William Hathorne, III (c.1606 - 1681) MP

‹ Back to Hathorne surname

Is your surname Hathorne?

Research the Hathorne family

Maj. William Hathorne's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Bray, Berkshire, England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in Town of Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About William Hathorne, III

Major William Hathorne arrived in the New World in 1630 on the Arbella. After living in Dorchester, MA, he moved around 1636 to Salem. He became a deputy to the General Court of Massachusetts and gained the rank of major in campaigns against the Indians. He was, as Hawthorne later characterized him, "a bitter persecutor" of Quakers. In particular, he is remembered for ordering the whipping of Ann Coleman. Both in "Main Street" and in "The Custom House" sketch, Nathanial Hawthorne refers to this ancestor as a persecutor of Quakers, and he is referred to indirectly in "Young Goodman Brown."

___________

William Hathorne arrived in America in 1630 on the ship "Arabella" with Gov. Winthrop. He settled originally at Dorchester where he was Freeman and proprietor May 14, 1634 and a town officer. He removed to Salem in 1636 where he and his wife were admitted to the church in 1636. There he was major (served in King Philip's War), town officer, deputy and Assistant Comissioner of the United Colonies. Said by Pope to the been "...one of the most sagacious and efficient of the colonial leaders."

Deposed in court at Salem Feb 2, 1659, he stated his age at about 51 years; in 1657 said he was age 51. He had letters from his brother Robert of Bray, England 4/1/1653 with a message to their brother John.

FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: A Mrs. Lydia Banks/Bankes of Salem requested dismissal 11/6/1664 from her church to a church at London, pastor Mr. Nye. On 8/28/1646 she wrote from Maidstone, Kent to her brother, Willaim Hathorne; spoke of brother Read; mentioned Wm.'s sale of her land at the plains; of her cattle; of a truck left at brother Mores. In another letter dated 4/18/1648, she refers to brother Roger Moorie; to "my sister, your wife;" to "my brother Read." She also wrote from London in 1673 to Daniel Epps calling him her cousin; recalls seeing him as a child in Holland and at his mother's house in New England; sent respects to his father Symonds, her cousin; refers to his aunt Lake. This all from Pope, "Pioneers of Mass"

___________

  1. Note:
   The Great Migration Begins
   Sketches
   PRESERVED PURITAN
   WILLIAM HATHORNE
   ORIGIN: Bray, Berkshire
   MIGRATION: 1633
   FIRST RESIDENCE: Dorchester
   REMOVES: Salem 1637
   OCCUPATION: Soldier.
   CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: Admission to Dorchester church prior to 14 May 1634 implied by freemanship.
   FREEMAN: 14 May 1634 [MBCR 1:369].
   EDUCATION: "...we still retain among our Democracy the godly Captain William Hathorn, whom the Lord hath indued with a quick apprehension, strong memory, and rhetoric, volubility of speech, which hath caused the people to make use of him often in public service, especially when they have had to do with any foreign government" [WWP 143].
   His inventory included "several old books, £4 10s."
   OFFICES: Assistant, Massachusetts Bay, 1662-79 [MA Civil List 24-25]. Deputy to Massachusetts Bay General Court for Dorchester, 6 May 1635, 7 December 1636 [MBCR 1:145, 185]. Deputy for Salem, 26 September 1637, 2 November 1637, 2 May 1638, 6 September 1638, 13 March 1638/9, 22 May 1639, 4 September 1639, 13 May 1640, 7 October 1640, 2 June 1641, 7 October 1641, 8 September 1642, 10 May 1643, 7 March 1643/4, 29 May 1644, 14 May 1645, 6 May 1646, 10 May 1648, 2 May 1649, 19 October 1649, 7 May 1651, 27 May 1652, 3 May 1654, 6 May 1657, 19 May 1658, 11 May 1659, 30 May 1660, 19 December 1660, 22 May 1661, 7 August 1661 [MBCR 1:204, 205, 27, 236, 250, 256, 270, 288, 301, 318, 336; 2:22, 33, 55, 66, 96, 145, 238, 264; 3:62, 121, 147, 182, 220, 258, 340, 422; 4:1:320, 364, 416, 449; 4:2:1, 30; STR 1:85, 125, 198, 215, 223]. Speaker of the House, 30 May 1644, 14 May 1645, 12 August 1645, 6 May 1646, 10 May 1648, 22 May 1650, 15 October 1650, 6 May 1657, 19 December 1660, 22 May 1661 [MBCR 3:2, 10, 39, 62, 122, 183, 210, 422, 4:1:449, 4:2:2]. Commissioner to the United Colonies, 29 May 1644, 22 May 1650, 7 May 1651, 27 May 1652, 18 May 1653, 3 May 1654 [MBCR 2:69, 3:182, 220, 258, 296, 339].
   Assistant, Salem Court, 1657-77 [EQC 2:42, 58, 61, 138, 157, 161, 168, 182, 202, 249, 266, 278, 281, 319, 347, 385, 431, 3:5, 21, 84, 182, 203, 228, 256, 270, 281, 299, 321, 344, 366, 387, 413, 436, 454, 4:1, 27, 46, 66, 100, 143, 175, 187, 251, 291, 372, 419, 429, 5:1, 40, 79, 105, 147, 224, 245, 269, 316, 416, 6:1, 31, 73, 118, 145, 215, 238]. Associate Salem Court, 15 May 1637, 10 May 1643, 29 May 1644, 2 May 1649 [STR 1:48, 130; MBCR 2:35, 68, 276]. Commissioner to end small causes at Salem, 1656, 1659 [EQC 2:6, 149]. Clerk, pro tem, July 1657 [EQC 2:50]. Recorder of sales and mortgages, 10 May 1643 (until Mr. Downing returns) [MBCR 2:35]. Committee to lay out Lynn bounds, 4 June 1640 [MBCR 2:7, 10]. Committee to take the names of beaver traders, 7 September 1643 [MBCR 2:44]. Arbiter, 7 March 1643/4 [MBCR 2:58]. Director for the trading company, 13 November 1644 [MBCR 2:83]. Commissioner to investigate the French business, 14 May 1645 [MBCR 2:109, 158-59]. Petitioner for a free company of adventurers, 1 October 1645 [MBCR 2:138]. Permitted to solemnize a marriage, 27 October 1647 [MBCR 2:198]. Committee to examine the articles of confederation with the United Colonies, 10 May 1648 [MBCR 2:245]. Special Commissioner to hold Essex Courts, 6 May 1657 [MBCR 3:423]. Appointed to examine bridge at Lynn, September 1672 [EQC 5:89]. Deputized to swear in cullers of fish, July 1674 [EQC 5:379].
   Dorchester selectman, 28 October 1634 [DTR 7]. Rater, 2 October 1636 [DTR 20].
   Salem selectman, 1637-59 [STR 1:50, 52-55, 58, 61-65, 68, 71-74, 77, 79-80, 83-87, 89, 91-94, 97, 105-06, 109, 114-16, 121, 128, 134, 137, 139-43, 146, 148-49, 151, 153, 155-72, 175-76, 179, 190, 192-93, 210, 213, 216, 218, 221, 228, 231]. Committee to view the Island, 3 February 1644[/5] [STR 1:135]. Chosen to marry persons, 10 November 1655 [STR 1:186]. Committee to settle the line between Salem and Ipswich, 13 March 1655/6 [STR 1:191]. Committee to talk with Topsfield men about bounds, 22 September 1657 [STR 1:205]. Arbiter, 8 February 1657[/8] [STR 1:209]. Commissioner to end small causes, 8 March 1657/8 [STR 1:212].
   Instigator of the single military company, 14 May 1645 [MBCR 2:110]. Captain for Salem, 1 October 1645, 6 May 1646 [MBCR 2:133, 146].
   Emmanuel Downing wrote from Salem 23 April 1646 "...our town is much troubled for the putting out of their old Captain, whereupon a day was appointed by Captain Hauthorne for a new choice at which time the old Captain [William Trask] was chosen again, having almost twenty votes more than the new [William Hawthorne]. Both will be presented to the court" (which chose Hawthorne despite the popular sentiment for Trask) [WP 5:77].
   ESTATE: Before 1634 he had a house and land in Dorchester which bounded many men's properties [DTR 6, 7, 8, 13]. On 1 December 1634 "Mr. Hathorne" was to have twelve acres near Roxbury bounds [DTR 9]. "Mr. Hathorne" received lot #47 in the meadow beyond Naponset [DTR 321]. On 20 December 1636 it was ordered that Mr. Hathorne receive one house lot of an acre near the mill [STR 1:18]. In the 1636 Salem land alotment Mr. Hathorne received two hundred acres [STR 1:25]. This was confirmed on 17 February 1636[/7] when the two ordered that he might have the two hundred acres "where he hath built with condition that he be dismissed from thr Church to ours at Salem" [STR 1:36]. On 2 January 1637[/8] "Mr. Hathorne's house" was given two acres near the Pine Neck, presumably indicating that he was no longer in residence [DTR 28]. In the 18 March 1637[/8] division of the neck and other land in Dorchester, "Mr. Hathorne's House" received three acres and three quarters and twenty-six rods in the neck and four acres and thirty rods in the other land [DTR 31]. (These last two grants were made after Hathorne had left Dorchester.)
   On 20 December 1636 Salem selectmen "ordered that Mr. Hathorne shall have one house lot of an acre on this side the rocks towards the mill being the sixth lot from the marshal's house" [STR 1:18].
   On 17 February 1636/7 "Mr. Hathorne" received two hundred acres "with condition that he be dismissed from their church to ours" [STR 1:25, 36]. On 25 December 1637 "Will[iam] Hathorne" received one acre of marsh and meadow, with a household of (possibly) ten [STR 1:103].
   On 15 May 1639 Will. Hathorne was granted three acres of rocky ground by his marsh [STR 1:88]. On 6 June 1639 "Mr. Willi[am] Hauthorne" was granted 250 acres of land by the Massachusetts Bay General Court [MBCR 1:262]. On 25 July 1639 Mr. Wm Hathorne was granted fifty acres of plowed land near his farm [STR 1:90].
   On 12 November 1644 the General Court paid "Mr. Willi[am] Hathorne £5" as part of his charge "expended in their voyage to Connecticut" [MBCR 2:79]. They were still raising the sum on 14 May 1645 [MBCR 2:99].
   On 18 October 1648 the General Court granted two hundred and fifty acres of land to "Capt. Wm Hathorne" at Rowley [MBCR 2:259, 3:48, 141]. On 22 May 1651 the General Court granted him four hundred acres of land [MBCR 3:226]. On 14 October 1651 he was granted land in Kittery in lieu of the £20 due him as Commissioner of the United Colonies [MBCR 3:252-53]. On 6 May 1657 he was granted three hundred acres for public service [MBCR 3:430]. On 29 November 1658 Major Will Hauthorn was granted the town's right and privileges in the planter's marsh and about twenty acres near Fish Brook [STR 1:220].
   In his will, dated 17 February 1670/80 and proved 28 June 1681, "William Hathorne of Salem" bequeathed to "the two sons of my son Eleazer Hathorne late deceased viz: William & Samuel £40 apiece, & to his daughter Abigaile, £20" to be paid by "my son John Hathorne" out of his share of the estate "to the sons payable at the age of one & twenty years & the daughter at eighteen years or marriage"; to "my son John Hathorne, all my housing & land, orchard & appurtenances lying in Salem"; "whereas I had formerly given to my son William (late deceased) in his lifetime three hundred and twenty acres of land lying near Groaten with two adventures at sea, I do by this my last will ... confirm the same & my will is that Sarah his wife, my daughter-in-law, shall have & hold the same"; "for the other part of my farm at Groaten, Jervice Helwyes my grandchild I give it to him and his heirs ... provided he come over out of Urop to enjoy it, if not, then I give it to my daughter Sarah Coaker's two eldest sons, by her husband Coaker, that are now living"; "I give to all the rest of my grandchildren 10s. apiece"; "I do give unto Ann my dear wife, all my moveable estate," she to be sole executrix; "my son John Hathorne & my son-in-law Israell Porter" overseers [EPR 3:423].
   The inventory of the estate of "Maj. William Hathorne, Esq.," was taken 10 June 1681 and totalled £754 3s., including £452 in real estate: "his dwelling house with the outhousing, orchard & land adjoining ... containing of upland & meadow about sixty acres," £450; and "a small parcel of land for a warehouse at the burying point," £2. His inventory also showed "3 guns, 3 old pistols, rapier & cutlass" [EPR 3:423-24].
   BIRTH: Probably Bray, Berkshire, about 1606 (deposed 2 December 1658 aged "about fifty-one years" [EQC 2:128]; deposed 1 November 1670 aged sixty-three years [EQC 4:317]), son of William and Sarah (_____) Hathorne of Binfield, Berkshire [NEHGR 67:257].
   DEATH: Salem April 1681 [Sewall 49].
   MARRIAGE: By 1634 Ann _____. She survived him.
   CHILDREN (birth dates from William Hathorne's own record [EIHC 1:2]):
   i SARAH, b. 11 March 1634/5; m. (1) before 7 April 1663 Edward Helwise, from whom she was divorced on 9 September 1664 [RCA 3:146]; m. (2) Newbury 13 April 1665 Joseph Coker (as "Sarah Hathorne").
   ii ELEAZER, b. 1 August 1637; bp. Salem 6 August 1637 [SChR 16]; m. Salem 28 August 1663 Abigail Curwen.
   iii NATHANIEL, b. 11 August 1639; bp. Salem 28 August 1639 [SChR 17]; no further record.
   iv JOHN, b. 4 August 1641 [sic]; bp. Salem 2 August 1641 [SChR 18]; m. Salem 22 March 1674/5 Ruth Gardner.
   v ANNA, b. 12 December 1643; bp. Salem 17 December 1643 [SChR 20]; m. Salem 27 January 1664/5 Joseph Porter.
   vi WILLIAM, b. 1 April 1645 [sic]; bp. Salem 5 April 1646 [SChR 21]; m. Sarah _____, who survived him [EQC 7:150]. (She is said to have been Sarah Ruck, daughter of John and Hannah [Spooner] Ruck, and to have married second Rev. George Burroughs [GDMNH 122, 783; TAG 56:43-45]. Burroughs did marry Sarah Ruck, for in his will of 4 October 1697 John Ruck bequeathed four hundred acres of land to "my four grandchildren Charles, George, Jeremiah and Josiah Burroughs" [EPR 306:15-17]; but no evidence has been found that Sarah was the wife of William Hathorne.)
   vii ELIZABETH, b. 22 July 1649; bp. Salem 29 July 1649 [SChR 22]; m. Salem 20 November 1672 Israel Porter.
   viii MARY, bp. Salem 1 May 1653 [EIHC 6:243 (SChR 23 skips the date for this entry)]; omitted from William's own list of his children [EIHC 1:2]; no further record.
   ASSOCIATIONS: Sister Elizabeth Hathorne married RICHARD DAVENPORT. Younger brother John Hathorne had arrived in Salem by the early 1640s [Dudley Wildes Anc 154 (which mistakes the Salem church admission of William for that of John)].
   Based on the letters of Mrs. Lydia Bankes, Paul Prindle has proposed that Ann, wife of William Hathorne the immigrant, was sister of ROGER MOWRY [Ancestors and Descendants of Timothy Crosby Jr., 1957, With Supplement H, Ancestry of Mary Morey, Wife of Timothy Crosby Sr., 1981 (Orleans, Massachusetts, 1982) 2:366-67]. Prindle thought this because Lydia Bankes called both Roger Mowry and William Hathorne brother; but she called so many people brother that we conclude she was using the term in the sense of brotherhood in the church, and no genealogical conclusions should be derived from her statements.
   COMMENTS: On 23 August 1640, Ezekiel Rogers advised John Winthrop regarding dealings with Mr. Hawthorne, promoting caution and reporting "that many of God's people did think that some of the Court were very sharp in dealing with Mr. Hawthorne, and above that he deserved, if matters be well scanned" [WP 4:277].
   Mr. Hathorne had part of the charge of Rebecca Cooper's estate and was involved in the consultations when James Downing desired to marry her [WP 4:305, 312]. When Mr. Pester sought the hand of one of Emmanuel Downing's daughters, Mr. Hathorne advised Downing that there would be "scandal to marry ... [her] to such a man that hath no religion" and that it would show that Downing was "stained in point of covetousness" [WP 4:502].
   On 2 December 1658 William Hathorne, aged about fifty-one years, deposed about his arbitration with Mr. Webb [EQC 2:128]. In court March 1669 Samuel Symonds and William Hathorne dissented from the decision to admonish Mr. Edward Woodman for false and scandalous statements regarding Mr. Parker and Mr. Woodbridge [EQC 4:122].
   At court November 1670 William Hathorn Sr. aged sixty-three years, testified about the time when "my Lady Moody first came over" about thirty years ago [EQC 4:317].
   As an Assistant at the Essex court for two decades, all the local tragedies, disagreements and misadventures played themselves out before him and rested on his final judgment. His name fills the pages of the quarterly courts as the assistant before whom most depositions were given.
   BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1884 Henry FitzGilbert Waters published three Hathorne wills from Berkshire which were sufficient to prove the ancestry of the immigrant [NEHGR 38:201-04]. In 1913 Elizabeth French published more wills and other records for this family, and compiled a genealogy of the immigrant's ancestry four four generations [NEHGR 67:248-60]. In 1925 G. Andrews Moriarty added several more English documents to the collection [NEHGR 79: 311-16]. Walter Goodwin Davis used this material in compiling his own account of the family of William Hathorne [Dudley Wildes Anc 147-59].

___________

  1. Birth: ABT. 1606 in Bray, Berkshire, England
  2. Death: APR 1681 in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts
  3. Military Service: Major William
  4. Event: Origin Bray, Berkshire
  5. Event: First Residence 1636 Dorchester, Essex, Massachusetts
  6. Event: Removes 1637 Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts
  7. Event: Migration 1636
  8. Occupation: Soldier
  9. Reference Number: 3740

--------------------

Major William Hathorne (Hawthorne's paternal great-great-great grandfather; c. 1606-1681)

Major William Hathorne arrived in the New World in 1630 on the Arbella. After living in Dorchester, MA, he moved around 1636 to Salem. He became a deputy to the General Court of Massachusetts and gained the rank of major in campaigns against the Indians. He was, as Hawthorne later characterized him, "a bitter persecutor" of Quakers. In particular, he is remembered for ordering the whipping of Ann Coleman. Both in "Main Street" and in "The Custom House" sketch, Hawthorne refers to this ancestor as a persecutor of Quakers, and he is referred to indirectly in "Young Goodman Brown."

view all 14

Maj. William Hathorne's Timeline

1606
1606
Bray, Berkshire, England, (Present UK)
1607
1607
Age 1
Bray, Berks, England, UK
1634
March 11, 1634
Age 28
Dorchester, Suffolk, MA
1634
Age 28
Dorchester (within present Boston), Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1637
August 1, 1637
Age 31
Salem, Essex, MA
1639
August 11, 1639
Age 33
Salem, Essex, Mass
1641
August 4, 1641
Age 35
Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
1643
April 1, 1643
Age 37
Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
December 12, 1643
Age 37
Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
1649
July 22, 1649
Age 43
Salem, Essex, MA, USA