Marie de Bourgogne (1457 - 1482)

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Nicknames: "Mary the Rich", ""the Rich"", "Mary Of /Burgundy/", "Joan the Mad"
Birthplace: Coudenberg, Bruxelles, Brabant
Death: Died in Bruges, Flandre
Cause of death: Horse riding accident
Occupation: Duchesse de Bourgogne (1477-1482), duchesse de Brabant, Holy Roman Empress Consort, Daughter of Charles the Bold, b. 2-13-1456/1457
Managed by: Michelle Lee Jovin
Last Updated:

About Marie de Bourgogne

http://genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00004050&tree=LEO

María de Borgoña (Bruselas, Bélgica, 1457 - Brujas, 1482) fue la esposa de Maximiliano I, emperador de Sacro Imperio Romano y madre de Felipe el Hermoso.

Como hija única del último duque de Borgoña, Carlos el Temerario y de su segunda esposa Isabel de Borbón, heredó el ducado de su padre, a los 20 años, tras la muerte de éste en la batalla de Nancy. La pretensión francesa por los territorios de los Países Bajos hizo al rey Luis XI ocupar algunas plazas como el Franco Condado o la propia región de Borgoña lo que impidió a María ejercer su título en los que habían sido sus territorios.

Con la finalidad de expulsar a los franceses, promulgó una carta que se conoce como El Gran Privilegio y por la que quedaba garantizado el gobierno propio de los Países Bajos.

Se casó en 1477 con el archiduque austríaco Maximiliano, hijo del emperador Federico III y después emperador del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico, con el que tendría por hijos a Margarita de Austria y a Felipe el Hermoso que introduciría, por su matrimonio con Juana I de Castilla, la estirpe de los Austria en España.

María de Borgoña murió en Brujas después de una caída de caballo en 1482.

-------------------- Duchess of Burgundy, Brabant, Guelders, Limburg, Lothier and Luxembourg; Margravine of Namur; Countess of Artois, Charolais, Flanders, Hainault, Holland, Zeeland and Zutphen; Countess Palatine of Burgundy.

Wikipedia: English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_of_Burgundy Deutsch: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_von_Burgund Francais: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_de_Bourgogne -------------------- Mary of Burgundy

Reign 5 January 1477–27 March 1482

Spouse Duke Maximilian of Austria

Father Charles the Bold Mother Isabella of Bourbon

Born 13 February 1457 Brussels

Died March 27, 1482 (aged 25) Bruges, Flanders Burial Bruges, Flanders

Mary, called Mary the Rich (13 February 1457 – 27 March 1482), was suo jure Duchess of Burgundy from 1477 – 1482. As the only child of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, and his wife Isabella of Bourbon, she was the heiress to the vast Burgundian domains in France and the Low Countries upon her father's sudden death on 5 January 1477. Her mother had died in 1465, but Mary was on very good terms with her stepmother Margaret of York, whom Charles married in 1468.


Mary of Burgundy was born in Brussels, at the Ducal castle of Coudenberg. Her birth, according to the court chronicler, Georges Chastellain, was attended by a clap of thunder ringing from the otherwise clear twilit sky. Her godfather was Louis the Dauphin, in exile in Burgundy at that time; he named her for his mother, Marie of Anjou. Reactions to the child were mixed: the baby's grandfather, Philip the Good, was unimpressed, and "chose not to attend the [Baptism] as it was only for a girl"; his wife, Isabel, was simply delighted at the birth of a granddaughter.[1]

As the only child of Charles the Bold, Mary was heiress to a vast and wealthy domain, made up of the Duchy of Burgundy, the Free County of Burgundy, and the majority of the Low Countries, and her hand was eagerly sought by a number of princes. The first proposal was received by her father when she was only five years old, to marry the future Ferdinand II of Aragon. Later the younger brother of Louis XI, Charles de Valois, Duc de Berry made an approach, to the intense annoyance of his brother the King, who attempted to prevent the necessary Papal dispensation for consanguinity.

As soon as Louis produced a male heir who survived infancy, the future Charles VIII of France, Louis wanted his son to be the one to marry Mary, despite his son being thirteen years younger than Mary. Nicholas I, Duke of Lorraine was a few years older than Mary, and his Duchy lay alongside Burgundian territory, but his plan to combine his territory with hers was frustrated by his death in battle in 1473.

When her father fell upon the field at the siege of Nancy, on 5 January 1477, Mary was only nineteen years old. Louis XI of France seized the opportunity afforded by his rival's defeat and death to attempt take possession of the Duchy of Burgundy proper, and also of Franche Comté, Picardy and Artois.

Louis was anxious that Mary should marry Charles, the Dauphin of France, and thus secure the inheritance of the Low Countries for his descendants, by force of arms if necessary. Mary, advised by Margaret, distrusted Louis, declined the French alliance, and turned to her Netherland subjects for help. Sensing her weakness, she obtained their help only at the price of great concessions.

On 10 February 1477 at Ghent on the occasion of her formal recognition, known as the Joyous Entry, as Charles' heir, she was compelled to sign a charter of rights, called the Great Privilege. Under this agreement, the provinces and towns of Flanders, Brabant, Hainaut, and Holland recovered all the local and communal rights which had been abolished by the decrees of the dukes of Burgundy in their efforts to create a centralized state on the French model out of their separate holdings in the Low Countries. In particular, the Parliament of Mechelen (established formally by Charles the Bold in 1470) was abolished and replaced with the pre-existing authority of the Parlement de Paris, which was considered an amenable counterweight to the encroaching, if informal, centralisation undertaken by both Charles and Philip the Good. Mary also had to undertake not to declare war, make peace, or raise taxes without the consent of the States, and to employ only native residents in official posts.

Such was the hatred of the people for the old regime that two of her father's influential councillors, the Chancellor Hugonet and the Sire d'Humbercourt, having been discovered in correspondence with the French king, were executed at Ghent despite the tears and entreaties of the youthful duchess.

Mary of Burdundy (right) with her husband and childrenMary now made her choice among the many suitors for her hand, selecting the Duke Maximilian of Austria (after her death the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I). The marriage took place at Ghent on 18 August 1477. By marrying Duke Maximilian of Austria, son of the Duke of Austria, she became Duchess Mary of Austria. In this way the Low Countries came to the Habsburgs, initiating two centuries of contention between France and the Habsburgs, later of Spain, then of Austria, for their possession, which climaxed in the War of the Spanish Succession, 1701–1714.

In the Netherlands, affairs now went more smoothly, the French aggression was temporarily checked, and internal peace was in a large measure restored.


Five years later, the 25-year-old Duchess met her death by a fall from her horse on 27 March 1482 near the Castle of Wijnendale. She loved riding, and was falconing with Maximilian when her horse tripped, threw her, and then landed on top of her, breaking her back. She died several days later, having made a detailed will. She is buried in Bruges.

-------------------- http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_von_Burgund Maria von Burgund aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche Maria von Burgund, Porträt um 1479. Dieses Profilbild diente als Vorlage für zahlreiche weitere Porträts Maria als Herrscherin umgeben von den Wappen ihre Untertanengebiete. Blatt aus der Excellente Cronyke van Vlaenderen, Ende 15. Jahrhundert Maria, ihr Mann Maximilian, ihr Sohn Philipp und drei ihrer Enkel (Genealogische Darstellung, Maria starb, als ihr Sohn vier Jahre alt war) Maximilian I. und seine Gattin Maria von Burgund. Illustration aus dem Weißkunig von Hans Burgkmair d. Ä.

Maria von Burgund (* 13. Februar 1457 in Brüssel; † 27. März 1482 in Brügge) war seit 1477 Herzogin von Burgund und Herrscherin über die anderen ererbte Gebiete des Hauses Burgund. Durch ihre Heirat mit Maximilian von Habsburg, nachmaliger römischer Kaiser, kam Burgund an das Haus Habsburg. Inhaltsverzeichnis [Anzeigen]

   * 1 Leben
   * 2 Nachkommen
   * 3 Vorfahren
   * 4 Literatur
   * 5 Weblinks

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Maria war das einzige Kind von Herzog Karls des Kühnen von Burgund und dessen zweiter Gattin Isabelle (Tochter von Karl I.). Sie lebte zunächst gemeinsam mit ihren Eltern in ziemlicher Abgeschiedenheit auf der Festung Le Quesnoy (südlicher Hennegau).

Bereits im Alter von sechs Jahren wurde sie von ihren Eltern getrennt. Philipp der Gute, ihr Großvater, hatte seinen Sohn als Statthalter nach Holland beordert, wohin er sich widerspruchslos mit seiner Frau Isabella begab. Während die Eltern in Gorinchem lebten, wurde das Kind in Gent, dem Sitz der Grafen von Flandern, erzogen. Ihre Erziehung und schulische Ausbildung leitete eine Madame d'Haleweyn. Maria wurde in allen für ihren Stand als Prinzessin wichtigen Wissensgebieten unterrichtet. Auf ihre Rolle als mögliche Herrscherin wurde sie allerdings nicht vorbereitet, da ihre Eltern noch immer auf einen Stammhalter hofften. Nachdem sie zweisprachig aufwuchs, beherrschte sie beide Landessprachen (Flämisch und Französisch) perfekt, lernte aber auch Latein und erhielt sorgfältigen Religions- und Geschichtsunterricht. Musik war ihr Lieblingsgegenstand, auf Handarbeit wurde großer Wert gelegt, aber auch auf Sport: als Burgunderin musste sie eine perfekte Reiterin und Jägerin sein. Bereits 1465 starb ihre Mutter (wahrscheinlich an Lungentuberkulose), sie hatte ihre Mutter in den zwei Jahren der Trennung nur ein einziges Mal noch kurz wiedergesehen.

Nach dem Tod ihres Vaters in der Schlacht bei Nancy am 5. Januar 1477 gegen die mit den Franzosen verbündeten Eidgenossen erbte Maria das Burgundische Reich ihres Vaters, zu dem außer dem Herzogtum Burgund auch die Niederlande (Flandern, Brabant, Luxemburg, Holland u.a.) gehörten. Um Finanzen und Truppen für ihren Kampf gegen die Franzosen zu erhalten, gewährte Maria am 11. Februar 1477 den Niederlanden das Große Privileg, in dem sie das Recht auf Selbstregierung garantierte. Im August 1477 heiratete sie gegen den Willen der Stände Maximilian von Österreich aus dem Haus Habsburg, der ab 1486 König, ab 1508 Kaiser Maximilian I werden würde. Entscheidend für diese Wahl war, dass ihm am ehesten zuzutrauen war, sich gegen ihren Taufpaten, König Ludwig XI. durchzusetzen, der bereits seine Hand nach dem burgundischen Erbe ausstreckte.

→ Hauptartikel: Stundenbuch der Maria von Burgund

Drei Wochen nach einem Sturz vom Pferd bei einer Falkenjagd starb Maria bei einer Fehlgeburt. Mit ihrem Tod im März 1482 fiel ihr Erbe an das Haus Habsburg, was zu langwierigen und schweren Konflikten mit Frankreich führte. Ihr Nachfolger in den Niederlanden wurde ihr Sohn Philipp der Schöne. Ihr Grab befindet sich in der Liebfrauenkirche in Brügge.

Zeitlebens wurde nur sie von den Ständen der Niederlande als Landesherrin akzeptiert. Sie galt als eine der schönsten Frauen ihrer Zeit und Maximilian soll ihren Tod zeitlebens nicht recht verwunden haben. Eine Erzählung über Maximilians Werbung und Brautfahrt ist im Theuerdank, eines von ihm selbst herausgegebenen Versepos 1517 enthalten.

Eines der wichtigsten Tanztraktate zur Basse danse, das Manuscrit des basses danses de Marguerite d'Autriche, gilt zuweilen als Maria von Burgund gewidmet. In Wirklichkeit wurde es von einer ihrer unehelichen Halbschwestern Anne de Bourgogne für Margarete von Österreich angefertigt und ihr als Geschenk übergeben.

Maria von Burgund (undatiert)

Grab Marias in Brügge

Grab Marias in Brügge

Medaille von U. Ursentaler

Bronzestatue in der Hofkirche zu Innsbruck Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

Maria von Burgund heiratete am 19. August 1477 Kaiser Maximilian I. Aus der Ehe gingen drei Kinder hervor:

   * Philipp I., (1478–1506) König von Kastilien ∞ 1496 Johanna von Kastilien (1479–1555)
   * Margarete von Österreich (1480–1530) 1.∞ 1497 Johann von Aragón und Kastilien (1478–1497 Fürst von Asturien); 2.∞ 1501 Philibert II. (1480–1504) Herzog von Savoyen
   * Franz (*/† 1481)
Literatur [Bearbeiten]
   * Thea Leitner: Habsburgs Goldene Bräute. Durch Mitgift zur Macht. Piper, München 2005, ISBN 3-492-23525-5.
   * Carl Vossen: Maria von Burgund. Des Hauses Habsburg Kronjuwel. Seewald Verlag, Stuttgart 1982, ISBN 3-512-00636-1.
   * Heinz Will: Maria von Burgund, Herzogin von Kleve. Boss-Verlag, Kleve 1967.
   * Constantin von Wurzbach: Maria von Burgund, Kaiserin. Nr. 196. In: Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich.  Bd 7 (1861). Verlag L. C. Zamarski, Wien 1856–1891, S. 15–18 (auf Wikisource).

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   *
     Commons Commons: Maria von Burgund – Album mit Bildern und/oder Videos und Audiodateien

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger Karl der Kühne Herzogin von Burgund 1477–1482 Burgund fällt als Kronland an Frankreich Herzogin von Luxemburg 1477–1482 Wilhelm II. von Sachsen Herzogin von Brabant Herzogin von Limburg Markgräfin von Antwerpen 1477–1482 Bestandteil der Spanischen Niederlande Gräfin von Charolais 1477–1482 Gräfin von Flandern Gräfin von Artois Pfalzgräfin von Burgund 1477–1482 Gräfin von Holland Gräfin von Seeland Gräfin von Hennegau Gräfin in Friesland 1477–1482 Normdaten: PND: 11857776X – weitere Informationen | LCCN: n79041983 Diese Seite wurde zuletzt am 5. Mai 2010 um 16:11 Uhr geändert -------------------- Mary of Burgundy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mary, called Mary the Rich (13 February 1457 – 27 March 1482), was suo jure Duchess of Burgundy from 1477 – 1482. As the only child of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, and his wife Isabella of Bourbon, she was the heiress to the vast Burgundian domains in France and the Low Countries upon her father's sudden death on 5 January 1477. Her mother died in 1465, but Mary was on very good terms with her step-mother Margaret of York, whom Charles married in 1468.

History

[edit]Heiress of Burgundy Mary of Burgundy was born in Brussels, at the Ducal castle of Coudenberg. Her birth, according to the court chronicler, Georges Chastellain, was attended by a clap of thunder ringing from the otherwise clear twilit sky. Her godfather was Louis the Dauphin, in exile in Burgundy at that time; he named her for his mother, Marie of Anjou. Reactions to the child were mixed: the baby's grandfather, Philip the Good, was unimpressed, and "chose not to attend the [Baptism] as it was only for a girl"; his wife, Isabel, was simply delighted at the birth of a granddaughter.[1] As the only child of Charles the Bold, Mary was heiress to a vast and wealthy domain, made up of the Duchy of Burgundy, the Free County of Burgundy, and the majority of the Low Countries, and her hand was eagerly sought by a number of princes. The first proposal was received by her father when she was only five years old, to marry the future Ferdinand II of Aragon. Later the younger brother of Louis XI, Charles de Valois, Duc de Berry made an approach, to the intense annoyance of his brother the King, who attempted to prevent the necessary Papal dispensation for consanguinity.

As soon as Louis produced a male heir who survived infancy, the future Charles VIII of France, Louis wanted his son to be the one to marry Mary, despite his son being thirteen years younger than Mary. Nicholas I, Duke of Lorraine was a few years older than Mary, and his Duchy lay alongside Burgundian territory, but his plan to combine his territory with hers was frustrated by his death in battle in 1473. When her father fell upon the field at the siege of Nancy, on 5 January 1477, Mary was only nineteen years old. Louis XI of France seized the opportunity afforded by his rival's defeat and death to attempt take possession of the Duchy of Burgundy proper, and also of Franche Comté, Picardy and Artois. Louis was anxious that Mary should marry Charles, the Dauphin of France, and thus secure the inheritance of the Low Countries for his descendants, by force of arms if necessary. Mary, advised by Margaret, distrusted Louis, declined the French alliance, and turned to her Netherland subjects for help. Sensing her weakness, she obtained their help only at the price of great concessions.

The Great Privilege

On 10 February 1477 at Ghent on the occasion of her formal recognition (known also as the Blijde Inkomst, or Joyous Entry) as Charles' heir, she was compelled to sign a charter of rights, called "the Great Privilege." Under this agreement, the provinces and towns of Flanders, Brabant, Hainaut, and Holland recovered all the local and communal rights which had been abolished by the decrees of the dukes of Burgundy in their efforts to create a centralized state on the French model out of their separate holdings in the Low Countries. In particular, the Parliament of Mechelen (established formally by Charles the Bold in 1470) was abolished and replaced with the pre-existing authority of the Parlement de Paris, which was considered an amenable counterweight to the encroaching, if informal, centralisation undertaken by both Charles and Philip the Good. Mary also had to undertake not to declare war, make peace, or raise taxes without the consent of the States, and to employ only native residents in official posts. Such was the hatred of the people for the old regime that two of her father's influential councillors, the Chancellor Hugonet and the Sire d'Humbercourt, having been discovered in correspondence with the French king, were executed at Ghent despite the tears and entreaties of the youthful duchess.

Marriage

Mary now made her choice among the many suitors for her hand, selecting the Archduke Maximilian of Austria, afterwards the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I. The marriage took place at Ghent on 18 August 1477. In this way the Low Countries came to the Habsburgs, initiating two centuries of contention between France and the Habsburgs, later of Spain, then of Austria, for their possession, which climaxed in the War of the Spanish Succession, 1701–1714. In the Netherlands, affairs now went more smoothly, the French aggression was temporarily checked, and internal peace was in a large measure restored.

Death and legacy

Five years later, the 25-year-old Duchess met her death by a fall from her horse on 27 March 1482 near the Castle of Wijnendale. She loved riding, and was falconing with Maximilian when her horse tripped, threw her, and then landed on top of her, breaking her back. She died several days later, having made a detailed will. She is buried in Bruges. Louis was swift to re-engage, and forced Maximilian to agree to the Treaty of Arras (1482) by which Franche Comté and Artois passed for a time to French rule, only to be exchanged for Burgundy and Picardy in the Treaty of Senlis (1493), which established peace in the Low Countries. [edit]Family

Three children had been the issue of her marriage, and her eldest son, Philip, succeeded to her dominions under the guardianship of his father. Her children were: Philip the Handsome, 22 July 1478 – 25 September 1506 who succeeded his mother as Philip IV of Burgundy, and became Philip I of Castile by marriage to Joanna of Castile Margaret, 10 January 1480 – 1 December 1530, married to 1) Crown Prince John of Aragon, also known as Juan, Infante of Spain (1478-1497), the son and heir of King Ferdinand II of Aragon and Queen Isabella I of Castile and 2) Philibert II of Savoy Franz, b. and d. 1481

-------------------- Mary, called Mary the Rich (13 February 1457 – 27 March 1482), was suo jure Duchess of Burgundy from 1477 – 1482. As the only child of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, and his wife Isabella of Bourbon, she was the heiress to the vast Burgundian domains in France and the Low Countries upon her father's death in the Battle of Nancy on 5 January 1477. Her mother had died in 1465, but Mary was on very good terms with her stepmother Margaret of York, whom Charles married in 1468.

Heiress of Burgundy Mary of Burgundy was born in Brussels, at the Ducal castle of Coudenberg. Her birth, according to the court chronicler, Georges Chastellain, was attended by a clap of thunder ringing from the otherwise clear twilit sky. Her godfather was Louis the Dauphin, in exile in Burgundy at that time; he named her for his mother, Marie of Anjou. Reactions to the child were mixed: the baby's grandfather, Philip the Good, was unimpressed, and "chose not to attend the [Baptism] as it was only for a girl"; his wife, Isabel, was simply delighted at the birth of a granddaughter.[1]

As the only child of Charles the Bold, Mary was heiress to a vast and wealthy domain, made up of the Duchy of Burgundy, the Free County of Burgundy, and the majority of the Low Countries, and her hand was eagerly sought by a number of princes. The first proposal was received by her father when she was only five years old, to marry the future Ferdinand II of Aragon. Later the younger brother of Louis XI, Charles de Valois, Duc de Berry made an approach, to the intense annoyance of his brother the King, who attempted to prevent the necessary Papal dispensation for consanguinity.

As soon as Louis produced a male heir who survived infancy, the future Charles VIII of France, Louis wanted his son to be the one to marry Mary, despite his son being thirteen years younger than Mary. Nicholas I, Duke of Lorraine was a few years older than Mary, and his Duchy lay alongside Burgundian territory, but his plan to combine his territory with hers was frustrated by his death in battle in 1473.

When her father fell upon the field at the siege of Nancy, on 5 January 1477, Mary was only nineteen years old. Louis XI of France seized the opportunity afforded by his rival's defeat and death to attempt take possession of the Duchy of Burgundy proper, and also of Franche Comté, Picardy and Artois.

Louis was anxious that Mary should marry Charles, the Dauphin of France, and thus secure the inheritance of the Low Countries for his descendants, by force of arms if necessary. Mary, advised by Margaret, distrusted Louis, declined the French alliance, and turned to her Netherland subjects for help. Sensing her weakness, she obtained their help only at the price of great concessions.

The Great Privilege On 10 February 1477 at Ghent on the occasion of her formal recognition, known as the Joyous Entry, as Charles' heir, she was compelled to sign a charter of rights, called the Great Privilege. Under this agreement, the provinces and towns of Flanders, Brabant, Hainaut, and Holland recovered all the local and communal rights which had been abolished by the decrees of the dukes of Burgundy in their efforts to create a centralized state on the French model out of their separate holdings in the Low Countries. In particular, the Parliament of Mechelen (established formally by Charles the Bold in 1470) was abolished and replaced with the pre-existing authority of the Parlement de Paris, which was considered an amenable counterweight to the encroaching, if informal, centralisation undertaken by both Charles and Philip the Good. Mary also had to undertake not to declare war, make peace, or raise taxes without the consent of the States, and to employ only native residents in official posts.

Such was the hatred of the people for the old regime that two of her father's influential councillors, the Chancellor Hugonet and the Sire d'Humbercourt, having been discovered in correspondence with the French king, were executed at Ghent despite the tears and entreaties of the youthful duchess.

Mary now made her choice among the many suitors for her hand, selecting the Archduke Maximilian of Austria (after her death the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I). The marriage took place at Ghent on 18 August 1477. By marrying Archduke Maximilian of Austria, son of the Archduke of Austria, she became Archduchess Mary of Austria. In this way the Low Countries came to the Habsburgs, initiating two centuries of contention between France and the Habsburgs, later of Spain, then of Austria, for their possession, which climaxed in the War of the Spanish Succession, 1701–1714.

In the Netherlands, affairs now went more smoothly, the French aggression was temporarily checked, and internal peace was in a large measure restored.

Five years later, the 25-year-old Duchess met her death by a fall from her horse on 27 March 1482 near the Castle of Wijnendale. She loved riding, and was falconing with Maximilian when her horse tripped, threw her, and then landed on top of her, breaking her back. She died several days later, having made a detailed will. She is buried in Bruges.

Louis was swift to re-engage, and forced Maximilian to agree to the Treaty of Arras (1482) by which Franche Comté and Artois passed for a time to French rule, only to be exchanged for Burgundy and Picardy in the Treaty of Senlis (1493), which established peace in the Low Countries.

In 1493, Maximilian married secondly Bianca Maria Sforza (5 April 1472- 31 December 1510), the daughter of Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan, and Bona of Savoy but had no children by her.

Family Three children had been the issue of her marriage, and her eldest son, Philip, succeeded to her dominions under the guardianship of his father.

Her children were:

Philip the Handsome, 22 July 1478 – 25 September 1506 who succeeded his mother as Philip IV of Burgundy, and became Philip I of Castile by marriage to Joanna of Castile Margaret, 10 January 1480 – 1 December 1530, married to 1) Juan, Prince of Asturias, the son and heir of King Ferdinand II of Aragon and Queen Isabella I of Castile and 2) Philibert II, Duke of Savoy Franz, b. and d. 1481

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_of_Burgundy -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_of_Burgundy --------------------

   * Mary of Burgundy (1457–1482). They were married in Ghent on 18 August 1477, and the marriage was ended by Mary's death in a riding accident in 1482. The marriage produced three children:
  1. Philip the Handsome (1478–1506) who inherited his mother's domains following her death, but predeceased his father. He married Joanna of Castile, becoming King-consort of Castile upon her accession in 1504, and was the father of the Holy Roman Emperors Charles V and Ferdinand I
  2. Margaret of Austria, (1480–1533), who was first engaged at the age of 2 to the French Dauphin (who became Charles VIII of France a year later) to confirm peace between France and Burgundy. She was sent back to her father in 1492 after Charles repudiated their betrothal to marry Anne of Brittany. She was then married to the Crown Prince of Castile and Aragon John, Prince of Asturias, and after his death to Philibert II of Savoy, after which she undertook the guardianship of her deceased brother Philip's children, and governed Burgundy for the heir, Charles.
  3. Francis of Austria, who died shortly after his birth in 1481.
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Marie de Bourgogne's Timeline

1457
February 13, 1457
Bruxelles, Brabant
1477
August 18, 1477
Age 20
Ghent, Flemish Region, Belgium
1477
- 1482
Age 19
1477
- 1482
Age 19
1478
June 22, 1478
Age 21
Bruges, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
1480
January 10, 1480
Age 22
Palais Du Coudenberg, Bruxelles, Brabant, Belgium
1481
September 2, 1481
Age 24
Brussels, Brabant, Belgium
1482
March 27, 1482
Age 25
Bruges, Flandre
1482
Age 24
Bruges, Flandre
????