Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Elmer (1793 - 1883)

‹ Back to Elmer surname

Is your surname Elmer?

Research the Elmer family

Lucius Q. C. Elmer, US Congress's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Bridgeton, NJ, USA
Death: Died
Managed by: Jessie Ann Weeks
Last Updated:

About Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Elmer

Son of Ebenezer Elmer, a surgeon of the Revolutionary army. Graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and admitted to the bar in 1815 and as counselor in 1818. 1820-1823: member of the Lower House and speaker for the later year. 1824: Prosecutor of the Pleas for Cumberland County and District Attorney of the U.S. for New Jersey 1843: member of U.S. Congress 1850: Attorney General of the state 1852: Associate Judge Author of a book of legal forms, a history of Cumberland County and "Elmer's Reminiscences (1872)." 1865: degree of LL.D. conferred on him by Princeton College

Descendant of Edward Elmer (Aylmer -- original spelling) who came to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1632.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Elmer

Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer (February 3, 1793, Bridgeton, New Jersey– March 11, 1883, Bridgeton, New Jersey) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district in the U.S. Congress from 1843 to 1845. He was son of Ebenezer Elmer and nephew of Jonathan Elmer, both of whom also served in Congress.


Elmer was born in Bridgeton, New Jersey on February 3, 1793. He attended the private schools and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. During the War of 1812, he served in the militia as a lieutenant of artillery, and was promoted to the rank of brigade major and inspector. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1815 and commenced practice in Bridgeton. He was prosecuting attorney for the State in 1824. He was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly from 1820–1823, serving the last year as speaker. He was prosecutor of the pleas for Cumberland County in 1824 and U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey from 1824-1829.


Elmer was elected in 1843 as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth Congress in a district which comprises Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem Counties (Camden County was created out of Gloucester in 1844), serving in office from March 4, 1843-March 3, 1845, where he served as chairman of the Committee on Elections. He was an unsuccessful for reelection in 1844 to the Twenty-ninth Congress. As a lame-duck Congressman, Elmer was the lone New Jersey Democratic vote against the annexation of Texas in January 1845.


After leaving Congress, he served as New Jersey Attorney General of New Jersey from 1850–1852, and was an associate justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court from 1852 to 1859 and again from 1861 until 1869 when he retired. He died in Bridgeton on March 11, 1883, and was interred in Old Broad Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Bridgeton.


Elmer married Catharine Hay on 6 October 1818 in Philadelphia. Catharine Hay, daughter of Daniel Hay and Catharine Ferrier, was born in 1794 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, died on 27 October 1884 in Bridgeton, Cumberland, New Jersey at age 90, and was interred on 30 October 1884 in Old Broad Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Bridgeton, Cumberland, New Jersey.


The Borough of Elmer in Salem County, New Jersey was named in his honor. Elmer helped obtain a post office for the community during his service as Congressman.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Elmer

Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer (February 3, 1793, Bridgeton, New Jersey– March 11, 1883, Bridgeton, New Jersey) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district in the U.S. Congress from 1843 to 1845. He was son of Ebenezer Elmer and nephew of Jonathan Elmer, both of whom also served in Congress.


Elmer was born in Bridgeton, New Jersey on February 3, 1793. He attended the private schools and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. During the War of 1812, he served in the militia as a lieutenant of artillery, and was promoted to the rank of brigade major and inspector. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1815 and commenced practice in Bridgeton. He was prosecuting attorney for the State in 1824. He was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly from 1820–1823, serving the last year as speaker. He was prosecutor of the pleas for Cumberland County in 1824 and U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey from 1824-1829.


Elmer was elected in 1843 as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth Congress in a district which comprises Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem Counties (Camden County was created out of Gloucester in 1844), serving in office from March 4, 1843-March 3, 1845, where he served as chairman of the Committee on Elections. He was an unsuccessful for reelection in 1844 to the Twenty-ninth Congress. As a lame-duck Congressman, Elmer was the lone New Jersey Democratic vote against the annexation of Texas in January 1845.


After leaving Congress, he served as New Jersey Attorney General of New Jersey from 1850–1852, and was an associate justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court from 1852 to 1859 and again from 1861 until 1869 when he retired. He died in Bridgeton on March 11, 1883, and was interred in Old Broad Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Bridgeton.


Elmer married Catharine Hay on 6 October 1818 in Philadelphia. Catharine Hay, daughter of Daniel Hay and Catharine Ferrier, was born in 1794 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, died on 27 October 1884 in Bridgeton, Cumberland, New Jersey at age 90, and was interred on 30 October 1884 in Old Broad Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Bridgeton, Cumberland, New Jersey.


The Borough of Elmer in Salem County, New Jersey was named in his honor. Elmer helped obtain a post office for the community during his service as Congressman.

-------------------- http://politicalstrangenames.blogspot.com/2011/07/lucius-quintius-cincinnatus-elmer-1793.html

Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer, a historian and politician from New Jersey. Born in Bridgeton, New Jersey on February 3, 1793, Elmer lived a long life, dying one month after his 90th birthday on March 11, 1883 in the town in which he was born. He was the son of General Ebenezer Elmer (1751-1843) a prominent New Jersey physician, military figure and member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1801-07. 
 Elmer attended private schools in the Bridgeton area and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. He married Philadelphia native Catherine Hay in 1818 and four daughters were born to this couple over eight years time. They are listed as follows: Hannah (1819-1882), Caroline (1821-1911), Catherine (1825-1914) and Mary (1827-1914).
   L.Q.C. Elmer was also a veteran of the War of 1812, serving as a lieutenant of artillery in the New Jersey state militia. Elmer earned his his law degree in 1815 and in 1820 was elected to the New Jersey State Assembly, serving here until 1823. In his last year of service in the State Assembly, Elmer was elected as its Speaker. In the following year Elmer was named U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey, and served five years in that office (1824-1829).
  In 1843, Elmer was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from New Jersey, where he served for one term. He was defeated for reelection in 1845 by fellow Bridgeton resident James Giles Hampton (1814-1861). After leaving Congress, Elmer experienced further political sucess when he was elected to the post of Attorney General of New Jersey, serving in this post from 1850-1852. In his last year as Attorney General, Elmer was appointed to a seat on the New Jersey State Supreme Court, serving as an Associate Justice from 1852-1859 and 1861-1869. 
 In the early 1870s Elmer retired from public office and after his retirement authored a number of works on local New Jersey history, including the History of the early settlement and progress of Cumberland County, New Jersey, and of the Currency of this and the adjoining colonies, published in 1869. Elmer also authored and revised works on New Jersey state law and statutes during his twilight years, including Elmer's Digest of the Laws of New Jersey and Elmer's Book of Law Forms, the latter being published in 1868. Elmer is also recorded as serving as the President of the Cumberland County Bible Society for many years.
  The History of the Counties of Gloucester, Salem and Cumberland, New Jersey notes that Elmer suffered the affects of blindness in the last few months of his life, and was confined to his bed during his final days. After his death in 1883 at age 90, Elmer was buried in the Old Broad Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Bridgeton. He was survived by three of his daughters as well as his wife Catherine, who died a year after her husband at the age of 89. Ten years following his death, Lucius Q.C. Elmer received the distinction of having a New Jersey borough named in his honor, the borough of Elmer in Salem County, incorporated in January 1893.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=7629694&ref=wvr

view all

Lucius Q. C. Elmer, US Congress's Timeline

1793
1793
Bridgeton, NJ, USA
1818
1818
Age 25
1819
1819
Age 26
1821
1821
Age 28
1825
1825
Age 32
1827
1827
Age 34
1883
1883
Age 90
????
Bridgeton, Cumberland, NJ, USA