Mary Haines (Carlisle) (c.1674 - 1744) MP

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Nicknames: "Carlyle; Carlile"
Birthplace: Stepney Parish, Spittlefields, London, co Middlesex, England
Death: Died in Evesham Twp., Burlington, New Jersey
Occupation: Kommer från Lenni Lenape-stammen "Vita Rosen" tog namnet Mary Carlile vid sitt dop
Managed by: Myrna Huthmacher, (C)
Last Updated:

About Mary Haines (Carlisle)

Married: 1691 -------------------- From Richard Haines and His Descendants by John W. Haines:

"Mary Carlile, said to have been an Indian maiden, and also said to have been born in London, 5 mo. (July) 20, 1674; daughter of John and Mary (Goodwin) Carlile. Since the identity of Mary Carlile has caused much controversy, this subject will be discussed more fully elsewhere in this volume. The date of their marriage is also uncertain. In the Haines Ancestry it is stated that the marriage took place in 1699. In Virkus the date is given as 1691. Since no record of a marriage has ever been found, it is difficult to establish a date. However, Richard and Mary Haines were witnesses to the marriage of Francis Austin and Mary Borton on 7 mo. (Sept.) 15, 1696, at Friends' Meeting, Haddonfield."

The extended "discussion" in Richard Haines and His Descendants by John W. Haines is 5 pages of small type - more than I want to import here. In essence, there is a long oral tradition that Mary Carlile was a Native American. Those that are skeptical say that there is no documentation to support such a claim. Those that believe say that the information came from descendants who were old enough to have known Richard and Mary. From a letter dated 6/4/1889 from Richard Haines of Medford NJ to Rowland I. Haines: "...the Indian blood from my grandmother, whom I have frequently heard speak of her great-grandmother, Mary Carlile, the Indian woman. I make mention of Mary Carlile from the fact that it is very objectionable to some of the family, but nevertheless, if there is any truth in tradition we cannot do otherwise than admit the Indian blood. Our authority is John Haines, the son of Carlile, the son of Richard and Mary, who lived to be nearly one hundred years old and saw his grandfather and grandmother and remembered and talked with three of his great uncles. He was born in 1742. Rsptfly, Richard Haines."

"It has been claimed that the story of Mary Carlile being an Indian girl could not be believed, because it was a tradition only, and traditions seldom reflect the entire truth. While it is admitted that the statement 'as allied by blood to Pocahontas' was highly traditional, the part about Mary Carlile being an Indian girl does seem possible, and could have been true. John Haines (1742-1832), known as 'Fostertown John Haines,' was the grandson of Mary Carlile. He and his brother Solomon Haines (1728-1820) who lived near him, both lived to an advanced age. In fact, they lived during the time in which it was possible to remember the first Haines settlers, and also during the time in which they could be remembered by those living late in the nineteenth century. Abigail Haines (1762-1847) was one of the great-granddaughters of Mary Carlile and the mother of Dr. George Haines (1798-1877) who collected the greater part of the family data contained in the Haines Ancestry. Core Haines (1766-1841), a great-grandson of Mary Carlile, who married Mary Haines (1767-1850), the daughter of Fostertown John Haines, and their son, Mark Haines (1807-1884) all lived to an advanced age. While it is said that Fostertown John Haines told Mark Haines about the Indian ancestry of Mary Carlile, inasmuch as these descendants of Mary Carlile lived to such advanced ages, and in the same community, any knowledge about Mary Carlile must have been common knowledge. This is borne out by the fact that Richard Haines, compiler of the Haines Ancestry wrote that his grandmother, Abigail Haines, told him the same story that Fostertown John Haines told Mark Haines."

"When the steps by which information has been relayed can be followed, it seems that such information should not be classed as traditional, but more as fact."

How could she have been a Carlile (and named her son Carlile) and still been a Native American? "Many Indian girls must have been taken into the homes of the early settlers to perform household duties." ..."There was certainly some relationship between Mary Carlile Haines and the Carlile brothers, Abraham and John. Was she their sister, or was she an Indian girl who had been taken into the Carlile household? If the latter, she would have taken an English last name, most likely the name of the family with which she lived, and would have been given an English first name. She would have been considered a member of the family, could have signed the marriage certificate of John Carlile, and would have a reason for naming sons Abraham and Carlile."

Obviously, I am one persuaded to the opinion that Mary Carlile Haines was a Native American. The argument against it seems weak to me, consisting only of the negative (no decisive documentation). But there is no decisive documentation to say that she wasn't Native American, and the word of her own grandson(Fostertown John Haines) and others is enough for me.

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Mary Haines's Timeline

1651
1651
1674
July 20, 1674
Stepney Parish, Spittlefields, London, co Middlesex, England
1677
1677
Age 2
1678
1678
Age 3
1679
1679
Age 4
1696
1696
Age 21
Evesham Township, NJ, USA
1698
January 8, 1698
Age 23
Evesham, Burlington, NJ, USA
1698
Age 23
Evesham Twp., Burlington, New Jersey
1700
1700
Age 25
Evesham, Burlington, New Jersey
1702
February 2, 1702
Age 27
Evesham Twp., Burlington, New Jersey