Maj. Simon Willard

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Simon Willard

Nicknames: "Simeon Willard", "The Pioneer of New England Shipping and Trading", "Major Simon Williard"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Horsmonden, Kent, England
Death: Died in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Richard Willard and Margery Willard
Husband of Mary Willard; Mary Willard; Elizabeth Willard; Mary Willard and Mary Noyes
Father of Mary Edmunds; Elizabeth infant Willard; Josiah Willard Sr.; Elizabeth Blood; Dorothy Willard infant 1638 and 14 others
Brother of Margery Davis; Catherine Willard and Elizabeth Willard
Half brother of Richard Willard; Thomas Willard; Mary Elizabeth Tyboul; Edward Willard; John Willard and 1 other

Occupation: Major in the British Army
Managed by: Christian Aaron PERKS
Last Updated:

About Simon Willard

Maj. Simon Willard

  • Birth: APR 1605 in Horsemonden, Kent, England
  • Parents: Richard Willard b: in Horsemonden, Kent, England & his 2nd wife, Margery Humphries
  • Baptism: 7 APR 1605 Horsemonden, Kent, England
  • wives: Mary Sharpe, Elizabeth Dunster, Mary Dunster, his surviving widow
  • Death: 24 APR 1676 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts

Simon Willard moved from England to Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1634: at the time he was a major in the English army. He is considered a key historical figure in the history of Concord, Massachusetts.

The Willard Memoir [Joseph Willard], Soldiers in King Philip’s War [George M. Bodge], History of Cambridge [Paige], History of Concord [Shattuck], History of Groton [Butler], New England Historical and Genealogical Register, all give interesting accounts of Major Simon Willard, "one of the finest types of a Puritan," living in New England in the middle of the seventeenth century [1634-76].

biographical notes

From http://www.accessgenealogy.com/massachusetts/simon-willard-genealogy.htm

The infant town of Concord probably owed more to Major Willard than to any other single person. He was its chief selectman; for eighteen years he was its clerk; for fifteen years its deputy to the General Court. From the beginning he was the military commander, and with two others made the legal tribunal before which all cases, between man and man, of small importance were tried. He was possibly the most influential man in the county. All through his later life he held the office of assistant. In Massachusetts, in the seventeenth century, an assistant was a person with high and varied duties. In the General Court he was a senator. To the Governor he was a councilor. In the administration of law he was a member of the only Supreme Judicial Court of the period. To all these honors and labors Simon Willard was called for twenty-two successive years, and just as he died received the largest vote given for any one for his twenty-third term. In 1641 to him and two others was given the whole charge of trade with the Indians. In 1655 he was promoted to the command of all the military force of Middlesex County. He settled innumerable cases of boundaries of land, and in one case that of the bounds between Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

In July, 1658, the selectmen of Lancaster, feeling the need of a ruling mind, thought “meet to order a letter of invitation to be sent to Major Simon Willard to come and inhabit among us.” A similar invitation in a previous year had been declined. But eight months before this last call Mr. Bulkeley had died: this may have weakened his affection for Concord. He accepted the invitation, and sold his farm. For twelve years he was the controlling mind in Lancaster. Then he moved to Groton, where his son was minister. There King Philip’s War found him. At seventy, with all the fire and vigor of youth, he took command of the Middlesex soldiers. He it was who, with his troopers and friendly Indians, rescued Capt. Thomas Wheeler and Lieut. Simon Davis, in their last extremity, at Brookfield. March 14, 1676, while absent from home, his house at Groton, with sixty-five others, was burned. One month later he died in his new home at Charlestown. “He was a noble specimen of a noble race. Weighty in judgment, versatile, trusty, of kindly temper, of indomitable industry, he filled well almost every conceivable post.”

Major Simon Willard d. April 0-4, 1676. His funeral was one of great pomp: it was on Thursday, the 27th of April. There was a military escort “of several hundred soldiers, consisting of three companies of foot, under the command of Captains Still, Cutler, and Holbrook; and three companies of horse, under command of Captains Brattle, Prentice, and Henchman, the last being commander of the whole.” (Willard Memoir.)

Family

Married

  1. Mary SHARPE b: 1614 Marriage: 1630 in Horsemonden, Kent, England

Children

  1. Mary WILLARD b: 1631 in , England
  2. Elizabeth WILLARD b: 1632 in , England
  3. Josiah WILLARD b: 1635 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  4. Elizabeth WILLARD b: 1636
  5. Dorothy WILLARD b: 1638
  6. Samuel (Symon) WILLARD b: 31 NOV 1639 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  7. Sarah WILLARD b: 24 MAY 1642 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Married

  • 2. Elizabeth DUNSTER b: 1619 Married: 1643 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Married

  • 3. Mary DUNSTER b: 1630 in Bury, Lancashire, England Married: 1645 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts

Children

  1. Abovehope WILLARD b: 30 OCT 1646 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  2. Simeon WILLARD b: 23 SEP 1649 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  3. Mary WILLARD b: 7 SEP 1653 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  4. Henry WILLARD b: 4 JUN 1655 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  5. John WILLARD b: 12 FEB 1656 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  6. Daniel WILLARD b: 26 DEC 1658 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
  7. Joseph WILLARD b: 4 JAN 1661 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
  8. Benjamin WILLARD b: 1664 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
  9. Hannah WILLARD b: 10 JUN 1666 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
  10. Jonathan WILLARD b: 14 DEC 1669 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts

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Maj Simon Willard

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Birth: Apr. 7, 1605

Kent, England

Death: Apr. 24, 1676

Charlestown

Suffolk County

Massachusetts, USA

Major Simon Willard was born on Apr. 7, 1605 at Horsmonden, Kent, England to Richard Willard and . He was christened on Apr. 7, 1605 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. He arrived in New England in 1634 and was a founder of Concord, Massachusetts. Simon Willard was a military officer, a major who fought in Ninigret's and Phillip's wars. He was married to Mary Sharp, Elizabeth Dunster and Mary Dunster. He became ill from a cold. He died on Apr. 24, 1676 at Charlstown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA. he was buried on Apr. 27, 1676 at Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA. He was Commander of Forces in Ninigret's & Phillip's Wars, Respresentative of the General Court of Massachusetts from 1635-1657, Assistant Governor 1654-1676.


Family links:

Children:
 Mary Willard Stevens (1653 - 1685)*
 Benjamin Willard (1664 - 1732)*

Spouse:
 Mary Dunster Willard (1630 - 1715)*

  • Point here for explanation

Burial:

Charlestown Cemetery

Boston

Suffolk County

Massachusetts, USA

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Willard

The following data is extracted from One Line of Descendants from Dolar Davis and Richard Everett.

The Willard Memoir [Joseph Willard], Soldiers in King Philip's War [George M. Bodge], History of Cambridge [Paige], History of Concord [Shattuck], History of Groton [Butler], New England Historical and Genealogical Register, all give interesting accounts of Major Simon Willard, one of the finest types of a Puritan, living in New England in the middle of the seventeenth century [1634-76].

Simon1 Willard was b. at Horsmonden, County Kent, England; bap. April 17, 1605. He was the son of Richard Willard by wife Margery, and brother of Margery [Willard] Davis, who married, in England, DOLAR DAMS. The family name in England is very old. It may be found in the Domesday Book.

Simon Willard m., in England, Mary, dau. of Henry and Jane [Ffielde] Sharpe, who was the mother of nine children. She was b. at Horsmonden; bap. Oct. 16, 1614; she d. at Newtowne [Cambridge]. He m. second Elizabeth Dunster, who d. in six months; m. third Mary Dunster, sister of Henry Dunster, first president of Harvard College. He mentions in his will "my sister Willard, and all her children." Mary [Dunster] Willard was living when her brother Henry's will was probated. She was the mother of eight children, by Willard, born between 1649-66. She m. second, July 14, 1680, Dea. John Noyes of Sudbury, Mass., and d. in that town, Dec., 1715.

Simon Willard was living in Cambridge [New Town] 1634. His house was on the south-east corner of what is now Winthrop and Dunster Streets. He moved to Concord in 1635.

In the summer of 1635 Rev. Peter Bulkeley, " a man of great learning, of large heart, of noble family, possessed of wealth, and distinguished as a divine, arrived in Cambridge, and to him Willard attached himself with affectionate regard." This alliance with Bulkeley shows that Willard had no disposition to follow the Hooker congregation to Hartford, and that his mind was so constructed as not to become a recipient of those somewhat mystical dogmas which became rife the following year in the Antinomian controversy.

In describing this emigration from Cambridge to Concord in 1635, Johnson in his Wonder Working Providence [second edition, p. 5] says, "The band of Concord is led by Capt. Simon Willard, being a Kentish souldier."

Again quoting from Johnson:

"Of the laborious worke Christs people have in planting this wildernesse set forth in the building of the Towne of Concord being the first inland Towne.

. . . "Upon some enquiry of the Indians who lived to the North-west of the Bay, one Captain Simon Willard being acquainted with them by way of Trade became a chief instrument in erecting this Town, the land they purchase of the Indians, and with much difficulties traveling through unknown woods and watery scrampes [swampes] they discover the fitness of the place, sometimes passing through Thickets, where their hands are forced to make way for their bodies passage, and their feet clambering over crossed Trees, which when they missed they sunk into an uncertain bottom in water, they wade up to the knees, tumbling sometimes higher, sometimes lower, wearied with this toile they at the end meet with a scorching plain; . . . lying in the open air, while the watery clouds pour down all the night season, and sometimes the driving snow disolving on their backs, they keep their wet clothes warm with a continued fire, till the renewed morning give fresh opportunity of further travel; after they have thus found out a place of abode, they burrow themselves into the earth for their first shelter." (Ibid., pp. 112-113.)

And thus was established by Rev. Peter Bulkeley and Major Simon Willard "the first inland Towne."

Johnson, an Englishman, was contemporary with these times. He was in this country, and his descriptions are from personal observations.

"A beautifully rounded little eminence, following the triangle made by the junction of Sudbury and Assabet Rivers with the woodlands, meadows, and arable land attached to it, made a tract of about four hundred acres, bounded chiefly by the two branches of the Concord River; in the second division of the lands, two hundred and twenty-eight years ago, it fell to the lot of Major Simon Willard." (Rev. Grindall Reynolds, D. D.)

The infant town of Concord probably owed more to Major Willard than to any other single person. He was its chief selectman; for eighteen years he was its clerk; for fifteen years its deputy to the General Court. From the beginning he was the military commander, and with two others made the legal tribunal before which all cases, between man and man, of small importance were tried. He was possibly the most influential man in the county. All through his later life he held the office of assistant. In Massachusetts, in the seventeenth century, an assistant was a person with high and varied duties. In the General Court he was a senator. To the Governor he was a councilor. In the administration of law he was a member of the only Supreme Judicial Court of the period. To all these honors and labors Simon Willard was called for twenty-two successive years, and just as he died received the largest vote given for any one for his twenty-third term. In 1641 to him and two others was given the whole charge of trade with the Indians. In 1655 he was promoted to the command of all the military force of Middlesex County. He settled innumerable cases of boundaries of land, and in one case that of the bounds between Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

In July, 1658, the selectmen of Lancaster, feeling the need of a ruling mind, thought "meet to order a letter of invitation to be sent to Major Simon Willard to come and inhabit among us." A similar invitation in a previous year had been declined. But eight months before this last call Mr. Bulkeley had died: this may have weakened his affection for Concord. He accepted the invitation, and sold his farm. For twelve years he was the controlling mind in Lancaster. Then he moved to Groton, where his son was minister. There King Philip's War found him. At seventy, with all the fire and vigor of youth, he took command of the Middlesex soldiers. He it was who, with his troopers and friendly Indians, rescued Capt. Thomas Wheeler and Lieut. Simon Davis, in their last extremity, at Brookfield. March 14, 1676, while absent from home, his house at Groton, with sixty-five others, was burned. One month later he died in his new home at Charlestown. "He was a noble specimen of a noble race. Weighty in judgment, versatile, trusty, of kindly temper, of indomitable industry, he filled well almost every conceivable post."

Major Simon Willard d. April 0-4, 1676. His funeral was one of great pomp: it was on Thursday, the 27th of April. There was a military escort "of several hundred soldiers, consisting of three companies of foot, under the command of Captains Still, Cutler, and Holbrook; and three companies of horse, under command of Captains Brattle, Prentice, and Henchman, the last being commander of the whole." (Willard Memoir.)

Henry2 Willard,

by wife Mary Dunster,

b. at Concord, June 4, 1655; m. first, July 18, 1675, Mary Lakin,

dau. of William Lakin of Groton.

She d. 1688. He m. second, 1689, Dorcas Cutler, who survived her husband and became the wife of Benjamin Bellows of Lancaster.

Henry Willard had a large estate. At one time he occupied one of the garrison houses in Lancaster. He d. Aug. 27, 1701.

His children, some of whom were men of note, speak well for the character of Henry Willard. Josiah3 Willard, b. at Lancaster, 1693; m., 1715, Hannah Wilder.

She was b.1690, the grand-dau. of Thomas1 Wilder, b. in England, who m. at Charlestown, 1640, Anna Eames; removed to Lancaster, July 1, 1659; "a leading citizen and public officer until his death, Oct. 23, 1667." John2 Wilder m. Hannah --, was a farmer in Lancaster, and father of Hannah [Wilder] Willard.

Col. Josiah Willard was the commander of Fort Dummer [Brattleboro, Vt.]. He was one of the settlers and principal officers in Lunenburg, Mass. He died on a journey from home, Dec. 8, 1750. "He was the grandson of the renowned Major Simon Willard; and was a gentleman of superior natural powers . . . . His death is a great loss to the public, considering his usefulness in many respects, particularly on the western frontiers." The Secretary of State wrote to the son Josiah4 Willard, "I heartily join with you and your family, in the mourning for the death of your father, esteeming it a great public loss." . . . (Willard Memoirs.) His wid. Hannah [Wilder] Willard was living in 1751.

Josiah4 Willard, b. at Lunenburg, Mass., Jan. 21, 1715; bap. at Lancaster, Aug. 6, 1721; m. at Groton, Nov. 23, 1'739., Hannah Hubbard.

Mr. Willard passed many years of his life on the frontiers. He succeeded his father in command at Fort Dummer, and was made lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards he was made colonel. He was in active service in the lines in the campaign of 1755, and was stationed with his regiment at Fort Edward in the same year. His father was one of the grantees of Winchester from Massachusetts in 1733. A church was organized in 1736, and Rev. Joseph Ashley, a grad. Yale Coll.,

was ordained as minister; but the church was broken up and the town deserted of inhabitants on account of the Indian Wars.

But it was reorganized under a charter obtained by the son Col. Josiah Willard and his brothers in '753. A new boundary line had been established, placing the town in the jurisdiction of New Hampshire. Col. Willard became the most important man in the town, holding all the offices of any trust or importance. In 1771 he was chosen the first representative of the town in the New Hampshire Legislature. He d. Nov. 19, 1786; his wid. Hannah [Hubbard] Willard d. Aug. 15, 1'791.

Eunice5 Willard, b. at Winchester, March, 1745; m., 1765, Rev. Micah Lawrence, who was the next minister of Winchester after Rev. Joseph Ashley. Their dau. Eunice Lawrence m. John s Wait; and they were the parents of Sarah Gilbert [Wait] Davis, the wife of William6 Davis.

Source: One Line of Descendants from Dolar Davis and Richard Everett

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http://rands.parrottfarms.com/Document%20Archives/Subject/Willard1.pdf

ID: I5989

Name: Simon WILLARD

Prefix: Major

Sex: M

Birth: 7 APR 1605 in Horsmonden, Kent, England 1

Christening: 7 APR 1605 Horsemonden, Kent, England 1

Death: 24 APR 1676 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts 1

Burial: Groton, Middlesex, Massachusetts 1

Ancestral File #: 35TX-PH

IDNO: F>2.400 1

Baptism: 7 APR 1605 Horsemonden, Kent, England 1

Immigration: MAY 1634 1

Note:

Note:

"Early New England People...Some Account of the Ellis, Pemberton, Willard, Prescott, Titcomb, Sewall...": Simon, son of Richard and Margery Willard, was born at Horsmonden, probably in the early part of the year 1605, as he was baptized in the church at that place, April 7, 1605, by Edward Alchine, Rector. He married Mary, daughter of Henry and Jane (Feylde) Sharpe, of Horsmonden. In April, 1634, Capt. Simon Willard, with his wife and one or two children, his sister Margery and her husband, Capt. Delour Davis, embarked from England, arriving at Boston about the middle of the month of May, after a short and very prosperous voyage. The name of the vessel is unknown, but there is on the files at Hartford, Conn., the deposition of a Mrs. Elizabeth Bacon, who states that she arrived in New England in the month of May, 1634, and that Samuel Greenhill "was reputed, by those who were well acquainted with him in the ship, a man of considerable estate, and was accordingly entertained in the ship with Mr. Willard and Mr. Pantry, and Mr. Crayfoote, and others of good account." Capt. Willard settled in Cambridge, Mass. From the Proprietors' Record, we learn that he had one hundred acres on the Brighton side of Charles River, adjoining the land owned by his brother-in-law, Capt. Davis. He engaged in the purchase and exportation of furs, dealing extensively with the Indians of the interior. At the time of his arrival the inhabitants of Cambridge were complaining of "straightness for want of land, especially meadow," and it may have been owing to this fact that he soon decided to leave Cambridge, and in company with others, to found a new plantation at Musketaquid. In September, 1635, a grant of land six miles square, was made by the General Court, Winthrop says, to "Mr. Buckly and [Simon Willard] merchant, and about twelve more families." The place was named Concord. Rev. Peter Bulkeley, with whom Mr. Willard was associated, was a man "of great learning, and large heart, 'of noble family,' 'possessed of wealth,' and distinguished as a divine. He arrived in Cambridge early in the summer of 1635, and to him Willard attached himself with affectionate regard." The following is from Capt. Edward Johnson's account of their removal: "Upon some inquiry of the Indians, who lived to the north west of the Bay, one Captain Simon Willard being acquainted with them by reason of his trade, became a chiefe instrument in erecting this town: the land they purchase of the Indians, and with much difficulties traveling through unknowne woods, and through watery scrampes (swamps), they discover the fitnesse of the place, sometimes passing through the thickets where their hands are forced to make way for their bodies passage, and their feete clambering over, the crossed trees, which when they missed they sunke into an uncertaine bottome in water, and wade up to the knees, tumbling sometimes higher and sometimes lower; wearied with this toile they at end of this , meete with a scorching plaine, yet not so plaine but that the ragged bushes scratch their legs fouly.....Their farther hardship is to travell, sometimes they know not whither, bewildred indeed without sight of sun, their compasse miscarrying in crowding through the bushes. They sadley search up and down for a known way,--the Indians paths being not above one foot broad, so that a man may travell many dayes and never find one.... Thus this poore people populate this howling desert, marching manfully on (the Lord assisting) through the greatest difficulties and sorest labors that ever any with such weake means have done." Soon after Capt. Willard's arrival in Concord, he and Maj.-Gen. Gibbons, with some twenty men under their control, were sent by Gov. Winthrop to Connecticut with instructions "to take possession of the place and to raise some buildings." Upon the organization of the town of Concord, Capt. Willaard was chosen Clerk of Writs, and was continued in that office by annual election for nineteen years. The second year he was appointed Surveyor of Arms, having been a Captain in England. His first military commission in the colony was that of Lieutenant-Commandant. He was afterwards made Captain, and in 1653, was chosen Major of Middlesex, second in rank only to the Commander-in-Chief of the forces of the colony. The next year he was placed in command of an expedition against a tribe of the Narraganset Indians. At the earliest election made by the town, he was chosen a Representative to the General Court, and was re-elected fifteen times. In 1654, he was placed by the freemen of the colony in a "more distinguished, responsible, and widely useful position, as assistant, or member of the higher branch of the Legislature, which office he held continuously till his death." This embraced a very critical period in the history of the colony,--the earnest and exciting controversy with the Commissioners of Charles II. "The Commissioners were clothed with large powers, some of which were wholly inconsistent with the charter, while others were especially offensive to the people of Massachusetts, who had enjoyed so much actual liberty under its provisions." The Commissioners having perused the "Books of the Generall Lawes and Liberties," proposed, in the name of the King, no less than twenty-six alterations and additions. Gov. Bellingham, Major Willard and Messrs. Collins and Fisher were appointed a committee to peruse the Commissioners' exceptions to the laws of the colony. "The Commissioners met," says Mr. Joseph Willard, "with a spirit as decided as their own,--a spirit that would not submit to any infringement of the patent, and hardly willing to stop even at that point. Thence arose a long and earnest controversy, which ended in the Commissioners being baffled at all points; and they left the country in a very angry frame of mind, with abundant threats of Royal indignation." The Commissioners, having been authorized by the King "to hear and determine complaints and appeals in all cases, as well military, as criminal and civil," gave notice to the General Court, that on a certain day, they should sit as his majesty's Commissioners to hear and determine the cause of Thomas Deane and others against the Governor and company, "and," say they, "we do expect you will by your attorney answer to the complaint." They did answer, but not as the Commissioners intended. When the day for meeting came, they published a long declaration by sound of trumpet, declaring the proposed trial inconsistent with the maintenance of the laws and authority, and summoned Thomas Deane to appear and make good his charges. The Commissioners express unfeigned surprise, that, in a case wherein the Governor and company are impleaded, they should assume to themselves the hearing; "it being," say they, "unheard of and contrary to all the laws of christendom, that the same persons should be judges and parties." The General Court sent loyal addresses to the King, with a ship-load of masts for his navy, of which he stood much in need, "and the colony had rest for a time." Major Willard resided in Concord twenty-five years, and was a "leading and valued citizen." His mansion house was afterwards owned by Dr. Joseph Lee, "who, being a strong tory, was imprisoned during the Revolutionary war, and his house was taken by the patriots and used for a time as a boarding house for Harvard students, when the College in 1775 was removed to Concord, by order of the Provincial Congress, as the College buildings at Cambridge were needed for the use of the soldiers of the American army. (Note: Concord Guide Book" G.B. Bartlett) The house was burned some years ago. Major Willard removed from Concord to Lancaster, Mass., "being importuned by the inhabitants to come and instruct them in municipal affairs. When the place was destroyed by the Indians, he removed to Groton, and remained there until that place was destroyed by the Indians, when he removed to Charlestown, Mass.

He was employed by the government in various transactions with the Indians, and was associated with Apostle Eliot, and Major Gookins, in their friendly missions. When a company was formed to encourage the trade in furs with the Indians, he was intrusted with the superintendence. He was chosen by the Indians about Concord "to record, and keep in writing," what they had generally agreed upon, touching their religious and civil government. Passaconaway, cheif sachem of the Merrimac, requested that the Apostle Eliot and Capt. Willard would live near his people to teach them. During the thirty-seven years that Major Willard was a member of the General Court, he was constantly engaged in the public service. "The records of the General Court and other archives show a large aggregate of assiduous and valuable labor." "He was much sought after to settle vexed questions of the boundaries of towns, to arbitrate in controversies on the administration of the internal affairs of towns, and to settle disputed claims." He was one of the committee chosen by the General Court to consider the subject of supplies. This resulted in a law requiring "that all hands not necessarily employed in other occasions, as women, boys and girls," should "spin according to their skill and ability." The office of surveyor was of very considerable importance in the early days of the colony, and Major Willard possessing of the qualifications required for it, was frequently called upon for its exercise. For years, Massachusetts had laid claim to the Province of New Hampshire, under the provision of her charter which granted on the north of the Merrimac; and, in 1652, when she was preparing to ward off the attack of Mason's heirs, and establish her claim to a wider jurisdiction, Major Willard and Captain Edward Johnson were appointed Commissioners to find out the most northerly part of Merrimac River. An interesting memorial of the survey still exists. About forty-five years ago, in consequence of a dam having been thrown across the head of the weirs at the point where Lake Winnipiseogee discharges its waters into the Upper Merrimac, a large rock was exposed to view, deeply embedded in the gravel, with its surface but little above the water. On this rock was the following inscription: EJ SW, WP JOHN ENDICOT, GOV This points back unerringly to the spot which the Commissioners in their return to the General Court, designate and establish as the north line of the patent. Endicott was then the Governor of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, so his name was inscriber, with the abbreviation W.P., for Worshipful, together with the initials of Simon Willard and Edward Johnson. The rock is now called the Endicott Rock. "When King Philip's war began, Major Willard was summoned from the court he was presiding over, at the advanced age of 70 years, to lead the Middlesex Militia, and drive back the foe from the exposed towns of his district. This he did, and rapidly marched through the desert to Brookfield, just in time to relieve the garrison there." Bailies states, that "Major Willard so silently and skillfully managed his approach that he was perceived by the garrison before he was discovered by the Indians." Increase Mather says: "What a black appearance of death and ruin was before the poor people at Quaboag, when they were all cooped up in one unfortified house, and surrounded by a barbarious multitude of cruel Indians, who thirsted after their blood! But God by a strange providence sent Major Willard, who, with a small party of soldiers, came a few house or minutes before it was too late; by which means, the remaining inhabitants of that place had their lives given them for a prey." Hubbard, in his history of the war, gives abundant commendation to the Major, whom he entitles "that honoured person, that worthy patriot and experience soldier." Mr. Sidney Willard says: "For more than forty years he was a frontier commander with inadequate forces under his command, engaged with an enemy whose modes of warfare were of a kind to occasion the utmost perplexity, and who by sudden surprises and simultanious attacks on different places were enabled to accomplish their fatal purpose." Major Willard received a number of grants of land, making in all between four and five thousand acres, exclusive of this right to subsequent divisions in the lands of Lancaster. The towns of Acton, Stow, and a part of Groton, are on land that belonged to him. After his death, his six youngest children received a grant of one thousand acres in payment of money that was due Major Willard from the Indians. In 1686, a tract of land twelve miles square,--afterwards the township of Rutland,--was conveyed by the Indian proprietors to Henry and Benjamin, sons of Major Willard; Cyprian Stevens, his son-in-law; Joseph Rolandson, son of the former minister of Lancaster; and Joseph Foster of Billerica. Major Willard married for his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Dunster, of Balehoult, Lancashire, Eng. She was sister to President Dunster. She lived but six months after her marriage. His third wife was Mary Dunster, cousin to President Dunster. She survived him and married Deacon Noyes of Sudbury. Major Willard died April 24, 1676. While presiding at court, he was seized with an epidemic cold of a very malignant type then prevailing in New England, and after a few days' illness, died in the seventy-second year of his age. He had the pleasure of knowing a short time before his death "that a grateful public still acknowledged the value of his faithful labors, when the official count of the votes placed him among the highest on the list of the proposed assistants for the political year beginning in May, 1676; in fact, heading all others with the exception of the Govenor and Deputy-Governor." Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton says of him: "He was a sage patriot in Israel whose wisdom assinged him a seat at the Council Board, and his military skill and martial spirit entitled him to the chief place in the field." Rev. Horation Wood of Lowell, Mass., says: "Mr. Willard was a stalwart Puritan of the elder day, a conscientious, religious man, possessing strong religious convictions, a devout, humble and earnest spirit. He was a man of sound and enlightened understanding, of discreet wisdom and of a brave and enduring spirit, not boastful, but possessing that true courage which belongs to a modest and generous nature, and is ready, at the call of duty, to sacrifice ease and comfort, yea, life itself, in defense of the public weal. Never was motto on coat of arms more characteristic..."

"Worcester County":Simon Willard was the pioneer ancestor of Mrs. Charles G. Cushing of Fitchburg...Major Simon Willard was baptized at Horsmondon, county Kent, England, April 7, 1605. He came to New England and settled in Cambridge; he was there in 1634 but in the following year removed to Concord, Massachusetts. He was a very prominent man. He had a long, honorable and eventful career, and during his long life no one was more distinguished and honored in Concord than he. He was a deputy to the general court in 1636 and 1649, assistant to the governor from 1657 to his death, lieutenant in 1637, captain in 1640 and major, the highest rank at that time, 1655. He married (first) Mary Sharpe, daughter of Henry Sharpe: (second) Elizabeth Dunster, sister of President Dunster of Harvard College; (third) Mary Dunster, cousin of the second wife. Major Willard died April 24, 1676, aged about sixty-eight years. He had sixteen children, of whom the first wife had six and the second and third wives ten in all.

Pam Emerson Notes: (Source: "The Charles Book" by Arthur R. Tourtallot, published by Farrer and Rinehart; Chapter 11; Pages 130-145) Simon Willard came from Horsmonden, Kent Co. England the middle of May 1634, age 31 years. The name has been known on English soil for 800 years being 5 times in the Doomsday Book. He was one of the founders of Concord, Mass. and in one of its suburbs a granite boulder inscribed to his memory. He died in Charleston, April 24, 1676. The Charleston history states that he was buried in Groton but it is not found in the record there. Major Simon Willard married three times, his third wife was Mary Dunster, daughter of Harry Dunster. Major Willard and Mary Dunster were married in 1645. Her sister, Elizabeth Dunster, was this second wife. There was one daughter born of the second marriage but she died unmarried. (Scott Robinson Note: I doubt this last paragraph due to other sources.)

(Source: "The Stevens Family" by E.H. Stevens) ...He had 3 wives

(Source: "Willard Genealogy" by Joseph Willard) His father had arranged before his death for him to be apprenticed to learn some trade or business which was probably done but there is no record. It is probable that he had served in the army before coming to America as he was appointed to drill soldiers very soon after his arrival and was called the Kentish Soldier by historian Edward Johnson. It seemed that he was married in England but no record found nor the birth of any child. Joseph Willard says that he married Mary Sharpe in England and came with him to this country and had children before coming and several afterwards. He married secondly Elizabeth Dunster, a sister of President Henry Dunster of Harvard College. She died within a year and he married her cousin Mary Dunster. In his father's will it was stated that he was to get all the rest of the land not already promised. His father directed that Symon be placed with some honest man where he may learn some good trade and be instructed. In case of Symon's death before reaching maturity George was to have the land bequeathed to him. He was the elder of the two brothers who founded the American Willard line. There is no record of the other brother's life in America. Major Simon Willard came to America in the spring of 1634 as testified by a woman in Hartford, Conn. Saying that Simon Willard and others of good account were passengers on the same ship. This does not tell us whether he brought with him any of his family or not. It is simply inferred by this after history that his wife and at least one child came with him. It has been thought that his brother, George, probably came at the same time but there is no proof. The fourth of August 1634 he had a grant of land at Cambridge where he stayed for a year. the 25th of August 1635 he sold the property and with others founded the plantation of Concord the name meaning the home for aging men. They bought the land from Indians in 1636 and remained friends for many years. In 1636 he was chosen representative to the General Court. He performed eminent services on committees usually as chairman. These committees tried to settle differences between towns, groups of inhabitans and boundaries between towns. He helped lay out grants of land and was one of commissioner who supervised critical emergencies in Lancaster and other towns. He was a magistrate chosen as one of the assistant judges of the General Court in 1654 and disputed to hold court in Hampton and Salisbury in 1666 and in Dover and York in 1675. He was chosen sergeant major of Middlesex Co. in 1653, was commander in chief of the Narragansett expedition in 1654 and 1655. On the outbreak of the Indian horror known as King Philip's war in 1675 he performed valient service. In 1659 he sold his Concord homestead and moved to Lancaster. After 12 years he again removed to Groton and built a house and other buildings and enjoyed his fourth home. During the King Philip's war, Groton was attacked and the savages burned Major Willard's home in March 1676 so he had no home for his family. But he went on in his service, directing movements of troops and relief expeditions and bearing untold hardship and strains. He was 71 years old. The month after his home was burned in Groton he was in Charleston, probably resting from his tremendous labors when he caught an epidemic cold and died 24 April, 1676. He was probably buried there. No will was offered for probate and probably none was made. The widow struggled to care for the younger children and had a very difficult time. The Major had left great land possessions but very little ready money... It is believed that he has 17 children by his first and third wife. The town clerk did not record the death of the first and second wife or the marriage of either the second or third.

(Source: "Willard Memoir - The Life and Times of Major Simon Willard")

Major Willard had 17 children by three wives. Nine sons and five of eight daughters arrived to mature age. There is a lot of confusion as to the mother of various children. Before Sept. 1639 there was no law to make registration of births, marriages, and deaths. Since Major Willard was the town clerk from 1653 to 1653(?) the records during this period should be correct. He had children over 40 years, the first grandson, Samuel Edmunds, was older than eight of his aunts and uncles. His father dying early provided for his welfare. There were a lot of persons in England who were Puritans and did not want to worship in the Church of England. These views were illegal and probably were the reason for Simon willard to come to America. Watching the persecution of other Puritans by Bishop Laud influenced his decision. His decision to come to New England with his family was the only one he could make. It was difficult to leave England as the church and government demanded allegiance to church and country before you could embark. He arrived in the new world at the age of 29 with a young family and immediately identified himself with his religious views and his democratic feelings. He left England in April 1634 with his family and his sister Margery and her husband Captain Dolor Davis. No ship records of the passage has been found but it is believed that he came over on a Winthrop ship. They arrived in the middle of May after a short passage. He was mentioned by Governor Winthrop as a merchant. He immediately moved to Cambridge and started trading with the Indians buying and exporting furs. Immediately there was trouble as the leading Congregational clergy, Cotton, did not want anyone to leave the Boston area and there was crowding and a lot wanted to go to Connecticut. Willard was probably in favor of moving as he made preparations to do so. Another clergy, Hooker, who had lost influence to Cotton and was displeased with Governor Winthrop wanted to leave and eventually, with a party, Hooker went to Connecticut in 1635. Simon Willard showed no inclination to join the Hooker crowd but was dissatisfied in Cambridge. In 1635, a Rev. Peter Bulkeley came to the colony and Simon Willard and he became very close. On Sept 5, 1635 a grant was made to Mr. Buckley and Mr. Willard of thirty six square miles of land where Concord is today. Simon Willard in his trade with the Indians saw it as a rich area for farming. About 12 families were to move to this location through the tangle of brush and swamps. Mr. Willard led the group. The hardships endured were great. After getting there they bought the land from the indians paying in trade goods. Mr. Willard was one of the three men who met with the indians and made the trade. The complete satisfaction to both parties ensured friendship till the days of King Philip.

Shortly after Willard founded the town of Concord, John Winthrop wanted to build a fortification at the mouth of the Connecticut river and sent 20 men under the direction of Gibbons and Willard to build a fortification. This was finished in December. Willard was a leading citizen in Concord and a leader in the church for about 25 years that he lived there. Immediately after the organization of the town, Willard was made clerk of the writs and continued for 19 years through annual elections. In this position, he had authority to grant summons and attachments in all civil actions, summon witnesses and take bond, etc. The next year after coming to Concord, he was appointed by the court surveyor of land and to exercise a military company at Concord. He must have had some military experience in England and one researcher states that he was a captain in England. He was granted a military commission in Corcord as lieutenant-commandant in March 1627. His military experience continued for 40 years until his death. He also filled various and important civil posts. In 1636 he was elected representative to the General Court and served till 1654 with the exception of three years. He was reelected in 1654 but refused to serve because of more important civic duties. Before the use of justices of peace, three freemen were appointed to serve in such proceedings. Any two could hear and determine such cases, Willard served in this capacity in the years 1639, 1641, and 1652. Since he was an special friend of the Indians he was assigned various tasks in dealing with them. He also assisted missionaries Eliot and Gookin in their missions. In 1641 a company was formed to trade for furs with the Indians and they were the only ones legally to trade with them. Simon Willard was a leader in this mission. They were to give one twentieth of the proceeds to the Treasury for their 3 year exclusive contract. He also was assigned to collect tribute from the Indians on Block Island and other tribes. The Indian tribes in the vicinity of Concord had accepted the missionaries and have watched the whites and their life style. The chiefs came to Concord and wanted to be treated as equals with the whites. The people of Concord accepted their offer and the Indians requested that Simon Willard draw up a contract to state their civil and religious intentions. Another chief, Passaconaway, was approached by the missionary, Eliot, and he wanted Eliot and Willard to move out to their village and live with them and teach them Christian and civil beliefs. It is possible that Willard accompanied Eliot on his visits between 1648 and 1651. He served as a medium of communication between the missionary and the chiefs.

He was a member of the General Court in some capacity for 37 years. The office of surveyor was important and Willard was used in this capacity frequently.

1637 - The people of Watertown asked Willard and two other men to lay out a plat of land in Concord for 50 to 60 families.

1638 - Proceeded in helping the people of Watertown to move. He also was on a committee on Mr. Gurling's land.

1640 - One of a committee to assess the value of stock on the Colony rate of Lb 1, 206

1641 - Lt. Willard and three others to lay out bounds of the Colony. Willard was one of a committee to aly out Mrs. Marg Winthrop's 3000 acres of land granted to here after the death of her husband.

1642, June - 14 Simon Willard was one of the committee appointed to levy a rate of Lb 800 upon the various towns of the colony.

1644 - Simon Willard was one of a committee to survey property on the Sudbury River.

1645 - On a committee to draw up certain bills for positive laws against lying, swearing, sabbath-breaking, drunkenness Etc.

1649, May - On a committee of Deputies to draw laws regarding the dividing shires, counties, etc.

1649, May - An order was passed by the Board of Deputies to regulate the practices of physicians, phirugeons, midwives and others requiring them to be ethical. Simon Willard was one of 7 deputies who voted against the measure.

1649, May 4 - Captain Willard and Sergeant Wheeler, a committee to lay out a tract of land.

1650, May - Captain Willard is chosen Comptroller for the session.

1650, June - Captain Willard and Sergeant Blood ordered to lay out the grant of Samuel Haugh.

1650, October - Captain Symon Willard was chosen controller for the session.

1650, October - Captain Willard and two others, commissioners to settle the boundaries of Sudbury and Watertown. They also served here in 1651.

1651, May - Captain Willard and Lt. Goodenow returned to help lay out 2000 acres to be laid out of the town of Watertown.

Civic work between 1651 and 1658 are not included here because I did not gather this material by mistake. (Pam's note)

1658, June 25 - Major Simon Willard and Thomas Danforth are appointed by the court to audit the account of the treasurer of the county and present what they find to the next County Court in Cambridge.

1658, October Sessions - They determined that the trade with the Indians belonged to the Colony and that they had full authority to regulate the trade. Major Willard was appointed one who could trade with the Indians.

1659, May Sessions - It is ordered the Major Symon Willard and two others shall hereby be appointed a committee to draw up the order which may prevent deceit in making and dressing of cloths and present the same to the next session of the court.

1659, November Session - Simon Willard was one of three judges of the county court to settle the controversy between the estate of Edward Goffe and his son, Samuel Goffe.

1659, November Session - Simon Willard was one of some who made return of the bounds of the Indian plantation called Niticke.

Skipping to the year 1676, we find 4000 Indians in the field ready to attack the whites. King Philip and others killed some whites. The whites caught and executed them, one of them was Philips brother. This was the spark that brought on the war. The war started in Plymouth Colony where Philip's father as chief had sold the land to the colonists.

Sources:NEHGS "Register," Vol 13, pg. 78 & "Gen. Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England," James Savage, 1860-1862 & "The Willard Genealogy," Charles Henry Pope, 1915. Title: Paine Ancestry, The Family of Robert Treat Paine Author: Sarah Cushing Paine, ed. Charles Henry Pope Publication: Boston: 1912 Repository: Note: NEHGS Library Call Number: Media: Book Page: pg. 79 NEHGS "Register," Vol 3, pg. 282 & "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England," James Savage, 1860-1862 & "Willard

Genealogy,"[WILLARDEzra.F

2 1

Change Date: 14 NOV 2004 at 20:08:23

Father: Richard WILLARD b: 6 FEB 1583 in Goudhurst, Kent, England c: 12 APR 1579 in Horsmonden, Kent, England

Mother: Margery HUMPHRIE b: 25 MAY 1572 in Horsmonden, Kent, England c: 25 MAY 1572 in Horsmonden, Kentshire, England

Marriage 1 Mary SHARPE b: 16 OCT 1614 in Horsmonden, Kent, England

Married: 24 SEP 1630 in Horsmonden, Kent, England

Children

Elizabeth WILLARD b: Abt 1636 in England
Mary WILLARD b: Bef MAY 1634 in Kent, England
Josiah WILLARD b: Abt 1635 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Dorothy WILLARD b: 1638 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Samuel WILLARD b: 31 JAN 1640 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Sarah WILLARD b: 27 JUN 1642 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Abovehope WILLARD b: 30 OCT 1646 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Simon WILLARD b: 23 NOV 1649 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Marriage 2 Spouse Unknown

Married: 24 SEP 1630 in Horsmonden, Kent, England 1

Children

Josiah WILLARD b: Abt 1635 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Abovehope WILLARD b: 30 OCT 1646 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Marriage 3 Elizabeth DUNSTER b: 26 APR 1619 in Bury, Lancashire, England

Married: 1651 in Massachusetts

Marriage 4 Mary DUNSTER b: Bef 25 OCT 1629 in Bury, Lancshire, England c: 25 OCT 1629 in Bury, Lancs., England

Married: 1652 in Lancaster, Middlesex, Massachusetts 1

Children

Josiah WILLARD b: Abt 1635 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Benjamin WILLARD b: 1644 in Lancaster, Worchester, Massachusetts
Abovehope WILLARD b: 30 OCT 1646 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Simeon WILLARD b: 23 SEP 1649 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Mary WILLARD b: 7 SEP 1653 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Henry WILLARD b: 4 JUN 1655 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
John WILLARD b: 12 FEB 1657 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Daniel WILLARD b: 29 DEC 1658 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Joseph WILLARD b: 4 JAN 1661 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts c: in London, England
Hope WILLARD b: 23 DEC 1663 in Lancaster, Worchester, Massachusetts
Benjamin WILLARD b: 1664 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Hannah WILLARD b: 6 OCT 1666 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Jonathan WILLARD b: 14 DEC 1669 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Elizabeth WILLARD b: Abt 1671 in Lancaster, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Dorothy WILLARD b: Abt 1673 in Lancaster, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Sources:

Title: WILLARDEzra.FBK

Abbrev: WILLARDEzra.FBK

Note:

Source Media Type: Other

Text: Date of Import: Nov 19, 2002

Title: WILLARD GENEALOGY, SEQUEL TO WILLARD MEMOIR

Author: Materials gathered by Joseph Willard and Charles Wilkes Walker, Edited and completed by Charles Henry Pope

Publication: Printed for the Willard Family Assn., Boston, MA, 1915, Murray and Emery, Kendall Sq., Cambridge, MA, Digital Edition 2001 by Richard Bingham, Oceanport, NJ

Abbrev: WILLARD GENEALOGY, SEQUEL TO WILLARD MEMOIR

Note:

Source Media Type: Electronic

------------------------------

ID: I18231

Name: SIMON WILLARD

Sex: M

Title: LIEUT.

Birth: ABT. 1636 in England

Death: 24 APR 1676

Note:

GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Page 107.

DOLOR DAVIS 253 came, it is probable, from Kent, England. He was in Cambridge, 1634; removed to Concord from Barnstable in 1655. His wife was MARGERY WILLARD 697, a sister of LIEUT. SIMON WILLARD 698.

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GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Page 15.

WILLARD

9 MARGERY WILLARD, 697, b. England m. DOLOR DAVIS. No. 253.

MAJ. SIMON WILLARD, 698,699,700, b. England 1605, d. Apr 24, 1676.

m. 1) MARY SHARPE; dau. HENRY and JANE.

m. 2) ELIZABETH DUNSTER.

m. 3) MARY DUNSTER.

========================

GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Pages 15. & 16.

MAJ. SIMON AND ( ) ( ) WILLARD 698

JOSIAH 701, d. 1674 m. Mar. 20, 1656-7 HANNAH HOSMER; dau. THOMAS

SIMON 702,703, b. Concord, Nov. 23, 1649, d. June 23, 1731, m. Abt. 1679 1) MARTHA JACOB, 2) PRISCILLA BUTTOLPH.

SAMUEL 704,705, b. Concord, Jan. 31, 1640, d. Sept. 12, 1707, m. Aug. 4, 1664 m. 1) ABIGAIL SHERMAN; dau. JOHN & MARY (LAWRENCE)

m. 2) EUNICE TYNG; d. 1720, dau. EDWARD

HENRY 706,707, b. Concord, June 4, 1655, d. Aug. 27, 1726, m. July 18, 1674, 1) MARY DAKIN; 2) DORCAS CUTLER.

JOHN 708, b. Concord, Feb. 12, 1656-7, m. Oct. 31, 1698, MARY HAYWARD. No. 294.

DANIEL 709,710, b. Concord, Dec. 12, 1658, d. Aug. 23, 1708, m. 1) Dec. 6, 1683, HANNAH CUTLER; d. 1690-1.

m. 2) Jan. 4, 1692, MARY MILLS, dau. JOSIAH.

JOSEPH 711, b. Lancaster, Jan. 4, 1660, d. June 1721, m. Jan 8, 1690, MARY BROWN.

BENJAMIN 712, b. Lancaster, 1665, m. 1690, SARAH LARKIN; dau. JOHN.

MARY 713, b. England, 1649, m. JOSHUA EDWARDS.

JONATHAN 714, b. Lancaster, Dec. 14, 1669, d. 1706

DOROTHY 715, unmarried

6-ELIZABETH 716, d. Aug. 29, 1690, m. Apr. 8, 1653, ROBERT BLOOD, No. 34.

SARAH 717, b. Concord, June 27, 1642, d. Jan. 22, 1677-8, m. NATHANIEL HOWARD.

ABOVEHOPE 718, b. Concord, Oct. 30, 1646, d. Dec. 23, 1663, unmarried

MARY 719, b. Concord, Sept. 7, 1653, m. May 23, 1693, CAPT. THOMAS BRINTNALL; son of THOMAS & ESTHER.

HANNAH 720, b. Lancaster, Oct. 6, 1666, unmarried

ELIZABETH 721, b. Lancaster, unmarried

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GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Page 9.

DAVIS

9 DOLOR DAVIS 253 b. England, abt. 1600 d. June 1673, m. 1) MARGERY WILLARD. No. 697.

m. 2) JOANNA (HULL) BURSLEY; b. 1620, dau. REV. JAMES HULL.

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SIMON, Cambridge, s. of vol. 4, p. 555 Richard of Horsemonden, Co. Kent, where he was bapt. 7 Apr. 1605, came 1634, arr. in May, with w. Mary, d. of Henry Sharpe of Horsemonden, bapt. 16 Oct. 1614; and d. Mary; rem. next yr. to the new settlem. of Concord, where prob. this d. soon d. aft. m. with Joshua Edmunds, and b. of her first ch. 16 Feb. 1650. At Cambridge or Concord, he had Elizabeth whose date of b. is not found, wh. m. 8 Apr. 1653, Robert Blood; Josiah, whose date is also unkn.; Samuel, in recorder's rec. at Boston, call. Simon, b. 31 Jan. 1640; Sarah, 27 June or 24 July 1642, wh. m. 2 July 1666, Nathaniel Howard of Charlestown, and d. 22 Jan. 1678; Abovehope, 30 Oct. 1646, d. at 17 yrs. unm.; Simon, 23 Nov. 1649; Mary, again, 7 or 27 Sept. 1653, wh. m. 22 Jan. 1672, Cyprian Stevens; Henry, 4 June 1655; John, 12 Jan. or Feb. 1657; Daniel, 29 Dec. 1658; but of these the last four were b. of a sec. w. Elizabeth Dunster, sis. of the presid. of the coll. or third w. Mary Dunster, a niece of the presid. for the dates of m. are not giv. But bef. the b. of his next ch. he rem. to Lancaster, there had Joseph, 4 Jan. 1661; Benjamin, 1665; Hannah, 6 Oct. 1666, wh. m. 23 May 1693, capt. Thomas Brintnall of Sudbury, and was the last surv. ch. of her f.; and Jonathan, 14 Dec. 1669; beside two others, Elizabeth and Dorothy, wh. both d. young. I suppose he must have had some acquaint. in Eng. with milit. duty, for he was made lieut. here so early as 1637, capt. 1646, and maj. the highest rank at that time, in 1655; and was rep. 1636-49, chos.

Assist. 1657 to his d. 24 Apr. 1676. Bef. the Ind. destr. Groton in 1676, to wh. he had rem. a few yrs. earlier, he had estab. his retreat at Salem, but d. at Charlestown, during the sess. of the Ct. of Assist. For his serv. the governm. had many yrs. bef. made him a gr. of 1,000 acres, wh. he had never taken up, but had giv. to his d. Elizabeth on her m. but his wid. Mary was compel. to petition for it in the yr. of his d. SIMON, Salem, third s. of the preced. m. a. 1679, Martha, d. of Richard Jacob of Ipswich, where he liv. some time, had at I. Jacob, b. perhaps 17 Sept. 1680; but at S. Josiah, 24 May 1682; Martha, 27 Jan. 1684; Simon, 4 Nov. 1685, d. under 2 yrs.; and Richard 26 or 29 Jan. 1687; was freem. 1680, capt. in the E. war with the Ind. 1689, and deac. (had sec. w. 30 Apr. 1702, Elizabeth wid. of John Walley, perhaps, but the Geneal, 371, ignores this sec. w.) and late in July 1722 took ano. w. Priscilla Buttolph, and d. 21 June 1731. THOMAS, Northampton 1668, br. of Nathaniel of the same, and subject to the same maledict. See Weller. Farmer notes in 1834, that gr. of this name at Harv. were 23; at Yale, 2; at other N. E. coll. 11. In ea. of the seven generat. from maj. Simon are one or more s. of the coll. to our times.

GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Page 9.

DOLOR AND MARGERY (WILLARD) DAVIS. 253-697.

JOHN 255, b. England, abt. 1626, d. 1703, m. Mar. 15, 1648-9, HANNAH LYNNELL; dau. ROBERT.

MARY 256, b. England, abt. 1631, m. June 15, 1653, THOMAS LEWIS; son GEORGE.

ELIZABETH 257, b. England, abt. 1633, died young.

9 SIMON, LIEUT. 258, b. America, abt. 1636, d. June 14, 1713, m. Dec. 12, 1660, MARY BLOOD. No. 36.

9 SAMUEL 259,260, b. America, m. 1) Jan. 11, 1665-6, MARY MEDOWS; d. 1710.

m. 2) Oct. 18, 1711, RUTH TAYLOR, d. 1720.

RUTH 261, b. America, m. STEPHEN HALL.

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GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Page 9.

LIEUT. SIMON AND MARY (BLOOD) DAVIS. 258-36.

9 SIMON, M.D. 262, 263, b. Concord, Oct. 12, 1661, m. 1) Feb. 14, 1689, ELIZABETH WOODHIS; d. 1711, dau. HENRY.

m. 2) Oct. 19, 1714, MARY WOOD.

MARY 264, b. Concord, Oct. 3, 1663, m. May 28, 1691, DELIVERENCE WHEELER, of Stow.

SARAH 265, b. Concord, Mar. 11, 1665-6, m. Nov. 13, 1695, THOMAS WHEELER, of Concord.

JAMES 266, b. Concord, Jan. 19, 1668, d. Sept. 1727, m. 1701, ANN SMEDLEY; d. 1760.

ELNOR 267, b. Concord, Oct 22, 1672, m. May 14, 1699, SAMUEL HUNT.

EBENEZER 268,269, b. Concord, June 1, 1676, m. 1) DINAH ___., m. 2) MRS. SARAH FRENCH; d. 1751.

6 HANNAH 270, b. Concord, b. Apr. 1, 1679, m. Apr. 1, 1701, SAMUEL BLOOD, No. 55.

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GENEALOGIES Of Some OLD FAMILIES of CONCORD, Massachusetts, And THEIR DESCENDANTS

In Part To the PRESENT GENERATION. by CHARLES EDWARD POTTER A Heritage Classic

Page 6.

BLOOD.

JAMES BLOOD 29, b. England, d. Nov. 17, 1683, m. ELLEN __________; d. 1764.

JAMES AND ELLEN ( ) BLOOD, 29.

6 JAMES 30, 31, d. Nov. 26, 1692, m. 1) Oct. 26, 1657, HANNAH PURCHISS; d. 1677; DAU. oliver, of Lynn.

m. 2) Nov. 19, 1679, ISABEL (FARMER) WYMAN; dau. JOHN FARMER.

6 RICHARD 32, d. Dec. 7, 1683, m. ISABEL ________.,

JOHN 33, d. Oct. 30, 1692. Unmarried

ROBERT 34, 35, d. Oct. 27, 1701, m. 1) Apr. 8, 1653, ELIZABETH WILLARD, No. 716.

m. 2) Jan. 8, 1690, HANNAH PARKER, d. 1716.

MARY 36, b. Concord, July 12, 1640, m. Dec. 12, 1660, LIEUT. SIMON DAVIS. No. 258.

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From: http://www.crossmyt.com/hc/gen/chfmbct3.html#b6498

6498 George Willard

bapt 4 Dec 1614 Horsmonden, Kent, England

migrated to New England about 1634

in Plymouth Colony by 1639 wife Dorothy Dunster of Baleholt, near Bury, Lancaster, England?

to Maryland? There is info on his siblings.

Child of Richard Willard and Joan --- (Moorebread):

6498 George Willard

=========================================

From: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~marshall/esmd142.htm

Willard Family

Generation One

1. Richard Willard; b. circa 1564 at Goudhurst, Kent, England; m.

Catherine; 1st wife; m. Margery Humphrey; 2nd wife; m. Joan Morebread;

3rd wife; bur. 29 Feb 1616/7 at Horsmondon, Kent, England.

Known children of Richard Willard include:

i. Mary Willard.

ii. Thomas Willard.

iii. Elizabeth Willard.

iv. Richard Willard.

v. Edward Willard.

vi. John Willard.

vii. George Willard resided at Scituate, MA. He had 3 children.

Catherine died in Mar 1597/98 at Horsmondon, Kent, England.

Margery Humphrey died in Dec 1608 at Horsmonden, Kent, England.

She was buried on 12 Dec 1608 at Horsmondon, Kent, England.

Known children of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrey were as

follows:

2. i. Maj. Simon Willard, m. Mary Sharpe; m. Elizabeth

Dunster; m. Mary Dunster.

ii. Margery Willard; m. Capt. Delour Davis.

She and Capt. Delour Davis immigrated in May 1634

to Boston, MA.

iii. Catherine Willard.

Joan Morebread died after Feb 1617.

Generation Two

2. Maj. Simon Willard (Richard1); baptized 7 Apr 1605 at Horsmonden,

Kent, England; m. Mary Sharpe, daughter of Henry Sharpe and Jane

Feylde; 1st wife; m. Elizabeth Dunster, daughter of Henrye Dunster;

2nd wife; m. Mary Dunster circa 1652; 3rd wife, 1st husband; d. 24 Apr

1676 at Charlestown, Middlesex Co., MA.

He and Mary Sharpe immigrated in May 1634 to Boston, MA. He

resided at Cambridge, MA. He resided in Sep 1635 at Concord, MA. He

was a Deputy between 1636 and 1653. He resided at Lancaster, MA. He

resided at Groton, MA. He resided at Charlestown, MA. He was commander

of Middlesex Co. troops in 1675 at Middlesex Co., MA.

Mary Sharpe resided at Horsmonden, Kent, England.

Known children of Maj. Simon Willard and Mary Sharpe were:

i. Mary Willard; b. at England; m. Joshua Edmonds.

Known children of Maj. Simon Willard include:

i. Rev. Samuel Willard; b. 31 Jan 1639/40 at Concord,

MA; m. Abigail Sherman, daughter of Rev. John

Sherman and Mary Launce; 1st wife; m. Eunice Tyng,

daughter of Col. Edward Tyng and Mary Sears, 1679;

2nd wife; d. 12 Sep 1707 at age 67.

He and Eunice Tyng had 14 children. He and Abigail

Sherman had 6 children. He was educated in 1659 at

Harvard College, Cambridge, MA. He resided in 1663

at Groton, MA. He was pastor of Old South Church

in 1678 at Boston, MA. He was acting President of

Harvard College between 1701 and 1707 at Boston,

MA.

ii. Elizabeth Willard; d. infancy.

iii. Elizabeth Willard; m. Robert Blodd.

iv. Dorothy Willard; d. infancy.

v. Josiah Willard; m. Hannah Hosmer, daughter of

Thomas Hosmer.

vi. Sarah Willard; m. Nathaniel Howard.

vii. Abovehope Willard; d. aged 17.

viii. Simon Willard; m. Martha Jacobs, daughter of

Richard Jacobs and Joanna; 1st wife; m. Priscilla

Buttolph; 2nd wife.

ix. Mary Willard; m. Cyprian Stevens, son of Col.

Thomas Stevens.

x. Henry Willard; m. Mary Lakin; 1st wife; m.

Dorothy; 2nd wife, 2nd husband.

xi. John Willard; m. Mary Hayward, daughter of John

Hayward.

xii. Capt. Joseph Willard; m. ___.

He was a sea captain. He resided at London,

England.

xiii. Benjamin Willard; m. Sarah Lakin, daughter of Ens.

John Lakin.

xiv. Hannah Willard; m. Capt. Thomas Brintnall, son of

Thomas Brintnall and Esther.

xv. Jonathan Willard; m. Mary Browne, daughter of Maj.

Thomas Browne and Patience.

Mary Dunster was born circa 1629 at Bury, Lancashire, England.

She married Joseph Noyes after 1659; 2nd husband. She died on 28 Dec

1715 at Sudbury, Middlesex Co., MA.

Known children of Maj. Simon Willard and Mary Dunster were:

3. i. Daniel Willard, b. 29 Dec 1658 at Concord, MA; m.

Hannah Cutler; m. Mary Mills.

================================================

Black - Howe Family

Entries: 14606 Updated: 2007-04-01 02:57:06 UTC (Sun) Contact: Brenda Black Watson

ID: I10184

Name: Simon Willard 1

Sex: M

Title: Major

Event: Distinction American Revolution - Colonial fame

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

Children

Benjamin Willard

Sources: Title: Howe Genealogies

=====================

From: http://kinnexions.com/kinnexions/cousinsg.htm#H

Harriet Goodhue HOSMER (1830-1908), sculptor, 'Queen Isabella' 1894 and 1868, 'Sleeping Faun' 1865, 'Zenobia' 1861, 'Puck' 1856, 'Oenone' 1855, 'The Clasped Hands of Mr. and Mrs. Browning' 1853, and others, studied in Rome 1853-1860, studied in St. Louis and Boston to 1852.

Hiram HOSMER (b. 1798) and Sarah Watson GRANT (b. 1802) [see below]

Jonas HOSMER (1758-1840) and Elizabeth 'Betsy' WILLARD (b. 1764) [see below]

Jonathan HOSMER (1712-1776) and Martha CONANT (1716-1795)

Stephen HOSMER (1680-1754) and Prudence BILLINGS (c1685-1770)

Stephen HOSMER (1642-1714) and Abigail WOOD (1642-1717)

James HOSMER (1605-1685) and Alice (d. 1645)

Stephen HOSMER (1570-1632) and Dorothy SELDON (c1582-1640)

Sarah Watson GRANT (b. 1802) and Hiram HOSMER (1798- )

Samuel GRANT (1770-1844) and Phebe Strong BELLOWS (1770-1847)

Benjamin BELLOWS (1740-1802) and Phebe STRONG (1738-1817) [see below]

Benjamin BELLOWS (1712-1777) and Abigail STEARNS (1708-1757)

John STEARNS (1677-1729) and Abigail FISKE (1684-1718)

John FISKE (1655-1718) and Abigail PARKS (1659-1714)

John FISKE (c1619-1684) and Sarah WYETH (1632-p1701)

Elizabeth 'Betsy' WILLARD (b. 1764) and Jonas HOSMER (1758-1840)

Joseph WILLARD (1728-1812) and Elizabeth HAPGOOD (1734-1803)

Joseph WILLARD (d. 1761) and Elizabeth TARBELL (1691-1763)

Henry WILLARD (1655-1701) and Mary LAKIN (b. c1660)

Maj. Simon WILLARD (1605-1676) and Mary DUNSTER (1630-1715)

Phebe STRONG (1738-1817) and Benjamin BELLOWS (1740-1802)

Caleb STRONG (1710-1776) and Phebe LYMAN (1717-1802)

Jonathan STRONG (1683-1766) and Mehitable STEBBINS

Ebenezer STRONG (1643-1729) and Hannah CLAPP (b. 1646)

Elder John STRONG (c1609-1699) and Abigail FORD (1619-1688)

Father: RICHARD WILLARD b: in England

Mother: MARGERY HUMPHREY b: in England

Marriage 1 ELIZABETH DUNSTER

Marriage 2 MARY DUNSTER

Children

BENJAMIN WILLARD

Marriage 3 MARGERY SHARPE

---------------------------------

D: I00565

Name: Simon WILLARD 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Sex: M

Title: Major

Birth: BEF 7 APR 1605 in Horsemonden, Kent, England 32 33 34 35

Death: 25 APR 1676 in Charlestown, Middlesex, Massachusetts 32 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 of influenza epidemic of 1676 20

Burial: 27 APR 1676 Charlestown, Middlesex, Massachusetts 5 20

Immigration: MAY 1634 Cambridge, Massachusetts 5 43 44

Military Service: 1652 Sergeant Major of Middlesex County 5 40 45

Military Service: 1637 Lieutenant 39

Military Service: 1646 Captain 39

Military Service: BET 1654 AND 1655 Commander-in-chief of the Narragansett Expedition 46 39 47 42

Military Service: 1655 Major 39

Military Service: BET 1675 AND 1676 Commander Middlesex regt. in King Philip's War 39 42

Event: Unknown2109 28 FEB 1634 Ship Winthrop from England 5

Event: Unknown2117 6 MAY 1657 General Court granted 500 acres 25

Event: Unknown2091 1676 1300 acres 20

Residence: BET 1670 AND 1671 Groton, Massachusetts 40

Residence: BET 1635 AND 1659 Concord, Massachusetts 39 20

Residence: 1660 Lancaster, Massachusetts 39 48 20

Residence: 1676 Salem, Massachusetts 42

Event: Unknown2100 BET 1654 AND 1676 Governor's Asst. - 22 years 39 40

Event: Unknown2100 1636 Representative - General Court, Concord Freemen 5

Event: Unknown2100 BET 1636 AND 1654 Deputy - General Court 39 40

Event: Unknown2100 BET 28 NOV 1654 AND 4 APR 1676 Juror - Between 70 and 80 terms of the county court 20

Event: Unknown2100 BET 1655 AND 1676 Mayor - Middlesex, Massachusetts 39

Event: Unknown2100 1673 Chairman of Groton Selectmen 20

Reference Number: 572

Note:

CONCORD, AMERICAN TOWN by Townsend Scudder, Boston, 1947.

Page 4 - "Simon Willard, thirty year old Kentish soldier, adventurer, shrewd trader, expert surveyor, a co-founder of the town (of Concord)..."

Page 5 - "From the town's founding, by annual election, he was named Clerk of the Writs. He was chosen captain of the militia company. He became the town's first deputy to the colony's General Court, its first Assistant to the Governor, its first judge or magistrate. Before his death, he was to serve as commander in chief of the Colony's forces in the Indian trouble. Yet unlike many Puritan leaders, he was no bigoted despiser of the red men. His fortune in the fur trade grew from his knowledge of how to handle Indians."

Page 7 - ..."Simon Willard had put up his house and trading post on the fallow land southwest of Nashawtuc Hill, not far from where the Sudbury River runs into the Assabet to form the Concord"...He had the only permit in the region for sale of strong drink.

Page 32 - ...by 1676, Simon Willard was residing in Groton. In (March?) his Groton home went up in flames, but he'd moved his family to Charlestown. (this was due to Indian raids.)

Page 34 - Toward the end of April (1676), after a brief illness, Simon Willard died.

  • *********

From Willard Family Association Web Site:

Major Simon4 Willard (Richard3, Symon2Willarde, Richard1Willard); born 1605 at Horsmonden, Kent Co., England; baptized 7 April 1605 at St. Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent Co., England; married Mary Sharpe, daughter of Henry Sharpe, before 1634 at England (1st wife of Simon Willard); married Elizabeth Dunster at Massachusetts (2nd wife of Simon Willard; died within a year of the marriage); married Mary Dunster at Massachusetts (3rd wife of Simon Willard);35 died 25 April 1676 at Charlestown, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, at age 71 of an "epidemic cold;" probably buried April 1676 at Charlestown, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts.

He can be found as WFA Genealogy #1 in the 1915 Willard Genealogy. Deciding which children belong to which wife has been problematic; further information is needed. See the argument for the present distribution given on pages 363 and 364 in the Willard Memoir.

--------------------------

Note: Commander in Chief of the British forces against the Indians. There is a plaque in Canterbury Catherdral.Willard Geneology, 1915

----------------

1617: Major Simon Willard lost both his father and his step-mother. He was mentioned in the will of Richard Willard dated on 12 February 1616/17 at Horsmonden, Kent Co., England. He and Mary Sharpe sailed on 28 February 1634 on the ship, the Planter, departing from the River Thames, England, and arrived in Boston the week of May 12-17, 1634. Winthrop said they had enjoyed a short passage. He was the chosen representative to the General Court by the Concord freemen at their first election in 1636; was appointed to train the military company at once; continued in the General Court, performing eminent services on committees and other ways; was particularly successful as a member, usually chairman, of committees to whom were referred controversies between towns and certain groups of inhabitants, and questions about boundaries between towns; he was in request for the laying out of grants of land and one of the commissioners who had supervision of the proceedings of Lancaster and some other towns in critical emergencies. He was a magistrate, chosen one of the "Assistants," (judges of the General court), in 1654, and deputed to hold court in Hampton and Salisbury in 1666 and in Dover and York in 1675. He was chosen "Sergeant Major" of Middlesex County in 1653; was commander-in-chief of the Narragansett expedition in 1654 and 1655. On the breaking out of the Indian dispute known as King Phillip's War in 1675, he performed valiant service.

Mary Sharpe was baptized on 16 October 1614 at St. Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent Co., England.

The nine known children of Major Simon4 Willard and Mary Sharpe were as follows:

i. Mary Willard; born at England; married Joshua Edmunds circa 1649 at Massachusetts; ) died circa 1652.

ii. Elizabeth Willard; died in infancy.

iii. Elizabeth Willard; married Robert Blood 8 April 1653 at Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts; died 29 August 1690.

iv. Dorothy Willard; died in infancy or in early youth.

v. Josiah Willard; born circa 1635 at Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts; married Hannah Hosmer 20 March 1656/57 Hannah was "of Hartford," Hartford Co., Connecticut; died July 1674 at Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut.

vi. Reverend Samuel Willard; born 31 January 1639/40 at Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts; married Abigail Sherman 8 August 1664 Abigail was "of Watertown," Middlesex Co., Massachusetts;) married Eunice Tyng, as his second wife, 29 July 1679;47,48,50 died 12 September 1707 at Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts, at age 67.

vii. Sarah Willard; born 27 June 1642 (or July 24) Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts;(47,49) married Nathaniel Howard 2 July 1666 Nathaniel was "of Chelmsford," Middlesex Co., Massachusetts;(47,49) died 22 January 1677/78 at Charlestown, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts, at age 35.

viii. Abovehope Willard; born 30 October 1646 at Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts; died 23 December 1663 at Lancaster, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, at age 17 unmarried.

ix. Simon Willard; born 23 November 1649 at Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts;) married Martha Jacob circa 1679; married Priscilla Buttolph as his second wife, 25 July 1722 at Salem, Essex Co., Massachusetts; died 23 June 1731 at Salem, Essex Co., Massachusetts, at age 81.

End notes:

1. Charles Henry Pope, editor, Willard Genealogy; Sequel to Willard Memoir (Boston: Willard Family Association, 1915), pg. 1. Hereinafter cited as Willard Genealogy.

2. Joseph Willard, editor, Willard Memoir; or, Life and Times of Major Simon Willard: with notices of three generations of his descendants, and two collateral branches in the United States (Boston: Phillips, Sampson, and Co., 1858), pg. 63. Hereinafter cited as Willard Memoir.

  • *****************

Families of Early Guilford, Connecticut by Alvan Talcott Fort Wayne Public Library Jan 8, 2001

Page 1218:

  • *****************

"Genealogical Records, Early New England Settlers 1600s-1800s" - Genealogy.com

"Ancestral heads of New England Families" Page 264

"WILLARD, Simon, Indian trader, brother of the preceding (George), bapt. Horsmonden, 1605, came to New England 1634, settled Cambridge, Massachusetts, one first settlers Concord, Mass., 1636, removed Lancaster, Mass., 1657, bore the military title of Major, died Charlestown, Mass., 1676."

  • *****************

"King Phlip's War - The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict"

by Eric B. Schultz and Michael J. Tougias

Page 73 - "Some Notes On The War's Aftermath - Many of the war's political and military leaders passed away soon after its end...Major Simon Willard was struck down by an 'epidemical colde' in 1676, and his funeral at Charlestown included a parade of six military companies..."

Page 158 - "Siege of Brookfield, West Brookfield, Massachusetts...Major Simon Willard and his forty-eight troopers were conducting operations west of Lancaster and arrived first at Quabaug. Willard, who at seventy years of age was the chief military officer of Middlesex County, had heard reports of nipmuc attack from people traveling along the Bay Path. he and his men rode the thirty-five or forty miles to Brookfield and arrived after nightfall on August 3 (1675), where they charged past the Nipmuc sentries, whose warning shots went unnoticed. Increase Mather wrote: the Indians were so busy and made such a noise about the house that they heard not the report of those guns; which if they had heard, in all probability not only the people when living at Quaboag, but those also that came to succor them had been cut off."

"Willard's party rode almost to the door of the Ayres garrison before they were spotted. With their arrival, the Nipmuc fired the remaining buildings and broke off the wiege. Soon after, colonial reinforcements arrived, swelling the ranks of men under Willard to 350 English plus the Mohegan that had pursued Philip so successfully at Nipsachuk. Willard would stay for several weeks to direct military activity in the area, but the residents had little reason and little hope of real security, so the settlement at Quabaug was abandoned."

"The landmarks related to the original Quabaug Plantation settlement are well marked along the north side of Foster Hill Road in present-day-West Brookfield. Much of the site today is a large, open field..."

References: "Ellis and Morris, King Philip's War, 94" and "Mather, History, 68".

Page 191 - "Attack on Lancaster, Massachusetts...The Stevens garrison is marked on Center Bridge Road, near Neck Road, on the south side of the North Nashua River. The marker reads: 'Site of the home of Cyprian Stevens in the assault upon the town, Feb 10, 1675/6, A relief force from Marlboro recovering a garrison house belonging to Cyprian Stevens through God's favor prevented the enemy from cutting off the garrison'. Stevens' father-in-law was Major Simon Willard, who rode to the rescue of Brookfield and was active in a variety of military operations during King Philip's War..."

Page 201 - "Attack on Groton, Massachusetts...On March 2, a small band of warriors raided eight or nine houses and made off with some cattle. The following day, Major Simon Willard and Captain Joseph Sill combed the area but could find no trace of the enemy."

  • *****************

Perces Fight March 25, 1676

March 25, 1676 occurred the skirmish known as Perces Fight in which 52 Englishmen and 11 Indians were slain. The names of those slain so far as known and the town from whence they came so far as not known, are as follows:

From Scituate 18, of whom 15 were slain, Capt. Peirce, Samuel Russell, Benjamin Chittenden, John Lothrope, Gersham Dodson, Samuel Pratt, Thomas Savary, Joseph Wade, William Wilcome, Jeremaih Barstow, John Ensign, Joseph Cowen, Joseph Perry, John Rowse (Rose).

Source: The Vital Records of Rehoboth, Mass., page 919

  • *****************

" Musket and the Cross"

By Walter D. Edmonds

Page 384

August 3, 4 and 5- Even after the attack on Mendon the Boston authorities the Boston authorities were determined to make peace with the Nipmucks. The pick Captain Edward Hutchinson to lead the mission with an escort of twenty men under Captain Thomas Wheeler of Concord. On August 3rd the mission is ambushed on its way to the Nipmuck village just outside Brookfield. Three men are killed and the rest race back to Brookfield to warn the town. The seventeen survivors along with 80 or 90 men, women and children of Brookfield garrison themselves into the largest and strongest house. The Indians attack the village burning all the unoccupied homes before turning there attention to the garrison home. All through the 4th 300 Nipmuck warriors attack the home and are held off. On the evening of the 4th forty-six troopers under the command of Major Simon Willard and Captain James Parker reach the village and ride right through the Nipmucks to the garrison house. The Nipmucks continue to attack through the night but on the morning of the 5th , deciding the cost would be to high to take the house, give up the attack. The people lingered for a few days trying to make up their minds on what to do, but in the end all decide to return to the east. Brookfield as a community has ceased to exist.

After the Great Swamp fight the Naragansetts, under the leadership of Canochet, had not been completely crushed. In March of 1676 he ambushed a company of fifty Plymouth men under Captain Michael Pierce, accompanied by twenty friendly Indians, and killed all except one Englishman and nine of the Indians, who were tortured to death. And he burned Rehoboth and Providence; but in April he was himself ambushed and captured. Brought into Stonington, he refused to accept the terms of submission offered by the English; so they turned him over to some Indian allies for execution. When he heard the sentence Canochet said he like that he should die before his heart was soft. After he was dead his executioners cut off his head and sent it to Hartford as a mark of their goodwill.

  • ************

"Soldiers of King Philip's War"

By George M.Bodge, Boston 1906

SOLDIERS

IN

KING PHILIP'S WAR

Chapter 6, Part I


VI.

MAJOR SIMON WILLARD AND HIS MEN

OF all the names that stand upon the pages of New England history, none are more honored than that of Major Simon Willard. His biography has been written in the "Willard Memoir," and therefore only a brief outline will be necessary here. He was born at Horsmonden, County of Kent, England, baptized April 7, 1605. He was the son of Richard and his second wife Margery. Simon married in England Mary Sharpe, of Horsmonden, who bore him before leaving England (probably) three children, and six in New England. He married for a second wife Elizabeth Dunster, who died six months after her marriage; and a third wife, Mary Dunster, who bore him eight children, between the years 1649 and 1669. Simon Willard arrived in Boston in May, 1634, and settled soon after at Cambridge. He was an enterprising merchant, and dealt extensively in furs with the various Indian tribes, and was the "chiefe instrument in settling the towne" of Concord, whither he removed at its first settlement in 1635-6, and remained for many years a principal inhabitant of that town. On the organization of the town he was chosen to the office of clerk, which he held by annual election for nineteen years. It is said upon respectable authority that he had held the rank of captain before leaving England, and in Johnson's "Wonder Working Providences" he is referred to as "Captain Simon Willard being a Kentish Soldier." In 1637 he was commissioned as the Lieutenant-Commandant of the first military company in Concord. At the first election, December, 1636, he was chosen the town's representative to the General Court, and was re‰lected and served constantly in that office till 1654, except three years. In that year he was re‰lected, but was called to other more pressing duties; and afterwards to his death was Assistant of the Colony. In 1641 he was appointed superintendent of the company formed in the colony for promoting trade in furs with the Indians, and held thereafter many other positions of trust, either by the election of freemen or the appointment of the Court, too many to admit of separate mention here. In 1646 he was chosen Captain of the military company which, as Sergeant and Lieutenant, he had commanded from its organization.

For many years he was a celebrated surveyor, and in 1652 was appointed on the commission sent to establish the northern bound of Massachusetts, at the head of Merrimac River, and the letters S W upon the famous Bound-Rock (discovered many years ago near Lake Winnepesaukee) were doubtless his initials, cut at that time. In 1653 he was chosen Serjeant-Major, the highest military officer of Middlesex County.

In October, 1654, Major Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of the military expedition against Ninigret, Sachem of the Nyanticks, as told heretofore, in the Introductory Chapter, p. 22. In the settlement of the town of Lancaster Major Willard had been of great service to the inhabitants, and their appreciation was shown when, in 1658, the selectmen wrote him an earnest invitation to come and settle among them, offering a generous share in their lands as inducement. This invitation he accepted, sold his large estate in Concord, and removed to Lancaster, probably in 1659, and thence to a large farm he had acquired in Groton, about 1671, at a place called Nonacoicus.

At the opening of "Philip's War," Major Willard, as chief military officer of Middlesex County, was in a station of great responsibility, and was very active in the organization of the colonial forces. His first actual participation in that war was in the defence of Brookfield, the particulars of which have been noted. We must admire this grand old man of seventy, mounting to the saddle at the call of the Court, and riding forth at the head of a frontier force for the protection of their towns. On August 4th he marched out from Lancaster with Capt. Parker and his company of forty-six men, "to look after some Indians to the westward of Lancaster and Groton," having five friendly Indians along as scouts, and, receiving the message of the distressed garrison at Brookfield, promptly hastened thither to their relief, which he accomplished, as we have seen in a former chapter. Upon the alarm of the disaster at Brookfield, a considerable force soon gathered there from various quarters. Two companies were sent up by the Council at Boston, under Captains Thomas Lathrop of Beverly and Richard Beers of Watertown, and arrived at Brookfield on the 7th. Capt. Mosely, also, who was at Mendon with sixty dragoons, marched with that force, and most of Capt. Henchman's company, and arrived at Brookfield probably about August. From Springfield came a Connecticut company of forty dragoons under Capt. Thomas Watts, of Hartford, with twenty-seven dragoons and ten Springfield Indians under Lieut. Thomas Cooper, of Springfield. These forces for several weeks scouted the surrounding country under Major Willard; the details of which service belong properly to the accounts of the several Captains. In addition to these were forty "River Indians" from the vicinity of Hartford, and thirty of Uncas's Indians under his son Joshua, who scouted with the other forces. The Nipmucks could not be found, and it was afterward learned from the Indian guide, George Memecho, captured by the Nipmucks in Wheeler's fight, that on their retreat from Brookfield on August 5th, Philip, with about forty warriors and many more women and children, had met them in a swamp six miles beyond the battle ground, and by presents to their Sachems and otherwise had engaged them further in his interest; and all, probably, hastened away towards Northfield and joined the Pocomptucks, and thence began to threaten the plantations on the Connecticut River. After several days diligent searching, on August 16th, Captain Lathrop's and Beers's companies, the latter reinforced by twenty-six men from Capt. Mosely, together with most of the Connecticut, Springfield and Indian forces, marched towards Hadley and the neighboring towns, while Mosely went towards Lancaster and Chelmsford. Major Willard remained for several weeks at the garrison. Mr. Hubbard and Capt. Wheeler make this statement, and further relate that he soon after went up to Hadley on the service of the country. I think the visit to Hadley was after August 24th, as on that date I find a letter from Secretary Rawson to him, enclosing one to Major Pynchon, and advising him to ride up to Springfield and visit Major Pynchon "for the encouragement of him and his people." The writer of the "Willard Memoir" states that he was in command of the forces about Hadley for some time in the absence of Major Pynchon, but I have been unable to find any confirmation of this, unless it may be the inference drawn from Hubbard, who states that when Major Willard "returned back to his own place to order the affairs of his own regiment, much needing his Presence," he left "the Forces about Hadley under the Command of the Major of that Regiment." The letter above contained directions about the disposal of his forces, etc., which would naturally take several weeks to accomplish, and although the precise date of Major Willard's return from Brookfield is not given, some inference may be drawn from circumstances noted further on. Following is the list of those credited with service under Major Willard, from August 7th to January 25th, 1675:


  • *************

"The Annals of America", Volume I by Holmes

Pages 301-302

"The commissioners (of the United Colonies in September 1654) nominated three men to the chief command, leaving the appointment to Massachusetts; but the general court of that colony, disregarding the nomination, appointed major Simon Willard. The commissioners gave him a commission to command the troops, with instructions to proceed with such of them, as should be found at the place of rendezvous by the 13th of October, directly to Ninnigret's quarters, and demand of him the Pequots who had been put under him, and the tribute that was still due, also a cessation of hostilities with the Long Islanders. If the Ninnigret should not comply with these demands, the instructions were, to subdue him. Willard marched with his men into the Narraganset country; and, finding that Ninigret with his men had fled into a swamp, 14 or 15 miles distant from the army, returned home, without attempting to injure the enemy..."

Page 306

Entry dated 1655 - "...and for the stating of both, that Capt. Willard...be appointed to lay out the said Plantation or Township..."

Page 371

Entry dated August 2, 1675 - referring to the Nipmuck Indians who had committed hostilities against the English - At this critical moment, major Willard happily arrived with 48 dragoons, and dispersed them."

  • ******************************

"Vital Records of Rehoboth, Mass."

Page 919

Perces Fight - March 25, 1676 occurred the skirmish known as Perces Fight in which 52 Englishmen and 11 Indians were slain. The names of those slain so far as known and the town from whence they came so far as not known, are as follows:

From Scituate 18, of whom 15 were slain, Capt. Peirce, Samuel Russell, Benjamin Chittenden, John Lothrope, Gersham Dodson, Samuel Pratt, Thomas Savary, Joseph Wade, William Wilcome, Jeremaih Barstow, John Ensign, Joseph Cowen, Joseph Perry, John Rowse (Rose).

August 3, 4 and 5- Even after the attack on Mendon the Boston authorities the Boston authorities were determined to make peace with the Nipmucks. The pick Captain Edward Hutchinson to lead the mission with an escort of twenty men under Captain Thomas Wheeler of Concord. On August 3rd the mission is ambushed on its way to the Nipmuck village just outside Brookfield. Three men are killed and the rest race back to Brookfield to warn the town. The seventeen survivors along with 80 or 90 men, women and children of Brookfield garrison themselves into the largest and strongest house. The Indians attack the village burning all the unoccupied homes before turning there attention to the garrison home. All through the 4th 300 Nipmuck warriors attack the home and are held off. On the evening of the 4th forty-six troopers under the command of Major Simon Willard and Captain James Parker reach the village and ride right through the Nipmucks to the garrison house. The Nipmucks continue to attack through the night but on the morning of the 5th , deciding the cost would be to high to take the house, give up the attack. The people lingered for a few days trying to make up their minds on what to do, but in the end all decide to return to the east. Brookfield as a community has ceased to exist.

  • *****************************

Genealogy.com

Bullard and Allied Families

Page 262

WILLARD

The surname Willard has been a personal name since earliest times and was in use as a place name before the establishment of surnames in England, where many branches of the family bore an ancient coat-of-arms previous to the sixteenth century.

MAJOR SIMON WILLARD, ancestor of the American branch of the Willard family, was the son of Richard and Margery Willard of Horsemonden, County Kent, England, and was baptized April 7, 1605. He came to New England in April, 1634, on the ship with Dolor Davis, his brother-in-law who married Margery Willard. He settled first at Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he lived for one year, receiving a grant of land August 4, 1634. He acquired a thousand acres of land along the Charles river and Boston town line, adjoining the farm of Dolor Davis, and had many grants of land from time to time.

He was one of the founders and first settlers of Concord, and was the first deputy to the General court, elected in December, 1636, serving every year thereafter until 1664, with the exception of 1643-47 and 1648. He was elected in 1654 but declined to serve. He was a member of the council fifteen years, and for twenty-two years an assistant. He was given a patent by the General court in 1641 for trading with the Indians and collecting tribute from them. He was appointed magistrate, and during his life attended between seventy and eighty terms of the County court, his first term beginning November 28, 1654, his last April 4, 1678.

For forty years be was active in military life, and rose to the rank of major, commanding the provincial troops against the Indians. In both military and civil life he became one of the most famous men of the province, and it was he that led the expedition against the Narragansetts in 1655. He was also at Brookfield and Hadley in King Philip's war, leading the Middlesex regiment. The town of Lancaster invited him by a personal letter, dated February 7, 1658-9, to make his home in that town, promising land and privileges. He decided to locate in Lancaster and sold his Concord estates to Capt. Thomas Marshall of Lynn in 1659. His first home in Lancaster was bounded on two sides by the Nashua river, and commanded a superb view of the valley and surrounding country. He lived there twelve years, and in 1670-71 removed to the large farm in the south part of Groton, where in 1671-2 he served as chairman of the committee to seat the meeting-house, and in 1673 was chairman of the Groton selectmen.

He had a splendid farm at Still River (now Harvard), and doubtless moved to Groton to be nearer his property. He left Lancaster enjoying peace and good order, but King Philip's war was soon to devastate the country. He was one of the most conspicuous and honored men of his day, and he died April 24, 1676, at the close of King Philip's war, after having reaped his greatest triumphs. He was a stalwart Puritan, conscientious and of sound understanding, of brave and enduring spirit. He had wealth as well as honor, bringing to this country an ample patrimony, giving large amounts of land to his children and leaving 1300 acres, besides other property, at his death. He was buried April 27, 1676, and the inventory of his estate was filed later by his widow.

He married (first) Mary Sharpe, born 1614 at Horsemonden in England, daughter of Henry and Jane (Field) Sharpe, died before 1651, at which time Major Willard married (second) Elizabeth Dunster, baptized April 26, 1619, at Baleholt in the Parish of Bury, County Lancaster, England, daughter of Henry Dunster of that parish and sister of Henry Dunster, first president of Harvard college. Elizabeth (Dunster) Willard died about six months after her marriage, and Mr. Willard married for his third wife, in 1652, Mary Dunster, daughter of Robert and Mary (Garrett) Dunster, baptized December 15, 1630, at Bury, Lancashire, England, who had come to New England in 1652, and is believed to have been a niece or cousin of Elizabeth (Dunster) Willard, the second wife of Major Simon. (See N. E. H. G. Reg., Vol. 80, p. 93.) By his third wife Major Willard had eight children, and after his death, the widow, Mary (Dunster) Willard, married (second) July 14, 1680, Deacon Joseph Noyes of Sudbury, Massachusetts, and died December, 1715. Major Willard's children by the first wife, Mary Sharpe, were:

I--Mary, b. in England; m. Joshua Edmunds and lived in Charlestow

II--Elizabeth, d. in infancy.

III--Elizabeth, m. Apr. 8, 1653, in Concord, Robert Blood.

IV--Dorothy, died young.

V--Josiah, b. abt. 1635; d. 1674; m. Mar. 20, 1656-7, Hannah Hosmer of Hartford, Conn.

VI--Samuel, b. Jan. 31, 1639-40, in Concord; d. Sept. 12, 1717; m. (first) Aug. 8, 1664, Abigail Sherman; m. (second) abt. 1679, Eunice Tyng.

VII--Sarah, b. June 27 or July 24, 1642, in Concord; d. Jan. 22, 1677-8; m. July 2, 1666, Nathaniel Howard of Chelmsford.

VIII--Abovehope, b. Oct. 30, 1646, in Concord; d. Dec. 23, 1663.

IX--Simon, b. Nov. 23, 1649, in Concord; d. June 23, 1731; m. (first) abt. 1679, Martha Jacob; m. (second) July 25, 1722, Priscilla Buttolph. Children by the third wife, Mary (Dunster) Willard, were:

X--Mary, b. Sept. 7, 1653, in Concord; m. Jan. 22, 1671, Cyprian Stevens of Lancaster.

XI--HENRY, b. June 4, 1655. (See following.)

XII--John, b. Feb. 12, 1656-7, in Concord; d. Aug. 27, 1726; m. Oct. 31, 1698, Mary Hayward.

XIII--Daniel, b. Dec. 29, 1658, in Concord; d. Aug. 23, 1708; m. (first) Dec. 6, 1683, Hannah Cutler, d. Feb. 22, 1690-1; m. (second) Jan. 1, 1692-3, Mary Mills.

XIV--Joseph, b. Jan. 4, 1660-1, in Lancaster; d. before June 23, 1721; m. and lived in London, England.

XV--Benjamin, b. 1664-5, at Lancaster; d. June 16, 1732; m. Sarah Lakin of Groton.

XVI--Hannah, b. Oct. 6, 1666, in Lancaster; m. May 23, 1693, Capt. Thomas Brintnall of Sudbury.

XVII--Jonathan, b. Dec. 14, 1669, in Lancaster; d. 1705; m. Jan. 8, 1690-1, Mary Brown.

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Genealogy.com

A Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of New England 1620-1675

Author: John Farmer

Call Number: 1760

This work, based almost exclusively on original records, is a directory of the first settlers of New England. Arranged alphabetically by surnames, the data on each individual includes the date of arrival, place of settlement, dates of birth and death, and some biographical highlights. It is an invaluable treatise on the settlers.

Bibliographic Information: Farmer, John. A Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of New England 1620-1675. 1829. Reprint, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1964.

Page 318

"SIMON, came from the county of Kent, and resided in Cambridge in 1634, from thence to Concord in 1635, to Lancaster as early as 1660; was of Groton in 1672, and, on the breaking up of that town in 1676, went to Salem, but d. at Charlestown, 24 April, 1676. He was early a military officer, and attained the rank of major, and commanded the forces in Ninigret's and Philip's wars. He represented Concord 14 years, commencing with 1636, and was elected assistant 22 years, from 1654 to his death. He m. (1) Mary Sharp, (2) Elizabeth Dunster, sister of President Dunster, (3) Mary Dunster, and had 9 sons; Josiah, who settled in Weathersfield; Samuel, minister of Groton, and Boston; Simon, b. 23 Nov. 1649, a deacon of Salem; Henry, b. 4 June, 1655, who lived in Lancaster; John, b. 15 Jan. 1657, who lived in Concord; Daniel, b. 29 Dec. 1650, of Boston; Joseph, b. 4 Jan. 1660, who went to England; Benjamin, of Grafton; Jonathan, born 14 Dec. 1669, who settled in Sudbury. His daughters were two Elizabeths, the last the wife of Robert Blood; Mary, who m. Cyprian Stevens; Sarah, who m. Nathaniel Howard; Hannah, who m. Capt. Thomas Brintnall; Mercy, who m. Joshua Edmunds; Abovehope, and Dorothy, who d. unmarried. In speaking of the loss of Major Willard and Richard Russell, Dr. Increase Mather [Indian Wars, 32] says "the death of a few such is as much as if thousands had fallen." Hubbard calls him that "worthy and experienced soldier," and Rev. Mr. Pemberton calls him "a sage patriot in our Israel, whose wisdom assigned him a seat at the council board, and his military skill and martial spirit entitled him to the chief place in the field." A letter from him to the commissioners of the United Colonies, 1654, is presented in Hutch. Coll. 263--268."

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NewEnglandAncestors.org

The New England Historic Genealogical Society

New England Chronology

Volume 7 - Page 343

"A brief memorial of some few remarkable occurrences in the 6 preceeding years. N_E...

'1676...2:27. Major Symon Willard, Esq. buried. 76 of the enemy taken and slain..."

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"Early History of New England"

by Increase Mather

Pages 221 - 222

"...a fmall Army fent forth under the Chriftian and Couragious Major Willard as Commander in Chief. (287)

"Upon the Approach of the Englifh Army, Ninnigret fled from the Place of his ufual Refidence, and got into a Swamp, where it was not eafie to purfue him. Moft of the Pequots under his Jurifidiction then deferted him, and came to the Englifh. Meffengers were fent to demand a Treaty with him, but he was afraid to appear...

(287) There was ftrong Diffatisfaction with Major Willard's Proceedings against ninigret. It was unaccountable to the war Party that he fhould have returned from his well planned Expedition, having inflicted no Chaftifement on the Nianticks; when a Ninnigret fled on his Approach leaving his Country, Corn and Wigwams unprotected which might have been deftroyed without moleftation. It is evident that the Major did not think fuch a Courfe was the beft one; and that Ninigret and his Nianticks did not deferve fuch Severity; and although he was gravely cenfured at the Time by fome, and perhaps even by a Majority of the Englifh, yet Pofterity will doubtlefs fuftain him. He did excellent Service afterwards in the War with philip, and died in the Midft of it..."

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"The complete Great Migration Newsletter"

Volumes 1 - 11

By Robert Charles Anderson

Page 212

"Focus on Cambridge...1635 Cambridge Land Inventory...The return to surveying in late August, which was most certainly not the first Monday of the month, may be related to the handful of alienations of land which are embedded in the records at this point...

"These entries are immediately followed by four deeds. Three of these are dated 25 August 1635, when 'Symond Willard' John Bridge and 'Dollerd Davis' each sold a piece of land to Richard Girling [CaBOP 15]."

Page 216

"Passenger Ships of 1635...On 25 August 1635, 'Richard Girling, mariner,' bought land in Cambridge from Simon Willard, John Bridge and Dolor Davis [CaBOP 15; CaTR19]."

Page 223

"American Genealogist 72 (1997): 321-28...wife of George Lewis was not

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Maj. Simon Willard's Timeline

1605
April 7, 1605
Horsmonden, Kent, England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent, England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent, England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden,Kent,England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent, England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Co. Kent, England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent, Eng
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent, England
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent
April 7, 1605
Horsemonden, Kent, England