Musa II ibn Musa valí de Tudela y Huesca

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Musa II ibn Musa valí de Tudela y Huesca

Arabic: موسى بن موسى
Nicknames: "Wali of Tudela and Huesca", "Musa II of Tudela \ Musa /al-Qasawi/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Spain
Death: Died in Spain
Immediate Family:

Son of Musa I ibn Fortún valì de Zaragoza and N.N.
Husband of Assona Iñiguez
Father of Lupo (Lubb) ibn Musa; Mutarrif ibn Musa valí de Huesca; Ismail ibn Musa; Awriya binti Musa and Fortún ibn Musa
Brother of Mutarrif ibn Musa
Half brother of Íñigo II Arista Íñiguez, rey de Pamplona; Fortún Iñiguez de Pamplona; Mutarrif ibn Musa valí de Huesca; Jonás (Yunus) ibn Musa; Yuwartas ibn Musa and 4 others

Occupation: Wali of Tudela and Huesca, governador muçulmano de Tudela, Huesca e Zaragoza, "Também conhecido por Musa II, foi o governador de Tudela, Huesca e Saragoça." (Wikipedia), Gouverneur, de Tolède, de Saragosse, Gobernador (Walí) de Tudela, Huesca y Zarag
Managed by: Kyle Dane
Last Updated:

About Musa II ibn Musa valí de Tudela y Huesca

Musa II

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Este artículo es sobre el valí de Zaragoza. Si busca información sobre el emperador de Malí, vea Musa II (mansa)

Musa II también conocido como Musa ibn Musa o Muza II ( - Tudela 862). Uno de los personajes más destacados de la familia Banu Qasi. Era hijo de Musa ibn Fortún y Oneca.

Contrajo matrimonio con su sobrina Ossona, hija de su hermanastro Íñigo Arista de Pamplona.

Permaneció, en general, fiel a Córdoba, sede del poder central, aunque en numerosas ocasiones dio la espalda al gobernador de Zaragoza y al emir cordobés.

En el 840 vivía en el castillo de Arnedo. Ese año se posiciona en contra del emir de Córdoba por el nombramiento de Al Kulaby como gobernador de Tudela.

Aliado con su pariente cristiano, el rey pamplonés Iñigo Arista, y con el también cristiano conde sobrarbense, a punto estuvo de anexionarse asimismo el waliato de Huesca en el 840, lo que le hubiera proporcionado en la práctica todo el valle medio del Ebro.

Tras someterse a Abd-al-Rahman II, éste le reconoció valí de Arnedo en 843. Al año siguiente se sublevó de nuevo, pero consiguio el perdón.

En el 852 Abderramán II le hizo valí de Tudela y más tarde el nuevo emir Mohamed I le hizo valí de Zaragoza. De esta manera controlaba una gran parte de la Marca Superior, por lo que se autodenominaba "tertius regem in Spania"("tercer rey de España")

El poder central cordobés tuvo que valerse de la dinastía de los Tuyibíes para oponerse a Musa ibn Musa, hasta lograr reducirlo.

Tuvo una pelea con su yerno Izraq ibn Muntil en Guadalajara, falleciendo al llegar a Tudela en el transcurso del año 862,

Descendencia  [editar]Lubb ibn Musa 

Ismail ibn Musa

Mutarrif ibn Musa

Fortún ibn Musa

--------------------

Banu Qasi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Banu Qasi, Banu Kasi, Beni Casi (Arabic: بنو قسي‎, meaning "sons" or "heirs of Cassius") or Banu Musa were a Basque Muladi dynasty that ruled the upper Ebro valley in the 9th, before being displaced in the first quarter of the 10th century.

Leadership of the Banu Qasi

The following men are the documented leaders of the Banu Qasi (entried in italics are of uncertain affiliation to the family):

Cassius, fl. 714

Abu Taur, Wali of Huesca, fl. 778, perhaps son of Cassius

Musa ibn Fortun, (perh. assassinated 788), grandson of Cassius

Mutarrif ibn Musa, assassinated 799, perhaps son of Musa ibn Fortun

Fortun ibn Musa, assassinated 801, perhaps son of Musa ibn Fortun, else identical to him

Musa ibn Musa, d. 862, son of Musa ibn Fortun

Lubb ibn Musa, d. 875, son of Musa ibn Musa

Is'mail ibn Musa, co-leader to 882, d. 889, son of Musa ibn Musa

Muhammad ibn Lubb, co-leader to 882, then sole leader, d. 899, son of Lubb ibn Musa

Lubb ibn Muhammad, d. 907, son of Muhammad ibn Lubb

Abd Allah ibn Muhammad, d. 915, son of Muhammad ibn Lubb

(succession struggle between Mutarrif ibn Muhammad and Muhammad ibn Abd Allah, 915-916)

Muhammad ibn Abd Allah, d. 923, son of Abd Allah ibn Muhammad

Muhammad ibn Lubb, d. 929, son of Lubb ibn Muhammad

(end of dynasty)

Musa ibn Musa ibn Qasi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Musa ibn Musa ibn Qasi,(Arabic: موسى بن موسى بن قسي)(c. 790 - 26 September 862), was leader of the muwallad Banu Qasi clan and ruler of a semi-autonomous principality in the upper Ebro valley in northern Iberia in the 9th century.

Rise

Musa ibn Musa was great-grandson of Cassius, who converted to Islam after the Muslim conquest of Iberia. His father, Musa ibn Fortun, appears in scattered accounts of the late 8th century, and was apparently assassinated in Musa’s youth. His mother, whose name is unknown, was also mother by another husband of Basque chieftain Íñigo Arista, Musa’s half-brother. Musa’s early years are obscure, although he is presumed to have supported the Basques against the French in the Third Battle of Ronceveaux, a battle generally credited as giving birth to the nascent Kingdom of Pamplona. Likewise it is claimed that in 839 his son Fortun ibn Musa led a campaign that resulted in a rout of the "king of the Galicians", "Loderik" or "Luzriq"[1] and he leveled the defenses of Alava.

[edit]Rebellion

It is in 840/1 that we first hear of Musa ibn Musa himself. In response to attacks on the lands of his half-brother, Íñigo Arista, and the expulsion of kinsman Abd al-Yabbar ibn Qasi by the brothers Abd Allah and Amir ibn Kalayb, governors respectively of Zaragoza and Tudela, Musa and Íñigo rose in rebellion against emir Abd ar-Rahman II. This led to a reprisal campaign under the leadership of the emir's son, Mutarrif, and general Abd al-Wahid ibn Yezid Iskenderani. In 842, Musa was in charge of the vanguard of the emir's army marching against Cerdaña, but believing himself mistreated by the commanding general, Musa again rebelled and along with his nephew, García Íñiguez of Pamplona, defeated a Cordoban army. Musa ibn Musa and Íñigo Arista again joined forces to ambush and capture one of Abd ar-Rahman's commanders in 843, but the consequence was a massive military response from Cordoba, led by the Emir in person, resulting in the defeat of the allies and the taking of slaves in the vicinity of Pamplona. A second retaliatory expedition in 844 inflicted a further defeat, in which Musa's half-brother Fortún Íñiguez, the premier soldier of Pamplona, was killed and Musa and Íñigo barely escaped, while hundreds of the Pamplona nobility defected to the Cordoban side. Musa submitted and in November led his troops to Seville, helping to rout a viking raiding party. However, he again rebelled the next year. When Muhammad, son of Abd ar-Rahman, took Tudela, Musa submitted, and his son Lubb ibn Musa, along with nephew Galindo Íñiguez, went to the emir’s court. In 846 Musa again was forced to submit, this time to the emir's son Hisham, but Abd ar-Rahman was again forced to launch punitive campaigns against Musa in 847, and in 850 when Musa and Íñigo again joined in rebellion, Musa's son Ismail ibn Musa playing a critical role in the uprising.

[edit]Third King of Spain

The Islamic year 237 (851/2) proved critical for Musa ibn Musa. In this year his half-brother and repeated ally in rebellion, Íñigo Arista, died, as did the emir, Abd er-Rahman II. Musa also gained a great victory in a two-day battle, defeating Basque or Gascon forces near Albelda. The next year, Musa’s control over his territories and his links to the emirate were formalized, the new emir, Muhammad, naming Musa Wāli of Zaragoza and governor of the March. The next decade marked the height of his power. He would control Zaragoza, Tudela, Huesca and Toledo, forming what was, in effect, a Taifa state stretching from Najera to Zaragoza and Calatayud, and viewed as equivalent to the emirate of Cordoba and the kingdom of Asturias, Musa being referred to as “The Third King of Spain”.[2]

In 854, Toledo rebelled, supported by Ordoño I of Asturias and García Íñiguez, and the emir Muhammad launched a punitive campaign which ended in a battle at the Guadacelete river, Musa apparently participating on Cordoba’s behalf. The next year Musa led a Cordoban attack on Alava, and in 856 he launched an independent expedition against Barcelona and Tarrasa. Apparently in 859, Musa’s son Lope ibn Musa ibn Qasi was appointed Wali of Toledo, and the same year, Musa permitted a viking force to pass through his lands to attack Pamplona, where they captured Musa’s nephew and former ally García Íñiguez, and ransomed him for either 70,000 or 90,000 gold dinars. This further soured relations between the kinsmen, and García joined with Ordoño in an assault on Musa’s lands, which led to a second battle at Albelda. The Christians divided their forces, besieging the town and pursuing Musa’a army to a refuge on Mount Laturce. They dealt Musa a crushing defeat, killing his son-in-law, an otherwise unknown Basque prince García, and forcing Musa to flee. This victory would be remembered in Christian sources in the form of the legendary Battle of Clavijo.

[edit]Decline and Death

The Christian victory at Albeda led to the end of Musa’s autonomy. In 860, emir Muhammad removed Musa as wali and governor, and personally led an army through Musa’a lands on a month-long punitive campaign against Pamplona which resulted in the capture of prince Fortún Garcés of Pamplona. In 861 Muhammad required Musa to play a subservient role in a campaign against Barcelona. The next year, 862, saw Musa trying to re-exert his power, directing a military show of force against his son-in-law, the Berber Izraq ibn Mantel ibn Salim. Musa attacked Guadalajara, but received several wounds, being unable to mount a horse. He withdrew to Tudela, where he died 26 September 862.

[edit]Family

Musa ibn Musa is reported by the Codice de Roda to have married a daughter of his half-brother Íñigo Arista. No source reports whether she was his only wife, or mother of his children: sons Lubb, Mutarrif, Fortun and Ismael, and a daughter Awriya (Oria), wife of Basque prince García who was killed at Mount Laturce, by him having a son Musa ibn Garsiya. A daughter (perhaps García's widow), married Izraq ibn Mantel ibn Salim.

[edit]Legacy

The death of Musa led to a decade long disappearance of the family from the political scene, but they returned to rule over a shrinking territory for another half-century. However, their position between the growing powers of the caliphate to the south and the Christian principalities to the north proved untenable, and after three generations of varied success, the leaders of the family, Musa’s great-great grandsons, were displaced, exiled or killed by the end of the 920s and the last vestiges of Musa's principality disappeared. His pseudo-autonomy from a Cordoba unable to maintain direct control foreshadowed the muwallad rebels of the early 10th century, and the later Taifa kingdoms.

[edit]References

[edit]Sources

Cañada Juste, Alberto, "Los Banu Qasi (714-924)", Príncipe de Viana, 41: 5-96 (1980).

Ibn Hazm, Jamharat ansab al-'Arab

Levi-Provençal, Histoire de l'Espagne Musulmane

[edit]

-------------------- Musa II, también conocido como Musa ibn Musa o Muza II ( - Tudela 862). Uno de los personajes más destacados de la familia Banu Qasi. Era hijo de Musa ibn Fortún y Oneca.

Contrajo matrimonio con su sobrina Ossona, hija de su hermanastro Íñigo Arista de Pamplona.

Permaneció, en general, fiel a Córdoba, sede del poder central, aunque en numerosas ocasiones dio la espalda al gobernador de Zaragoza y al emir cordobés.

En 840 vivía en el castillo de Arnedo. Ese año se posiciona en contra del emir de Córdoba por el nombramiento de Al Kulaby como gobernador de Tudela.

Aliado con su pariente cristiano, el rey pamplonés Iñigo Arista, y con el también cristiano conde sobrarbense, estuvo a punto de anexionarse asimismo el waliato de Huesca en 840, lo que le hubiera proporcionado en la práctica todo el valle medio del Ebro.

Tras someterse a Abd-al-Rahman II, éste le reconoció valí de Arnedo en 843. Al año siguiente se sublevó de nuevo, pero consiguió el perdón.

En 852 Abderramán II le hizo valí de Tudela y más tarde el nuevo emir Mohamed I le nombró valí de Zaragoza. De esta manera controlaba una gran parte de la Marca Superior, por lo que se autodenominaba "tertius regem in Spania"("tercer rey de España").

El poder central cordobés tuvo que valerse de la dinastía de los Tuyibíes para oponerse a Musa ibn Musa, hasta lograr reducirlo.

Tuvo una pelea con su yerno Izraq ibn Muntil en Guadalajara, falleciendo al llegar a Tudela en el transcurso del año 862.

Descendencia

Lubb ibn Musa

Ismail ibn Musa

Mutarrif ibn Musa

Fortún ibn Musa

Obtenido de "http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musa_II"

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