Richard Smith, Gent. (c.1613 - 1691) MP

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Birthplace: perhaps, Myreshaw, Yorkshire, England
Death: Died in Smithtown, Suffolk County, New York
Occupation: Patentee of Smithtown, Long Island, NY;Coat Of Arms, founded Smithtown, New York, Founder of Smithtown, Honorable, captain, and reverend.
Managed by: Sharon Sue Whitney
Last Updated:

About Richard Smith, Gent.

Richard "Bull" Smith, founder of Smithtown

  • BIRTH: ABT 1613, England
  • DEATH: 7 Mar 1691, Smithtown, Suffolk, Long Island, NY
  • PARENTS: unknown
  • Family 1 : Sarah Hammond
  • EMIGRATION: MA

Biographical Summary:

Richard Smith and The Bull Story

From http://longislandgenealogy.com/bull.html

One of the most controversial figures in Long Island history is Richard (Bull) Smith (Smythe), the founder of Smithtown. The owner of lands of vast extent, he was often engaged in boundary disputes. His contest with the town of Huntington over the boundary between it and his own lands was long and bitter, the courts finally deciding in his favor. Richard Smith, Jr., came with his father, Richard Smith, Sr. in 1630, from Gloucestershire, England, to Boston where he married. The young man settled with his father at Taunton, Massachusetts, in 1641; he then purchased a large tract of land on Narragansett Bay and built a trading post at Wickford, Rhode Island. After having trouble with his neighbors in Rhode Island, young Smith removed to the colony of Southampton on Long Island where he again got into difficulty, finally moving to Setauket where he built a home and became a magistrate and public spirited citizen. His wealth permitted him to buy land freely and he soon had assembled a princely domain. He became one of the great men of Colonial Long Island. Smith was buried near his home at Nissequogue.

The often repeated story about Smith, and one which apparently lacks historical foundation, recounts how he made an agreement with the Indians that he could have all of the land which he could encircle in one day riding on the back of a bull. From daylight to dusk he rode, so the legend goes, defining a huge domain. This story, whether true or not, left its mark upon the neighborhood; "Bread and Cheese Hollow" was so named, it is said, because Mr. Smith tarried there on the momentous ride for his noon-day meal.

The bronze statue of a bull, which was erected on a prominent corner of the village of Smithtown to commemorate Smith's reputed exploit, has met with considerable disapproval throughout the years on the part of aesthetic- minded citizens. The principal part of Smithtown originally was owned by Lion Gardiner who received it from Grand Sachem Wyandanch in return for a noble service performed by the Englishman. Gardiner procured the ransom of the chief's lovely daughter, Heather Flower, who had been captured on her wedding night by a raiding band of Narragansett Indians and carried off captive to Connecticut.

In a deed dated July 14, 1659, and witnessed by Richard Smith, Wyandanch in the last year of his life transferred the Smithtown lands to Gardiner, his friend and benefactor. This deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society in Brooklyn. Before his death in 1663, Gardiner in turn transferred his entire rights to this land to Smith who later obtained a patent on March 3, 1665, from Governor Nicoll of New York.

The first deed of land from the Indians is dated 1650. Smith was a shrewd businessman and had his deeds recorded with the local authorities on March 2, 1666, and at the same time with the Secretary of State. In subsequent litigation over the boundaries between Smithtown and Huntington, Smith's claims were sustained in the courts

links

  • The Bull Smith Family: The family of Richard Smith, the "Bullrider"Of Smithtown, Long Island, New York. Database on line.
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Discussion comments:

April 2014

"The only place I have found where Richard 'Bull' Smith is called Major is on his Geni profile. I don't know who or why put Major in his profile."

Removed. EH, curator

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Came To New England Early Part Of 1600 A Patentee Of Smithtown, Long Island, NY

Coat of Arms: Pictured in William S. Pelletreau's "Records of Smithtown", show on the shield six fleur-de-lis set in three, two and one. The fleur-de-lis was also a prominent figure on the Arms of the Augusta County early Smiths, who settled there from PA, as shown by the seal on Captain John Smith's Will. Son, Col. Daniel Smith b 1724 in Ulster; m. c 1751 Jane Harrison, dau Capt. Daniel Harrison and his wife, Margaret Cravens, sister of Robert Cravens, Sr.

It is likely there was a relationship between the immigrant, Richard Smith of Smithtown, and the immigrant, Capt. John Smith, both of whom were born in England in the 1600's. Capt. Smith died in Smithland, VA, the home of his son, Daniel, shortly after the beginning of the Revolution. --------------------

One of the "EIGHT MEN" who came to America before 1654. Leader of the first Squadron, Member of Colonial Council 1688. Justice of Suffolk County, L.I.

Magistrate, Brookhaven and Setauket L.I.

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U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Richard Smith

Name: Richard Smith

Gender: Male

Birth Place: EN

Birth Year: 1615

Spouse Name: Sarah Folger

Marriage State: of NY

Number Pages: 1


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Deed to Samuel Smith - Aug 29, 1688

Richard Smith and Wife Sarah Deed to Samuel Smith - August 29 1688

 

Abstract:

 
Conveys All his messuage tenement or dwelling house and one acre of land next adjoining for a home lot and 3 acres of land more or less adjoining to the north side of Daniel Smith's home lot and Nissequage river westerly and 20 acres of upland adjoining to ye east side of the land in the occupation of Job Smith bounded northerly by the Cliff and sound and two points of meadow land on ye east side of Nissequogue river below the second brook above the mill Also one equal third part of the tract of land meadow and creek thatch on ye east side of ye river a little to ye southward of a small inclosure late in ye occupation of Jonathan Smith and 2 acres of upland next Rasapeage bay northward of the next brook to ye southward of Adam Smiths farm and all the lands meadows and creek thatch be it whatsoever now in ye tenure and occupation of him the said Samuel It is also agreed that Samuel Smith shall have 3 acres adjoining his house for a home lot on condition he maintains a fence Recorded in Suffolk Co Clerk's office Liber A p 25 RECORDS OF THE TOWN OF SMITHTOWN 69

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He was living in Southampton by Oct. 26, 1643. He had the titles of Mr. and Gentleman. On Dec. 3, 1656, he was banished from Southampton for his unreverend carriage toward the magistrates. Then he went to Setauket, where he lived when he patented and founded Smithtown, Long Island, NY. He was traditionally known as the "Bull Rider", and his descendants were known as the "Bull Smiths". He was named "Bull" because he trained and used a bull for riding instead of a horse. He owned at least two slaves. He was buried near his house at Missequaque.

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Richard sailed from England on October 2, 1635, at age 22, on the ship John of London, bound for St. Christopher's. He was in Boston in 1639 and 1640. He migrated to Southampton with a group of men who livedvat Lynn, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in June 1640. His name is found in the Southampton recordsvbetween 1643 and June 6, 1656. He was made a freeman on October 7, 1648. On October 7, 1650, he was chosen constable by the General Court. From Southampton, Richard migrated to the north side of Long Island and went to Setauket in Brookhaven. In 1663, Lion Gardiner conveyed to Richard the title to the lands covered by the deed of gift dated July 14, 1659 which described the land as between Huntington and Setauket and extending southerly half way through the island. In 1677, a patent was issued by Gov. Andros. In 1688, Richard became a member of the Colonial Council.

Early records show that Richard was referred to as "Mr. Smith" and was considered a "gentleman", in the English social terminology. Richard designated himself as such in some of the deeds, suggesting he was from an armigerious family. This is confirmed by the fact that with his signature on legal documents, he used a seal bearing a fleur-de-lis which may have been a charge on his coat-of-arms. He had the liberal schooling of English boys of the more privileged families and based on his penmanship, may have been subjected to the influence of an atmosphere of legal or official procedures and records. Based on the many silver items handed down to various family members, Richard apparently had been brought up surrounded by a considerable degree of luxury. Richard married Sarah probably in New England. Tradition has it that Sarah was the daughter of John Folger, who was the first of that name in New England and one of the settlers of Martha's vineyard.

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Smithtown:

The town was first settled around 1665. Local legend has it that after rescuing a Native American Chief's kidnapped daughter, Richard Smith was told that the Chief would grant title to all of the land Smith could encircle in one day - on a bull. Richard Smith chose to ride the bull on the longest day of the year (summer solstice) - to enable him to ride longer "in one day". The land he acquired in this way is said to approximate the current town's location. There is a large anatomically correct statue of Smith's bull, known as Whisper, at the fork of Jericho Turnpike (New York State Route 25) and St. Johnland Road (New York State Route 25A). Smithtown originally was known as "Smithfield."

More History of Richard "The Bull" Smith and Smithtown:

http://www.sgsosu.net/nmetro/bull.html

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Family Data Collection - Deaths about Richard Smith

Name: Richard Smith

Death Date: 7 Mar 1692

City: Smithtown

County: Suffolk

State: NY

Country: USA


-------------------- Life Events of Richard Smith, Sr. The following account of Richard Smith, patentee of Smithtown, was found in an account written by JW Blydenburgh, Esq. for the Barber-Howe Historical Collections in 1841:

One of the most controversial figures in Long Island history is Richard (Bull) Smith (Smythe), the founder of Smithtown. The owner of lands of vast extent, he was often engaged in boundary disputes. His contest with the town of Huntington over the boundary between it and his own lands was long and bitter, the courts finally deciding in his favor. Richard Smith, Jr., came with his father, Richard Smith, Sr., and other relatives in 1630, from Gloucestershire, England, to Boston where he married. The young man settled with his father at Taunton, Massachusetts, in 1637- 1641; he then purchased a large tract of land on Narragansett Bay and built a trading post at Wickford, Rhode Island. After having trouble with his neighbors in Rhode Island, young Smith removed to the colony of Southampton on Long Island where he again got into difficulty, finally moving to Setauket where he built a home and became a magistrate and public spirited citizen. His wealth permitted him to buy land freely and he soon had assembled a princely domain. He became one of the great men of Colonial Long Island. Smith was buried near his home at Nissequogue.

Smithtown founder Richard Smith's original holdings included the headwaters of the Nissequogue River east to a freshwater pond called Raconkamuck, which translates as "the boundary fishing place" in the Algonquian language. What is now known as Lake Ronkonkoma served as a boundary between lands occupied by four Indian communities: Nissequogues, Setaukets, Secatogues and Unkechaugs. It is now owned by the Town of Islip under the terms of the Nichols Patent, while land around it is controlled by three governments - Smithtown, Islip and Brookhaven. That's because different Indian communities gave separate deeds to the land under their control.

The often repeated story about Smith, and one which apparently lacks historical foundation, recounts how he made an agreement with the Indians that he could have all of the land which he could encircle in one day riding on the back of a bull. From daylight to dusk he rode, so the legend goes, defining a huge domain. This story, whether true or not, left its mark upon the neighborhood; "Bread and Cheese Hollow" was so named, it is said, because Mr. Smith tarried there on the momentous ride for his noon-day meal.

The bronze statue of a bull, which was erected on a prominent corner of the village of Smithtown to commemorate Smith's reputed exploit, has met with considerable disapproval throughout the years on the part of aesthetic- minded citizens. The principal part of Smithtown originally was owned by Lion Gardiner who received it from Grand Sachem Wyandanch in return for a noble service performed by the Englishman. Gardiner procured the ransom of the chief's lovely daughter, Heather Flower, who had been captured on her wedding night by a raiding band of Narragansett Indians and carried off captive to Connecticut.

In a deed dated July 14, 1659, and witnessed by Richard Smith, Wyandanch in the last year of his life transferred the Smithtown lands to Gardiner, his friend and benefactor. This deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society in Brooklyn. Before his death in 1663, Gardiner in turn transferred his entire rights to this land to Smith who later obtained a patent on March 3, 1665, from Governor Nicoll of New York.

The first deed of land from the Indians is dated 1650. Smith was a shrewd businessman and had his deeds recorded with the local authorities on March 2, 1666, and at the same time with the Secretary of State. In subsequent litigation over the boundaries between Smithtown and Huntington, Smith's claims were sustained in the courts.

[edit] ▼An Alternate Account of the Life of Richard Smith Early records show that Richard was referred to as "Mr. Smith" and was considered a "gentleman" in the English social terminology. He used a seal bearing a fleur-de-lis which may have been a charge on his coat-of-arms. Based on the many silver items handed down to various family members, Richard apparently had been brought up surrounded by a considerable degree of wealth.

Richard Smith was one of the early settlers of Southampton, Long Island, New York, who later became the patentee of Smithtown, and whose activities made him a prominent figure among his contemporaries and gave him a well recognized position in the history of Long Island.

Richard sailed from England on October 2, 1635, at age 22, on the ship John of London, bound for St. Christopher's. He was in Boston in 1639 and 1640. He migrated to Southampton with a group of men who lived at Lynn, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in June 1640. His name is found in the Southampton records between 1643 and June 6, 1656. He was made a freeman on October 7, 1648. On October 7, 1650, he was chosen constable by the General Court.

From Southampton, Richard migrated to the north side of Long Island and went to Setauket in Brookhaven. In 1663, Lion Gardiner conveyed to Richard the title to the lands covered by the deed of gift dated July 14, 1659 which described the land as between Huntington and Setauket and extending southerly half way through the island. In 1677, a patent was issued by Gov. Andros.

In 1688, Richard became a member of the Colonial Council.

Richard married Sarah probably in New England. Tradition has it that Sarah was the daughter of John Folger, who was the first of that name in New England and one of the settlers of Martha's Vineyard.

The late Dr. Frederick K. Smith of Warren, Ohio, devoted 20 years to gathering and preserving all available records concerning Richard Smythe and his descendants. His work, The Family of Richard Smith of Smithtown, Long Island, was published by the Smithtown Historical Society in 1967 for the 300th anniversary of Richard Smythe receiving the patent of land.

[edit] ▼Early English Settlers and Patents The early settlers of Long Island were mostly people of English descent who had come from Massachusetts in the 1600s. Growth was generally slow in the lake area. They were in no hurry to leave the safety of the Long Island Sound where they had access to boats to carry them away in case of danger. A 1795 survey reported five houses north of the lake and none to the south. In 1834, a Coastal Survey Map gave evidence of fewer than a dozen houses scattered around the lake. In 1655, the Setaukets Tribe was the first to sell its land to the white man. The price was 10 coats, 12 hoes, 12 hatchets, 50 muves (broad awks for drilling wampum), 100 needles, 6 kettles, 10 fathoms of wampum, 7 parcels of powder, a pair of stockings (for a child), 10 pounds of lead, and a dozen knives. The Indians retained the right to hunt, fish, and in some instances, live on the land. It is doubtful that the Indians really understood the meaning of the sale since they had no concept of individual ownership of land as practiced by white men. Before the white man eventually settled in the lake area, however, many Indians had died of small pox and other diseases brought overseas by the settlers.

Each settler contributed part of the purchase price and received shares in proportion to the amount contributed. These purchases from the Indians were not legally recognized and it was necessary to obtain patents from the king confirming the titles and set boundaries. Patents were granted to William Nicholl (Islip), Richard Bull Smith (Smithtown), Richard Woodhull and several others for Brookhaven. Islip, Smithtown, and Brookhaven formed separate townships with the right to purchase land beginning at the shoreline of Lake Ronkonkoma. This precluded the possibility of ever having a single community with the lake as its natural center.

The patents were drawn up in England and did not always follow exactly the lines agreed to by the settlers. This led to boundary disputes between the townships in later years. Roughly speaking, the land abutting the rim of Lake Ronkonkoma in the Brookhaven section originally belonged to the Setauket and Unkechaug Tribes, in Smithtown, the Nissequogues, and in Islip, the Secatogs.

The name Ronkonkoma, which was spelled many different ways, was not used excepting in reference to the lake itself, although in the Smithtown records we find the land around Spectacle Pond called the Ronconkomy Plains and other parcels of land mentioned as being in the vicinity of Ronkonkomy Pond. Records are incomplete since early settlers used family burial plots, but we do know that people lived on the Smithtown side of the lake in the 1740s.

Regarding early Smithtown history, descendants of the Richard (Bull) Smith family of founding fame, found their way to the shores of lake Ronkonkoma, One Smithtown reference mentions a sale of property in 1734 to Thomas Biggs by Capt. E. Smith, "lying on the north side of Rongconcoma pond not coming within four road of ye said pond" (66 feet).

[edit] ▼1659 Deed Witnessed by Richard Smith The deed seen here is a duplicate of the 1659 document that sealed the exchange. It was copied by hand in 1665 for public record.

http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/3/hs30121a.jpg

The deed's text appears below (spellings are updated for ease of reading). Wyandanch, his son and wife used marks to sign the deed. Richard Smith, founder of Smithtown, was a witness. Notes in the margin reveal the subsequent transfer of the land from David Gardiner, Lion's heir, to Smith in 1665.

East Hampton, July 14th, 1659.

Be it known unto all men both English and Indians, especially the inhabitants of Long Island, that I, Wyandanch, sachem of Paumanack, with my wife and son Wyankanbone, my only son and heir, having deliberately considered how this twenty-four years we have been not only acquainted with Lyon Gardiner, but from time to time have received much kindness of him, and from him not only by counsel and advice in our prosperity, but in our great extremity, when we were almost swallowed up of our enemies -- then, we say, he appeared to us, not only as a friend, but as a father, in giving us his money and goods, whereby we defended ourselves, and ransomed my daughter and friends.

And we say and know that by his means, we had great comfort and relief from the most honorable of the English Nation here about us. So that, seeing we yet live, and both of us being now old, and not that we at any time have given him anything to gratify his love, care and charge, we having nothing left that is worth his acceptance but a small tract of land, we desire him to accept for himself, his heirs, executors and assigns forever.

Now that it may be known how and where this land lyeth on Long Island, we say it lyeth between Huntington and Setauket, the western bound being Cow Harbor [now Northport], easterly Acataamunk, and southerly, across the Island to the end of the great hollow or valley, or more than halfway through the island southerly; and that this is our free act and deed, doth appear by our hand marks under written.

Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of

[Signed] Richard Smith, Thomas Chatfield, Thomas Talmage, and Wyandanch, Wyankanbone, the Sachem's Wife [with their marks]

[edit] ▼The Richard (Bull) Story This story can be found online at http://longislandgenealogy.com/bull.html

The often repeated story about Smith, and one which apparently lacks historical foundation, recounts how he made an agreement with the Indians that he could have all of the land which he could encircle in one day riding on the back of a bull. From daylight to dusk he rode, so the legend goes, defining a huge domain. This story, whether true or not, left its mark upon the neighborhood; "Bread and Cheese Hollow" was so named, it is said, because Mr. Smith tarried there on the momentous ride for his noon-day meal.

The bronze statue of a bull, which was erected on a prominent corner of the village of Smithtown to commemorate Smith's reputed exploit, has met with considerable disapproval throughout the years on the part of aesthetic- minded citizens. The principal part of Smithtown originally was owned by Lion Gardiner who received it from Grand Sachem Wyandanch in return for a noble service performed by the Englishman. Gardiner procured the ransom of the chief's lovely daughter, Heather Flower, who had been captured on her wedding night by a raiding band of Narragansett Indians and carried off captive to Connecticut.

In a deed dated July 14, 1659, and witnessed by Richard Smith, Wyandanch in the last year of his life transferred the Smithtown lands to Gardiner, his friend and benefactor. This deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society in Brooklyn. Before his death in 1663, Gardiner in turn transferred his entire rights to this land to Smith who later obtained a patent on March 3, 1665, from Governor Nicoll of New York.

The first deed of land from the Indians is dated 1650. Smith was a shrewd businessman and had his deeds recorded with the local authorities on March 2, 1666, and at the same time with the Secretary of State. In subsequent litigation over the boundaries between Smithtown and Huntington, Smith's claims were sustained in the courts.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/paula18/2382828217/ This is another picture of the bull, Whisper.

[edit] ▼Legacy: 'Take a Right at the Bull' There probably never was a real bull. But that didn't stop a sculptor from casting a stand-in for Richard Smith's legendary beast. It all started in 1903 when Lawrence Smith Butler, a descendant of The Bull Rider, regaled a classmate with the story of his ancestor's plodding ride. The classmate, sculptor Charles Rumsey, crafted a miniature statue of the bull small enough to sit on a tabletop.

But Butler wanted a bigger one. He set Rumsey to work and tried to raise the $12,000 the artist commanded. In 1923, the five-ton bronze bull was complete.

When Butler couldn't raise enough cash, the bull was sent to the Brooklyn Museum, where it stood out front until 1932. Then it languished in storage until Butler convinced Rumsey's heirs to donate the bull to Smithtown.

The 14-foot-tall bull was unveiled atop a new concrete pedestal on May 10, 1941, at the intersection of Jericho Turnpike and Route 25A. It still stands watch today over the bustling intersection and has become a cult figure for local students who occasionally paint the bull's private parts as a rite of passage.

"The bull has become such a landmark. It's like the expression: Meet me under the Biltmore clock. You hear people give directions like, 'When you see the bull, take a right,'" said Smithtown Supervisor Pat Vecchio.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_much_did_the_Smithtown_Bull_statue_cost_to_build&src=ansTT

How much did the Smithtown Bull statue cost to build? $12,000

[edit] ▼Colonial Dames Connection for Descendants of Richard Smith, Sr. Ancestral Records and Portraits Vol I, Colonial Dames of America, Grafton Press, NY 1910

RICHARD SMITH, for whom Smithtown, L. I., is named, was the son of Richard Smith, of Gloucestershire, England, with whom he came to Boston, Mass., in 1630. The younger Richard purchased a tract of about thirty thousand acres of land from the Narragansett Sachems, in 1641. He erected a house for trade, and gave free entertainment to travellers, it being the great road of the country. Smith's was the first house built in what is now North Kingston, and was probably a block house. In 1659, he leased an enormous tract from the Indians for a thousand years, which gave rise to so many disputes, that it was the final cause of his leaving Narragansett and settling Smithtown. Richard Smith became very influential with the Indians.

He negotiated and signed the treaty for Connecticut, and several times made peace between the Narragansetts and the Massachusetts colonies. His eastern neighbors became jealous of his power, had him indicted in their court, and carried to Newport for trial. They tried to prevent his release, which caused Roger Williams to interfere in his behalf, and to write a very complimentary letter concerning him to King Charles II. Smith became so incensed with his neighbors' behavior that he purchased land on Long Island from Lion Gardiner, removed there, and left his Narragansett property with his relatives. The Long Island property was given to Lion Gardiner by an Indian chief, Wyandauch, as a ransom for the chief's daughter, who was taken captive during the war between the Ninigrets and the Long Island Indians. The princess spent her captivity at Smith's house, which was the rendezvous of the whites during all the Indian wars. The patents for Smithtown were dated March 25, 1677. He had been one of the "Eight Men," 1645, and was a member of the Governor's Council, Province of New York, in 1688. His wife, whom he married in England, was Sarah Folger. He died 1691, leaving his town on Long Island to his seven children, in equal shares.

Nathaniel Smith, grandson of Richard Bull Smith founder of Smithtown owned the large plantation on the east bank of Terrell’s River and a large portion of what is now East Moriches. Col. Josiah Smith lived in the family house [still on Moriches Ave.] and is buried along with family members in their backyard cemetery, now on Paquatuck Ave. This small family cemetery holds the remains of several Revolutionary soldiers. Col. Smith led troops from Brookhaven and east in the ill fated battle of Long Island at Brooklyn in 1776. It is said that the cemetery also holds the remains of many of his many slaves. Large estates on Long Island seemed to have averaged around 20 slaves. Often a slave child would be given to a child of the owner around the same age resulting in bonds of friendship between them. Slavery was abolished in the state of New York in 1821, often earlier in the towns.

One often wonders the mind set of good Christian people toward their slaves! A moral dilemma! Without slaves they would be hard put to exist in this virgin land. Food to live had to be wrested from the ground by hard work.

[edit] ▼Was Richard Smith Sr. A Quaker?? Richard Smith, the founder of Smithtown, appears to have been, not only the first Quaker on Long Island, but the first Quaker in what is now the United States and Canada. Quaker is a nickname for a Friend; a member of the Religious Society of Friends. Richard Smith, probably from Yorkshire, England, came to New England and bought land in Narragansett County in 1641. By 1643 he had come to Southampton. Here he was an important man. He was a full Proprietor and in 1647 was one of five men to lay out the land and in 1648 he was a member of the General Court. In 1648 and 1649 he was on a committee to lay out the "Great Playnes" "Mr." and "Gent" were used with his name. In the Records of Smithtown, we find that "probably the first breach of promise suit occurred in 1650" and that, Mr. Richard Smith was an arbitrator. In 1650 he was chosen Constable and given additional land.

In 1654 he left Southampton to visit England. Here he met one of the "Publishers of Truth", the Quaker Wm. Dewsbury, and became a Friend. Ann Austin and Mary Fisher arrived in Massachusetts Colony in July, 1656. The Colony leaders knew about Quakers from correspondance with Old England and from Puritan Immigrants, so when one of the women said "Thee" the authorities knew they were Quakers. As heretics and blasphemers they were arrested and promptly banished.

On April 7, 1656, about 2 days after the women were banished from Boston, a ship with eight other Quakers and Richard Smith of Long Island arrived. This ship had picked up Smith at New York. The Boston Authorities hurried him back to N. Y. by ship "that he might not contaminate or infect anybody by a land journey." The arrival of this ship started six years of terror. Quakers were beaten, had their ears cut off and four suffered death. Charles the II, a friend of Wm. Penn, in 1661 ordered that "the laws against the Quakers be suspended." While it is possible there may have been Quakers in Salem or other parts of New England, there were none known to the Puritan Authorities. Of course Rhode Island was different.

The Dutch Ministers, at New Amsterdam, in 1658 reported that "The raving Quakers have not settled down -- for altho our government has issued orders against these fanatics, nevertheless they do not fail to pour forth their venom. There is one place in New England where they are tolerated and that is Rhode Island, which is the caeca latrina (sewer) of New England." Our Long Island Meetings stem from the arrival of the ship Woodhouse at New Amsterdam on 1st day, 6th, month of 1657. This was about 25 years before William Penn's settlement of Pennsylvania and about 20 years before Burlington, N. J. was settled by Quakers. Robert Hogdson, who came in the Woodhouse, held a Meeting at Deborah Moody's in Gravesend in 1657. A few days later he preached at Jamaica, from his prison window, while his jailor was at church. These were the first public meetings on Long Island.

James Bowden in the History of Friends says "except for Rhode Island and Shelter Island, there was in 1658, not a rock in the Colonies of North America on which a Quaker could stand without exposing himself to severe suffering." From Friends in the 17th Century we learn that "Capt. Sylvester became a Friend at the time of purchase of Shelter Island or soon thereafter." 1659 appears to be soon thereafter, for from Mallmans Shelter Island, "as early as the 3rd. Mo., 1659, he is referred to as one who has adopted our (Quaker) principles. This is the opinion of his descencents who live on the estate today." Incidentally, some say Shelter Island was so called because Quakers were sheltered there but it was called by this name before any Quakers were around.

To return to Richard Smith as mentioned in the Smithtown Records. In 1656 he was expelled from Southampton because of "irrevend carriage toward the Magistrates." Perhaps he wouldn't take off his hat to the magistrate; this being an old, democratic, Quaker practice. No man is to be reverenced above another and the hat would be removed to God alone. For this reason, and to keep warm, men wore their hats at Meetings. If someone prayed aloud, men removed their hats during the prayer.

"No monument marks Richard Smith's Grave", showing his sons were lacking in filial reverence." This was also Quaker Practice. There was not to be a large monument for a wealthy person and a field stone or a wooden peg for the usual grave, as all are equal in death. There were to be no markers but a burial place record was kept by the Meeting. However notice that when 0badiah, Richard Smiths son died "a substantial tomb was erected" by his father.

Also from the Smithtown Records. "The son of Samuel Smith was known as Quaker Smith" and "Quaker (Richard) Smiths deed from Col. Nichols bears the date March 7, 1665." In the Southampton Records Richard Smith is called "an emissary of Sathan, a Quaker." Richard Smith probably had Meetings at home, with his family. There does not seem to be much information about the Quaker Meetings in Smithtown; but Setauket is occasionally mentioned. A travelling Quaker, John Burnyeat, in his journal tells of a "meeting at Richard Smiths in New England" (1671, L. I. ?)

From the above we know that he was not only a Quaker but an active one. That he was the first Quaker on Long Island, was pointed out some years ago by Rufus Jones, a modern Quaker writer.

[edit] OR The article by John Shiel of Glen Head THE BULLRIDER'S OTHER FIRST, concerning the founder of Smithtown. Mr. Shiel's conclusion was that "Bull" Smith was also "Quaker" Smith. The article brought a prompt and vehement rebuttal from Rufus B. Langhans, Smithtown librarian and longtime student of Smith genealogy and lore. His initial reaction was completely negative. There followed an exchange of correspondence. A few members of the Smith family also contested Mr. Shiel's findings.

Both the primary protagonists in the matter took the original article, paragraph by paragraph; Mr. Langhans first spelling out his objections, the author then defending his position and, finally Mr. Langhans commenting in a conclusion. Mr. Langhan's final comment: "I do not see that we can come to a historical fact based on shaky primary evidence and then go on to prove out' these primary sources by the conclusions of others .... We may at some future date be able to prove that Richard Smith of Smithtown was indeed a Quaker but we are going to have to uncover primary evidence in order to do it".

Mr. Shiel does not seem to have altered his conclusion. However, we have the feeling that if he had the article to do over he might have presented the matter as documented speculation, rather than historical fact.

[edit] ▼Will of Richard Smith The will of Richard Smith in which his wife joined was recorded in the Lester Will Book of which Pelletreau’s Early Long Island Wills contains an unabridged copy; it is also reprinted in Records of Smithtown.

March ye 5 1691

In ye name of God Amen I Richard Smith Sen of Smithtown in ye County of Suffolk on Long Island in ye Province of New York being sick and weak in body but sound and perfect memory thanks be to God calling to mind ye uncertain state of this life and that we must submit to God’s will when it shall please him to call us out of this life do make constitute and ordain this our last Will and testament hereby revoking and annulling any former or other will or testament made by us either by word or writing Imprimis - We give our souls to God who gave them and our bodies being dead to be decently buried in such place and manner as to our executors hereafter named shall seem convenient

Item - To Jonathan Smith our eldest son - our house barn & orchard joining to his home lot and ye home stall as far as old fence Northward and halfe way from said house to Samuel’s house and thence to ye West ende of ye barn and ye wood close on ye East side of ye little brook over against ye house and 40 acres of land more than his equal share in division with ye rest of our children and that lot of meadow over against ye mill on ye west side of ye river

Item - To our son Richard - our Negro Harry and an equal share of land in division with ye rest of our children

Item - To our som Job we and bequeath our Negro Robin for ye term of 12 years and an equal share of land in division with ye rest of our children and ye end of ye sd 12 years the said Robin shall be free.

Item - To our son Adam we give an equal share of land in division with ye rest of our children

Item - To our son Samuel - ye orchard Southward of the house and half of ye pasture bounded by ye little Creek ye eastward parte thereof and ye lower or Northward most Fresh Island on ye east side of ye river with an equall share of land in division with ye rest of our children and the swamp called ye North swamp with ye land on ye east side which is fenced

Item - To our son Daniel - other half of ye pasture Southward of his house ye westward part of it and an equall share of land in division with ye rest of our children & our will is that James Necke shall be and remaine for ye use and improvement of my 6 sons above and their heirs forever

Item - To our daughter Elizabeth Townley - land and meadow at a place called Sunck Meadow as it is mentioned in a deed made by us & also ye one halfe of my cloathing

Item - To our daughter Lawrence - an equall parte and share in division with ye rest of our children where it shall be most suitable & convenient also ye other halfe of my clothing

Lastly - we doe hereby nominate and appoint our beloved sons Jonathan and Rich Smith Executors of this our last Will & testament to pay our just debts and to make an equall partition amongst all our children of all ye goods and chattels and what moveable estate shall be left.

In Witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seales the day and yeare above named

Signed by both Richard Smith w/seal and Sarah Smith w/seal

Sealed & delivered in presence of John Roe Jonathan Lewis Thomas Helme

2 day May 1693 at Brookhaven, Suffolk Co, NY Prerogative Court proved and approved before Coll. William Smith Judge, this to be last will and testament of Richard Smith, Sen, deceased at Smithtown on 7 Mar 1691/92 in which he nominated and appointed his sons Jonathan and Richard tobe his executors.

[edit] ▼Richard Smith and Descendants in Records of Smithtown Some sources say that Richard Smith came to Smithtown from Rhode Island. He was the early proprietor of the town which was organized by patent on 25 Mar 1677 and recognized as a town on 7 Mar 1788. Smithtown lies upon the north side of Long Island between Huntington and Brookhaven.

From Records of Smithtown

p2 Copy of Indian deed of Nesequage lands, entered in the records for Richard Smith, 2 Mar 1666 - recorded in office of Sec of State Albany. His deed from Colonel Nicolls bears date of 7 Mar 1665.

p3 David Gardner, the heir of Lion Gardner made a deed 15 Oct 1664 to confirm the sale of land by Lyon Gardner to Richard Smythe; Lion had died in 1663.

p4 Jeremyah Conklings, deposed testified, that Mr. Richard Smith of Nessaquauk came to my mother Gardiner’s house and fell into discourse with her about a parsel of land which he had bought of Mr. Lyon Gardiner lying beyond Nessaquack. Mr. Smith said he thought he should meet with a great deal of trouble about the land. Mrs. Gardiner made answer of this, rather than she should have any trouble about it she would let the bargain be voide or to that purpose. Whereupon Mr Smith said he would have the bargain stand and he would pain accordings to the agreement with her husband and he would take all the trouble on himself. Which agreement was that Mr. Gardiner should to Mr. Smith all his right in that parcel of land. This testimony taken 21 Mar 1670/01 before me, John Mulford, JP which is recorded in V1 p336, East Hampton.

p5 Deed from Nassekege, Indian Sachem He sold the part of land on east side of Nessequague River..do by these presents for me and my heirs make over all our interest in the sayd halve neck unto Richard Smith of Nessequage senyer

p6 A Patent from Governor Richard Nicolls This was a confirmation of a tract of land called Nesequake granted unto Richard Smith of Long Island in June 1664 whereupon Richard Smith should place 10 families upon said land in 3 years and 20 families in 5 years.

p7-9 Deed from Sunk Squaw who seemed to own the land which Richard Smith had need to have a clear legal title, so he agreed to buy it from her for 1 gun, 1 kettle, 10 coats, 1 blanket, 3 hands of powder, and 3 handfulls of lead. This was all Nessetconsett’s land on west side of Nesaquack River with all the benefits and privileges to Richard Smith of Smithfield andhis heirs or assigns forever. Also Catawump for 2 coats more agreed to join in the sale.

p10 Richard Smith had purchased several tracts of land from the Indians in Brookhaven but the people of Setauket insisted that as he was about to set up a township of his own, he should surrender all his Indian titles to Brookhaven. This he did for a suitable consideration and the agreement was made to settle disputed boundaries on 8 Mar 1666.

p11 On 31 July 1656 Richard Smith, plaintiff and Huntington men Defendants over lands at Fresh Pond. In 1670 the claim of Huntington men was sustained; in 1674 the Dutch recaptured NY and Lng Island for a brief period. Richard Smith with his usual energy had made application for a new trial, which was granted

p14-15 In the October term 1675 the NY English Government head his case and the court found in favor of him, the plaintiff.

p18-20 Agreement between Captain John Scott who was to pay 25 pounds to Richard Smith, SR. on 22 Nov 1663 for lands lying between Cow Harbour and Nessequack River, which was witnessed by Henry Pierson, Richard Howell, and John Youngs, set down by Christopher Foster, Southampton Clerk. In this Richard Smith is identified as Richard Smith of Ashford alias Setauket on Long Island. John Scott was a con artist and he fled the area.

p20-22 It would seem that the agreement was not legal so a second patent was issued to Ricard Smith by Governor Andross in 1677.

p25-26 Daniel Whitehead of Jamaica renounced any claims to lands of interest by Richard Smith on 8 Mar 1691, found in Liber A p60 of deeds. Timothy Wood’s son John Wood made over his deed to Richard Smith on 3 Mar 1681 but it was not recorded until 8 Mar 1691, found in Liber A p61 of deeds.

p26-27 Deed from Wyandance to Heirs of Richard Smith for 12 shillings current money in NY from Sarah Smith and her sons Jonathan, Richard, Samuel, Adam, and Daniel Smith of Smithtown; Wyandance was the grandfather who sold rights to Richard Smith, now deceased. This deed was dated 18 Sept 1703.

p33 Commission of Lt. Richard Smith Jr in Company of which Richard Woodhal Jr is Captain, 13 Mar 1685; Commission of Richard Smith, JR as JP on 14 Dec 1689; Petition of Sarah Smith, widow, complaining of one Richard Smith and praying to have a decree of the Court of Equity in relation to her husband’s estate executed. She having now living 50 children and grand children whom she is desirous of providing for, 24 Nov 1703; same to oblige her son Richard to surrender a deed in his possession, 3 Sept 1703; claim of Nathaniel Platt and James S. Adams in behalf of devisees of Richard Smith and Joshua Smith for land in possession of Timothy Wheeler, bounded west by Mowbrays Patent and Winnecomack Patent, north by Smithtown patent, east by Nicoll’s Patent, 11 Apr 1789

p33- Will of Richard Smith, 5 Mar 1691/92 written and 2 May 1693 proved

p37- Will of Sarah Smith, 27 Jan 1707/08, and recorded in Liber B p25 Suffolk Co’s Clerk

p39 Will of Richard Smith the Second, known as Justice Richard Smith, written 23 June 1718 and proved 28 Mar 1720

p41 Estate of Obediah Smith, who died intestate on 24 Apr 1662; Obediah drowned and his Letters of Administration listed the inventory of his estate; he was the youngest son of the patent holder, Richard Smith; the estate of just over 143 pounds went to his father as heir-at-law.

p42 Will of Quaker Richard Smith, son of Samuel Smith, now of Newport, RI

p43 Will of Captain Richard Smith, son of Richard, 2nd

p44 Will of Samuel Smith, son of Quaker Richard Smith Will of aaron Smith, son of Job Smith

p46 Will of Ebenzer Smith, son of Richard, 2nd Will of Adam Smith, son of Richard the Patentee

p47 Will of Edmund Smith, son of Adam

p48 Will of Edmund Smith, son of Edmund and grandson of Adam Smith

p49 Will of Jacob Smith of Smithtown, son of Othniel, son of Adam, son of Job Smith

p50 Will of Job Smith, son of Job, 2nd

[edit] ▼Sources “Ancestral Records and Portraits Vol I, Colonial Dames of America”, Grafton Press, NY 1910

"Compendium of American Genealogy" Frederick Adams Virkus, Originally Published: Institute of American Genealogy, Chicago, IL, 1937, Republished: Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore, MD, 1968 Volume VII: Immigrant Ancestors, p 881

“Early Long Island Wills of Suffolk County, 1691-1703” Pelletreau, William S., A.M., New York, 1897. FHL 974.725 P2p film #833370

"The Family of Richard Smith of Smithtown, Long Island" Frederick Kinsman Smith, Smithtown Historical Society, Smithtown, NY, 1967

"The Founders and Patriots of America" Mrs. Herman E. Weston, National Society of the Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, 1975, V4 p98, 130; V15 p9; V32 p183; V34 p115

“Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England” James Savage, Originally published 1860-1862. Reprint published Baltimore MD: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1994, p929-931

"Genealogies of Long Island Families, V2, Henry B. Huff, p57, 62, 72, 74-75, 77-82, 84-85, 103, 106, 205, 221, 395, 406, 419-420, 671, 704, 706, 728, 747

“History and Genealogies of the Hammond Families in America: with an account of the early history of Hammond Family” Frederick Stam Hammond, Oneida NY: Ryan & Burkhard, 1902-1904

“The Identity of Sarah, Wife of Richard1 Smith of Smithtown, Long Island” Edward H. L. Smith, New York: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 1990 (vol. 121)

"New England Marriages Before 1700" Clarence A. Torrey, Baltimore, MD, 1985

"Papers and Biography of Lion Gardiner, 1599-1663" Curtis Gardiner, p86

"Records of the Town of Smithtown, Long Island, N.Y." Transcribed by William S. Pelletreau, Huntington, N.Y.: Long-Islander Print, 1898

"Topographical Dictionary of 2885 English Emigrants: na New England 1620-1650" Charles Banks, p59, 121

“Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700”. (Online database. NewEnglandAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001, {Southampton 198; Winthrop-Babcock 445; Wickham-Billard 93; Bissell 94; Strong 648; LBDF&P 4:78, 130, 15:9}

"Wills of the Smith Families of New York and Long Island, 1664-1794" Pelletreau, William S., New York: F.P. Harper, 1898

"Woodhull Genealogy: The Woodhull Family in England and America", Mary Gould Woodhull and Frances Bowes Stevens, Henry T. Coates & Co., Philadelphia, PA, 1904 ______________________________

Name: Major Richard "The Bull" SMITH Surname: Smith Given Name: Major Richard "The Bull" Sex: M Birth: ABT. 1613 in Myreshaw, Bradford, Yorkshire, England

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In today's dates, this would be Mar. 5, 1692 - notice that he died Mar. 7, 1691/2, and the will wasn't probated till 2 May 1693 - but it's not almost a two year lapse, but only 10 months.

The document says 1691, but it was actually 1692.

He was living in Southampton by Oct. 26, 1643. He had the titles of Mr. and Gentleman. On Dec. 3, 1656, he was banished from Southampton for his unreverend carriage toward the magistrates. Then he went to Setauket, where he lived when he patented and founded Smithtown, Long Island, NY. He was traditionally known as the "Bull Rider", and his descendants were known as the "Bull Smiths". He was named "Bull" because he trained and used a bull fo r riding instead of a horse. He owned at least two slaves. He was buried near his house at Missequaque. America's First Families Ancestor Roll Of Honor

RICHARD SMITH SMITHTOWN, LONG ISLAND (c.1613-1691/92)

Richard Smith was one of the early settlers of Southampton, Long Island, New York, who later became the patentee of Smithtown, and whose activities made him a prominent figure among his contemporaries and gave him a well recognized position in the history of Long Island.

Richard sailed from England on October 2, 1635, at age 22, on the ship John of London, bound for St. Christopher's. He was in Boston in 1639 and 1640. He migrated to Southampton with a group of men who lived at Lynn, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in June 1640. His name is found in the Southampton records between 1643 and June 6, 1656. He was made a freeman on October 7, 1648. On October 7, 1650, he was chosen constable by the General Court.

From Southampton, Richard migrated to the north side of Long Island and went to Setauket in Brookhaven. In 1663, Lion Gardiner conveyed to Richard the title to the lands covered by the deed of gift dated July 14, 1659 which described the land as between Huntington and Setauket and extending southerly half way through the island. In 1677, a patent was issued by Gov. Andros.

In 1688, Richard became a member of the Colonial Council.

Early records show that Richard was referred to as "Mr. Smith" and was considered a "gentleman", in the English social terminology. Richard designated himself as such in some of the deeds, suggesting he was from an armigerious family. This is confirmed by the fact that with his signature on legal documents, he used a seal bearing a fleur-de-lis which may have been a charge on his coat-of-arms. He had the liberal schooling of English boys of the more privileged families and based on his penmanship, may have been subjected to the influence of an atmosphere of legal or official procedures and records. Based on the many silver items handed down to various family members, Richard apparently had been brought up surrounded by a considerable degree of luxury.

Richard married Sarah probably in New England. Tradition has it that Sarah was the daughter of John Folger, who was the first of that name in New England and one of the settlers of Martha's vineyard.

The late Dr. Frederick K. Smith of Warren, Ohio, devoted 20 years to gathering and preserving all available records concerning Richard Smythe and his descendants. His work, The Family of Richard Smith of Smithtown, Long Island, was published by the Smithtown Historical Society in 1967 for the 300th anniversary of Richard Smythe receiving the patent of land.

Legacy 'Take a Right at the Bull' There probably never was a real bull. But that didn't stop a sculptor from casting a stand-in for Richard Smith's legendary beast. It all started in 1903 when Lawrence Smith Butler, a descendant of The Bull Rider, regaled a classmate with the story of his ancestor's plodding ride. The classmate, sculptor Charles Rumsey, crafted a miniature statue of the bull small enough to sit on a tabletop.

But Butler wanted a bigger one. He set Rumsey to work and tried to raise the $12,000 the artist commanded. In 1923, the five-ton bronze bull was complete.

When Butler couldn't raise enough cash, the bull was sent to the Brooklyn Museum, where it stood out front until 1932. Then it languished in storage until Butler convinced Rumsey's heirs to donate the bull to Smithtown.

The 14-foot-tall bull was unveiled atop a new concrete pedestal on May 10, 1941, at the intersection of Jericho Turnpike and Route 25A. It still stands watch today over the bustling intersection and has become a cult figure for local students who occasionally paint the bull's private parts as a rite of passage.

The bull has become such a landmark. It's like the expression: Meet me under the Biltmore clock. You hear people give directions like, When you see the bull, take a right, said Smithtown Supervisor Pat Vecchio. 1 Change Date: 19 Oct 2001 at 01:00:00

Father: Richard SMITH b: ABT. 1586 in Jersey, Channel Islands, England Mother: Mrs. SMITH b: ABT. 1590 in Jersey, Channel Islands, England

Marriage 1 Sarah HAMMOND b: ABT. 1626 in Brokhaven, Brookhaven, Suffolk, New York ** •Married: 1645 in Watertown, Middlesex, Ma .Children 1. Samuel SMITH b: 1654 in Southampton, Long Island, New York 2. Jonathan SMITH b: ABT. 1641 in Smithtown, Suffolk, New York 3. Elizabeth SMITH b: ABT. 1643 in Southampton, Long Island, New York 4. Richard SMITH b: ABT. 1645 in Southampton, Long Island, New York 5. Job SMITH b: ABT. 1647 in Southampton, Long Island, New York 6. Adam SMITH b: 1649 in Southampton, Long Island, New York 7. Obadiah SMITH b: 1649 in Smithtown, Suffolk, New York 8. Daniel SMITH b: ABT. 1656 in Brookhaven, Long Island 9. Deborah SMITH b: ABT. 1658 in Brookhaven, Long Island .

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.

Name: Richard Smith Sex: M Birth: 1613 in Myreshaw, Bradford, Yorkshire, England Death: 7 MAR 1692 in Smithtown, Suffolk Co., NY

Note: .

Patentee of Smithtown on Long Island

March ye 5th, 1693, in ye name of God Amen, I Richard Smith of Smithtown in the county of Suffolk on Long Island in ye province of New York, being sick and weak in body of sound and perfect Memory thanks be to God, calling to mind ye uncertain state of this life and that we must submit to God's will when it shall please him to call us out of this life, doe make institute and ordain this our last Will and Testament, hereby revoking and annulling any former other Will or Testament made by us either by word or writing. Imprimis we give our souls to God who gave them and our bodies being dead to be decently buried in such place and manner as our Executors hereinafter named shall find convenient; and as for lands and goods and for wherewith it hath pleased God to endow us with, all our Just Debts and Legacyes being first paid, we order and dispose in manner and form following. Item, to Jonathan Smith our Eldest son, we give and bequeath our house farm and orchard, joining to his home lot and ye home shall as far as the old fence northward and half-way from ye west end of the farm, and ye woodhouse on ye East side of the little Brook over against ye house, and forty acres of Land, more or less, his equal share in division with the rest of our children, and that lot or meadow over against ye Mill on west side of ye river. Item, to our son Richard we give and bequeath our Negro Harry and an Equal share of Land in division with ye rest of children. Item, to our son Job we give and bequeath our Negro Robin ye Term of twelve years and an equal share of Land in division with ye rest of our children, and at the end of ye twelve years the said Robin shall be free. Item, to our son Adam we give an equal share of Land in division with the rest of our children. Item, to our son Samuel Smith we give and bequeath ye orchard southward of the house and half of ye pasture bounded by ye little Creek ye Eastward part thereof and ye lower or northward most fresh Island and ye eastward of ye river, with an equal share of land in division with the rest of our children, and the swamp called ye north swamp, with ye land on ye eastern which is fenced. Item, to our son Daniel we give and bequeath ye other half of the pasture southward of his house, ye westward parts of it, and an Equal share of land in division with ye rest of our children; and our will is that James Hill shall be and remain for the use and improvement of my six sons, aforesaid, and their heirs forever. Item, to our Daughter Elizabeth Townley, we give and confirm that land and meadow at a place called Sunk Meadow, as it is mentioned in a deed made by us, and also ye one-half of my clothing. Item, to our Daughter Lawrence we give and bequeath an equal part and share of land in division with the rest of our children, and the other half of my clothing which it shall be most suitable and convenient; and appoint our beloved sons Jonathan and Richard Smith Executors of this our last will and testament, to pay all our Just Debts and to make an equal partition amongst all our children of all ye goods and chattels and what moveable estate shall be left. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hand and seals the day and year above mentioned.

RICHARD SMITH. [Seal.] SARAH SMITH. [Seal.] Sealed and delivered in presence of JOHN ROE, JONATHAN LEWIS, THOMAS HOLMES.

Marriage 1 Sarah Folger . •Married: 1645 in Watertown, Middlesex, MA . Children . 1. Elizabeth Smith b: 1648 2. Deborah Smith b: ABT. 1658 in Long Island, NY 3. Daniel Smith b: ABT. 1657 4. Job Smith b: ABT. 1647 in Smithtown, Suffolk Co., NY 5. Richard Smith b: ABT. 1645 .

As you can see there is some disagreement among geneological scholars over the wife of Richard Smith. Its funny but there is even evidence above the Sarah Hammond Marriage that the Wife of RIchard Smith is Sarah Folger. Your thoughts are always appreciated. .

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One of the most controversial figures in Long Island history is Richard (Bull) Smith (Smythe), the founder of Smithtown. The owner of lands of vast extent, he was often engaged in boundary disputes. His contest with the town of Huntington over the boundary between it and his own lands was long and bitter, the courts finally deciding in his favor. His wealth permitted him to buy land freely and he soon had assembled a princely domain. He became one of the great men of Colonial Long Island. Smith was buried near his home at Nissequogue. The often repeated story about Smith, and one which apparently lacks historical foundation, recounts how he made an agreement with the Indians that he could have all of the land which he could encircle in one day riding on the back of a bull. From daylight to dusk he rode, so the legend goes, defining a huge domain. This story, whether true or not, left its mark upon the neighborhood; "Bread and Cheese Hollow" was so named, it is said, because Mr. Smith tarried there on the momentous ride for his noon-day meal. The bronze statue of a bull, which was erected on a prominent corner of the village of Smithtown to commemorate Smith's reputed exploit, has met with considerable disapproval throughout the years on the part of aesthetic- minded citizens. The principal part of Smithtown originally was owned by Lion Gardiner who received it from Grand Sachem Wyandanch in return for a noble service performed by the Englishman. Gardiner procured the ransom of the chief's lovely daughter, Heather Flower, who had been captured on her wedding night by a raiding band of Narragansett Indians and carried off captive to Connecticut. In a deed dated July 14, 1659, and witnessed by Richard Smith, Wyandanch in the last year of his life transferred the Smithtown lands to Gardiner, his friend and benefactor. This deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society in Brooklyn. Before his death in 1663, Gardiner in turn transferred his entire rights to this land to Smith who later obtained a patent on March 3, 1665, from Governor Nicoll of New York. The first deed of land from the Indians is dated 1650. Smith was a shrewd businessman and had his deeds recorded with the local authorities on March 2, 1666, and at the same time with the Secretary of State. In subsequent litigation over the boundaries between Smithtown and Huntington, Smith's claims were sustained in the courts.

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"2 die Octobris 1635: Aboard the John of London James Waymouth Mr bound to St Christophers." Batcheller, John, 26 Clark, Gilbert, 19 Clymer, Jo. 30 Cooke, Edward 22 Dodson, Edward, 21 Elmes, Richard, 21 Evans, Lewes, 25 Evans, Richard, 21 Feeld, Henrie, 25 Fleetwood, Alexander, 19 Freeman, Elizabeth, 18 Frost, Thomas, 28 Goodwinn, Mary, 18 Goodwynn, Jane, 20 Heelis, George, 19 Henman, Jo, 19 Hill, Joan, 21 James, Thomas, 25 Lee, Walter, 21 Lilliot, Martha, 20 Mekins, Edward, 18 Metcalf, Oswell, 22 Mulleneux, Jo, 24 Murrin, Elizabeth, 21 Parker, Samuel, 16 Radford, Henrie, 20 Richardson, William, 24 Sherlock, Jo, 20 Smith, Richard, 22 Thompson, Jo, 19 Thomson, Christopher, 21 Townsend, Richard, 19 Walker, Thomas, 19

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He was referred to as Richard Smith, the Quaker; partly because there were other Richard Smiths in Bethpage area of Long Island, and partly because he was one of the first Quakers in the New World.

"You can start by going to the site for Smithtown, Long Island, which this Richard Smythe/Smith founded. Lots of info and links from there. I have a book entitled "The Family of Richard Smith - Ten Generations" a great resource. My mother was a Smith and from this lineage

Sincerely,

Sandra Lee Peevers "

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A mural tablet in St. Paul's Church in Wickford, erected in 1903 to the memory of Richard Smith, recites the highlights of his eventful career. "he led a sober, honourable and religious life," it reads, and closes with the words of Roger Williams: "In his owne house with much serenitie of soule and comfort ye yielded up his spirit to God (the Father of Spirits) in peace." His will reads:.

In the Name of God, Amen. The fourteenth day of July in the year of Our Lord, one thousand, six hundred, sixty and four, in the Sixteenth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord, Charles the Second by the Grace of God of England and Scotland, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Father, etc. I, Richard Smith, of Wickford, in the Narragansett Countrey, in New England, Yeoman, being in health of Body, and of good and perfect memory, (Thanks be unto God) Do make this my last Will and Testament, and I do hereby revoak and renounce all former and other Wills and Testaments whatsoever heretofore by me made, by Word, Writing or otherwise And make and ordain this to be my very true, last Will and Testament, and no other Concerning my Lands, Chattels, debts, and every part and parcel thereof, in manner and form as followeth. .

First: I Commend my soul to Almighty God, and to his Son Jesus Christ, my Saviour and Redeemer, by whom I have to obtain full pardon, and remission of all my Sins, and to Inherit Everlasting Life. And I will that my Body be decently buryed by the Discretion of my Executors hereunto named. .

Item. I will that my debts which I shall owe unto any Person or Persons at the time of my decease either by Law or Conscience be well and truly Contented and paid, within Convenient time, out of my Goods and Chattels. .

Item, I give unto my Son Richard Smith all my Right, Title and interest of, in and to my Dwelling house, and Lands thereto belonging, Situate, being and lying in Wickford aforesaid, and is bounded on the Southwest by Annoquatucket river, and by the Lands of Capt. William Hudson, Northeasterly and on the East by a fresh river or brook and Creek and Cove. .

Item, I give unto my Son the s'd Richard Smith, all my right title and interest of, in, and to my propriety of Lands lying in Cunnanicot Island and Dutch Island, with the privileges and appurtenances to them or either of them belonging or in any way appertaining. .

Item, I give unto my daughter Elisabeth, wife of John Vial of Boston, Vintner, all that my Share, which is a oe Third part of Land lying on the Southerly side of my son, Richard Smith's two thirds part of a tract of land lying on the Easterly side of the aforesaid fresh river, or Brook, and Creek and Cove, Commonly Called by the name of Sagag. Item, I will that all my share and part in the Great Neck of Land beyond Capt. Edward Hutchinss house, Westward and Southward and all the rest of my share of Land belonging to that purchase And also my share of Land of the last purchase and all my Cattle, Horses, Mares, Sheep, Goats, & Swine and all my Goods and Debt whatsoever to me appertaining be (after my decease) Divided into Four Equal parts and portions, the which after my debts paid & funeral Charged thereout, I give and bequeath as followeth. That is to say. To my son Richard Smith, and his heirs, the one fourth part or portion thereof, and to my Daughter, Elisabeth, wife of John Vial and her issue, I give one other Fourth part thereof, and to my Grand Children, the Children of my dec'd daughter Katharine, sometime wife to Gilbert Updike, one other forth part thereof to be Equally Divided amongst them. And to my Grand Children, the Children of my deceased daughter, Joan, sometime wife to Thomas Newton, one other fourth part thereof to be Equally divided amongst them my S'd Grand Children, parts to be paid to each of them, Viz. To Each of my Grandsons as they Come to the age of Twenty one years; And to Each of my Grand Daughters as they Come to the age of Eighteen years, or on day of marriage which shall first happen, And in Case that any One of my Grand Children, the Children of my daughters Katharine and Joan, do Dyue before they come to be of the age aforesaid or Marr'yd, then such part or share, as should have been to such deceased, shall be to the Survivours of them, part and part alike to them to be divided. .

Item, I make and ordain my sons, Richard Smith, and John Vial, to be my full whole and only Executors of this my last will and Testament. And my Well beloved Friend Capt. Edward Hutchinson of Boston. [Here the document is torn.] Before John Leverett Assistant, Entered and recorded at the request of the s'd Vial the 22d. of August, 1666. Robert Howard, Not. Pub., An attested Copy..

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Richard "Bull" Smith, founder of Smithtown's Timeline

1613
1613
Myreshaw, Yorkshire, England
1628
July 13, 1628
Age 15
Chipping Campden, Gloucs., Eng.
1635
1635
Age 22
from England
1641
1641
Age 28
Smithtown, Cattaraurgus, NY
1643
1643
Age 30
Southampton, Suffolk, New York
1645
1645
Age 32
Southampton, Suffolk, New York
1645
Age 32
Long Island, New York
1647
1647
Age 34
Southampton, Suffolk, New York
1648
1648
Age 35
England, United Kingdom

Prehaps to Jamaica (now Queens NY) Long Island

1648
- present
Age 35
Smithtown, Long Island, NY