Matthys LeRoy Blanchan, de Noeville, Bourgeois de Mannheim (c.1604 - c.1688) MP

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Nicknames: "Matthys Blanchan /(Blancon)/"
Birthplace: Noeville Oco,Ricame,St Paul,Artois Normandy
Death: Died in Kingston, Ulster, New York
Occupation: emigrated 1660
Managed by: Ian Thomas Gillespie
Last Updated:

About Matthys LeRoy Blanchan, de Noeville, Bourgeois de Mannheim

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=wsenne&id=I02077

Matthys Blanshan fled to Mannheim, Germany, from France, to escape French persecution. But once he

was there, he became disillusioned, went to Holland, and immigrated to the Dutch colony of New

Netherlands in 1660. Four years later, in 1664, England took control of the Dutch colony and New

Netherlands became New York. Back in the Palatinate, some of Blanshan's friends and relatives

decided to follow his lead. So they immigrated too. When they got to New York they secured a "Patent"

for land to settle on from the English government. They founded New Paltz on the Hudson in 1678. New Paltz was named in remembrance of their friends back in the Palatinate, also called the Rhein land/ Pfalz, or Pfalz. Those Huguenots were the first immigrants to leave Germany as Palatines.

http://www.MohawkValleyHistory.Homestead.com/11MigPal02.html -------------------- His parents were said to be Leonin Blanchamp and Isabeau LeRoy. 1704

Abstract of Marriage Contracts: '1649, April 12. Marriage contract between Anthoine Blanchamp [Blanchant], son of the late Leonin and the late Isabeau le Roy, his father and mother, assisted by Mathieu Blanchamp [Blanchan], his brother; and Martinne Valque, daughter of Jacques, assisted by Jaque Valque [Valke], her brother, and Mahieu Marhem. Mention of land in Arthois belonging to the said Anthoine. Witness, A. Denis. (Vol. iv., No. 157)' [from the Intro p. 626 "The variations between square brackets [ ] are taken from signatures." ] 1748

This isn't ironclad proof of my Mathieu's parents; Anthoine and Mathieu could be half-brothers, I suppose. But since Mathieu did bap. Magdelaine also in this Canterbury church in 1647, I think there is a good chance that Leonin is Mathieu's father. . . . Note also that her marriage record [Magdelaine's] in the Kingston records ed. by Hoes (#21) shows her as 'of Engelant'. So, this gives added weight that the above is the one we want. And helps place Mathieu there, too. I don't think they were in Canterbury very long, as they were supposedly in Mannheim by, I think, 1651." 1749

"Since beginning this article the marriage of Matthew Blanchan and Magdalena Joire was found in the registers of the same church as above (Marriages Roman Cahtolic Church of Armentieres, 1630-1736, FHL 1,122,754). As this information has not been published to date, according to the author's knowledge, it is included here: '15 Oct. 1633 Cont. Mat., Mattheus blanchart et Mag la Joire test. Petrus Joire et Michaele de lestre. [Translation] 15 Oct 1633 Contracted Marriage, Mattheus Blanchart and Magdalena Joire, witnesses Petrus Joire and Michaele de Lestre.' " 1747

"Matthew/Matthys Blancon and his wife Magdalena/Madeleine Jorisse were natives of Artois, Franch Flanders. It is believed they were married before 1635 in France. Matthew Blancon was born about 1610 at Noeuville-au-Corne, Ricame, France. His Will was proved 1688 at Hurley, New York. He was the son of Leonin Blanchamp and his wife Isabeau LeRoy, who was probably the daughter of Nicholas LeRoy of Armentieres, France. Nicholas LeRoy married Judith, daughter of Pierre de Maretz (Demarest) on 26 October 1595. They did not emigrate to America." 1704

"The whole family eventually ended up in New York. From the 1679 marriage record of the Mantieu, Jr., at Kingston, NY, one can learn that he was born in Manheim. It is also know that dau. Catherine, m. Louis DuBois in Mannheim n 1655. As Ms. Eperson describes in her book, earlier Ruth Heidgerd had found the marriage of dau. Maria to Anthoine Crispel in Mannheim (1660) and that record says that Maria was born in Armentieres. So, Armentieres would be a likely place to look for the marriage of Magdalena. And, indeed, it was found there as well as the record of her own baptism. The parish registers did not go back far enough to enable her grandparents to be found. We also know from his will (testamentary disposition) that Mathieu was born in 'Noeville o corne de la paroise Ricame de la cone de S: Paul in the province of Artois'. Modern spelling from Michelin map #51 is: Neuville-au-Cornet; it is near St. Pol-sur-Ternoise. This is about 50 km from Armentieres - a little farther than I would like to guarantee we have the right guy. However, his will goes on to mention 'all the land in Artois' 'where the testator was born' and in 'Armentieres and other places' - Ulster County, New York Probate Records, translated and edited by Gustave Anjou pp 30-31. So, that places him in Armentieres, which I think clinches it. Perhaps I should also mention, that the marr. record Mathieu and Magdalena's dau. Magdalena shows she was b. in England and her bap. isfound in the records of the Walloon Church in Canterbury. So, now to summarize the migration of Mathieu: Neuville-au-Cornet; near St. Pol-sur-Ternoise Armentieres Canterbury Mannheim Ulster Co., New York." 1750

"It is evident that Matthew Blancon and wife were refugees first to England and then to Mannheim, Germany. One record states there were three sons, age 12, 9 and 5 years, and a cousin Rachel de la Montaigne, daughter of Jean, who accompanied them to America. (Ref: Genealogy of the Dukd, Shepherd, van Metre Families by Samuel G. Smyth; 1909). On 22 April 1660 the Dutch ship 'De Mergulde Otter' (Gilded Otter) Captin Cornelis Reyerson van der Buts, arrived in America with a mixed passengers were 'Mathew Blanchan from Artois, agriculturish; wife and three children.' All went first to Kingston, New York. Also traveling with them were Maria Blanchan and her husband Anthony Crispel and three young children. "1704

"Some thirty five years ago, Major Louis DuBois of Salem County, New Jersey wrote an account of Matthew, carefully documented and annotated, from references usually inaccessible to descendants in other parts of the country: 'Matthew Blanchan in Eurpoe and America The antecendents of Matthew Blanchan are deduced from the record of a marriage contract dated 12 April 1649, recorded at the Walloon or Strangers Church of Canterbury, England between: 'Anthoin Blanchamp, son the the late Leonin, and the late Isabeau LeRoy, his father and mother, assisted by Mathieu Blanchan, his brother; and Martinne Valque, daughter of Jacques, assisted by Jaque Valque (Valke), her brothers, and Mathieu Marheim.' Isabeau LeRoy was probably closely related to Jonas, son of Nicholas LeRoy of ARmentieres, who married at the same church 26 October 1595, Judith, daughter of Pierre de Maretz (Demarest). It is notable that both LeRoy and Demarest names appear in the early records of the French congregation at Mannheim. Also from the Strangers Church, is found under 19 November 1654: Anthoine Blanchon and Martine Baete have had baptized their son named Mathieu, who had for godfather Mathieu Blancon and for godmother Marie Desoprie." 1704

"According to his testamentary deposition given, Matthew Blanchon was born at Noeuville-au-Corne, parish of Ricame, about six miles southeast of st. Pol-sur-Tournoise, and some thirty miles due north of Amiens. Some time before 1635, hemoved to Armentieres, very near the Belgian border, and married Magdeleine Jorisse or Joire. The recent translations of the Mannheim records make us wonder if this was a patronymic. In one place her name is given as 'Madeleine Serge' and we wonder if her father's name could be Joris Serge. Did his family, perhaps, have something to do with the development of that twilled fabric so important to the text6ile industry around Lille? This is sheer speculation." 1704

"Matthew Blanchan of Armentieres could foresee the future. Long before the treaty [of Westphalia] was concluded, he and his wife, with their daughters Catharine and Maria, had made their way to England. On 16 May 1647 there was baptized at the Strangers Church, Canterbury: 'Magdelaine, fille de Mattieu Blanchan et Magdelaine Jorre. Tem." Pierre Lambert, Jacques Toulet, Magdelaine Descamps, Magdelain Preuno.' Huguenot services are still held today, occasionally, in the little chapel in the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral. We suppose it was the trial and execution of Charles I in 1649 that caused Matthew Blanchan to look beyond England for a safer refuge. He was one of the first to accept the invitation of the Elector Platine to Huguenot merchants and manufacturers. They were invited to resettle and rebuild the commercial city of Mannheim. . . . Matthew Blanchan was in Mannheim by 1651, along with enough Huguenots to form a separate French congregation. The next year, they obtained the services of Pastor Benedict de Besson and Matthew was among the first deacons of the Huguenot congregation in Mannheim, elected in 1652. Soon after, also to resettle and rebuild Mannheim, Louis du Bois of Wicres and Antoine Crispell had arrived and subsequently married two of Matthew's daughters." 1704

"The five children of Matthew Blanchan and Magdelaine Joire/Jorisen were widely spaced. Matthew, Jr. was only six months old when his eldest sister catharine marrried Louis du Bois in 1655. A second sister, Maria, married Antoine Crispell on 31 Janaury 1661. Almost at once the Blancan family with their new son-in-law set out for the New World. Catharine and Louis du Bois remained in Mannheim where their son Isaac was born on May 14th, emigrating in 1661 on the 'St. Jan Baptiste'." 1704

Listed in Baptemes, Eglise de Canterbury, 1647: Mai 16 Magdelaine, fille de Mattieu BLANCHAN et de Magdelaine JORRE. em. Pierre Lambert, Jaques Toulet, Magdelaine Descamps, Magdelaine Pruuo." 1751

"Matthew (Matthys) BLANCHAN was "born in the village of Noeuville o corne in the parish de la paroise Ricame de la conte' de S: Paul in the province of Artois", France. He had been of some note in his Nouville le Conte. He married Madeline Brissen Jorisse. "1730

"Matthys Blanshan, from Artois, embarked with his wife, Madeline Jorisen, and three children on the 27th of April, 1660, in the ship Gilded Otter for this country. On his arrival he came to Esopus. He subsequently moved to Hurley and followed his occupation as a distiller. Of their children Kathryn married Louis Du Bois . . . " 1740

He was said to come to America 22 April 1660. 1704

In Boyer's List of Passengers, there is a listing: "April 26, 1660. In De Vergulde otter (The Gilded Otter), Captain Cornelis Reyersz Van der Beets. (New York Colonial Mss., Vol. XIV., p. 97.) . . . Mttheus Blanchard, farmer, from Artois, wife and three children, 12, 9, and 5 years old. . . "1752

"In 1980 the author (Gwenn F. Epperson) was in correspondence with Ruth P. heidgerd of New Paltz, New York, concerning a mutual ancestor Matthew Blanchan. She included a copy of all Blanchan and Crispel entries in the French Church of Mannheim, Baden-Wurttembury, Germany, which records she had transcribed, translated, and cross-referenced for the Huguenot historical Society of New Paltz. Mannheim was one of several towns where the Blanchans took refuge on their long, curcuitous route to America. Included was the marriage 'Antoine Crispel, young man, native of St. Guin [formerly French Flanders, now Sainghinen-Weppes, Nord, France] in the low country, and Marie Blanchan, native of Armentieres [formerly in French Flanders, now Nord, France], were married in this church the 31 Janaury, 1660.' A booklet which she also enclosed, Matthew Blanchan in Europe and America, says: 'According to his testamentary deposition given below (p. 15) Matthew was born at Neuville-au-Cornet, parish of Ricame . . . Sometime before 1635 he moved to Armentieres, very near the Belgian border and married Magdeleine Jorisse or Joire.' Since their daughter Maria was born in Armentieres it was logical to believe her parents may have married there, and that was Magdalena Joire's home parish. A search of the Baptisms of the Roman Catholic Church turned up the baptism of Magdelena: '27 Oct. 1611, die baptizata est Magdalena filia Petri Joire, susceptor fuit Bartholomeus Le Blanc, susceptrix fuit Magdalena Gruson. 27 Oct 1611, was baptized Magdalena daughter of Petrus [Pierre] Joire, godfather Bartholomeus Le Blanc, godmother Magdalena Gruson.' "1753

"The baptisms of five additional children were located in the same parish. The baptism of the first child Maria 1 october 1601 also gave the name of the mother as Jacoba Le Blanc. Another exciting find was the marriage of Matthew Blanchan and Magdalena Joire '15 Oct. 1633 Cont. Mat., Mattheus blanchart et Mag la Joire test. Petrus Joire et Michaele de lestre. 15 Oct. 1633 contracted marriage, Mattheus Blanchart and Magdelana Joire, witnesses Petrus Joire and Michaele De Lestre.' Also the baptismal record of an additional child of this couple, who probably died young and was thus heretofore unknown, was discovered in the baptisms (See Illustration 8): '14 Aug. 1642, baptizatus fuit Maximilianus Blanchart filuis Mathei et Magdelenae Joire. Pubr. Maximilianus Lalau, and Joanna Cousmart.' 14 Aug. 1642, was baptized Maximilianus Blanchart son of Matheus and Magdalena Joire. Godparents Maximilianus Lauau, and Joanna Cousmart."1753

"On April 27, 1660, Mathese Blanchan, with his wife Madeline Jorisse, his daughter Maria, and her husband Anthony Crispell, and three children, embarked in the Dutch ship Gilded Otter for New Netherland, and arrived at Wiltwyck before December 7, 1660, for on that date Domine Blom recorded their presence at this first celebration of the Lord's Supper."1733

"Illustration 7: Marriage of Matthew Blanchan and Magdalena Joire in the Roman Catholic Church of Armentieres, France." [on file] 1753

"Casier and family arrived here from Mannheim in June, 1660, having in company Matthew Blanchan, and his son-in-law, Antoine Crepel; these two going to Esopus, while Casier, at New Amsterdam, engaged, 'with his three beside,' in timber sawing. . . . Blanchan an dCrepel, (now written Crispell) were originally from Artois, as before stated; and the first of some note in his native town of Nouville le-Conte. With him came his wife, Madeleine Goore, and (besides Maria, Mrs. Crepel), three other children, viz., Madeleine, aged 12 years; Elizabeth, 9, and Matthew, 5, the last born at Mannheim. Stuyvesant welcomed them and gave Blanchan a letter to Sergt. Romp, at Esopus, directing him to provide them accomodation. Arrived there, and Dominie Blom having also come, it was a solace to the pious Blanchan, for all he had suffered, and the loss of property in his native place, and at Armentieres (Flanders), and elsewhere, to sit down with his wife and son and daughter Crepel, at the Lord's Supper, on December 25, ensuing. . . . Blanchan, Du Bois and Crepel all got land in Hurley, near Kingston, and received groundbriefs April 25, 1663. Du Bois died in Kingston in 1696, and his widow married Jean cottin, named page 71."1737

"A Deed of Confirmation was granted Blanchan by Governor Nicolls 18 June 1664 'for a house and lot of ground lying and being at Wiltwyck, at Esopus'. (New york Land Papers, Vol. 1. p. 21). Blanchan and his two sons-in-law probably went from Wiltwyck (Kingston) to Nieu Dorp (the New Village) sometime prior to 25 April 1663, since Riker states that they received ground briefs on that date. (Riker op. cit. p. 183). A Register of Patents granted to the inhabitants of the town of Hurley (the name given to the New Village by the English) lists Matthew Blanchan as holding two tracts, one of 24 acres - 450 rods, and one of 16 acres - 247 rods; Louis du Bois, two tracts, one of 24 acres - 450 rods and one of 16 acres - 408 rods (Paltsits. Minutes of the Executive Council of the Province of New York, 1668-1673, Vol. 1, p. 212). Matthew Blanchan acquired considerable property at Esopus. On 8 October 1666 he contracted to purchase from Jan Jansen van Oosterhout a house and lot between Jan Broersen (Decker) and Albert Jansen van Steenwyck for 92 sec. of winter wheat. (Versteeg New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch. Kingston Papers, p. 618). On 7 June 1673 governor Lovelace gave him a Deed of Confirmation for thirty-six acres of land at Hurley. A description of a sixty-three acre plot, a part of the Hurley Great Piece, on the north side of the Esopus Kill, laid out for Matthew Blanchan, was recorded 20 May 1686, by Phillip Wells, surveyor. He was awarded a further grant of 62-3/4 acres, 36 rods of land at Hurley on 11 October 1687. On the same date, a petition from Blanchan was recorded for one hundred acres of land, south of the 'Cale Bergh' in Marble town. The New Village was destroyed by the Esopus Indians on 7 June 1663. Two children of Matthew Blanchan, the wife and three children of Louis du Bois and the wife and child of Anthony Crispell were carried away into captivity by the Indians; to be rescued months later by an expedition commanded by Captain Martin Cregier. Matthew Blanchan's home was destroyed as were many others at this time by the Indians. Matthew Blanchan has gone down in history as aggressive and obstinate. Of the Reformed religion, he had abandoned property both in Flanders and in England to struggle for a living in a frontier settlement for the right to worship his God in accordance with his own free conscience. A rugged individual, he labored for a hard-earned living or himself and his family and he demanded just payment from his debtors. In regard to his difficulties with the Wiltwyck magistrate over the excise tax, it is well to remember the unsettled state of affairs reseulting from the transfer of the government from the Dutch to the English. The records show that he had the support of Director-General Stuyyvesant and later the English governors." 1704

"On 20 January 1665 he was charged with refusing to pay his share of 20 guilders in beavers toward the minister's salary. His defense was that the minister did not hold consistory properly and had not supported him in his suit against Aldert Heymans Roos. On 29 April 1666 he was called as witness in a brawl between Albert Heymans Roos(a) and a soldier, Francois Vreeman. The problems with the Indians had apparently subsided at that time. In the fall and early winter of 1668, the Wiltwyck court heard evidence in an unusually bitter libel sit, brought by Tjerck Claesen de Witt against Matthew Blanchan, the father-in-law of Louis du Bois. DeWitt, A commissary of the court, demanded vindication of his honor, because Blanchan had called him a thief, and had said that he, de Witt, did not do justice as a Commissary. Blanchan, in return, complained that de Witt had hated him for years. In the course of testimony, it was brought out that Blanchan, who owned the mill in Wildwyck, had for a long time refused to grind grain for de Witt, who as a consquence, was forced to take a ship to Albany in order to have his grain ground. De Witt claimed that Blanchan had said to others '(even) if he (de Witt) were starving he would not grind for him; which as de Witt complained, 'is no christian love.' De Witt admitted having said on one occasion 'I have once assisted in putting out a fire in the guard house, which threatened to damage the mill. If it should happen again I woul dnot even move a hand in assisting to put it out.' A witness testified that Blanchan had said that 'If he were master he would hang Tierck Claesen." The ill will between the two men had originated in an incident that occurred between them in 1663. At that time de Witt was holding office as Commissary. It was this incident that apparently prompted Blanchan to refer to de Witt as a thief. The court now ordered Blanchan 'to prove at the next session that . . . Tierck Claesen is a thief or by default he will have to expect such punishment as ought to be justly meted out to a thief.' " 1704

"Blanchan's position in the argument was based largely on a misunderstanding of certain legal and political conditions existing in 1663, at the time of the incident that precipitated the feud. The court clarified the situation existing at the time, and absolved de Witt of any wrong-doing. In pronouncing sentence, the court ordered that Blanchan 'shall with uncovered head pray God and the court for forgiveness, and admit that he knows nothing concerning the person of Commissary Tierck Claesen but what is honorable and upright, and to be banished during one year out of this jurisdiction as soon as the river is navigable and besides is sentenced to pay a fine of 600 gldrs light money . .. besides the expenses of the suit, and shall remain under arrest until the ssentence shall hand been carried out.' " 1704

"Under date of 11 August 1769 the record shows the sale of a negro and negress for 800 guilers to Matthew Blanchan. Matthew Blanchan prospered. He build a new barn in 1670 but he had problems with Teunis Jacobs concerning the shingles. Among the old Kingston records, book 2, p. 390 under date of 8 Janaury 1677 we find: Jacques du Bois and Matthew Blanchan made an 'agreement to purchase a distillery mill and lot for 500 schepels of wheat.' The desire for a Huguenot settlement grew. Matthew, however, was gitting old. In fact, he began to think about his estate some twenty three years before he died. The French Huguenots were ahead of the English in the matter of women's rights. Their wives were considered partners rather than dependents. When English law came to the Hudson Valley, Matthew took steps to protect Magdeleine. He presented a deposition, written in Dutch 17 July 1665 to protect his wife. Again, old records reveal that on 8 October 1666 Jan Jansen van Oosterhout conveyed a house and lot in Wiltwyck to Mattheww Blanchan and in 1673 there is a deed of confirmation from Governor Lovelace to Matthew Blanchan for 63 acres land in Hurley." 1704

"Smyth says in his Genealogy of the Duke-Shepherd-Van Metre Families, 1909, that Matthew Blanshan made two Wills. The first was dated 17 July 1665 wherein he mentions his 'wife Magdalene Joresse as lawful wife who shall possess the whole estate here in America as long as she remain a widow; also all land in Artois where he was born in in Armentiers and other places. She to keep the three children Magdelena, Elizabeth and Matthew until they reach their majority or marry.' She was then to act toward them as she treated the two married daughters Catharine and Maria. In his second Will dated 22 August 1671, proved 7 March 1688, preserved in the Surrogate's office, city of New York in Liber 34, p. 85, mentions his wife but directs certain property be divided among his children, Catharine, Maria, Magdalena, Elizabeth and Matthew. Matthew (Matthys) Blanchan died at Hurley, New York 1688 and from the fragmentary record appears to be a man of prominence. Matthew Blanchan was not a Patentee of New Paltz, but probably there would have been no settlement there without him. This shrewd and foresighted business man was a leader in each step of the migration. Only one son and one grandson carried on his name, but descendants of most early Ulster county, New York families, whether French or Dutch, find that his name appears someplace, or in several places, on the family tree." 1704

"Descendants of Matthew Blanchan and his wife Magdalena Joresse are eligible and have joined hereditary societies including the National Society Daughters of Colonial Wars; National Society of the Sons and Daughters of the Pilgrims; National Society of the Colonial Dames of the seventeenth Century, The Huguenot Society of America and the National Society of Huguentos. The Huguenot Society of New Paltz, New York founded by Mr. Kenneth Hasbrouck has many members from this founding father. Needless to say, Matthew Blanchan was a very religious man and was active in the church in his new country. The Rev. Hermanus Blom of Wiltwyck has mentioned Matthew Blanchan eleven times in his Account Book of Parishioners between the years 1663-1666." 1704

"DE VERGULDE OTTER (The Gilded Otter) Sailed 26 April 1660 [NWI] after 1 April 1660 [JJ] arrived New Amsterdam before 25 Aug. 1660 [JJ] Captain Cornelis Reyersz Van Der Beets

Source unless otherwise noted: New World Immigrants edited by Michael Tepper, Volume 1"1754

"Matthew Blanchan b perhaps 1610 - 1615 in Noeuville-au-Corne, Ricame, Artois, France and d 1688 in Ulster County, New York. He moved to Armentieres and mar Magdeleine Jorisse (Joire?) by 1635. (It is speculated that her father could have been Joris Serge.) By 1649 they were living in or near Canterbury, England where their presence is recorded at the Walloons or Strangers Church of Canterbury for the marriage of his brother Anthoin. The passenger list of "De Verguige Otter" (The Gilded Otter) under Capt. Cornelis Reyersz Van der Beets lists "Mattheu Blanchand, farmer, from Artois, wife and three children, 12, 9, and 5 years old." They arrived at New Amsterdam April 26, 1660. Also listed is his new son in law Anthony Krypel (Antoine Crispell). Matthew Blanchan acquired title to a considerable amount of land in the Esopus (New Paltz). Aspects of his life were also well documented in court records of the time. His last will was dated August 22, 1671 and proved March 4, 1687 in Kingston. " 1754

"Ordinary Session, Tuesday, September 13, 1661. . . Mathys Blanchan, plaintiff, vs. Hendrick sewant reyger [braider of sewant]. Default." 1717

In Dutch Records of Kingston: "Ordinary Session, held Tuesday, November 8, Anno 1661 . . . Matheus Blanchan, plaintiff, vs. Pieter van Alen, defendant. Plaintiff, by virtue of a power of attorney conferred upon him by Fousien Brief, demands payment of Pieter van Alen of the amount of two schepels of wheat. Default." 1717

In Dutch Records of Kingston: "Ordinary Session held Tuesday, November 22, [1661] . . . Mathyue Blansan, plaintiff, summons Pieter van Alen again, and, by virtue of a power of attorney from Toeryn Briel, demands two schepels of wheat and a sack [zak, or three schepels]. Defendant's third default. He is ordered after the third default to pa to Matheue Blanchan, by virtue of a power of attorney, and the costs of the case."1717

In Dutch Records of Kingston: "Ordinary Session, held at Wildtwyck, January 3, Anno, 1662 . . . Matheu Blanchan, plaintiff, demands from Pieter van Alen, by virtue of an earlier judgement against him, payment of two schepels of wheat and a sack. Whereas, Pieter van Arlen shows us a receipt from Toesyn Briel's son-in-law for the debt sued for, dated November 24, and whereas Matheu Blanchan has pressed the Schout to issue execution against Pieter van Alen, who has demanded security from Matheu Blanchan, which is conceded as due to Pieter van Alen, but Matheu Blanchan refuses to give security, and the parties, at their request, having been heard, Pieter van Alen is ordered to pay, as aforesaid, provided Matheu Blanchan gives security on his claim against Pieter van Alen." 1717

In Dutch Record of Kingston: "Ordinary Session, held this March 29. . . Matheu Blanchan, plaintiff, says he leased to Mathys Roelofsen two oxen for the amount of fifty guilders, for the purpose of carting wood to his house, and that this should have been done last fall The defendant, Mathys roeloofsen, says his wife hire the ocxen for fifty gldrs., but has not yet carted it all, and therefore refuses to pay. Jan Mertense testifies that the oxen were leased and hired, and that the carting ought to have been finished in the fall at ploughing time, or the oxen returned. Whereas, Mathue Blanchan says he as another account against her, he is given time until next session of the Court to make out his bill." 1717

"Ordinary Session, held Tuesday, April 18, 1662. . . Matheu Blanchan, plainfitt, demands for the second time fifty gldrs., zeewant, for the use of two oxen by Mathys roelofsen. He also demands twenty-five gldrs., eleven stivers, zeewant, more, for milk, butter and brandy supplied to defendant. Default." 1717

"Ordinary Session, held Tuesday, May 2, 1662 . . . Mathys Blahchan, plaintiff, demands from Matyhs Roeloofsen payment of fifty gldrs., zeewant, for the use of two oxen, as already mentioned, as as has been proved. Plaintiff in addition demands twenty-five guilders, in zeewant, for goods furnished. Defendant admits the debt of twenty-five gldrs., zeewant, but says he has not the satisfactory use of the oxen, and therefore declines to pay. The Commissaries, after having heard the parties, and the circumstances being known to the Court, order defendant to pay the plaintiff the amount sued for." 1717

"Ordinary Session held Tuesday, July 4, 1662 . . . Mathys Blanchan, plaintiff, demands vindication of his honor. Says that Juriaen told his wife that it was reported that Dirck Adriaensen said to her he had seen matheu Blanchan beat Juriaen Westvael's pig. Defendant Juriaen Westvael and his wife admit having heard this from Dirck Adriaensen, and state that Pieter Jansen also heard it. Defendant Dirck Adriaensen denies this, and says he did not say so. The Schout and Commissaries order the parties to preserve the peach, and sentence Dirck Adriaensen to pay a fine of sic gldrs., for the poor." 1717

Tuesday, January 23, 1663: "Matheu Blanchan, plaintiff, vs. Mathys Roeloofsen, defendant. Plaintiff demands the expenses he says he incurred for defendant when defendant was under sentence. Defendant answers he offered to pay plaintiff, but his obstinacy caused him to go to Court. The Court, after hearing both parties, decides that each pay one-half the expense, so that deendant must pay plaintiff ten gldrs., ten stivers." 1717

Tuesday, February 6, 1663: "The Schout, plaintiff, vs. Mattheu Blanchan, defndant. Plaintiff says that defendant, an inhabitant of this village, does not confine himself to distilling, but has dared to violate the ordinances established by the Director General and Supreme Council for this place, and still, unrepealed, providing that those who desire to tap must observe said ordinances until further order. Concerning which the Schout states that defendant sold a half anker of brandy to his brother-in-law, Lowys Dubo, and [that] when the court was at defendant's house to gauge, [the defendant,] t account for what had become of his wine, gave as an answer that he had two or three times voiled over into the ashes [i.e., spoiled the product]. And the Court, being informed that on the great piece some mishap has accurred, went thither with the whole Board on horseback to investigate for the general good how much wine there was and in whose possession it was, and found a half anker of distilled water at the house of Lowys Dubo who admitted and declared, in the pesence o the Court, that he bought it from his father. And, whereas, the defendant did not declare the wine, the Schout demands his fine. . . The matter on the other side [of the page] between the Schout and Matheu Blanchan having been presented to the Commissaries and having been considered by them and the Court, they find that the ordinance must be observed, and in order to prevent the evils which otherwise might result, and for cause it thereunto moving, the Court condemns the defendant to pay a fine of one hundred and twenty-five guilders, to be applied as follows: One third to the poor, one-third to the Bench, and one-third to the Schout. . . On February 28, Matheu Banchan requested permission to appeal, which was granted by the Court. He offers Christiaen Nissen romp and Lowys Dubo as sureties for the judgment rendered or to be rendered, with the costs thereof. Christyan Niszen, Louys (x) DuBois." 1717

Tuesday, February 12, 1664: "Mattheus Capito, Provisional Schout, plaintiff, vs. Matthew Blanchan, defendant. Plaintif demands a fine of fifty guilders from defendant because, after the second beating of the drum, he churned some milk on the day of fasting and prayer. Defendant answers that the drum beat only once, and that he had no milk for his calf, and he never in his life did this before. The Honorable Court, having exained the Schout's complaint and the answer of the defendant, order defendant to pay six guilders, one-half for the Church." 1717

"Among the Walloons from Artois found here, were Matthieu Blanchan, Louis Du Bois, and Antoine Crispel: Blanchan having sojourned in England, as perhaps had the other two, who became his sons-in-law. "1737

"On 29 April 1666 Matthew Blanchan was called as a witness in a brawl between Albert Heymans Roosa and a soldier, Francois Vreeman." 1704

"testametary disposition, dated Sept. 7/17, 1665, and written in Dutch. 'Before me, Mattheus Capito' 'appeared the worthy Matheus Blanchan, born in the village of Neouville o corne in the parish de la paroise Ricame de la conte de S:Paul in the province of Artois.' - Long religious preamble. - 'Magdalen Joire' 'lawful wife, shall possess the whole estate' 'here in America, as long as she remains a widow' also 'all land in Artois' 'where the testator was born' and in 'Armentiers and other places' she to keep the 'three children, Madalena, Elizabeth and Matheu' 'minors' 'untl they reach their majority or marry'. 'When they marry, she to act towards them as she treated the two other married daughters, Catarinen and Marien.' - After remarriage, wife to have only one half of the property, for the purpose of bringing up the three minors. - 'Wife being present, consents to these conditions.' Signed by the testator, and witnessed by Wallerand Du Mont and Pier Nuee." 1719

"Matthys Blashan, from Artois, farmer, and his wife, Maddelen Jorisse, and their son-in-law, Anthony Crispel, with his wife, Maria Blanshan, and three younger children of Mattheus Blanchan, sailed for the new world in the 'Guilded Otter', April 27, 1660, arriving at Wiltwyck before dec. 7, 1660. On Oct. 8, 1666, Jan Jansen van Oosterhou conveyed to M.B. a house and lot in W (English MSS., xxi, p. 11) - On June 18, 1667, there is a deed of confirmation from Gov. Nicolls to M.B. for a house and lot of ground at W., at Esopus. (N.Y. Land Papers, I., p. 21). - On Oct. 16, 1666, Oerloff Swartwout and Jurien Westphael made a declaration respecting the arrival of M.B. and family and his application for a place to settle. (Ibid, p. 12. - On June 7, 1673, there is a deed of confirmation from Gov. Lovelace to M.B. for 63 acres land in Hurley. (N.Y. Land Papers, I., p. 51). - On May 20, 1686, there is a description of a survey of a lot of land, of about 63 acres, part of Hurley great piece, on the north side of Esopus Kill, laid out for M.B. byPhilip Welles, surveyor (N.Y. Land Papers, II., p. 186). On Oct. 11, 1686, M.B. had a Patent for 62 3/4 acres 36 rods land in Hurley. (Engl. MSS., xxxiii, p. 60). On June 17, 1697, Mathias Blanson petitioned for a patent for 100 acres of land, south of the Cale Bergh, in Marbletown. (N.Y. Land Papers, II., p. 249). Magdalena B., m., Sept 28, 1667, Jan Matthysen Jansen, of Fort Orange , when she is described as 'of England.' (q.v.)" 1719

"Matthew (Matthys) BLANCHAN was 'born in the village of Noeuville of corne in the parish de la paroise Ricame de la conte' de S: Paul in the province of Artois', France. He had been of some note in his Nouville le Conte. . . Matthew, his wife, their son-in-law, Anthony Crispel, with his wife, Maria, and Matthew's three younger children, sailed on the 'Gilded Otter' on 27 April 1660, arriving at Wiltwyck before 7 December 1660. Riker's History of Harlem, New York, 1881 states: "Governor Stuyvesant welcomed them and gave Blanchan a letter to Sergeant Romp at Esopus directing him to provide accommodations for them. They arrived there and Domine Blom, also having arrived, it was a solace to pious Blanchan, for all that he had suffered with the loss of his property in his native place and at Armentiers in Flanders as well as elsewhere, to sit down with his family at the Lord's Supper on the ensuing December 25th." "It has been generally accepted that Louis DuBois accompanied Matthys Blanchan and Antoine Crispell, but Riker suggests that he probably came with his brother-in-law Pierre Billiou the following year. "Blanchan, Crispell, and DuBois all received grants of land in Hurley, near Kingston, obtaining ground briefs on 25 April 1663. "On 8 October 1666, Jan Jansen van Oosterhout conveyed to Matthew Blanchan a house and lot in Wiltwyck [English MSS, xxii, p. 11]. On 16 October 1666, Roeloff Swartwout and Jurien Westphael make a declaration respecting the arrival of Matthew Blanchan and family and his application for a place to settle [N.Y. Land Papers, I., p. 12]. On 18 June 1667 there is a deed of confirmation from Gov. Nicolls to Matthew Blanchan for a house and lot of ground at Wiltwyck, at Esopus [N.Y. Land Papers, I., p. 21]. On 7 June 1673 there is a deed of confirmation from Gov. Lovelace to Matthew Blanchan for 63 acres land in Hurley [N.Y. Land Papers, I., p. 51]. On 20 May 1686 there is a description of a survey of a lot of land, of about 63 acres, part of 'Hurley great piece', on the north side of Esopus Kill, laid out for Matthew Blanchan by Philip Welles, surveyor [N.Y. Land Papers, II., p. 186] On 11 October 1686 Matthew Blanchan had a Patent for 62 3/4 acres 36 rods land in Hurley [English MSS, xxxiii, p. 60]. On 17 June 1697 Mathias Blansan petitioned for a patent for 100 acres of land, south of the Cale Bergh, in Marbletown [N.Y. Land Papers, II., p. 249]." The following testamentary disposition, dated 7 September 1665, is translated from Dutch: "Before me, Mattheus Capito, appeared the worthy Mattheus Blanchan, born in the village of Noeuville o corne in the parish de la paroise Ricame de la conte' de S: Paul in the province of Artois. [Long religious preamble] Magdalen Joire, lawful wife, shall possess the whole estate here in America, as long as she remains a widow, also all the land in Artois where the testator was born and in Armentiers and other places, she to keep the three children, Magdalena, Elizabeth and Mattheu, minors, until they reach their majority or marry. When they marry, she to act towards them as she treated the two other married daughters, Catarinen and Marien. [After remarriage, wife to have only one half of the property, for the purpose of bringing up the three minors.] Wife being present, consents to these conditions." [Signed by the testator, and witnessed by Wallerand Du Mont and Pier Nuee] A later will was dated 22 August 1671 and recorded 30 April 1688: "If Matthis Blanchan happens to dy first his wife shall continue in possession of all ye Goods so long as she lives and if Magdalen Joore happens to Deceas first her husband Matthis Blanchan shall continue in possession of ye Goods and Estates as long as he lives and if Either of them marry hee or Shee shall deliver to ye children ye Equall half part of ye whole Estat butt if both Matthis Blanchan and his wife happen to dy then their son Matthis Blanchan shall have ye farme lying in Hurley with house barns and appurtenances with four horses and four cows, and whatt Remains in Esopus and America their children shall Equally divide Among them yt is to say Chatharine Maria Magdalena Elizabeth Matthes." [Witnessed by (Capt.) Thomas Chambers, Cornelius Barentse, Clarke, Jno Williamse, all Magistrates of ye Court; Attestor, W. De La Montagne] "1730

"The following excerpts are taken from the book 'Matthew Blanchan in Europe and America' by Ruth Heidgard, and will give you some idea of how I came up with the dates for these people. 'The antecedents of Matthew Blanchan are deduced from the record of a marriage contract dated April 12, 1649, recorded at the Walloon or Strangers' Church of Canterbury England between: 'Anthoin Blanchamp, son of the Late Leonin, and the late Isabeau LeRoy, his father and mother, assisted by Mathieu Blancham, his brother; and Martinne Valque, daughter of Jacques, assisted by Jaque Valque (Valke), her brother, and Mathieu Marheim.' (Huguenot Society of London, collections. Vol. 5 part 3, p. 725). Isabeau LeRoy was probably closely related to Jonas, son of Nicholas LeRoy of Armentieres, who married at the same church 26 Oct 1595, Judith, daughter of Pierre de Maretz (Demarest). It is notable that both LeRoy and Demarest names appear in the early records of the French congregation at Mannheim. Also from the Strangers' Church, is found under 19 November 1654: 'Anthoine Blanchon and Martine Baete have had baptized their son named Mathieu, who had for godfather Mathieu Blachon and for godmother Marie Desoprie.' According to his testamentary deposition given below (p. 15), Matthew was born at Noeuville-au-corne, parish of Ricame, about six miles southeast of St. Pol-sur-Tournoise, and some thirty miles due north of Amiens. Sometime before 1635, he moved to Armentieres, very ear the Belgian border, and married Magdeleine Jorise or Joire. Matthew Blanchan had his ear to the ground. Long before the treaty was concluded, he and his wife, wth their daughters Catherine and Maria, had made their way to England. On 16 May 1647, there was baptized at the Strangers' Church, Canterbury: 'Magdelaine, fille de Mattieu Blanchan et Magdelaine Joore. Tem: Pierre Lambert, Jacques Toulet, Magdelaine Descamps, Magdelaine Preuno. (Huguenot Society of London. Collections, Vol. 5 part 2)' " 1755

"Another exciting find was the marriage of Matthew Blanchan and Magdalena Joire (See Illustration 7): '15 Oct. 1633 Cont. Mat., Mattheus blanchart et Mag la Joire test. Petrus Joire et Michaele de lestre. 15 Oct. 1633 contracted marriage, Mattheus Blanchart and Magdelana Joire, witnesses Petrus Joire and Michaele De Lestre.' " 1753

In John Beatty's will (proved March 9, 1720, old style) it states: "I give unto my son John all my third part in the mill Likewise twenty acres of Land near by which was promised to be Conveyed to me by Matthias Blanehn before the Trustees of Marbletown but afterwards said Matthias Blanehan told me that all there was above one hundred acres I might take for he would take no more as to pay one Shilling Quitt and when I surveyed it I found it to be twenty three acres above his hundred but his mother is to have said part of the Mill as long as the Debts is paid She Chance to Marry in the mean while then it is to be delivered up to my said Son John." 1744

"After the death of William Asfordby and his wife, Martha Burton, real estate owned by them in Marbletown was confirmed to their heirs in the following deed, executed by the Trustees of Marbletown . . .'then South 50 degrees East 9 chians and 11 links to the bounds of the land of Mattys Blanchon . . . ' [27 April 1711]" 1744

"As an example, Mathieu Blanchan married in the Catholic Church in Armentieres in 1633 and baptized a son there in 1642. In 1647 he baptized a daughter in the Wallon Church in Canterbury, England. Then he moved to Mannheim and then to Kingston, NY, where he was in a Reformed Church. So, did he become a Protestant between 1642 and 1647, or was he one all along? We may never know." 1756

"Certain it is, that among the persons admitted to the Lord's Supper, upon the occasion of its first celebration in Esopus, on the seventh day of December in that year [1660], were Matthew Blanchan, with Madeleine Jorisse, his wife, and Anthony Crispel, with Maria Blanchan, his wife. . . .Blanchan and his two sons-in-law were among those who removed from Wiltwyck to the New Village. A summer passed by, and the colonists remained undisturbed. They were, however, by no means safe from molestation. Stuyvesant's severity in sending some of his Indian prisoners, at the close of the Esopus war, to the island of Curacoa, had left a lasting impression of resentment in the minds of the savages. The building of the 'New Village' upon land to which they still laid claim, was an additional grievance. Underrating either the courage or the strength of their wild neighbors, the settlers took no suitable precautions agains attack, but on the contrary, with strange infatuation, sold to them freely the fum that took away their reason and intensified their worst passions. The time came for an uprising. Stuyvesant had sent word to the Indian chiefs, through the magistrates of Wiltwyck, that he would shortly visit them, to make them presents, and to renew the peach concluded the year before. The message was received with professions of friendliness. Two days after, about noon, on the seventh of June [1663], a concerted attack was made by parties of Indians upon both the settlements. The destruction of the 'New Village' was complete. Every dwelling was burned. The greater number of the adult inhabitants had gone forth that day as usual to their field work upon the outlying farms, leaving some of the women, with the little children, at home. Three of the men, who had doubtless returned to protect them, were killed; and eight women, with twenty-six children, were taken prisoners. among these were the families of our Walloons: the wife and three children of Louis du Bois,the two children of Matthew Blanchan, and Anthony Crispel's wife and child." 1732

"Mathieu and Magdelena also bap. dau. Madelaine in Canterbury: !CHRISTENING: )16 May 1647) Publications of the Huguenot Society of London, vol. 5: The Registers of the Wallon of Strangers' Church in Canterbury, part 1, 1891; BX9450.H8; p 209: Baptemes 1647: 'Mai 16 Magdelaine, fille de Mattieu Blanchau et de Magdelaine Jorre' !CHRISTENING: Note also that her marriage record in the Kingston records ed. by Hoes (#21) shows her as 'of Engelant'. So, this gives added weight that the above is the one we want. And helps place Mathieu there, too. I don't think they were in Canterbury very long, as they were supposedly in Mannheim by, I think, 1651. There may be more records in Mannheim on Mathieu and Magdalena." 1749

"Matthew Blanchan b perhaps 1610-1615 in Noeuville-au-Come, Ricame, Artois, France and d. 1688 in Ulster County, New York. He moved to Armentieres and mar Magdeleine Jorisse (Joire?) by 1635. (It is speculated that her father could have been Joris Serge.) By 1649 they wer living in or near Canterbury, England where their presence is recorded at the Walloons or STrangers Church of Canterbury for the marriage of his brother Anthoin. The passenger list of 'De Verguige Otter' (The Gilded Otter) under Capt. Cornelis Reyersz Van der Beets lists 'Mattheu Blanchand, farmer, from Artois, wife and three children, 12, 9, and 5 years old.' They arrived at New Amsterdam April 26, 1660. Also listed is his new son in law Anthony Krypel (Antoine Crispell). Matthew Blanchan acquired title to a considerable amount of land in the Esopus (New Paltz). Aspects of his life were also well documented in court records of the time. His last will was dated August 22, 1671 and proved March 4, 1687 in Kingston. His parents were Leonin Blanchan and Isabeu Leroy possibly from the area around Armentieres. They were both deceased by April 1649 when their son Anthoin was married." 1731

"Page 71 - Blanchan, Matthes & Magdelen Joore. 'If Matthis Blanchan happens to dy first his wife shall continue in possession of all ye Goods so long as she lives and if Magdalen Joore happens to Deceas first her husband Matthis Blanchan shall continue in possession of ye Goods and Estates as long as he lives and if Either of them marry hee or Shee shall deliver to ye children ye Equall half part of ye whole Estat butt if both Matthis Blanchan and his wife happen to dy then their Matthis Blanchan shall have ye farme lying in Jurley with house barns and appurtenances with four horses and four cows, and whatt Remains in Esopus and America their children shall Equally divide Among them yt is to say Chatarine Maria Magdalena Elizabeth Matthes.' Dated Aug. 22, 1671, and recorded Apr. 30, 1688. (Capt.) Thomas Chambers Cornelius Barentse, Clarke Magistrates of ye Court. Jno Williamse Attestor, W. De La Montagne" 1719

"As to who comprised the New Paltz 'Duzine', it was a homogeneous group. Actually each of the ten older men of the Twelve Patentees was a leader in his own right, but Louis DuBois was the acknowledged head of the group when they obtained their Indian Deed in 1677 and the grant from Governor Andros during the Reign of James II. Why was Louis DuBois the leader? First, and foremost, he had been in the New World the longest. He knew the ways of the Dutch and the Colony of New York which had been taken from the Netherlands in 1664. He was a keen bargainer. He had become well-acquainted with the Dutch during his residence at Hurley. His father-in-law, the clever and shrewd Matthew Blanshan, was a good teacher. . . . It is interesting to note that Louis DuBois and his old neighbors returned to Kingston after the first years of pioneering were over." 1757

"A true List of the Negroes Male and female above the Age of fourteen years; of the touwnship of hurley In Ulsters County: Listed by me - Dated this 19th Day of Aprill. 1755 . . . Masters and Mistress: Matthys Blanjan Names of Negroes: James and Jane . . . " 1746

A List of the Ffreeholders within the County of Ulster, 1728. . . The ffreeholders of the Towne of Hurly: . . . Mattys Blanjan . . . "1746 http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS05/PS05_072.HTM -------------------- Matthew Blanshan (Blanchan, Blancsan, Llansjan) and wife, Magdalena Joriesse, parents fo maria (Blanshan) Crispell, were natives of ARtois, French Flanders, residing at Mannheim, Germany. On April 22, 1660, the Dutch ship Guidled Otter saield for America with a mixed passenger list from Holland, Germany, and France, many of whome were soldiers. In the list is "Matthew Blanchan, from Arois; agricuturlist, wife and three children," also "Anthony Krupel (Crispell) from Artois, Agriculturist and wife," All went firs tto what is now Kingston, but soon located at Hurley.

On June 7, 1663, Hurley and part of Kingston were burned by Indians, many inhabitants killed and many women and childnre carried away captives. The family of Matthew Blanshan suffered heavily; his two younger children Elizabeth and matthe Jr, his daughter Cathrine, wife of Louis Du Bois, and her three children Abraham, Issac and Jacob, and his daughter Maria, wife of Anthony Crispell, and her daughter Mary Magdelena, were among the captives. The distress of the communtiy was great. Within three months, however, hte captives were all restored. Some had been ransomed or exchanged, whiel others were rescued by Captainmartin Cregier in a sudden attack upon the savage who, in their excitment, did not take time to murder the captives.

Many traxcitions are still extant as to the treatement of the captives by the Indiana. The one that, when attacked, the Indians ahd placed Catharine Du Bois upon a pile of wood preperatory to burning her, and that she delayed their purpose by singing hyumns to them until the moment of the attack, is not improbable, and is consistant with Indian Character, their purpose being probably not to burn, but to frighten her. The captives reported that they had not been subjected to any greater hardships than the Indians themshelves had been compelled to undergo.

Matthew blanshan made two wills. In the first, dated July 17, 1665, he mentioned his wife Magdalena Jorisse as "lawful wife who shall possess the whole estate here in America as long as she remains a widow"' also "all the land in ARtois, where I was born, and in Armentiers and other places", she to keep the "three children, Magdalena, Elizabeth and Matthew, until they reach their majority or marry." She ws then, to act toward them as she treated her treated her two married daughers, CAtharine and maria. In his second wil, dated August 22, 1671, he mentions his wife but directs that certain proeprty be divieded amongh is children, Catharine, Maria, Magdalena,, Elizabeth and Matthew. He, no doubt, died at Hurley, in 1688, and from framgmentary records extant, he appears to have been a man of prominence.

Of his five childnre, Catharine, married Louis Du Boisl; Maria married ANthony Cirspell; Magdalena, married Jan Mattya Jansen(Van Keuren); Elizabeth married Peter Cornelise Louw, adn Matthew Jr married Margaret CLaes Van Schoonhoven.

p11/401 - The Van Niuewkirk, Newkirk Family by Adamson Bentley Newkir from special Number of Publications of Genealogical Soceity of Pennsylvania (March 1934) 1-105; Additions by William J Hoffman: Vol XIII: 1-2 (OCt 1938), 122-126 -------------------- http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Blanchan-5

view all 17

Matthys LeRoy Blanchan, de Noeville, Bourgeois de Mannheim's Timeline

1601
1601
Abt 1606 OR Abt 1615 OR Abt 1620 OR Bef 1635
1604
1604
Noeville Oco,Ricame,St Paul,Artois Normandy
1625
1625
Age 21
ARTOIS, NORMANDY, FR
1627
October 17, 1627
Age 23
Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland
1627
Age 23
Die, Mannheim, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
1633
October 15, 1633
Age 29
Armentieres
1635
1635
Age 31
MANNHEIM, BADEN, GR
1642
August 14, 1642
Age 38
(bapt) Armentieres, Flanders
1644
1644
Age 40
Manheim, , Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
1646
March 7, 1646
Age 42
Armentieres, Artios, Flanders, France