Marcel Duchamp (1887 - 1968)

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Nicknames: "Rrose Sélavy", "Rose Sélavy"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Blainville-Crevon, Upper-Normandy, France
Death: Died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, Ile-de-France, France
Managed by: Mandy Tan
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About Marcel Duchamp

He was a French artist whose work is most often associated with the Dadaist and Surrealist movements. Duchamp's output influenced the development of post-World War I Western art. He advised modern art collectors, such as Peggy Guggenheim and other prominent figures, thereby helping to shape the tastes of Western art during this period.

A playful man, Duchamp challenged conventional thought about artistic processes and art marketing, not so much by writing, but through subversive actions such as dubbing a urinal art and naming it Fountain. He produced relatively few artworks, while moving quickly through the avant-garde circles of his time.

The creative act is not performed by the artist alone; the spectator brings the work in contact with the external world by deciphering and interpreting its inner qualifications and thus adds his contribution to the creative act.

Marcel Duchamp was born in Blainville-Crevon Seine-Maritime in the Haute-Normandie region of France, and grew up in a family that enjoyed cultural activities. The art of painter and engraver Emile Nicolle, his maternal grandfather, filled the house, and the family liked to play chess, read books, paint, and make music together.

Of Eugene and Lucie Duchamp's seven children, one died as an infant and four became successful artists. Marcel Duchamp was the brother of:

  • Jacques Villon (1875–1963), painter, printmaker
  • Raymond Duchamp-Villon (1876–1918), sculptor
  • Suzanne Duchamp-Crotti (1889–1963), painter.

As a child, with his two older brothers already away from home at school in Rouen, Duchamp was close to his sister Suzanne, who was a willing accomplice in games and activities conjured by his fertile imagination. At 10 years old, Duchamp followed in his brothers' footsteps when he left home and began schooling at the Lycée Corneille in Rouen. For the next 7 years, he was locked into an educational regime which focused on intellectual development. Though he was not an outstanding student, his best subject was mathematics and he won two mathematics prizes at the school. He also won a prize for drawing in 1903, and at his commencement in 1904 he won a coveted first prize, validating his recent decision to become an artist.

He learned academic drawing from a teacher who unsuccessfully attempted to protect his students from Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and other avant-garde influences. However, Duchamp's true artistic mentor was his brother Jacques Villon, whose fluid and incisive style he sought to imitate. At 14, his first serious art attempts were drawings and watercolors depicting his sister Suzanne in various poses and activities. That summer he also painted landscapes in an Impressionist style using oils.

Dada

New York Dada had a less serious tone than that of European Dadaism, and was not a particularly organized venture. Duchamp's friend Picabia connected with the Dada group in Zürich, bringing to New York the Dadaist ideas of absurdity and "anti-art". A group met almost nightly at the Arensberg home, or caroused in Greenwich Village. Together with Man Ray, Duchamp contributed his ideas and humor to the New York activities, many of which ran concurrent with the development of his Readymades and The Large Glass. They also worked on the concept of "found art".

The most prominent example of Duchamp's association with Dada was his submission of Fountain, a urinal, to the Society of Independent Artists exhibit in 1917. Artworks in the Independent Artists shows were not selected by jury, and all pieces submitted were displayed. However, the show committee insisted that Fountain was not art, and rejected it from the show. This caused an uproar amongst the Dadaists, and led Duchamp to resign from the board of the Independent Artists.

Along with Henri-Pierre Roché and Beatrice Wood, Duchamp published a Dada magazine in New York, entitled The Blind Man, which included art, literature, humor and commentary.

When he returned to Paris after World War I, Duchamp did not participate in the Dada group.

Marcel Duchamp died on October 2, 1968 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, and is buried in the Rouen Cemetery, in Rouen, France. His grave bears the epitaph, "D'ailleurs, c'est toujours les autres qui meurent;" or "Besides, it's always other people who die."

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcel_Duchamp

"Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nude_Descending_a_Staircase,_No._2

Readymades of Marcel Duchamp: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readymades_of_Marcel_Duchamp

Fountain (Duchamp): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fountain_%28Duchamp%29

L.H.O.O.Q.: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.H.O.O.Q.

"The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Large_Glass

Rrose Sélavy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rrose_S%C3%A9lavy

Étant donnés: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etant_donn%C3%A9s

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Marcel Duchamp's Timeline

1887
July 28, 1887
Blainville-Crevon, Upper-Normandy, France
1927
June 8, 1927
Age 39
Paris, Ile-de-France, France
1954
January 16, 1954
Age 66
1968
October 2, 1968
Age 81
Neuilly-sur-Seine, Ile-de-France, France