Is your surname Washington?

Research the Washington family

Mary Washington's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Mary Washington (Ball)

Nicknames: "Mary Washington (Mrs Augustine Washington)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Epping Forest, Lancaster, Virginia, United States
Death: Died in Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Virginia, United States
Place of Burial: Bridges Creek Washington Family Cemetery, Kenmore, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Col. Joseph Ball, of "Epping Forest" and Mary Johnson Ball
Wife of Lawrence Augustine Washington and Capt. Augustine Washington, Sr.
Mother of George Washington; George Washington, 1st President of the USA; Elizabeth "Betty" Washington; Col. Samuel Washington; John Augustine Washington and 8 others
Half sister of John Johnson; Eliza Johnson; Frances Carter; Hannah Pearson; Esther Chinn and 3 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Mary Washington (Ball)

A Patriot of the American Revolution for VIRGINIA. DAR Ancestor #: A121971

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Ball_Washington

--------------------

Mary Ball Washington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mary Ball Washington was born as Mary Ball in 1708 in Lancaster County, Virginia, British America. She was the only child of Joseph Ball and his second wife, Mary Johnson (née Montagu) [1].

Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. It was her first marriage and his second. Augustine had four children with his first wife, Jane Butler Washington however, only 2 of them lived to adulthood. Together, Mary and Augustine had the following children:

George - (1732-1799)

Betty - (1733-1797)

Samuel - (1734-1781)

John Augustine - (1736-1787)

Charles - (1738-1799)

Mildred - (1739-1740)

Augustine died in 1743. Unlike most widows in Virginia at the time, Mary Ball Washington never remarried. She lived to see her son, George Washington, inaugurated as President in 1789. She died four months later.

Mary Ball Washington was buried on the Lewis Plantation a few steps from "Meditation Rock." Tradition has it that this was her favorite retreat for reading, prayer, and meditation.

Legacy

There are many monuments to Mary Ball Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she lived from 1772 until her death in 1789.

The house purchased for her by her son George has been preserved by APVA Preservation Virginia and is open to the public as a historic house museum. It contains a fine collection of antique furnishings, some with Washington family provenance.

Mary Ball Washington is buried near Kenmore, the former home of her daughter and son-in-law Fielding and Betty Lewis. Kenmore is also open regularly for public tours.

A monument to Mary Ball Washington was erected in 1833 and dedicated by President Andrew Jackson. But was left unfinished until a new one was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1894. [2]

The University of Mary Washington, a public university in Fredericksburg, Virginia, was also named after Mary Washington.

--------------------

Washington's relationship with his mother was forever strained. Although she was by no means poor, she regularly complained to outsiders that she was destitute and neglected by her children, much to George's embarrassment. Animosity between mother and son persisted until her death from cancer in the first year of his presidency.

She was the second wife and George was their first child

The Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library is a museum and historical archive in the Northern Neck of The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Its purpose is to preserve the history of Lancaster County, Virginia. It opened in 1958 and was named in honor of George Washington's mother, Mary Ball, a Lancaster County, Virginia native and granddaughter of the ca 1653 emigrant, William Ball I.

The Library has an extensive collection of books and genealogical research material dating back to 1651, covering some 350 years of history in Lancaster County in particular and the Northern Neck in general, as well as Middlesex and Essex counties. It contains approximately 10,000 books, periodicals and manuscripts concerning Virginia and the Northern Neck, as well as research material on adjoining states. The Museum seeks to recapture the stories and the rich history of the people of The Northern Neck.

The museum and library are open to the public, who may tour the historic buildings, view exhibits, participate in educational programs and trace family histories.

In addition to the museum and library, the five building complex, located in the Lancaster Courthouse Historic District, includes the Old Jail (1820), Clerk's Office (c. 1797), Lancaster House and the Steuart Blakemore Building (c.1900).

--------------------

Mary Ball is the mother of President George Washington. The father of our country.

--------------------

Please see Wikipedia link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Ball_Washington

--------------------

Mary Ball Washington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mary Ball Washington (1708 – 1789) was the mother of George Washington.

Mary Ball Washington was born as Mary Ball in 1708 in Lancaster County, Virginia, British America. She was the only child of Joseph Ball and his second wife, Mary Johnson (née Montagu) [1].

Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. It was her first marriage and his second. Augustine had four children with his first wife, Jane Butler Washington however, only 2 of them lived to adulthood. Together, Mary and Augustine had the following children:

George - (1732-1799)

Betty - (1733-1797)

Samuel - (1734-1781)

John Augustine - (1736-1787)

Charles - (1738-1799)

Mildred - (1739-1740)

Augustine died in 1743. Unlike most widows in Virginia at the time, Mary Ball Washington never remarried. She lived to see her son, George Washington, inaugurated as President in 1789. She died four months later.

Mary Ball Washington was buried on the Lewis Plantation a few steps from "Meditation Rock." Tradition has it that this was her favorite retreat for reading, prayer, and meditation.

Legacy

There are many monuments to Mary Ball Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she lived from 1772 until her death in 1789.

The house purchased for her by her son George has been preserved by APVA Preservation Virginia and is open to the public as a historic house museum. It contains a fine collection of antique furnishings, some with Washington family provenance.

Mary Ball Washington is buried near Kenmore, the former home of her daughter and son-in-law Fielding and Betty Lewis. Kenmore is also open regularly for public tours.

A monument to Mary Ball Washington was erected in 1833 and dedicated by President Andrew Jackson. But was left unfinished until a new one was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1894. [2]

The University of Mary Washington, a public university in Fredericksburg, Virginia, was also named after Mary Washington.

The Lineage of George Washington

Written and researched by Margaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska

Augustine's second wife was Mary Ball, the daughter of Col. Ball of Lancaster, Virginia. Augustine and Mary were married on March 6, 1730. Mary brought Augustine even more property. Mary and Augustine lived at Popes Creek, the home Augustine bought from Joseph Abbington on February 22, 1732. Mary gave birth to two daughters and four sons:

George Washington was born in February 22, 1732. He inherited Ferry Farm when he reached maturity. George was eleven (11) years old when his father died. His father moved to Ferry farm in 1735.

Elizabeth "Betty" Washington was born in early 1733. She married Fielding Lewis, a successful businessman. They lived in Kenmore Mansion.

Samuel Washington was born in late 1733.

John Augustine Washington was born in 1735.

Charles Washington was born in 1738.

Mildred Washington, died in infancy.

Mary (nee Ball) Washington (c. 1708-1789)lived at Strother Plantation across from Fredericksburg, VA. Her son George helped her for another 4 years. She never remarried. George would later inherit the Strother Plantation from his mother. Her daughter Betty lived close to her mother. Mary Ball Washington lived to age 81, surviving her husband Augustine by 40 years. She remained a Tory and died on the eve of her son, George's, inauguration as the first President of the United States of America.

--------------------

Mary Ball Washington was born in Lancaster County, Virginia, in 1708 to Joseph Ball and Mary Montague Johnson Ball. Each of her parents had been previously married and had children by their previous marriages. The family home was Epping Forest. Her grandfather, William Ball, had been born in England and had immigrated to Virginia around 1650.

By age thirteen, both of Mary’s parents had died, and family friend George Eskridge was appointed her guardian. For the next decade, she lived with Eskridge and family and her married half sister – Elizabeth Bonum. Not much is known about her life at this time, but we know that she could read and write, and that she was an avid horsewoman.

In 1731, Mary married Augustine Washington. She was about 23, which was somewhat old for a first marriage by the standards of the day. Augustine was also from a family that had been in the colony since the mid-1600s, and he had been educated in England, as was the custom of the day. He was a well-established widower, fourteen years her senior, with three children, Lawrence, Augustine, and Jane.


After marriage, Mary lived at Pope’s Creek Plantation, later called Wakefield. The next year, on February 22, she gave birth to her first child, George, named for her guardian George Eskridge. While living at Wakefield, she gave birth to two more children, Betty and Samuel, who were named for Mary’s other guardians, her sister and brother-in-law. Also at Wakefield, Augustine’s daughter Jane died at age 13.

In 1736, the family moved to Epsewassen (or Hunting Creek), later renamed Mt. Vernon, and Mary gave birth to two more children, John Augustine and Charles. Two years later, Augustine purchased Ferry Farm to be closer to his iron business, and the family moved.

In 1830, the women of Fredericksburg banded together to raise the money to fund a monument. The next year, Silas Burrows of New York offered to pay for it himself. In laying the cornerstone, Andrew Jackson said this about her:

“Mary Washington acquired and maintained a wonderful ascendancy over those around her. This true characteristic of genius attended her through life, and she conferred upon her son that power of self-command which was one of the remarkable traits of her character. She conducted herself through this life with virtue and prudence worthy of the mother of the greatest hero that ever adorned the annals of history.” -------------------- Mary Ball Washington (1708 – 1789) was the second wife to Augustine Washington (after the first wife, Jane Butler, died) and was the mother of George Washington. Mary Ball Washington was born as Mary Ball in 1708 in Lively, Virginia, Lancaster County, Virginia. She was the only child of Joseph Ball and his second wife, the widow Mary Johnson, whose maiden name and origins are not known. Fatherless at 3 and orphaned at 12, she was placed, in accordance with the terms of her mother's will, under the guardianship of George Eskridge, a lawyer.

Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. It was her first marriage and his second. Augustine had four children with his first wife, Jane Butler Washington however, only 2 of them lived to adulthood. Together, Mary and Augustine had the following children:

George - (1732-1799)

Betty - (1733-1797)

Samuel - (1734-1781)

John Augustine - (1736-1787)

Charles - (1738-1799)

Mildred - (1739-1740)

Augustine died in 1743. Unlike most widows in Virginia at the time, Mary Ball Washington never remarried. She lived to see her son, George Washington, inaugurated as President in 1789. She died four months later.

Mary Ball Washington was buried on the Lewis Plantation a few steps from "Meditation Rock." Tradition has it that this was her favorite retreat for reading, prayer, and meditation.

Legacy

There are many monuments to Mary Ball Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she lived from 1772 until her death in 1789.

The house purchased for her by her son George has been preserved by APVA Preservation Virginia and is open to the public as a historic house museum. It contains a fine collection of antique furnishings, some with Washington family provenance.

Mary Ball Washington is buried near Kenmore, the former home of her daughter and son-in-law Fielding and Betty Lewis. Kenmore is also open regularly for public tours.

A monument to Mary Ball Washington was erected in 1833 and dedicated by President Andrew Jackson. But was left unfinished until a new one was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1894. [2]

The University of Mary Washington, a public university in Fredericksburg, Virginia, was also named after Mary Washington.

--------------------

Washington's relationship with his mother was forever strained. Although she was by no means poor, she regularly complained to outsiders that she was destitute and neglected by her children, much to George's embarrassment. Animosity between mother and son persisted until her death from cancer in the first year of his presidency.

She was the second wife and George was their first child

The Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library is a museum and historical archive in the Northern Neck of The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Its purpose is to preserve the history of Lancaster County, Virginia. It opened in 1958 and was named in honor of George Washington's mother, Mary Ball, a Lancaster County, Virginia native and granddaughter of the ca 1653 emigrant, William Ball I.

The Library has an extensive collection of books and genealogical research material dating back to 1651, covering some 350 years of history in Lancaster County in particular and the Northern Neck in general, as well as Middlesex and Essex counties. It contains approximately 10,000 books, periodicals and manuscripts concerning Virginia and the Northern Neck, as well as research material on adjoining states. The Museum seeks to recapture the stories and the rich history of the people of The Northern Neck.

The museum and library are open to the public, who may tour the historic buildings, view exhibits, participate in educational programs and trace family histories.

In addition to the museum and library, the five building complex, located in the Lancaster Courthouse Historic District, includes the Old Jail (1820), Clerk's Office (c. 1797), Lancaster House and the Steuart Blakemore Building (c.1900).

Augustine's second wife was Mary Ball, the daughter of Col. Ball of Lancaster, Virginia. Augustine and Mary were married on March 6, 1730. Mary brought Augustine even more property. Mary and Augustine lived at Popes Creek, the home Augustine bought from Joseph Abbington on February 22, 1732. Mary gave birth to two daughters and four sons:

George Washington was born in February 22, 1732. He inherited Ferry Farm when he reached maturity. George was eleven (11) years old when his father died. His father moved to Ferry farm in 1735.

Elizabeth "Betty" Washington was born in early 1733. She married Fielding Lewis, a successful businessman. They lived in Kenmore Mansion.

Samuel Washington was born in late 1733.

John Augustine Washington was born in 1735.

Charles Washington was born in 1738.

Mildred Washington, died in infancy.

Mary (nee Ball) Washington (c. 1708-1789)lived at Strother Plantation across from Fredericksburg, VA. Her son George helped her for another 4 years. She never remarried. George would later inherit the Strother Plantation from his mother. Her daughter Betty lived close to her mother. Mary Ball Washington lived to age 81, surviving her husband Augustine by 40 years. She remained a Tory and died on the eve of her son, George's, inauguration as the first President of the United States of America.

Mary Ball Washington was born in Lancaster County, Virginia, in 1708 to Joseph Ball and Mary Montague Johnson Ball. Each of her parents had been previously married and had children by their previous marriages. The family home was Epping Forest. Her grandfather, William Ball, had been born in England and had immigrated to Virginia around 1650.

By age thirteen, both of Mary’s parents had died, and family friend George Eskridge was appointed her guardian. For the next decade, she lived with Eskridge and family and her married half sister – Elizabeth Bonum. Not much is known about her life at this time, but we know that she could read and write, and that she was an avid horsewoman.

In 1731, Mary married Augustine Washington. She was about 23, which was somewhat old for a first marriage by the standards of the day. Augustine was also from a family that had been in the colony since the mid-1600s, and he had been educated in England, as was the custom of the day. He was a well-established widower, fourteen years her senior, with three children, Lawrence, Augustine, and Jane.

After marriage, Mary lived at Pope’s Creek Plantation, later called Wakefield. The next year, on February 22, she gave birth to her first child, George, named for her guardian George Eskridge. While living at Wakefield, she gave birth to two more children, Betty and Samuel, who were named for Mary’s other guardians, her sister and brother-in-law. Also at Wakefield, Augustine’s daughter Jane died at age 13.

In 1736, the family moved to Epsewassen (or Hunting Creek), later renamed Mt. Vernon, and Mary gave birth to two more children, John Augustine and Charles. Two years later, Augustine purchased Ferry Farm to be closer to his iron business, and the family moved.

In 1830, the women of Fredericksburg banded together to raise the money to fund a monument. The next year, Silas Burrows of New York offered to pay for it himself. In laying the cornerstone, Andrew Jackson said this about her:

“Mary Washington acquired and maintained a wonderful ascendancy over those around her. This true characteristic of genius attended her through life, and she conferred upon her son that power of self-command which was one of the remarkable traits of her character. She conducted herself through this life with virtue and prudence worthy of the mother of the greatest hero that ever adorned the annals of history.” -------------------- Mary Ball Washington was born as Mary Ball in 1708 in Lancaster County, Virginia, British America. She was the only child of Joseph Ball and his second wife, Mary Johnson (née Montagu) [1].

Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. It was her first marriage and his second. Augustine had four children with his first wife, Jane Butler Washington however, only 2 of them lived to adulthood. Together, Mary and Augustine had the following children:

George - (1732-1799)

Betty - (1733-1797)

Samuel - (1734-1781)

John Augustine - (1736-1787)

Charles - (1738-1799)

Mildred - (1739-1740)

Augustine died in 1743. Unlike most widows in Virginia at the time, Mary Ball Washington never remarried. She lived to see her son, George Washington, inaugurated as President in 1789. She died four months later.

Mary Ball Washington was buried on the Lewis Plantation a few steps from "Meditation Rock." Tradition has it that this was her favorite retreat for reading, prayer, and meditation.

Legacy

There are many monuments to Mary Ball Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she lived from 1772 until her death in 1789.

The house purchased for her by her son George has been preserved by APVA Preservation Virginia and is open to the public as a historic house museum. It contains a fine collection of antique furnishings, some with Washington family provenance.

Mary Ball Washington is buried near Kenmore, the former home of her daughter and son-in-law Fielding and Betty Lewis. Kenmore is also open regularly for public tours.

A monument to Mary Ball Washington was erected in 1833 and dedicated by President Andrew Jackson. But was left unfinished until a new one was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1894. [2]

The University of Mary Washington, a public university in Fredericksburg, Virginia, was also named after Mary Washington.

--------------------

Washington's relationship with his mother was forever strained. Although she was by no means poor, she regularly complained to outsiders that she was destitute and neglected by her children, much to George's embarrassment. Animosity between mother and son persisted until her death from cancer in the first year of his presidency.

She was the second wife and George was their first child

The Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library is a museum and historical archive in the Northern Neck of The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Its purpose is to preserve the history of Lancaster County, Virginia. It opened in 1958 and was named in honor of George Washington's mother, Mary Ball, a Lancaster County, Virginia native and granddaughter of the ca 1653 emigrant, William Ball I.

The Library has an extensive collection of books and genealogical research material dating back to 1651, covering some 350 years of history in Lancaster County in particular and the Northern Neck in general, as well as Middlesex and Essex counties. It contains approximately 10,000 books, periodicals and manuscripts concerning Virginia and the Northern Neck, as well as research material on adjoining states. The Museum seeks to recapture the stories and the rich history of the people of The Northern Neck.

The museum and library are open to the public, who may tour the historic buildings, view exhibits, participate in educational programs and trace family histories.

In addition to the museum and library, the five building complex, located in the Lancaster Courthouse Historic District, includes the Old Jail (1820), Clerk's Office (c. 1797), Lancaster House and the Steuart Blakemore Building (c.1900).

--------------------

Mary Ball is the mother of President George Washington. The father of our country.

--------------------

Please see Wikipedia link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Ball_Washington

--------------------

Mary Ball Washington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mary Ball Washington (1708 – 1789) was the mother of George Washington.

Mary Ball Washington was born as Mary Ball in 1708 in Lancaster County, Virginia, British America. She was the only child of Joseph Ball and his second wife, Mary Johnson (née Montagu) [1].

Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. It was her first marriage and his second. Augustine had four children with his first wife, Jane Butler Washington however, only 2 of them lived to adulthood. Together, Mary and Augustine had the following children:

George - (1732-1799)

Betty - (1733-1797)

Samuel - (1734-1781)

John Augustine - (1736-1787)

Charles - (1738-1799)

Mildred - (1739-1740)

Augustine died in 1743. Unlike most widows in Virginia at the time, Mary Ball Washington never remarried. She lived to see her son, George Washington, inaugurated as President in 1789. She died four months later.

Mary Ball Washington was buried on the Lewis Plantation a few steps from "Meditation Rock." Tradition has it that this was her favorite retreat for reading, prayer, and meditation.

Legacy

There are many monuments to Mary Ball Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she lived from 1772 until her death in 1789.

The house purchased for her by her son George has been preserved by APVA Preservation Virginia and is open to the public as a historic house museum. It contains a fine collection of antique furnishings, some with Washington family provenance.

Mary Ball Washington is buried near Kenmore, the former home of her daughter and son-in-law Fielding and Betty Lewis. Kenmore is also open regularly for public tours.

A monument to Mary Ball Washington was erected in 1833 and dedicated by President Andrew Jackson. But was left unfinished until a new one was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1894. [2]

The University of Mary Washington, a public university in Fredericksburg, Virginia, was also named after Mary Washington.

The Lineage of George Washington

Written and researched by Margaret Odrowaz-Sypniewska

Augustine's second wife was Mary Ball, the daughter of Col. Ball of Lancaster, Virginia. Augustine and Mary were married on March 6, 1730. Mary brought Augustine even more property. Mary and Augustine lived at Popes Creek, the home Augustine bought from Joseph Abbington on February 22, 1732. Mary gave birth to two daughters and four sons:

George Washington was born in February 22, 1732. He inherited Ferry Farm when he reached maturity. George was eleven (11) years old when his father died. His father moved to Ferry farm in 1735.

Elizabeth "Betty" Washington was born in early 1733. She married Fielding Lewis, a successful businessman. They lived in Kenmore Mansion.

Samuel Washington was born in late 1733.

John Augustine Washington was born in 1735.

Charles Washington was born in 1738.

Mildred Washington, died in infancy.

Mary (nee Ball) Washington (c. 1708-1789)lived at Strother Plantation across from Fredericksburg, VA. Her son George helped her for another 4 years. She never remarried. George would later inherit the Strother Plantation from his mother. Her daughter Betty lived close to her mother. Mary Ball Washington lived to age 81, surviving her husband Augustine by 40 years. She remained a Tory and died on the eve of her son, George's, inauguration as the first President of the United States of America.

Mary Ball Washington was born in Lancaster County, Virginia, in 1708 to Joseph Ball and Mary Montague Johnson Ball. Each of her parents had been previously married and had children by their previous marriages. The family home was Epping Forest. Her grandfather, William Ball, had been born in England and had immigrated to Virginia around 1650.

By age thirteen, both of Mary’s parents had died, and family friend George Eskridge was appointed her guardian. For the next decade, she lived with Eskridge and family and her married half sister – Elizabeth Bonum. Not much is known about her life at this time, but we know that she could read and write, and that she was an avid horsewoman.

In 1731, Mary married Augustine Washington. She was about 23, which was somewhat old for a first marriage by the standards of the day. Augustine was also from a family that had been in the colony since the mid-1600s, and he had been educated in England, as was the custom of the day. He was a well-established widower, fourteen years her senior, with three children, Lawrence, Augustine, and Jane.

After marriage, Mary lived at Pope’s Creek Plantation, later called Wakefield. The next year, on February 22, she gave birth to her first child, George, named for her guardian George Eskridge. While living at Wakefield, she gave birth to two more children, Betty and Samuel, who were named for Mary’s other guardians, her sister and brother-in-law. Also at Wakefield, Augustine’s daughter Jane died at age 13.

In 1736, the family moved to Epsewassen (or Hunting Creek), later renamed Mt. Vernon, and Mary gave birth to two more children, John Augustine and Charles. Two years later, Augustine purchased Ferry Farm to be closer to his iron business, and the family moved.

In 1830, the women of Fredericksburg banded together to raise the money to fund a monument. The next year, Silas Burrows of New York offered to pay for it himself. In laying the cornerstone, Andrew Jackson said this about her:

“Mary Washington acquired and maintained a wonderful ascendancy over those around her. This true characteristic of genius attended her through life, and she conferred upon her son that power of self-command which was one of the remarkable traits of her character. She conducted herself through this life with virtue and prudence worthy of the mother of the greatest hero that ever adorned the annals of history.” -------------------- Mary Ball Washington (1708 – 1789) was the second wife to Augustine Washington (after the first wife, Jane Butler, died) and was the mother of George Washington. Mary Ball Washington was born as Mary Ball in 1708 in Lively, Virginia, Lancaster County, Virginia. She was the only child of Joseph Ball and his second wife, the widow Mary Johnson, whose maiden name and origins are not known. Fatherless at 3 and orphaned at 12, she was placed, in accordance with the terms of her mother's will, under the guardianship of George Eskridge, a lawyer.

Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. It was her first marriage and his second. Augustine had four children with his first wife, Jane Butler Washington however, only 2 of them lived to adulthood. Together, Mary and Augustine had the following children:

George - (1732-1799)

Betty - (1733-1797)

Samuel - (1734-1781)

John Augustine - (1736-1787)

Charles - (1738-1799)

Mildred - (1739-1740)

Augustine died in 1743. Unlike most widows in Virginia at the time, Mary Ball Washington never remarried. She lived to see her son, George Washington, inaugurated as President in 1789. She died four months later.

Mary Ball Washington was buried on the Lewis Plantation a few steps from "Meditation Rock." Tradition has it that this was her favorite retreat for reading, prayer, and meditation.

Legacy

There are many monuments to Mary Ball Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where she lived from 1772 until her death in 1789.

The house purchased for her by her son George has been preserved by APVA Preservation Virginia and is open to the public as a historic house museum. It contains a fine collection of antique furnishings, some with Washington family provenance.

Mary Ball Washington is buried near Kenmore, the former home of her daughter and son-in-law Fielding and Betty Lewis. Kenmore is also open regularly for public tours.

A monument to Mary Ball Washington was erected in 1833 and dedicated by President Andrew Jackson. But was left unfinished until a new one was dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1894. [2]

The University of Mary Washington, a public university in Fredericksburg, Virginia, was also named after Mary Washington.

--------------------

Washington's relationship with his mother was forever strained. Although she was by no means poor, she regularly complained to outsiders that she was destitute and neglected by her children, much to George's embarrassment. Animosity between mother and son persisted until her death from cancer in the first year of his presidency.

She was the second wife and George was their first child

The Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library is a museum and historical archive in the Northern Neck of The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Its purpose is to preserve the history of Lancaster County, Virginia. It opened in 1958 and was named in honor of George Washington's mother, Mary Ball, a Lancaster County, Virginia native and granddaughter of the ca 1653 emigrant, William Ball I.

The Library has an extensive collection of books and genealogical research material dating back to 1651, covering some 350 years of history in Lancaster County in particular and the Northern Neck in general, as well as Middlesex and Essex counties. It contains approximately 10,000 books, periodicals and manuscripts concerning Virginia and the Northern Neck, as well as research material on adjoining states. The Museum seeks to recapture the stories and the rich history of the people of The Northern Neck.

The museum and library are open to the public, who may tour the historic buildings, view exhibits, participate in educational programs and trace family histories.

In addition to the museum and library, the five building complex, located in the Lancaster Courthouse Historic District, includes the Old Jail (1820), Clerk's Office (c. 1797), Lancaster House and the Steuart Blakemore Building (c.1900).

Augustine's second wife was Mary Ball, the daughter of Col. Ball of Lancaster, Virginia. Augustine and Mary were married on March 6, 1730. Mary brought Augustine even more property. Mary and Augustine lived at Popes Creek, the home Augustine bought from Joseph Abbington on February 22, 1732. Mary gave birth to two daughters and four sons:

George Washington was born in February 22, 1732. He inherited Ferry Farm when he reached maturity. George was eleven (11) years old when his father died. His father moved to Ferry farm in 1735.

Elizabeth "Betty" Washington was born in early 1733. She married Fielding Lewis, a successful businessman. They lived in Kenmore Mansion.

Samuel Washington was born in late 1733.

John Augustine Washington was born in 1735.

Charles Washington was born in 1738.

Mildred Washington, died in infancy.

Mary (nee Ball) Washington (c. 1708-1789)lived at Strother Plantation across from Fredericksburg, VA. Her son George helped her for another 4 years. She never remarried. George would later inherit the Strother Plantation from his mother. Her daughter Betty lived close to her mother. Mary Ball Washington lived to age 81, surviving her husband Augustine by 40 years. She remained a Tory and died on the eve of her son, George's, inauguration as the first President of the United States of America.

Mary Ball Washington was born in Lancaster County, Virginia, in 1708 to Joseph Ball and Mary Montague Johnson Ball. Each of her parents had been previously married and had children by their previous marriages. The family home was Epping Forest. Her grandfather, William Ball, had been born in England and had immigrated to Virginia around 1650.

By age thirteen, both of Mary’s parents had died, and family friend George Eskridge was appointed her guardian. For the next decade, she lived with Eskridge and family and her married half sister – Elizabeth Bonum. Not much is known about her life at this time, but we know that she could read and write, and that she was an avid horsewoman.

In 1731, Mary married Augustine Washington. She was about 23, which was somewhat old for a first marriage by the standards of the day. Augustine was also from a family that had been in the colony since the mid-1600s, and he had been educated in England, as was the custom of the day. He was a well-established widower, fourteen years her senior, with three children, Lawrence, Augustine, and Jane.

After marriage, Mary lived at Pope’s Creek Plantation, later called Wakefield. The next year, on February 22, she gave birth to her first child, George, named for her guardian George Eskridge. While living at Wakefield, she gave birth to two more children, Betty and Samuel, who were named for Mary’s other guardians, her sister and brother-in-law. Also at Wakefield, Augustine’s daughter Jane died at age 13.

In 1736, the family moved to Epsewassen (or Hunting Creek), later renamed Mt. Vernon, and Mary gave birth to two more children, John Augustine and Charles. Two years later, Augustine purchased Ferry Farm to be closer to his iron business, and the family moved.

In 1830, the women of Fredericksburg banded together to raise the money to fund a monument. The next year, Silas Burrows of New York offered to pay for it himself. In laying the cornerstone, Andrew Jackson said this about her:

“Mary Washington acquired and maintained a wonderful ascendancy over those around her. This true characteristic of genius attended her through life, and she conferred upon her son that power of self-command which was one of the remarkable traits of her character. She conducted herself through this life with virtue and prudence worthy of the mother of the greatest hero that ever adorned the annals of history.” -------------------- Mother of George Washington. "The Belle of Epping Forest" was born in 1708 or 1709 in Lancaster County, Virginia to a well-to-do family. Both of her parents had children from prior marriages, but she would be the only child born to Joseph and Mary Washington; her father would die when Mary was only a few years old. At the age of thirteen, her mother died as well. Her early years were spent between the homes of her half-sister Elizabeth and her guardian Colonel George Eskridge, being educated in the "feminine arts" of sewing, cooking, running an estate and etiquette. At the age of twenty, Mary traveled to London to visit her half-brother Joseph and there met Augustine Washington, who also lived in Virginia. They courted for two years before being married in 1731 and settling down at his estate, Pope's Creek, in Westmoreland County. Augustine was much like her father, having three children from a prior marriage and sufficiently successful, owning an ironworks. The following year on February 22, their first son George was born. Six years and four more children later, the family moved to Ferry Farm to be closer to Augustine's ironworks. Mary was left alone with the children often, as her husband did a lot of traveling for his business; it was during these times that she handled the overseeing of the farm and personally educating all of her children in everything from studying the Bible to horsemanship. In April of 1743, Augustine died unexpectedly and left Mary a widow at thirty-five with five children under twelve years old. She threw herself into managing the six hundred acre estate; while women were not allowed to own property at the time, Augustine had left Ferry Farm to George and she was allowed possession until he came of age. Unable to send George to England to be educated as was the custom of the time, she sent him to Mount Vernon to study with his elder half-brother Lawrence. At the age of fourteen, George wanted to enlist in the British Navy, but Mary put her foot down - he was needed at home. To combat his disappointment, she let him have his father's old surveying equipment and hired a tutor to train him; within years he was buying up land with the money he earned as a surveyor. Mary continued to live at Ferry Farm for forty-five years, never remarrying. Her land and her children were her life, there was no room for anything else. As she got older, however, she could not work as often as she liked and came to rely on some support from her children. In 1772, when she was sixty-four, George bought her a house in Fredericksburg a few blocks from Kenmore, the estate of her daughter Betty and her husband Fielding Lewis. The relationship between her and George was more strained than the one she had with the rest of her children, yet he was her main provider in her later years, even buying her a "riding chair" so that she could more easily visit her friends and neighbors. During the War for Independence, she would walk or ride to an outcropping of rock on Betty's estate, now referred to as "Meditation Rock" where she would pray for her son and his success. Mary lived to see her son George not only succeed in his drive to defeat the British in the War, but become the first President of the United States. He last visited her on his way to New York City for his inauguration in April 1789. Four months later, Mary Ball Washington died on August 25, 1789 at the age of eighty-one and was buried a few paces from Meditation Rock. (bio by: Lysa)


-------------------- Mary Ball, was the sister of Francis "Ann" Ball and Sister-in-law of John Carter. Mary Ball was married to General George Washington the 1st President of the United States of America. John Carter was brother-in-law to George Washington.

Mary Ball was the only child of Capt. Joseph Mathaes Ball (widower) and Mary Montague Johnson, his second wife.

Frances "Ann" Ball was the daughter of Capt Joseph M. Ball and Elizabeth Julia Romney. Capt Ball married again and had Mary Ball by second wife and his first wife's death.

view all 18

Mary Washington's Timeline

1708
September 17, 1708
Epping Forest, Lancaster, Virginia, United States
1731
March 6, 1731
Age 22
Epping Forest, Lancaster, Virginia
1731
Age 22
1732
February 22, 1732
Age 23
Westmoreland, Virginia
1733
June 20, 1733
Age 24
Westmoreland, Virginia
1734
November 16, 1734
Age 26
Wakefield, Stafford Co, VA
1736
January 13, 1736
Age 27
Wakefield, Westmoreland, Virginia, United States
1738
May 2, 1738
Age 29
Stafford, Virginia
1739
June 21, 1739
Age 30
Wakefield, Westmoreland, Virginia, United States
1789
August 25, 1789
Age 80
Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Virginia, United States