land and helped settle Northfield MA and resettle it in 1682-1690 when it had to be rebuilt after abandonment during King Philip's War. In Northampton he built a log house where he lived until 1681, when it was burned, being set on fire by a negro, Jack, a servant of Samuel Wolcott, who took a brand of fire from the hearth and swung it up and down to “find victuals”. The new house built in its place remained standing until 1826.

All healthy men in colonial New England, with very few exceptions, were required to enlist in their town's militia. William was chosen Lieutenant of the first military company ever organized in Northampton, when that was the office of highest rank to which the company, on account of its small number of men (60) was entitled. As the senior officer he organized and led the annual training sessions and guided many of the drills. The militia held drills a few times a year but in reality they were only poorly trained "citizen soldiers" who had to furnish their own arms--mostly flintlocks by then. At the age of 67 during King Philip’s War (1675-1676) he took an active part in building up the defenses of Northampton as they built block houses (combined homes and forts) and a two mile palisade around the town. Additional men were recruited from other Connecticut River towns and a constant guard was maintained day and night during the two years of the war. Their guards warnings helped them survive several Indian attacks. William, at the same time, was a member of the military committee of the county that tried to build defenses for the towns and grow food crops for New England--the "restored monarchy" of Charles II was not interested in helping in any way the Puritans who had executed his father Charles I in the "English Civil War". The Redcoats were nowhere to be seen. At that time the Connecticut River valley with its extensive fields of crops was considered the "breadbasket" of New England. He supplied the commissary department that helped feed the troops to some extent during King Philip’s Indian War and the Legislature ordered the Treasurer to pay him in 1676 ‘thirty-eight pounds, eighteen shillings for “Porke and bisket” delivered to the country’s use’. King Phillip's War was an Indian war that erupted all over New England in which the Indians destroyed over 12 towns and damaged over 60 more. Casualties were heavy on both sides with the colonists losing over 500 men, women and children and the Indians many more. Because of their good organizations and high birth rates they buried their dead, paid all their war debts, rebuilt all the destroyed towns and many more in a few years as New England continued to grow rapidly. The New England Militias would show up again as "Minutemen" in the American Revolution only by then New England had grown to over 900,000 settlers and was the core that started and persevered to win the American Revolution (1775-1783).

After William's death a monument was erected in 1884 to his memory by his descendants. The old gravestone is still preserved. Spelling in the 17th and 18th century was haphazard and many last names had an "extra" e added to them. Lt. William spelled his last name Clarke as is demonstrated by his many surviving signatures, Exactly when his descendants dropped the 'Clarke' spelling is unknown and the records in this period often show both versions of the last name. His namesake-William Jr., who left Northampton about 1698 for Lebanon, CT, apparently kept the Clarke spelling in his family. Most of Capt. William Jr’s offspring continue this tradition for several generations before dropping the 'e'. Some Clark/Clarkes, to this day, never have dropped the Clarke spelling. William Clarke was the first citizen of Northampton to be elected as the Northampton Deputy to the General Court that governed New England, and was re-elected 14 times between 1663 and 1682. He was Associate Justice of county court for 26 years and served as judge on many important court cases including one case of witchcraft (she was acquitted). In 1662, he was authorized by the General Court to solemnize marriages, being the first person in that town to hold that responsible position. The Puritans of that time did not believe in church weddings. He was frequently appointed by the General Court to deal with Indians.

He helped to build the first grist mill and the first saw mill in Nothampton. He oversaw their rebuilding after they were destroyed during King Phillip's War by Indians.He was greatly interested in promoting the new settlement of Squakheag (Northfield) and is named as having served as town clerk at the second settlement of that place at the end of King Phillip's War, although there is no evidence that he ever lived there. Several times he was chosen commissioner, with others, to determine disputed boundaries between Northampton and neighboring towns. His home lot, one of the largest, covered the north half of the Smith College property. Tradition states that here he built a block house upon his lot which was used for refuge during the Indian troubles. In 1671, he was licensed to sell “wine, cider or liquor for a year”. He had large grants of land in the meadows and elsewhere and purchased many acres in different parts of the town. All his lands, embracing nearly two hundred acres, with the exception of 7 3/4 acres, he disposed of before his death to his sons, reserving to himself an annuity of 24 pounds.

William's first wife died in September 1675. William soon made the acquaintance of another Sarah. Sarah Slye Cooper was born in England around 1620. She was widow of Lt. Thomas Cooper (1616-1675). There is some contention about this Sarah’s heritage. Different sources say that she was the daughter of either George Slye or John Russell. After Lt. Thomas Cooper was killed in Springfield on October 5, 1675 during a Indian raid during King Phillip's War, Sarah and at least one daughter fled up the Connecticut River to the fortified town of Northampton. Sarah and Rebecah (sometimes spelled Rebecca--spelling often varied in this period) lived with Lt. Clarke and his family in Northampton (he was a widower at this time and had extra room and they were in the middle of a combat zone)--his first wife having died in Sept 1675. Lt. William Clarke married Sarah Slye Cooper on July 12, 1677--and his son Deacon John Clarke married Rebecah on the same day. John and Rebecah are listed as having one child, another Sarah Clark b. 20 Apr 1678, before Rebecah died 5 days later. Deacon John Clark married Mary Strong, daughter of Elder John Strong and Abigail Ford, on 20 March 1679 in part to help raise his new daughter. This Sarah married Zechariah Field. The unpublished Clark genealogy manuscript by genealogist Edith M. Clark Nyman (available at the Salt Lake Family History Library on film) states that Sarah, William's second wife, was the sister of William Russell of New Haven, which would mean she was the daughter of John Russell. There is some evidence that there were TWO Thomas Cooper’s in Springfield at the time of the Indian raid-both married to a Sarah. Sarah [Cooper] Clarke died 8 May 1688 in Northampton, Mass.

“The house of Lieut. William Clarke, situated very nearly on the ground now occupied by the main Smith College building, was burned on the night of July 14, 1681. It was built of logs, and Clarke and his wife were living in it at the time. A Negro, named Jack, set the house on fire. He confessed the deed and pretended that it was done accidentally, while he was searching for food, swinging a burning brand to light his way. Jack did not belong in town; he was a servant to Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield; and had already been before the courts for other misdemeanors.

In 1689 a "epidemic" is recorded as starting on Connecticut River towns and moving up the river as time progressed. The Northampton death roll of 1690 shows over 25 deaths including Lt. William Clarke who died 19 July 1690. He and his two wives are buried at Bridge St. cemetery in Northampton Mass. An inventory of his estate was held 13 Aug 1690 and came to 131 pounds 6 shillings and 9 pence. He had already given much of his estate to his family. His will was filed 23 Dec 1690 in Springfield, Hampshire Mass Probate Court..

[In the Genealogical and Family History of State of CT-Vol II, c. 1911 starting on page 652 ”Lt. William Clarke, immigrant ancestor, was mentioned--again this may just be conjecture since documented proof is not given.]

http://www.familytreesite.org/clarke.htm 

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/o/p/Sandra-Popiel/FILE/1166text.txt

--------------------

Other William Clarke writeups

ID: I04151

Name: William Clarke

Sex: M

Title: Lt.

Name: William Clarke

Birth: ABT 1609 in Dorsetshire, England

Death: 18 JUL 1690 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., Mass.

Note:

William Clarke departed England and arrived in America in the 1630's. (According to researcher Arlys LaFehr, " Lt. William probably did not come on the "Mary and John" in 1633/4. Quite a few ships came to Dorchester early on, but he is not on Spears' "Mary & John" list, nor is he mentioned that early by Savage or in "The Great Migration Begins." We just know that he had arrived by ca 1636 and became a freeman in 1639.") (According to Researcher Doneva Shepard, " Lt. William, immigrant, was born in Dorsetshire, England. Family tradition says that he came to New England in the ship "Mary and John," leaving Plymouth, England, March 30, 1630. His name also appears in the list of passengers in the "Mary and John" which sailed from London, March 24, 1633. Lt. William settled at Dorchester before 1635, where he was a prominent citizen, selectman, 1646-50.") He was one of the petitioners to settle in Northampton, Hampshire Co. and moved there in 1659. Lt. William's land compromises what is today the north half of the campus of Smith College. He built a log house which was later set ablaze in 1681 by a negro named Jack., a servant and slave of Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield, Hartford Co., CT., who was later found guilty and hanged for it. The new house, that was built in its place, remained standing until 1826. Lt. William organized in 1661 a train band of 60 men, which he commanded in King Philip's War. He also served as a selectman and a judge of the county court. In 1675, Mary Bliss Parsons was tried for witchcraft and Lt. William, among others, sat on the trial bench to decide her case. Lt. William was also the first person sanctioned to perform marriages in Northampton, Hampshire Co., MA. After his death, a monument was erected in his memory, in 1884, which today still exists.

[From Dave Clark's web site] William1 CLARKE Lt. (#128) was born in Dorsetshire, England 1609. William died 19 Jul 1690 Northampton, Hampshire, MA, at 81 years of age. His body was interred Jul 1690 Bridge St. Cemetery, Northampton, MA.

He married twice. He married Sarah ? in Dorchester, Suffolk, MA, abt 1635/36. (Sarah ? is #127.) Sarah was born in England about 1611/13. Sarah died 6 Sep 1675 Northampton, Hampshire, MA, at 63 years of age. Her body was interred Sep 1675 Bridge St. Cemetery, Northampton, MA. Little is known about Sarah, not even her surname, or exact date & place of birth. Since her husband, William Clarke, is first noted in the town of Dorchester in 1635, and apparently arrived there from England unmarried, virtually every unmarried Sarah in Dorchester at that time, has been suggested. I have seen Strong, Holton, Bolton, Lambert, Lumbert, Smith and too many more to mention. What I haven't seen is any positive proof for any of these. At present, all that is known of Sarah, is that she & William were admitted as Church members in Dorchester in 1636, resigned from that church to be admitted to the new church in Northampton, in 1666, that all of her children were born in Dorchester, and that she was a good and loving wife to William.

He married Sarah (Cooper) RUSSELL Northampton, Hampshire, MA, 15 Nov 1676. (Sarah (Cooper) RUSSELL is #1083.) Sarah was born in England about 1620. Sarah was the daughter of John RUSSELL. Sarah died 8 May 1688 Northampton, Hampshire, MA, at 67 years of age. Her body was interred May 1688 Bridge St. Cemetery, Northampton, MA. There is some contention about this Sarah's heritage. Different sources say that she was the daughter of either George Slye or John Russell. Either way, this Sarah was the wife of Lt. Thomas Cooper of Springfield. After he was killed there on Oct 5th, 1675 during the Indian raid, Sarah and at least one daughter fled to Northampton. Sarah & Rebecah lived with Lt. Clarke and his family (he was a widower at this time). Lt. Clarke married Sarah on 15 Nov 1676 in Northampton, and his son John married Rebecah on 12 July 1677.

The unpublished manuscript of Edith M. Clark Nyman states that Sarah was the sister of William Russell of New Haven, which now leads me to believe that she would have been the daughter of John Russell. There is some evidence that there were TWO Thomas Cooper's in Springfield at the time of the Indian raid - both married to a Sarah. The one who survived supposedly returned to the eastern part of the state, to Rehobeth, and lived a long life, with many children. His wife was Sarah Slye Cooper, daughter of George Slye.

For the present, we have at least three versions of the arrival of William Clarke in the New World:

Version 1 - he departed Plymouth, England on March 30, 1630 aboard the ship 'Mary and John' arriving in Nautucket (now called Hull) on May 30, 1630. He would have been 21 at that time. This is the version that appears in most family records, and the majority of published genealogies including Savage, Trumbull and others. Since there is no existing record of him in Dorchester until 1635, I believe that this version can be discounted.

Version 2 - William Clarke emigrated in 1630 aboard the ship 'William and Mary' in the company of Rev. Mister Warham of Plymouth, Dorsetshire, England. He settled first in Dorchester, Suffolk, Ma. prior to 1635, where he officiated as Townsman or Selectman from 1646 to 1653, removing to Northampton in 1659.

Version 3 - William Clarke left England on the ship 'Mary and John', which sailed from London on March 24, 1633/34, arriving in New England in June of that year.

This last version seems the most likely, even though it does not agree with "old family tradition". The port of embarkation also differs, although the ship may have made additional stops in other English ports before its final destination. THE 1633/4 PASSENGER LIST FOR THE "MARY & JOHN" A list and data concerning the passengers of the "Mary and John", a wooden sailing ship that left Southampton, England 24 March 1633/4. This data was made available from the "Mary and John" Clearing House, of Toledo, Ohio. It was printed in about 1986. Another list was published in the "Planters of the Commonwealth", by Charles E. Banks-1930. In it he states: "There has been some confusion between the passengers of the 'Mary and John' of 1630 and those who came in 1633/34 on a ship with the same name. The following list is being presented here to help clear up the situation and to help searchers by listing references on these people. " The 'Mary and John', with Robert Sayers, Master, sailed from Southampton, England, 24 March, 1633/4, but the time was not recorded. Among the passengers: #7. William CLARKE- Dorchester, Northampton, Massachusetts."

So far, I have learned this much - Most early crossings of ships from the west of England to Massachusetts were made under the auspices of the Church - what we now refer to as 'Puritans'. Considering William's long association with the Rev. Mister Richard Mather (and his son, Rev. Eleazer Mather) both in Dorchester and later in Northampton, we know that he too, was a Puritan. Most ships did not maintain passenger lists - the majority of lists that exist today were made up years after the fact to support claims of early settlers that 'I was here first', and are totally unreliable.

The first fully proven record of William Clarke is found in Dorchester Church Records, which show that William Clarke and wife, Sarah, were members of that church on 23 Aug 1636.

The births of their 10 children were all recorded in Dorchester. (A quick note here: Sarah has never been conclusively identified. "The Parsons Family" by Henry Parsons (1920) identifies her as Sarah Holton. William Holton of Hartford & Northampton came to New England in "The Francis", sailing from Ipswich in 1634. He had a sister, Sarah, who was baptized in Nayland, Suffolk, England, Parish of Holton St. Marys, but nothing more is known about her. Sarah was definitely NOT the daughter, or sister, of Elder John Strong, as has been written so often. Elder John DID have a niece named Sarah, but as far as is known she never left England.)

Town records of Dorchester show that William Clarke obtained about 8 acres of land at Squantum Neck from William Hill, sometime prior to 23 Feb 1638, because he sold an acre and a quarter on that date. On 20 Oct 1639 he sold the remaining 7 acres at 20s per acre. He was elected Selectman in Dorchester in 1645, 1647 and 1650. He was a 'Rater' (assessor) in 1651, 52, 55 and 57. In 1652-3 he was one of four men appointed to lay out land for Augustine Clement and was appointed Fence Viewer in 1653, 56, 58 and 59.

In 1689 a "epidemic" is recorded as starting on Connecticut River towns and moving up the river as time progressed. The Northampton death roll of 1690 shows over 25 deaths including Lt. William Clarke who died 19 July 1690. He and his two wives are buried at Bridge St. cemetery in Northampton Mass. An inventory of his estate was held 13 Aug 1690 and came to 131 pounds 6 shillings and 9 pence. He had already given much of his estate to his family. His will was filed 23 Dec 1690 in Springfield, Hampshire Mass Probate Court..ion, at the urging of Eleazer Mather, the son of Rev. Mather, of Dorchester. Eleazer had been hired by the town of Northampton to become their first minister, and had been given 186 1/2 acres of land to use to entice new settlers to the struggling community. Clarke was already listed as a proprieter, having been one of the original petitioners, but had resisted moving there. When he finally agreed to go to Northampton, he was granted the largest homelot (12 acres), plus additional land in the Manhan Meadows. Several other prominent men from Dorchester also went to Northampton at about the same time. Even after leaving Dorchester, Clarke still owned land there. He was assessed in 1671 for not keeping the fences of his old home lot in repair. He had left his house and six acres in care of John Capen. Both Clarke and his wife Sarah, apparently returned to Dorchester at least twice to sell property there, since their names appear on land transfer records in 1662 & 1672. The last transaction may have resulted due to a decision by the town council, taken in a meeting on October 5th, 1670. "The same day it was p'posed to the Towne whether they would haue William Clarks house and land and all accomodations in Dorchester purchased to ly for the vse of the minestry in dorchester and soe to continue for euer, and whether the towne will Engage to pay in specy as shalbe agreed with the said William Clarke, Further that if any pt or the whole shal be Changed for the bettering of the thing, or more Conueniency of any of it, yet the Chang shall be for the use of the ministry as aforesaid, and the Chang to be approued off by the Major pt of the town before it be Changed. The vote was in the Affermatiue."

At another town meeting, held on September 8th, 1662 - "The same day ensigne Capen and Wm Blake senr were apointed to speake to leift william Clarke and demand a barrell of powder of him or pay for that berrell which he sold out of the townes stock and made returne the 19 day of this Instant to the selectmen." (Clarke was by this time already residing in Northampton, and had been appointed Lieutenant of the train band there. Did he visit Dorchester and make off with a barrel of powder?)

By all accounts, William became a prominent citizen, both in Dorchester, and later in Northampton. I have located these references to him:

In 'Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut' - vol II, c. 1911 starting on page 652 - "Lt. William Clarke, immigrant ancestor, was born in Dorsetshire, England in 1609. Family tradition says he came to New England in the ship 'Mary and John', leaving Plymouth, England on March 30, 1630. The name of Williame Clarke also appears on the list of passengers in the 'Mary and John' which sailed from London March 24th 1633. He settled in Dorchester before 1635, where he became a prominent citizen, selectman, 1646-1653. In 1653 he was one of the petitioners to settle in Northampton, and he removed there in 1659. His wife rode on horseback with two baskets or panniers slung across the horse, carrying a boy in each basket and one on her lap, her husband, fifty years old, preceding on foot. He was granted twelve acres on the West side of what is now Elm Street, bordering on Mill river, and comprising today the North half of the campus of Smith College. He built a log house where he lived until 1681, when it was burned, being set on fire by a negro, Jack, a servant of Samuel Wolcott, who took a brand of fire from the hearth and swung it up and down to "find victuals". The new house built in its place remained standing until 1826. Lieutenant Clarke organized in 1661 a train band of sixty men, which he commanded in King Philips's War. He served as selectman twenty years, and was also a judge of the county court. He died at Northampton, July 18, 1690, and in 1884 a monument was erected to his memory by his descendants. The old gravestone is still preserved. He married (first) Sarah ?, who died May 6, 1675; (second) November 15, 1676, Sarah Cooper, who died May 6, 1688."

  • From The History of Northampton by J.R Trumbull p. 376-377 "Burning of William Clarke's House" The house of Lieut. William Clarke, situated very nearly on the ground now occupied by the main Smith College building, was burned on the night of July 14, 1681. It was built of logs, and Clarke and his wife were living in it at the time. A negro, named Jack, set the house on fire. He confessed the deed and pretended that it was done accidentally, while he was searching for food, swinging a burning brand to light his way. Jack did not belong in town; he was a servant to Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield; was a vicious character, a forerunner of the great army of tramps now everywhere wearying the patience of the public, and had already been before the courts for other misdemeanors. His object undoubtedly, was robbery, and it is not probable that he went about the house searching for food even, with a lighted pine torch in his hands. Very likely after stealing whatever he could lay his hands upon, he set the house on fire to conceal the robbery, or from spite against William Clarke, who was at this time 72 years of age.

Capture and Punishment of the Incendiary. Jack was arrested in Brookfield or Springfield, and was brought before the court in Boston, where he plead not guilty. When his confession was read to him, however, he acknowledged it, and the jury brought in a verdict of guilty. The court believed his confession as to setting the house on fire, but did not credit his statement that it was done carelessly. He was sentenced to be "hanged by the neck till he be dead and then taken down and burnt to ashes in the fire with Maria, the negro". Maria was under sentence of death for burning the houses of Thomas Swan, and of her master, Joshua Lamb, in Roxbury. She was burned alive. Both of these negroes were slaves. Why the body of Jack was burned is not known.

(note 1): Many slaves were burned alive in New York and New Jersey, and in the southern colonies, but few in Massachusetts.

(note 2): Tradition has handed down the following items concerning the burning of Clarke's house: The negro fastened the door on the outside so that no one could escape, and set the fire on the outside. William Clarke injured his hands considerably (pounded them, it is said) in his endeavor to escape, and his wife was somewhat burned. John Clarke, grandson of William, a little more than a year old, was brought out of the house and laid beside the fence. There was powder in one of the chambers, and when it exploded the ridge pole was blown across the road, and one end forced into the ground. The negro had taken offense at something William Clarke had done in his official capacity, and set the fire in a spirit of revenge. He was discovered either at Brookfield, Springfield, or near New Haven, and identified by means of a jack-knife in his possession that belonged to the Clarkes.

(The above notes are from Trumbull, and should be taken in the context of a late 19th century writer.)

One last item that will hopefully clear up some confusion - although Lt. William spelled his last name CLARKE, only one of his children continued to do so after his death. That was his namesake - William Jr., who left Northampton about 1698 for Lebanon, CT. Most of William Jr.'s offspring continued this tradition for several generations before dropping the 'E'. Some, to this day, never have.

References: "The Waterman Family", by E.F. Waterman. 1639-1954. 3 volumes. TAG (The American Genealogist) 12:255. "Descendants of Lt. William Clark of Northampton-1952": Colket Pg 67. Savage 1:404: Pope Pg 104: "History of Northampton from its Founding in 1654" by J.R. Trumbull "Dorchester Town Records"

In 'History of Northampton Massachusetts From Its Settlement in 1654' by James Russell Trumbull - Printed in Northampton in 1898 He was one of the early settlers of Northampton, arriving 1659. Townsman 20 times; He was the first citizen of Northampton to be elected deputy to the General Court, and 14 times between 1663 and 1682 was elected to that office, although not consecutively. He was Associate Justice of county court for 26 years; In 1662, he was authorized by the General Court to solemnize marriages, being the first person in that town to hold that responsible position. Frequently appointed by the Court to deal with Indians. He was chosen Lieutenant of the first military company ever organized here, when that was the office of highest rank to which the company, on account of its small number of men was entitled, and was in active service during King Philip's War and was at the same time a member of the military committee of the county. He supplied the commissary department to some extent during King Philip's Indian War and the Legislature ordered the Treasurer to pay him in 1676 'thirty-eight pounds, eighteen shillings for "Porke and bisket" delivered to the countrys use'. He helped to build the first grist mill and the first saw mill in the town. He was greatly interested in promoting the new settlement of Squakheag (Northfield) and is named as having served as town clerk at the second settlement of that place, although there is no evidence that he ever lived there. Several times he was chosen commissioner, with others, to determine disputed boundaries between Northampton and neighboring towns. His home lot, one of the largest, covered the north half of the Smith College property. Tradition states that here he built a block house upon this lot which was used for refuge during the Indian troubles. His dwelling house was burned in 1681, having been set on fire by a negro, as he averred in search of food. * In 1671, he was licensed to sell "wine, cider or liquor for a year". He had large grants of land in the meadows and elsewhere and purchased many acres in different parts of the town. All his lands, embracing nearly two hundred acres, with the exception of 7 3/4 acres, he disposed of before his death to his sons, reserving to himself an annuity of 24 pounds. There are no records remaining by which to judge of his private life and character. Only through the public duties he was called upon to perform can any estimate of him as a man and a citizen be reached. He was a hard worker, a pioneer in the best sense of the term. Enduring hardship with cheerfulness, meeting difficulty half way, conquering oftener than conquered, he stands one of the most prominent amoung the promoters of the plantation. Founder of a numerous family that has had worthy representitives during the entire history of the town, and whose descendants are scattered throughout the land, his name is honored and respected wherever it is found.

The will of William Clarke was probated 30 Sep 1690 at Northampton. He made bequeathments to sons John, Samuel and William. Also to daughters Rebecca and Sarah; to Mary and Sarah, daughters of son Nathaniel.

[The following info. comes from researcher Gordon Fisher's World Connect Site at Rootsweb. site. His e-mail is gfisher@shentel.net]

In a table titled "The Northampton Oligarchy, 1661-1669" in *Solomon Stoddard* by Ralph J Coffman, Boston (Twayne) 1978, p 192, the occupation of William CLARK (or CLARKE) is given as miller and innkeeper.

rom the same, p 52: (P) From Lancashire County, England, came a group of emigrants apparently associated with the Reverend Richard Mather in Dorchester, Massachusetts, before migrating further in New England. Richard Mather, who went down to Oxford in 1618 but never graduated, was therewith John White and John Maverick and William Parsons. Oxford was, perhaps, a center of moderate Puritanism at the time. Richard Mather arrived in the new Dorchester in 1636, just as John Warham was migrating to Windsor, Connecticut. Mather and His Lancashire men were denied permission to form a church by Thomas Shepard, John Cotton, and Governor Winthrop, on the grounds that they could not give adequate evidence of their spiritual condition. (P) The Lancashire men who accompanied Mather to Dorchester displayed a restiveness which may have been in part due to this religious difference of opinion. Thus, William Clark, Jr., son of a tailor of Cockerhsam who was baptized February 20, 1616, emigrated in the *Mary and John* in 1633 to Dorchester. He was not awarded land immediately nor did he become a church member, although he did hold the selectman post illegally for two terms, reflecting Mather's moderate Congregational laxity in enforcing Massachusetts law. He married Sarah in 1636, and by the time their ninth child was born in 1659, Northampton looked to be the last chance he had of becoming accepted as a full citizen in New England, even though it was an outpost. He moved to Northampton in1659, never to return to Dorchester. As he predicted, he became a leader in the new town."

From same, p 61: " ... William Clark, another pillar [of the Northampton Congregational church], and his wife, both members, witnessed their children John, Samuel, Rebecca and William take the oath. Only Rebecca and John, the two elder children, would become full members."

From same, p 62: "On April 22, 1672, Samuel Bartlett, a farmer, had married James Bridgman's daughter, Mary. Bartlett was a second generation Half-Way [a Congregationalist "covenant"] memberm whose father Robert was a moderately wealthy farmer who refused to give his son and land outright. ..... Town gossip probaly caused Mary's father, James Bridgman, to defend his daughter by accusing Mary Parsons, the daughter of his rival oligarchic leader, Joseph Parsons, of witchcraft, and he was eagerly joined by other Half-Way members. On September 19, 1674, Mary Parsons voluntarily appeared before the Hampshire County Court to clear herself from Accusations ..... Within a month Mary Bartlett died in childbirth and Bridgman charged "that she died by some unusual means, viz., by means of some evil instrument," namely, by Mary Parson's black magic. Bridgman accused Mary of witchcraft and on January 4, 1675, at the Northampton Inferior Court, an examination of Mary's body for signs of the devil was ordered by the town's leading men, John Pynchon, Henry Clark, William Clark and David Wilton. (P) The examiner was, of course, the minister, Solomon Stoddard [q.v.], and he performed his duty without incident, recommending that Mary Parons be secured to trial by the Court of Assistants in Boston with a bail set at L50. Once the Assistants received Stoddard's evidences they immediately indicted Mary on suspicion of witchcraft -- Stoddard had obviously found possible marks of the devil on her person. However, her trial on May13, 1675, was speedy: she was found not guilty by a jury of twelve Bostonians. It is noteworthy that this case of witchcraft in Northampton did not elicit any public response from Stoddard. Although he apparently was enlisted in the investigation to discover the marks of Satan, he did not become a vociferous champion of witch-hunting."

[The following info. on Lt. William Clarke came from the Rootsweb site of Donald (Roy) Clay. His e-mail is dclay24@home.com]

REFN: 996 [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #1377, Date of Import: Feb 10, 2000]

Lt. William Clark was usually referred to as "Clarke". The first proven record of him is found in Dorchester Church Records which show that William Clarke and his wife, Sarah, were members of that Church on Aug. 23, 1636. The births of their ten children, the first on June 21, 1638, were recorded in Dorchester. He was elected a Selectman in Dorchester, then a "Rator" (Assessor"), then a Fence Viewer in the years from 1645 to 1658. In May 1653, William Clarke was one of twenty-four petitioners to the Massachusetts General Court who desired to inhabit "Nonotuck" (Northampton). On Oct. 3, 1653, the first meeting for the proprietors for Northampton was held at either Springfield or Hartford and "william Clark" attended and signed as a proprietor. However, he apparently didn't move there at once because of his duties in Dorchester.

In 1659, Northampton was a frontier outpost of about 200 inhabitants with two horse paths going into it- one to Springfield and one to Hadley. Worcester County was still a wilderness so the settlement was surrounded by Indians, except for the group at Springfield to the south. In June of 1659, Rev. Eleazar Mather arrived to be the first minister. Six men emigrated to Northampton at the suggestion of Mr. Mather. William Clarke, John Strong, Aaron Cook, David Wilton, Henry Cunliffe and Henry Woodward brought new life and energy to the feeble town. William and Sarah Clarke sold their land in Dorchester and were granted a 12 acre lot, 55 or 60 acres in three lots and a 15 acre lot in Northampton. A total of 110 acres were granted to him by the town of Northampton. At the organization of a train band, or company of militia, of 60 men, William Clarke was chosen the highest officer, viz: Lieutenant. Hampshire County was established 7 May 1662 and Lt. Clarke was one chosen to confer with Springfield and Hadley to name the new county. For 26 years he acted as an associate Justice of the County Court.

In 1675, Mary Bliss Parsons was tried for witchcraft and Lt. Clarke, among others, sat on the trial bench to decide her case. The same year, Lt. Clarke served actively in King Phillip's War. Western Massachusetts suffered during the Indian Wars until well after 1750 but especially during the period when Lt. Clarke was active. Much sickness prevailed throughout Connecticut in 1689 and the epidemic found its way up the river. Twenty-five are recorded on the death roll of Northampton, including Lt. William Clarke who died of this ailment in July of 1690. He is buried in the Bridge St. Cemetery in Northampton.

In 1884, his descendants from all sections of the country erected a granite monument in his memory.

Lt. William Clarke and his Descendants; Edith M. (Clark) Nyman

One researcher wonders if Lt. William Clarke's parents were William Clarke and Margaret Hadlock. William and Margaret had 7 children, and they were the following, Joane, William, Margaret, Elizabeth, Miles, Lydia and Hanna. It is believed by this researcher that Lt. William was from Great Bromley, Essex, England. Also, this researcher had Sarah Holton as Lt. William's spouse, one of the known possibles. Thus, if this is the case, Lt. William would be a Jr. and his son William would be the III, etc.

Marriage 1 Sarah b: ABT 1611 in England

Married: ABT 1636

Children

Sarah Clark b: 21 JUN 1638 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
Jonathan Clark b: 10 OCT 1639 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
Nathaniel Clark b: 27 JAN 1641 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
Experience Clark b: 30 MAR 1643 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass.
Increase Clark b: 1 MAR 1646 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
Rebecca Clark b: 1649 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass.
John Clark b: 1 MAY 1651 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
Samuel Clark b: 23 OCT 1653 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
William Clarke b: 3 JUL 1656 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
Sarah Clark b: 19 MAR 1659 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.

Marriage 2 Sarah (Mary) Slye Cooper

Married: 1676

-------------------- From: Lorretta Sinclair <zinclair@netsense.net>

Subject: Re: Jeremiah Clark, b c1605

Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1999 21:56:55 -0400

Joe, You are right....serves me right to try & do anything from memory. Sat down last night w/few books I was *supposed* to be packing. Francis m Jeremiah Clarke III. 4 of children were Dungans & kept Dungan name. I have quite a bit of info on some Dungan children & grdchildren & somewhere in my boxes is will/synopsis for Jeremiah Clarke. I do not see anything on children Rick listed in the Bucks Co info that I have out. I do have plenty on Dungan children being & staying in Bucks Co. Jeremiah Clarke, d Jan 1652; settled 1st at Portsmouth, RI in 1638,

then at Newport in 1640 (Note: this is only few mi apart on Aquidneck Island). He was Treas of RI 1647-1649; acting Gov of colony in 1648; m Frances Latham; his ch were Walter, Jeremiah, Latham, Weston, James, Frances, Mary, & Sarah.

Rick...it would seem to me that considering Jeremiah had few prominent roles here in RI, I should be able to find much more on him. When I get settled, I will look. It has been few yrs since I went thru RI Clarke info since I couldn't tie anything together. As I look at what info is not yet packed, I am wondering if I only traced Dungan children (step children of Jeremiah Clarke) to Bucks Co. & not Clarke children. Unfortunately, I won't be able to do much more until I move. In books I have yet to pack I found:

1) Emigrants to RI (since we know Jeremiah Clarke & Frances Latham settled there, I checked for other Clarke's as well)

Carew Clark emigrated to Newport, RI from Westhorpe, Suffolk, Eng in or prior to 1650

Jeremy Clarke emigrated to New Eng from Bromfield, Essex, Eng in or prior to 1650

Jeremy Clark emigrated to Newport, RI from East Farleigh, Kent, Eng, in or prior to 1650

John Clarke emigrated to Newport, RI from Westhorpe, Suffolk, Eng in or prior to 1650, physician, b 8 Oct 1609, d 20 Apr 1676, b in Bedfordshire, Eng; emigrated to Boston Nov 1637; later settled in Newport, RI. Treas of Colony of RI; Deputy Gov of United Colonies of RI & Providence.

Joseph Clarke b 11 Feb 1642, d 11 Jan 1727; lived in both Newport & Westerly, RI; lrg land owner & active in civic affairs; town clerk for 30 yrs ending 1700; deputy to Genl Assembly for 6 yrs bet 1698 & 1708; m1 Bethiah Hubbard, m2 to Hannah Weeden Peckham; his ch were Judith, Joseph, Samuel, John, Bethiah, Mary, Susanna, Thomas, & William.

Joseph Clarke b 9 Dec 1619, d 1 Jun 1694; b Westhorpe,

Suffolk, Eng; emigrated to Newport, RI in 1639; admitted freeman in 1641; mbr of Genl Crt in 1648; commissioner for 4 yrs; Asst Gov for 10 yrs bet 1658 & 1690; deputy to Genl Assembly, 1668, 1672, & 1690; 1st wife's name unk, m2 Margaret; his ch: were Joseph, John, William, Joshua, Sarah, Susannah, Thomas, Carew, Elizabeth & Mary.

Thomas Clarke emigrated to Newport, RI from Westhorpe, Suffolk, Eng, in or prior to 1650.

Walter Clarke b 1640, d 23 May 1714; gov of RI 1676-1677, also in 1686, 1697 & 1698; deputy-gov for 21 yrs, 1679-1686, & from 1700-1714; m Hannah Scott; had dtr Hannah.

2) Llooked up what I have on Clarks in Rev including those who proved Patriotic Service for RI

Caleb Clark b 5 Sep 1764 d 1847; m Susannah Wilson; private in RI unit

Cornelius Clark b c1723 d 24 Mar 1791 m Patience Carter; armorer in RI unit

Eleazer Clark; b 1756 d 27 Jun 1842 m Sibil Reynolds; private in RI unit

Elisha Clark b 17 Nov 1718, d 21 Aug 1796; m Mary Potter; private in RI unit

Elisha Clark b 1738 d 11785; m Desire Gardiner; private in RI unit

Ethan Clark; b 7 Mar 1745 d 1833 m Anna Ward; Capt in RI Reg 28 Jun to Dec 1775

George Clark; b 1755, d 22 Sept 1831; m Keturah Maxson; private in RI unit

Gideon Clark; b 15 Oct 1738, d 4 Apr 1817; m Eunice Browning; civil svc in RI

James Clark b 22 Jan 1752, d 20 Jan 1815 m1 Barbara Tillinghast, m2 Hanna; sergeant in RI unit

Jeremiah Clark b 3 May 1734, d 12 Sep 1815 m Sarah Wanton, Lt in RI unit

Jeremiah Clark b 14 Sept 1740, d Jun 1783 m Elizabeth Howland, did patriotic svc in RI

Jeremiah Clark b 15 Jul 1760, d 15 Jan 1846, m Margaret Ritchie, private in Pa unit

John Clark Jr, b 4 Aug 1734, d 9 Apr 1798; m1 Mercy Case, m2 Mary Peckham; private in RI unit

John Clark, b 8 Jul 1738, d 22 Feb 1836; m Sarah Gardner; Capt RI unit

Joseph Clark b 6 Oct 1728, d 6 May 1793; m to Deborah Pendleton; Capt & did patriotic svc in RI

Joseph Clark, b 1735, d 8 May 1822-23 m Dorcas Helme Sheffield, soldier in RI unit

Joseph Clark, b 5 Mar 1728, d aft 1790; m Hannah Perry; civil svc in RI

Joshua Clark; b 19 Feb 1749, d 7 Jul 1796; m Elizabeth Dodge; private in RI

Joshua Clark b 20 Jun 1759, d 15 Dec 1842, m Wealtha Stillman; private in RI

Nathan Clark b 9 May 1756, d aft Aug 1832; m Sarah Maxson; private in both MA & RI units

Oliver Clark; b 21 Nov 1743, d aft 1797; m1 Mary Wells, m2 Louise Babcock; 1st Lt of 1st RI 3 May-Dec 1775; Capt 9th Continental Infantry 1 Jan-31 Dec 1776; Capt 1st RI 11 Feb 1777; taken prisoner at Ft Mercer 22 Oct 1777

Paul Clark b 3 Jan 1757, d 9 Aug 1850; m Elizabeth Wright; sergeant RI unit

Phineas Clark, b 23 Feb 1740, d 6 Nov 1793; m Mary Babcock; private RI

Samuel Clark b 10 Nov 1754, d 15 Oct1780; m Martha Curtis; major in RI

Samuel Clark; b 1719, d 20 Aug 1783, m1 Rachel; m2 Mrs Elizabeth (Barney) Streeter; private in RI

Samuel Clark; b 11 Dec 1754, d 13 Feb 1830; m Chloe Maxon; sergeant major in RI

Simeon Clark Jr b 22 Aug 1742, d aft 1786; m Hannah Champlin; Capt & did civil svc in RI

Stephen Clark b 13 May 1753, d 17 May 1810 m Susanna Potter; private in RI

Thomas Clark b 7 Aug 1743, d 20 Apr 1813; m Sarah Case; major in RI Militia 1778

Thoms Clark; b 1752, d 14 Jan 1830 m Fanny Brown; private in RI

Walter Clark b 1738, d 6 Apr 1822 m Abigail Philips; Capt in RI

William Calrk Sr b 25 Dec 1757, d 11 Jun 1827 m Mary Gardner; private in RI

2) sce: History of Bucks Co by Davis, pg 207

Dungan Family. Rev Thomas Dungan, ggrdfather of John

Dungan mentioned in preceding sketch, b London, Eng, c1632. His father, William Dungan, was merchant of London, & was of cadet branch of Dungans of Dublin, Ire, enobled by Queen Elizabeth. Senior branch ended under following circumstances:

William Dungan, Earl of Limerick, d 1698, w/out leaving issue, in consequence of death of his son, Lord Walter Dungan, Col of Dragoons at Boyne, in 1690. Title of Earl of Limerick then came to Col Thomas Dungan, bro of Earl of Limerick. Thomas, under will of his father, Sir John Dungan, baronet, inherited estate in Queen's Co, & served in army of Louis XIV til 1678 as Col of Irish regiment, worth to him abt 5,000 lbs/annum. He had from

Charles II life pension of 500 lbs/yr, was made Lt-Gov of

Tangier, in Morocco, & subsequently gov of NY in Am. The title of Earl of Limerick ceased in Dungan family on death of Col Thomas Dungan Dec 1715, he leaving no heirs. William Dungan d London 1636, leaving 4 children, Barbara, William, Frances & Thomas. Mother of Rev Thomas Dungan was Frances Latham, dtr of Lewis Latham, Sgt falconer to Charles I. She had m1 Lord Weston, m2 William Dungan, & soon aft latter's death, m3 Capt Jeremiah Clarke, & w/him & her children

emigrated to New Eng & settled in Newport, RI, where

Capt Clarke became prominent, serving in provincial assembly & filling other official positions. He d 1651, & his widow m4 Rev William Vaughan, pastor of 1st Baptist Church in Am. Mrs Vaughan d Sep 1677 at age 67 yrs.

Thomas Dungan came to Newport, RI in 1637, w/mother & stepfather, Capt Clarke, & was reared & educated in that colony, prob receiving his education in school established there by Roger Williams. His 2nd stepfather (Vaughan) being Baptist clergyman he imbibed that

faith & became eminent Baptist preacher. He was representative in Colonial Assembly of RI, 1678-81 & Sgt in Newport militia. He became 1 of patentees of East Greenwich, RI, but sold his real estate there in 1682 & removed w/colony of Welsh Baptists from RI to

Cold Spring Falls Twp, Bucks Co, & established 1st Baptist Church in PA. He d 1688. He m Newport, RI, Elizabeth Weaver, dtr of Sgt Clement & Mary (Freeborn) Weaver. Clement Weaver was mbr of Colonial Assembly in 1678, & his f-in-law, William Freeborn served in same body in 1657. Elizabeth (Weaver) Dungan, d at Cold Spring, Bucks Co 1690. Children of Rev Thomas &

Elizabeth (Weaver) Dungan were as follows:

Wiliam b 1658 preceded his father to Bucks Co, d there in 1713, m Deborah Wing of Newport & left 5 children

Clement, d in Northampton Twp, Bucks Co in 1732, w/out issue

Elizabeth, m Nathanial West, had 4 ch, 1 of whom Elizabeth, m Joseph Hough of Warwick, & has numerous descendants in Bucks

Thomas, b c1670, d Jun 23, 1759, m Mary Drake, had 9 ch, viz; Thomas, Joseph, James, John, Jonathan, Elizabeth, Mary & Sarah

Rebecca m Edward Doyle, who d 1703, leaving sons Edward & Clement

Jeremiah, b c1673, d Bucks Co, 6 Apr 1766 m Deborah Drake, had 8 ch

Mary, m fnu Richards, had 3 ch

John d w/out issue

Sarah, m James Carrel, had 6 ch.

Have more info on Dungans in Bucks Co, including few more bios, tax records & some (1800's) marriage records.....

Biographies on Wallace; John b 1753, d 22 Mar 1798; Colonel Thomas Dungan 1710, d 1785 & their families. If anyone wants it, please let me know.

Rick wrote:

I have subject Jeremiah Clarke b c1605 London, Eng, d Jan 1651/52, son of William & Mary (Weston)

Clarke. I show he m Frances Latham, dtr of Lewis Latham c1637, prob in RI. Jeremiah & Frances had

at least 7 children bet c1638 & 1651. Children are:

Walter b c1638, d May 23 1714

Mary b c1641, d Apr 7 1711, m John Cranston

Jeremiah b c1643, d Jan 16 1728/39, m Ann Audley

Latham b c1645, d Aug 1 1719, m Hannah Wilbur

Weston b Apr 5 1648, m Mary Easton

James b c1649, d Dec 1 1736, m Hope Power

Sarah b c1651, m John Pinner

At 09:09 PM 10/14/99 -0400, Joseph A Arlt wrote:

Hi. For Frances, I have: Dtr of Lewis Latham.... widow of William Dungan & m3 William Vaughn....

Which seems to say she m1 William Dungan & m2 Jeremiah Clark.

Loretta: Do you have dates when she was in Bucks Co, PA?

From Joe ARLT........joearlt@juno.com......CLARK Clearing House...

Compulsive Genealogy Searcher, NEW YORK,

ARLT, CLARK, COSTELLO, COVERT, FALANGA,

GUIDETTI, HIGGINS, KONEN, PARISI, TOMPKINS,

& WAGNER

On Thu, 14 Oct 1999 12:37:38 -0400 Lorretta Sinclair

<zinclair@netsense.net> writes:

Rick, I ran across this family while hunting for info on my own Jeremiah Clark b 1760, d 1845 m Margaret Ritchey in Bucks Co, PA. Your Jeremiah Clark Sr d, Frances m2 Dungan & moved to Bucks Co, PA. I have info on this family, but am in middle of a move. Will try & dig thru some papers in next few wks, though bulk of my research is in storage until Dec. (being a gen addict, I had to keep some stuff out). I do know family moved to PA, then moved back when Dungan d. You are right abt them being from RI. Also....we just moved from CA to

RI, so once we are settled, I am really willing to try & find more info on this family if you want. Pretty sure I have Dungan's will, stating all children of Jeremiah Clark Sr. Sorry can't be of more help right now, but I'll work on it.

Sincerely, Lorretta Sinclair

From: Walter Harwood <harwood@loxinfo.co.th>

To: CLARKE-L@rootsweb.com

Message-ID: <3803E86F.446DEB52@loxinfo.co.th>

Subject: Clarke, Jeremiah; b c1605; London, Eng

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Good morning to Clarke list mbrs,

I have subject Jeremiah Clarke b c1605 in London,

Eng, d Jan 1651/52, son of William & Mary (Weston)

Clarke. I show he m Frances Latham, dtr of Lewis Latham c1637, prob RI. Jeremiah & Frances had at least 7 children bet c1638 & 1651. Children are:

Walter b c1638, d May 23 1714

Mary b c1641, d Apr 7 1711, m John Cranston

Jeremiah b c1643, d Jan 16 1728/39, m Ann Audley

Latham b c1645, d Aug 1 1719, m Hannah Wilbur

Weston b Apr 5 1648, m Mary Easton

James b c1649, d Dec 1 1736, m Hope Power

Sarah b c1651, m John Pinner

If anyone on list has info they are willing to share on this family, it would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Rick in Thailand -------------------- Had 10 children;

Lt. William Clark was a selectman of Dorchester 1646-1647. Removed to Northampton in 1659. Representative in General Court in 1663 and 13 years in addition, but not consecutively. He was a Lieutenant of a military company in King Philip's War. One of the Justices of County Court appointed to try small cases. Selectman of Northampton about 20 years in all.

Children: Sarah... died early. b) 06.21.38 Jonathan b) 10.01.1639 Nathaniel b. 01.27.1642 m): Mary Meakins in 1663 Experience b. 03.30.1643 died young Increase b. 03.01.1646 died at age 16 Rebecca b. 10.1648 m) Israel Rust 1669 John b. 1651 m) Mary Strong 20 March 1679 died 03 SEPTEMBER 1704 Samuel, Capt .b. 10.23.1653 m) Elizabeth Edwards 1682 d) 05 August 1729 William b. 07.03.1656 m) Hannah Strong 1680 Sarah b. 03.1659 m) John Parsons 1675

notes from Ethel Stanton

This is the information I collected about Lt. William Clarke, of Northampton

Genealogical and personal memoirs ... - Google Books CUTTER page 1318

William Clark (1609-1690), Nantticket, Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1630, Dorchester, 1636, Northampton, 1659, is the progenitor of the Clarks of Western Massachusetts and Connecticut and has numerous descendants in the far west. I) William Clark, immigrant, was born in Dorsetshire, England, in 1609. Family tradition has it that he sailed from Plymouth, England, March 30, 1630, in the ship "Mary and John," in company with Mr. Maverick. Mr. Warham and their company, arriving at Nantucket, May 30. 1630. and after looking a while, decided to settle in Dorchester. In the list of passengers who took oathes of supremacy and allegiance to pass for New England in the 'Mary and John' of London, Robert Sayres, master, March 24, 1633," the name of William Clark appears.

There were three other Clarks, Bray, Joseph and Thomas, among the first settlers of Dorchester, whose memory is preserved by the following couplet upon their gravestone: "Here lie three Clerks, their accounts are even, Entered on Earth, Carried to Heaven." William Clark, settled in Dorchester previous to 1635, one year before Mr. Norham with a great part of his church removed to Windsor in Connecticut.

William Clark was a prominent citizen of Dorchester, being made a selectman in 1646 and serving continuously up to 1650.

In 1653 he was one of the petitioners to the general court of the Massachusetts Bay for permission to settle in the "New Country" in the Connecticut Valley and he removed his family to Northampton in 1659, somewhat in this way: His wife rode on horseback with two panniers across the horse behind the saddle on which she rode. In each pannier she carried a boy and the third she carried on her lap while her husband, then fifty-three years of age, preceded her on foot and designating the trail through the forests.

He had been named by Eleazor Mather, son of Mr. Richard Mather, the settled minister at Dorchester, who was preaching in Northampton on probation, to the town authorities as a proper person to receive a grant of land on condition he would come with his family and dwell in the town. Henry Woodward and Henry Gortiff were the other two who accepted the invitation, and January 1, 1659, a committee was appointed to locate the grant. William Clark was allotted twelve acres on the west side of the road now Elm street and bordering on Mill river. He erected a log house on the land in 1659 and occupied it with his family up to 1681, when the house burned down.

With the incident of this fire a sad picture is presented by a local historian: "Jack, a negro servant of Samuel Wolcott of \Wethersfield, set fire to the house of Lieutenant William Clarke by taking a brand of fire from his hearth and swinging it up and down for to find victuals, and was sentenced to be taken from the bar of justice to the place whence he came and then to be hanged by the neck till he be dead and then to be taken down and burnt to ashes on the fire. He confessed that he did it, and did it in carelessness and the law had its course.

The new house erected by Lieutenant Clark in 1681 remained a landmark of historic interest in Northampton until 1826. He took a dismission from the church in Dorchester in April, 1661, and on June 18, was one of the seven incorporators of the first church in Northampton, and Mr. Mather was ordained minister. He served as selectman of the town fcr twenty years, and also served as judge of the county courts.

He gained his military title from having been elected lieutenant of the train band in August, 1661, and he commanded the company in the King Philip and other Indian wars.

His first wife, Sarah, died September 6, 1675, after having given birth to ten children, nine in Dorchester and Sara, the youngest, in Northampton, the same year of the arrival of the family after the tiresome journey through the wilderness.

Lieutenant William Clark married (second) Sarah Cooper. November 15, 1676, and she died childless. May 6, 1688. Lieutenant William Clark died in Northampton, July 19, 1690, and an ancient gravestone marks his grave in the cemetery at Northampton inscribed: "Lieuten William Clarke Aged 81 years. He died July 19 ano 1690."

His descendants in 1884 erected a monument inscribed "Lieutenant William Clark died July 19, 1690, aged eighty-one years. Erected by his descendants 1884." The children of Lieutenant William and Sarah Clark were: i. Sarah, June 21, 1638, died young. 2. Jonathan, October I, 1639, died young. 3. Nathaniel, January 27, 1642, married Mary Meekins, of Hatfield, May 8, 1663. 4. Experience, March 30, 1643, died young. 5. Increase, baptized March, 1646, died probably 1662. 6. Rebecca, 1648, married Israel Rust. 7. John, ((]. v.) 1651. 8. Samuel, baptized October 23, *653- 9- William, July 3, 1656, married and removed to Connecticut, where he had a numerous family. 10. Sarah, March 14, 1659, married John Parsons, December 3, 1675.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The Settler in Dorchester, Suffolk, MA

SOURCES 1) James Savage Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England 2) Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut, Vol. II 3) Barbour's Index to the Vital Records of CT 4) Clark, Dave- CLARKE of Northampton web pages 5) New England Families Genealogical and Memorial, Vol. I

William Clarke/Mary Smith

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~stuw/fam04197.htm

Stu Wilson, Compiler ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/o/p/Sandra-Popiel/FILE...

WILLIAM1 CLARK was born 1609 in England, and died 19 Jul 1690 in Northampton, Massachusetts. He married (1) SARAH STRONG Abt. 1637, daughter of RICHARD STRONG and ELEANOR DEANE. She died 06 Sep 1675. He married (2) SARAH 15 Nov 1676. She died 06 May 1688.

Notes for WILLIAM CLARK: --Lieutenant --settled in Dorchester, Mass. as early as 1638. --lived to be 81 years --had nine or ten children--came to New England in the ship "William and John," which left Plymouth, England, 30 March 1630; settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts before 1635; moved to Northampton, Massachusetts in 1659;

Notes for SARAH STRONG: --Sarah Allen?, daughter of Thomas Allen?--it looks like the two Sarahs who married William Clark may be Sarah Strong and/or Sarah Cooper and/or Sarah Holman;

Notes for SARAH: --of Springfield, Massachusetts;--widow of Thomas Cooper;--

Children of WILLIAM CLARK and SARAH STRONG are: i. SARAH2 CLARK, b. 04 Apr 1638; d. Died in infancy.

Notes for SARAH CLARK: --born 4 April or 21 June 1638?

ii. JONATHAN CLARK, b. 01 Aug 1639.

Notes for JONATHAN CLARK: --born 1 October or 1 August 1639?

2. iii. NATHANIEL CLARK, b. 27 Nov 1641; d. 1669. iv. EXPERIENCE CLARK, b. 30 Jan 1643.

Notes for EXPERIENCE CLARK: --born 30 March or 30 January 1643?

v. INCREASE CLARK, b. 01 Mar 1646; d. Abt. 1662. vi. REBECCA CLARK, b. 1649; m. ISRAEL RUST, 09 Dec 1669. 3. vii. JOHN CLARK, b. 1651; d. 03 Sep 1704. 4. viii. SAMUEL CLARK, b. 1653; d. 05 Aug 1729. 5. ix. WILLIAM CLARK, b. 03 May 1656, Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts; d. 09 May 1725, Lebanon, New London, Connecticut. 6. x. SARAH CLARK, b. 19 Mar 1659; d. 1728. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

More notes concerning the burning of the Clark home. CLARKE

"The house of Lieut. William Clarke, situated very nearly on the ground now occupied by the main Smith College building, was burned on the night of July 14, 1681. It was built of logs, and Clarke and his wife were living in it at the time. A Negro, named Jack, set the house on fire. He confessed the deed and pretended that it was done accidentally, while he was searching for food, swinging a burning brand to light his way. Jack did not belong in town; he was a servant to Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield; was a vicious character, a forerunner of the great army of tramps now everywhere wearying the patience of the public, and had already been before the courts for other misdemeanors. His object undoubtedly, was robbery, and it is not probable that he went about the house searching for food even, with a lighted pine torch in his hands. Very likely after stealing whatever he could lay his hands upon, he set the house on fire to conceal the robbery, or from spite against William Clarke, who was at this time 72 years of age. Capture and Punishment of the Incendiary. Jack was arrested in Brookfield or Springfield, and was brought before the court in Boston, where he plead not guilty. When his confession was read to him, however, he acknowledged it, and the jury brought in a verdict of guilty. The court believed his confession as to setting the house on fire, but did not credit his statement that it was done carelessly. He was sentenced to be "hanged by the neck till he be dead and then taken down and burnt to ashes in the fire with Maria, the Negro". Maria was under sentence of death for burning the houses of Thomas Swan, and of her master, Joshua Lamb, in Roxbury. She was burned alive. Both of these Negroes were slaves. Why the body of Jack was burned is not known. note 1: Many slaves were burned alive in New York and New Jersey, and in the southern colonies, but few in Massachusetts. note 2: Tradition has handed down the following items concerning the burning of Clarke's house: The Negro fastened the door on the outside so that no one could escape, and set the fire on the outside. William Clarke injured his hands considerably (pounded them, it is said) in his endeavor to escape, and his wife was somewhat burned. John Clarke, grandson of William, a little more than a year old, was brought out of the house and laid beside the fence. There was powder in one of the chambers, and when it exploded the ridge pole was blown across the road, and one end forced into the ground. The Negro had taken offense at something William Clarke had done in his official capacity, and set the fire in a spirit of revenge. He was discovered either at Brookfield, Springfield, or near New Haven, and identified by means of a jack-knife in his possession that belonged to the Clarke's."    History of Northampton Massachusetts From Its Settlement in 1654 (James Russell Trumbull - Printed in Northampton in 1898)

view all 46

Lt. William Clarke, of Northampton's Timeline

1593
April 18, 1593
Great Bromley, Essex, England, United Kingdom
1608
1608
Dorsetshire, England
1610
1610
Age 2
Dorsetshire, England
1611
February 11, 1611
Age 3
West Thorpe, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom
February 11, 1611
Age 3
Westhorpe, Suffolk, England
February 11, 1611
Age 3
Westhorpe, Suffolk, England
February 11, 1611
Age 3
Westhorp, Suffolk, England
February 11, 1611
Age 3
Westhorpe, Suffolk, England
February 11, 1611
Age 3
Westhorp, Suffolk, England
1635
1635
Age 27
Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA