Nathaniel Brittain (c.1640 - 1684) MP

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Nicknames: "Nathaniel", "Brittaine", "Britton"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Birmingham, Warwick, England
Death: Died in Old Town, Staten Island, New York, United States
Managed by: LindaLee Potter Knight
Last Updated:

About Nathaniel Brittain

Nathaniel Brittain was born in Birmingham, Warwick, England about 1640 and as the following will show he must have immigrated to America about 1652. The following is from extensive research by Jean White and Lee Wise and they have documented everything that is here.

Nathaniel came to America with his brother William about 1652 and settled in New Hampshire and then moved to Newton, Kings County, New York and then to Flatland, New York. In 1660 they moved to Brooklyn, Kings County, New York called the "Flat Lands" Both Nathaniel and William married daughters of Nicholas Stillwell. In 1664 both brothers moved to Staten Island. Nathaniel bought land on the Southeast side of Staten Island where he finally settled.

“ When he arrived in this country, New Netherland was a feeble and ill-managed commercial community of less than 10,000 Europeans. The Dutch West India Company which controlled the colony was chiefly interested in the Indian fur trade. Contentions arose between the company and the settlers; and the last of the Dutch governors, Peter Stuyvesant, found he had little means of defense of the colonies and no intelligent support. Upon the vague claims upon the whole Atlantic Coast, King Charles II granted the region occupied by the Dutch to his brother James, Duke of York. A fleet was sent out to which the little town of New Amsterdam surrendered in August 1664, and the name New York was thereafter applied. A Dutch fleet occupied the place for a few months in 1673, but that was the end of the Dutch in America. It was after the occupation that Nathaniel obtained his patent to the land on Staten Island.

It has been asserted by eminent historians that Nathaniel Britton arrived in America, with his brother, William, and that they settled in New Hampshire in 1652 and later moved to Newton and Flatlands."

The Will" of Nathaniel Brittain

"In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ as there is nothing certain But Death and nothing certain but the year of Death I Nathaniel Britton being very sick and weak, but having my full powers, and in the first place I commit my soul in the protection of God Almighty and my body to be buried according to custom. Wife Anne Britton to remain in possession of all estate moveable or unmoveable; in the event of her remarriage she is to have the one-third part of the estate after the debts be paid, the other two parts to be divided into five parts, one fifth part to Nathaniel Britton my eldest son, a fifth part unto Sarah my eldest daughter, a fifth part unto Richard Britton, my youngest son and a fifth part unto my youngest daughter Abigail Britton. Finally the Ten pounds left me by my brother Richard Britten deceased (minister) of Bisly which is in the hands and Custody of William Clutterbook, my Desire it that my two youngest children of Witt Richard Britten and Abigil Britten each shall have five pounds. So I commend my wife children unto God and to walk in His way."

 Witnesses: Petrus Theshenmaker, Hans Christofsolfe (his mark), Corsen Cornelius Prince (his mark).

The will was written November 30, 1683; proved March 4, 1684 Signed Nathaniel Britton.

Richmond County Deeds, New York, Staten Island, New York

Nathaniel died in February 1682 on Staten Island. Ann died in 1709

_________________________

Nathaniel Britton -Colonial Slaves and Staten Island purchase abt 1670 , Staten Island, NY

http://legacy.www.nypl.org/branch/staten/index2.cfm?Trg=1&d1=962&template=StatenIslandSla ves

STATEN ISLAND COLONIAL SLAVES IN WILLS AND MANUMISSIONS OF RICHMOND COUNTY, NEW YORK

by Richard Dickenson (Staten Island/Richmond County Public Historian)

[ Extracted from Wills and Letters of Administration, Richmond Co., N.Y. 1670-1800, by Charlotte Megill Hix, C.G.R.S. (Heritage Books, Inc. Maryland, 1993); supplemented by African American History in Staten Island, Slave Holding Families and their Slaves, by Ronald David Jackson and Evelyn E. Jackson (JJ), Staten Island Historical Society, September, 1995; and History of Richmond County (Staten Island) New York, Edited by Richard M. Bayles, 1887.]

.....

It is clear that the Britton Cottage and Conference (or Billopp) House are extant (though not sole) examples of slaveowners homes. However it is not clear where the slaves were kept or buried.

.......

BRITTON, Nathaniel (p. 19) [A Nathaniel Britton came to Staten Island from Long Island before 1670; on February 16 of that year he, Richard Stillwell, Nathan Whitman, together with the constable and overseers, were appointed "to treat and agree with the Indians." The 1670 purchase [of Staten Island] resulted from their labors. Tradition makes the Britton family of French origin; the earliest records found by Bergen show their settlement in the English colony on Long Island where Nathaniel, William, and Richard, lived before 1660. A later (grandson?) Nathaniel, whose wife was Elizabeth (Lake?), acquired the house on land patented to Obadiah Holmes at the foot of New Dorp Lane now known as the Britton Cottage, in 1695; and the same Nathaniel (or his son) was one of the twelve who built the Church of St. Andrew in 1709 to 1712, and established the English Presbyterian Church in 1729 (pp. 867-9, Leng & Davis)] to wife ELIZABETH....a negro woman Dated June 1, 1729; Proved Nov. 11, 1729

BRITTAIN, Nicholas (p. 21) my wife FRANCKE....a negro man Dated Jan. 5, 1740; Proved Feb 27, 1739(?)

BRITTEN, Samuel (p. 21-22) my wife MARY...."if she remarries,"… a negro wench Dated 27 Oct. 1777; Proved 22 Nov. 1777

janiceLsutherland added this on 1 Jun 2011From a book on Colonial Slaves on Staten Island by Richard Dickenson. Nathaniel Britton helped buy Staten Island from the Indians. The Britton surname is believed to be from France. Part of the French Huegenot settlement.

___________________________

Nathaniel Brittain was born in Birmingham, Warwick, England about 1640 and as the following will show he must have immigrated to America about 1652. The following is from extensive research by Jean White and Lee Wise and they have documented everything that is here.

Nathaniel came to America with his brother William about 1652 and settled in New Hampshire and then moved to Newton, Kings County, New York and then to Flatland, New York. In 1660 they moved to Brooklyn, Kings County, New York called the "Flat Lands" Both Nathaniel and William married daughters of Nicholas Stillwell. In 1664 both brothers moved to Staten Island. Nathaniel bought land on the Southeast side of Staten Island where he finally settled.

“When he arrived in this country, New Netherland was a feeble and ill-managed commercial community of less than 10,000 Europeans. The Dutch West India Company which controlled the colony was chiefly interested in the Indian fur trade. Contentions arose between the company and the settlers; and the last of the Dutch governors, Peter Stuyvesant, found he had little means of defense of the colonies and no intelligent support. Upon the vague claims upon the whole Atlantic Coast, King Charles II granted the region occupied by the Dutch to his brother James, Duke of York. A fleet was sent out to which the little town of New Amsterdam surrendered in August 1664, and the name New York was thereafter applied. A Dutch fleet occupied the place for a few months in 1673, but that was the end of the Dutch in America. It was after the occupation that Nathaniel obtained his patent to the land on Staten Island.

It has been asserted by eminent historians that Nathaniel Britton arrived in America, with his brother, William, and that they settled in New Hampshire in 1652 and later moved to Newton and Flatlands."

Miss Amanda I. Roundy, Jean White

"Nathaniel Britton was a good man of English extraction, shrewd, contentious, of good education, and fair means. He held office occasionally but apparently a good portion of his time was spent in the courts, either as a plaintiff or defendant. A good many of the early settlers were accustomed to get solace or enjoyment out of these legal bouts, and the scarcity of public events was a stimulus thereto."

Stillwell Genealogy vol. 4, pg. 43

"As early as 1660, Britton owned a farm in Amersfoort (also called Flatlands) which he bought from Hendrick Corneillessen. When, in the fall of 1663, Nicholas Stillwell frustrated the efforts of the English to overthrow the Dutch on Long Island, it was to the dwelling of Nathaniel Britton Stillwell fled from his own when he was aware of the approach of the hostile English, following the arrest of James Chrystic. When Nicholas Stillwell decided, in 1663, to sell his plantation, he stipulated that "reasonable satisfaction be made to my son-in-law Nathaniel Brittain for the house and housing which he, the said, Nathaniel, hath built upon said land."

Nathaniel, thus ousted, proceeded to buy a farm, April 3, 1664, from Albert (Albertae) Terhume. This was located in New Utrecht, and happened to be upon the dividing line between New Utrecht and Gravesend, it was claimed by both towns. Subsequent litigation proved that Nathaniel was not a Frenchman."

Stillwell Genealogy by John E. Stillwell

"In 1664 Nathaniel made application for a patent for one hundred forty-four acres of land on Staten Island, near or at Old Town. On September 29, 1677, though thirteen years had elapsed, land was confirmed on him (probably before 1670 according to Staten Island Historians). He then turned his attention to agriculture and apparently remained a farmer until his demise. This was near New Creek near Old Dorp."

Jean White

This property was site of the Perin House and was situated between the present streets of Liberty and Jefferson.

This land was at New Creek near Old Dorp, New York. The grant from Edmond Androse, Esq., to Nathaniel Brittain reads:

"Sept. 29, 1677. Whereas--there is a certain piece of Land upon Staten Island ye wch by my order hath beene layd out for Nathaniel Brittaine being ye South East side of ye sd Island beginning at a certain markt tree at ye edge of ye hills at ye land of Pieter Bileocu (Billeau) Ranging thence...to ye land of Thomass Stillwell Ranging thence...to ye edge of ye meadow, etc....(on the) Northwest by ye highway near ye Hills con(taining) one hundred fourth four acres of upland together with one small Humocke adjoining lying to ye Southeast of ye said land and alsoe ye swampy Reedy meadow lying betweene ye said Hummock and ye upland contay(n)ing by computacon both Hummock and Meadow Sixteene acres as alsoe one lott of meaddow at ye Great Hill cont(aining) tenn acres of salt and fresh (meadow) bounded on ye Northeast by ye meadows of Odediah Holma and ye Southwast by ye meadow of Peter Billeau as by ye Returne of ye survey under ye Hand of ye Survr doth & may appears. Know ye, &c...Quitt Rent two Bushell of good Winter Wheat at New York."

Book of Patents, B.4 Albany, New York

"Governor Lovelace appointed Nathaniel Britton and others as Commissioners to treat with the Indians for the purchase of Staten Island. Of this Commission his brother-in-law, . Richard Stillwell, was President. The purchase of 1670 resulted from their labors. 1678, Dec. 28 Nathaniel Britton was a juryman (Gravesend Records) but was probably of Staten Island."

BRI HIS 004

Nathaniel married Ann Stillwell between 1653 and 1656 on Long Island, New York. She was the daughter of Nicholas Stillwell and Anne Van Dyke and was born in 1639 at New Amsterdam, (Gravesend), King County, New York. Nathaniel is listed as a farmer and a merchant. They had the following children:

William Brittain (1661 - ) Nathaniel Brittain (1) (between 14 July 1663 - 1666 - ) Sarah Brittain (between 1664 -1668 - ) Rachel Brittain (1665 - ) Joseph Brittain (1667 - ) Rebecca Brittain (between 1668 - 1669) Benjamin Brittain (1669 - ) Richard Brittain (1670 - ) Abigail Brittain (between 1667 - 1674) Daniel Brittain (1674 - ) Nicholas Brittain (1679 - ) The will of Nathaniel Brittain (1): "In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ as there is nothing certain But Death and nothing certain but the year of Death I Nathaniel Britton being very sick and weak, but having my full powers, and in the first place I commit my soul in the protection of God Almighty and my body to be buried according to custom. Wife Anne Britton to remain in possession of all estate moveable or unmoveable; in the event of her remarriage she is to have the one-third part of the estate after the debts be paid, the other two parts to be divided into five parts, one fifth part to Nathaniel Britton my eldest son, a fifth part unto Sarah my eldest daughter, a fifth part unto Richard Britton, my youngest son and a fifth part unto my youngest daughter Abigail Britton. Finally the Ten pounds left me by my brother Richard Britten deceased (minister) of Bisly which is in the hands and Custody of William Clutterbook, my Desire it that my two youngest children of Witt Richard Britten and Abigil Britten each shall have five pounds. So I commend my wife children unto God and to walk in His way."

Witnesses: Petrus Theshenmaker, Hans Christofsolfe (his mark), Corsen Cornelius Prince (his mark).

The will was written November 30, 1683; proved March 4, 1684 Signed Nathaniel Britton.

Richmond County Deeds, New York, Staten Island, New York

Nathaniel died in February 1682 on Staten Island. Ann died in 1709

http://www.axsinfo.com/Dad/html/nathaniel_brittain.html


-------------------- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=48528326

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Nathaniel Brittain's Timeline

1640
1640
Birmingham, Warwick, England
1658
1658
Age 18
Long Island,NY
1661
1661
Age 21
1664
1664
Age 24
1665
July 14, 1665
Age 25
NY, USA
1667
1667
Age 27
1668
1668
Age 28
1669
1669
Age 29
1670
1670
Age 30
1671
1671
Age 31
Old Town,Long Island,NY